UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 28, 1949

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0125606.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125606.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0125606-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0125606-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125606-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0125606-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0125606-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0125606-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0125606-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0125606.ris

Full Text

 READ TENNANT
TODAY
Page 2
The Ubyssey
READ TENNANT
TODAY
Page 2
VOL. XXXII
VANCOUVER, B, C, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1949
No. 17
- .jot/ivey   t-noto   oy   /Mul   jujjury
VIVACIOUS lineup for the coming Alpha Gamma Delta Cabaret on November 17th practises
for the chorus. Left to right are Elaine Hopkins, Del Stockstead, Shirley Selman, June Lawrence and Barb Adams.
International Week Begins
Monday on University Campus
Tradition And Pageantry
Combine For Homecoming
philosophy six-
ARTICLE LECTURE
SERIES COMMENCES
Is our education satisfactory?
Arc we devoting too great a proportion of our educational facilities to thc physical sciences and
not enough to the social sciences
and philosophy?
Are the problems facing man today the sort which can be most
easily solved by thc physical or
thc social sciences?
Thc Ubyssey, believing this to be
thc major educational issue in a
day, will discuss the problem in h
six article scries by editor Lest
Armour beginning Tuesday.
President MacKenzie Officially
Opens Week-Long Club Program
International Week will be officially opened on the campus on Monday, October 31, when President MacKenzie addresses students at 12:30 in the Armories.
Various international clubs will stage events from then
till the following Friday, when an International Masquerade
will wind up the activities.
Gala Sport and Entertainment
Program Planned For UBC Alums
Tradition, pageantry and entertainment will be combined
Saturday to make the annual 1949 Homecoming the best in
history.
Annual day is set aside for graduates to return to UBC to
see progress their university has made.
Chairman of the Homecoming Committee Peter deVooght,
has lined up a gala program of sport and entertainment for
UBC's alumni.
 . '•     Entertainment will get underway at
2:15 p.m. in UBC stadium when lhe
Thunderbirds take on Pacific University, undefeated in five games this
season.
UBC's footballing Thunderbirds, bolstered by the return of speedy, 131
pound halfback Freddy French, will
be out lo repeat Iheir performance of
last Saturday when they came within
one point of shellacking Central Washington College of Education.
Party
Conservative
Extinct
Says Fraser
Bray Refutes
Hecklers, Fraser
The Progressive Conservative Party was declared "dead
as a dodo" but was promptly
resurrected in a debate presented by the Liberal Club, in
Arts 100, Wednesday.
Speaking for the affirmative of the
motion: "Resolved that' the Conservative Party has gone the way
of the dodo," Allastair Fraser, Liberal
oratcr, declared the party extinct because, "It has no name, it can't see,
ii' can't hear, and it has no head."
Student Relations
Closer Urges Visitor
Toronto— (CUP)-One of the aims
of French Foreign Affairs Minister
Robert Schuman's visit to Canada is
■the promotion of student exchanges
between France and Canada, Schuman
announced recently during a visit to
the University of Toronto.
"I will contribute all in my power
to develop the exchange of professors,
technicians and students," Schuman
said. "French students like to stay
at home. When I return I will make
'propaganda' in the French universities. With better organization we hope
to have more student exchanges."
Feature of the entire week will bc a
Model Assembly, the third of its kind
to be given by United Nations Club
at UBC. This will be staged on Monday, at 8 p.m. in Brock Hall.
TEA DANCE
At 3:30 on the same day, a tea dance
will bp sponsored by Hillel, Jewish
International club, Noon hour Tuesday
in Arts 100 will be the cue for lhe
UN Club which will present Elmore
Philpott on "World Government.'
Film Society raises the curtain on
"La Bandera" at 3:30 p.m. in the auditorium.
Twelve-thirty Wednesday will be
time for dual entertainment, with
CCF club sponsored Dorothy Steeves
in Arts 100, and LSE sponsored Symphony Concert in the auditorium.
"Opposition to thc UN" discussion
takes place in Arts 100 at 3:30 p.m.
while IRC Round Table "Europe Today
and Tomorrow" will go on at the Brock
Hall at 8 p.m,
INTRODUCTION
Parliamentary Forum Current Affairs Debate will introduce Thursday's schedule in Arts 100, and an
8 p.m. international concert by Language clubs will wind up the day in
the Brock Hall.
Church Contacts
With Society Lost
Reason that the church is no longer
a shaping force in modern society is
because it has "lost contact with the
mass of tlie people."
HOSE TO HEART
"In former days," he said, "being
a Conservative really meant something. Proof of being one was usually a picture of Queen Victoria car-
_ried close.to tlie heart, Today, the
name Progressive Conservative means
nothing.'
Bible - quoting Marshall Bray refuted the charge and said his party
had been in existence a long time
and would stay in existence a long
time.
"Tlie Conservative Party," he said,
This   is   the   opinion   of  Ron   Smith \ "stands  for  the  people   who  are   nei-
who spoke for the motion: "Resolved
the modern church is no longer a
shaping force of society" in a parliamentary   forum  debate  yesterday.
Bob Wallace speaking for the opposition, said ISS scholarships, boys'
camps, preservation of Indian culture,
industrial chaplains, the fact that thc
founder of the CCF, J. S, Woodsworth,
was a minister, and many resistance
leaders were ministers was ample
proof that modern society is influenced
by the church.
Smith    maintained    that Christian
principles   were  perverted and   used
for amassing fortunes and justifying
war.
Speakers from the floor for the
opposition said the church was only
an influence as long as it was "in
phase with society."'
Grant Livingstone, speaking for the
opposition, maintained the church was
ther Liberal, CCF, nor communist,"
to which a wit in thc audience replied:   "Yeah,  both of them."
Trigger-tongued Bray retorted:
"Give him (heckler) a job in the
post office."
ILINDNESS
Evidence of blindness in the party
was given by Fraser in the Duplessis
alliance. It had no head because a
group of top-hatted delegates who
did not represent majority opinion
came clown from ■ Toronto t'o choose
George Drew, who, hc said, "should
have remained as premier of Ontario
instead of using his axe in Ottawa."
Bray said that Canadian people
don't like leaders who "get out and
fight." The Liberals "haven't fought
an  honest-to-God eleci'ion since  '35,"
Fraser said the Conservatives clo
not have the'support of the people
because  "no  one  is fool  to  jump   in
MOCK TREK
Mock Trek, to commemorate the
famous 1922 student walk will bc
staged at half-time when Dr, A. E.
Richards, leader of the famous 1922
affair will be presented with an engraved silver tray.
In addition to these honors, Dr.
Richards will kick off for the game
with Dean of Agriculture E'lythc
Eagles.
At 8 p.m. in UBC Armories a Potlatch will be staged for the grads
with the UBC Musical Society's Glee
Club  presenting  a   musical   program.
On the same program will be the
immortal, "Her Scienceman Lover,"
by Eric Nicol. Players Club will stage
the  production.
At 8 p.m. in the UBC gym, graduates and undergrads will clash in the
annual grudge match, a tradition in
Homecoming history.
At 9 p.m. in the Armory, Keith
Watson and his 11-pieco orchestra
will play for the Homecoming Dance,
Food is included in the admission
price to thhs dance.
PATRONS
Patrons for the affair include: Chancellor and Mrs. E. W. Hamber, President and Mrs. N. A. M. MacKenzie,
Mr. and Mrs G. C. Andrew Dean
Mawdsley, Dr. and Mrs. Frank Buck,
and Mr, and Mrs. D. A. E. Grauer.
Chairman of the dance committee
is Bill Anstis
To commemo'rate their return visit
to UBC, grads may sign the registration book which will be kept in the
Lounge of Brock Hall.
Show
"T922 Dress To
Authenticate
Famed Trek
Dress of 1922 will help authenticate the enactment of the
famed Trek at half-time in
UBC stadium Saturday.
Trek was the famed protest Iiy
students lo have the university moved
from the Fairview shacks to a site on
Point  Grey.
Leader of the Trek. Dr. A. E. Richards, who was honored with thc conferring of the honorary degrees
at Wednesday's Congregation ceremonies, will bc honored Saturday and
will lead the re-enactment.
Friday in B.C.'s capital city of Victoria, Dr. D. B. Turner, president of
lhe Victoria branch of the UBC Alumni Development Fund, officiated
at a re-enactment of the event there.
Proceeds of tlie Victoria affair went
into the coffers of the UBC Alumni
Development Fund.
UBYSSEY WRITING
CLASSES HOLD
SECOND MEETING
Ubyssey sponsored journalism
classes will bc held again today at
12:30 p.m. in Brock Hall stage room.
All staff members and reporters
of The Ubyssey arc expected to
attend. The classes will also be open
to any other interested students on
the campus.
In addition to news writing classes, special speakers will be brought
to the campus from downtown
papers.
Dance Team Plays
At UBC Saturday
Spotlight will fall on Vincent-Visini
donee exhibition tonight when the
University Dance Club sponsor (heir
first show of the season
Rated by Vancouver Ballroom dancing enthusiasts a.s "the be-t in the
business," the visitors' interpretation
of the fox-trot. wait?., tango and rhumba will be the feature attraction.
Exhibition will consist of six couples and will include the studio's most
talented performers.
the representative of "eternal  truth." I a grave because of the  smel
V. ■'   'j j      < < W       \/,t it/V     t v     A      4&
GRADS TO WAX NOSTALGIC
OVER UBYSSEY'S PAGE 3
The Ubyssey is dedicated today to UBCs Homecoming
graduates who will flock back to their Alma Mater for
another look at its progress.
On page 3 of today's issues are stories culled from
Ubyssey files which will have grads waxing nostalgic over
former glories.
POWfciHi /UNI/ M'Liji/ LUiVlliifxL m mis iiiiiuuei unri   looioau   oiiensive   lineup,  only   one   ot
the ground-gaining si rings that   have  been  giving opposition such  big scares m the  last lew
weeks.  Solid-looking forward  balanced  line  in   "ready"  position  are,  from  left  to  right,  end   MacFarlane backing them up, plays over ri
Tom Barker, tackle Gil Steer, guard Cece Tayloi,   centre   Bob   Murphy,   guard   Don   West,   features  of  Saturday's   Homecoming   gome
tackle Gene Dzendolet, end Bob Simpson. Potent backfield combination pictured are blocking   which gets under way  in  the  UBC stadium  a I 2:15 p.m
m sn.ipe once again ,mu  his long
it'll back Don LiOrd (44)   Cece  iajloi, bai
mjuiies, and Gil Steer add smashing weight to   the   light   side   oi
it   end are most sueees
lie
Inn .   \\
nd  will
la\ oil i  ium d by
Dave
Oig
one
with    the   powerful   Pacuic    University    Badger;
back Dave MacFarlane (51), half back Stan Lla rkc   (25),   quarterback   Roy   Sadler   (2,5),
and Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
Friday,   October   28,   1949
The Ubyssey
„ Member Canadian University Press
Authorized ns Second Class Mail, Post Office Dept,, Ottawa, Mail Subscriptions—52.00 per year.
Published throughout the university  year by  thc  Student Publications Board  of the Alma
Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein aro those of the editorial staff of The Ubyssey and not
necessarily those of tht- Alma Mater Society nor of the University.
Offices in Brock Hall. Phono ALma 1G24 For display advertising phone ALma 3253
ED1TOR-IN-CHIKF Jli\I    BANHAM
MANAGING  EDITOR CHUCK  MARSHALL
GENERAL STAFF: CUP Editor, Jerry Mcdonald; News Editor, Art Welsh; Features Editor,
Vic Hay; Sports Editor, Ray Frost; Women's Editor, Shirley Finch; Editorial Asst, Les Armour
City Editor This Issue-KON 1MNC1IIN
Associate Editor-MARI P1NEO
Report To Stockholders
Every now and then a newspaper ought
to explain its reason for existence, its general
broad policies, and its policies of the moment.
The Ubyssey feels that the time ha.s
come for such an explanation. It is, of course,
possible to deduce the policy of a journal
from its day to day editorials and its news
selection. But the day to day editorials will
become somewhat clearer if they can be seen
within the context of a broad policy.
We are, first of all, a student newspaper.
Our function is to inform, to entertain, and
to provide some training for would-be journalists.
We have been charged with attempting
to stir the campus up simply for the sake
of creating trouble. We have been charged
with unfair selection of news. Wc have been
charged with providing poor entertainment.
In short, some of our stockholders have given
us the works.
But these charges, we think, have stemmed from a minority of students. Wc think
that those who have laid the charges have
generally been badly misinformed.
We have attempted to create harmony
rather than strife between student and student aud between student and student government. But we have never hesitated to
suggest needed reforms, to admonish when
mistakes have been made, and to take issue
with anyone whose actions have not, in our
opinion, been in keeping with the best interests of students.
We are, after all, the principal go-between
between students and their government.
It is true, and we have never denied it,
that we have made mistakes. Any paper
which serves as a training ground must necessarily make mistakes. The Ubyssey has,
however, always made an effort to correct its
mistakes and to minimize their effect.
It i.s essential that we have the cooperation of students if we are to succeed, We
hope they will continue to admonish us
when we bungle as we admonish others, But
we hope they will make an effort to understand our aims and our problems before they
admonish.
Ubyssey Classified
A Greeting To Grads
For hundreds of grads, flocking back to
UBC Saturday for the annual Homecoming,
the university will seem a very different
place from 15, ten, or even five years ago.
New buildings, swollen enrollments and
new educational techniques have all contributed to the stature and reputation of the
university.
UBC's graduates have carried the name
and honor of UBC to almost every corner
of the world and have always been proud
of their association with it.
Perhaps  the  most   tangible  example  of
Gobbledeygook
alumni help is the ever-growing UPC Alumni
Development fund, which this year made
several contributions to university coffers.
Under the able guidance of their fire-ball
secretary Frank J. E. Turner, and other
members of the organization, the Fund
should grow and continue to be a valuable
contribution to UBC expansion.
On behalf of the undergraduates, the
Ubyssey extends a hearty greeting to all
alums returning to their Alma Mater and it
hopes their connections with UBC will continue to be lasting and affable.
By Hal Tennant
Room and Board
BED-SITTING ROOM and breakfast
for two men sharing, single beds. Ride
to UBC available at 8:30 each morning. $25.00 each. 4000 West 10th Ave.,
AL. 3459L.
FOR   RENT   -   SLEEPING   ROOM
suitable for two boy students. Twin
beds, close to UBC bus, $12.50 each
per month. AL. 1209R.
NICE QUIET DOUBLE ROOM
available in private home within 10
minutes walk of UE'C. Phone AL.
0333L after 6 p.m.
ONE LARGE SINGLE ROOM, TWO
meals and carry lunch. Male student,
?55. 3794 West 22nd. AL. 2839L.
SINGLE ACCOMMODATION, ROOM
and Board, Fort and Acadia Camps,
how available. Married accommodation, four-room self-contained suites,
$25.50 up. Little Mountain and Lulu
Island Camps. Apply Housing Office,
Room 205A, Physics building.
FOR RENT -TWO LARGE BRIGHT
modernly furnished rooms. Close to
transportation,  CE.  4376,
COMFORTABLE, WARM ROOM FOR
male student. Breakfast and dinner,
3 meals Saturday and Sunday. Dunbar
and 15th. AL. 2023R.
WANTEJD-ROOM AND BOARD FOR
male student in home, practicing scientific diet. Reply Box 224, Ubyssey.
VARSITY STUDENT TO BOARD IN
refined  home.  4489  Angus.  CH.  0836.
Meetings
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB MEET-
ing on Tuesday November 1 at 12:30
in Arts 106.
GEOGRAPHY CLUE'. "NORTHERN
Australia," 0  noon   hour   lecture   by
Dr. Mackay on Monday, October 31
in H M 16.
THE REGULAR TESTIMONIAL
meeting of Christian Science Organization will be held Friday at 12:30
in Arts 207.
Notices
Lett
Anti-War Formula Also Wins
Football Games, Cures Cancer
A boycott on "war fever" was advocated by Dorothy Livesay MatNair, Canadian writer, at Town Meeting . . .
Refuse to buy irom stores that handle
war and crime comics, walk out of theatres with war films, turn off destructive
radio programs, close your ears to war
talk, live and think peace, Mrs. MacNair
suggested. —News Item
A big bouquet lo Mrs. MacNair for coming
up with the cleverest device since the invention of Ihe l!-fool pole for touching
people you wouldn't, touch wilh a ten-loot
pole.
Unfortunately, lhat was all the space one
downtown paper saw fit lo give Mrs. MacNair on the subject. As compensation to
her, we report below a  few news items, all
of which  involve  Ihe MacNair Principle:
tf tf tf
MEW YORK- Seven doctors walked oul
ol the operaling room ol the Cancel' Hospital
here today shortly before1 (hey vvitc scheduled to operate on a dying cancer victim.
"We refuse to listen to talk about the
woman having cancer," one doctor told reporters, ■'Admit I ing she has cancer i.s admitting  defeat."   hc  said.
* Another surgeon, aboul to return a verdict ot "a slightly rundown condition," later
said   diagnosis  would   be   unnecessary.
"She's no longer sick," he reported cheerfully.  "She  just   died."
•Y. tf tf
BERKELEY, Cal.—Homer "Hornvoiee"
Hooligiui. coach of I lie famous California
Snuidgepots, who hpvo ye( m win a football
game ihis season, said yesio'-dsy lie is r<'~
lusing to read ores-. , repoi I . ilcil his, Irani
was defeated !Mi-0 by University of Upper
Lower C'alilomia s (.MrpinimUs  la-d  weekend.
"'1 oIk like d:il won ; help u, none," t be
Smudgepol conch drebirod. 'We won the
game, and dnl'.. dal. Ab.ybe they e,ot a couple
more  loiiehiUwn    limn   w,. ,li,|    Un   wc  won
just the same. We won't be beat, dis season.
Wait and see."
Later reports indicated that Hooligan's
prediction may come true, since hi.s Smuclgo-
pols have been ousted from the California
Conference loop) for attempting to change
Ihe letters on the scoreboard during the game.
tf tf tf
OTTAWA—A mob of CCFers—all candidates in the last federal election—today
stormed lhe House of Commons and took
-cats before Liberals arrived for the morning
session.
"We refuse to believe we were defeated
in lhe June election," M. J. Coldwell, CCF
leader, slated.
"Defeatist  talk  like  that  will  never get
u.s a majority in the House," he declared.
tf tf tf
WASHINGTON, D.C.—President Truman today refused to comment on reports
lhal Russian bombers have destroyed three
U.S. air bases in tbe Eastern Mediterranean.
' It's  probably  true,"  the President  told
loporlers.  "But.  why talk about  it?  There's
loo  much  war talk already."
tf tf tf
VANCOUVER, B.C.—Phidias K. Finkle-
boltom, who last spring finished first year
Art-; for the fourth time, is back at UBC
ri gain this fall—this lime as a second year
Artsman.
Although voted "the student most likely
to stay in first year Arts for another year,"
ihe, spirited I'T-year-old student claims he
ewe-- his promotion this year to a "change
oi  my ouHook.'
"Ol'noi years," he says, "they (old me
' ■'. iled, and 1 look their word for it, But
nol lli'aa lime. Lasl Spring 1 got my marks —
nd under a > per cent-—and I just decided
I.'  lew n-e  i!h m.   1   promoted   mysell.
"li'-. ;i v oiiderful philosophy, and 1 wish
id ihssi h: of it -'ooiier. No, sir—-no more
■ '■ I ■ -.• ■ i  r i   !   r   m \ '
ers
To The Editor
THANKS
EDITOR,
THE UBYSSEY
Dear Sir:
May we request the privilege of using your column to c::pr:ss to every
member of the Univer i'.y of British
Columbia staff, to the hcilty, and to
every student, a deep rnd sincere appreciation for the 1C37 pints of blood
received these past nine days.
With an enrollment of some 2000
less than last year, and an increase
of more than 20 percent in donations
received, one just car nol find words
to express the than': ; \vj feel so
deeply.
Somewhere, in solve '
bed  someone-  i.s  yoia •
new opportunity I"  "\
recovery to health !-i    e       i i the unselfish   donation   ,".iv.:i   •'•'   >he  clinic.
The   Canadian   i ' d
is proud of being yenr ■
ing such a gift possible.
Yours sincerely,
B. M. Hoffmeister,
Chairman,
Bloorl Donor Committee,
Vancouver E'ranch
Canadian Red Cross Society
i il or sick
- given ;i
r   a   faster
Society
in mak-
BADMINTON - QUEEN ELIZA-
bcths School, 16th and Camosan. Monday or and Thursday nights, 7:30-10:30
p.m. Applications accepted at the
school on these nights. $8 for one
night and $12 for two.
Lost
HONSON LIGHTER ON LAWN BE-
tween Library and Main Mall. Name
engraved on front. Please phone CE'.
2744.
*LOST    AT   CONVOCATION,    PAIR
ladies pigskin gloves. Please return to
H. D. Dcncly, Library.
BLACK   WALLET   LOST   THURS-
day noon in gym. Phone KErr. 3862Y
or return to Lost and Found.
POST   SLIDE   RULE.    NAME    ON
case. M. K. Lorimcr. CH. 6328.
BOOK-STEVENSON,   "BACTERIAL
Metabolism" — urgent. Please return
to  Bacteriology  Library  or Lost and
Found.
For Sale
1930 MODEL  A  FORD ROADSTER.
Excellent condition. Must bc sold at
once. CH. 2744.
1932   G-CYLINDER   SPECIAL    DE-
luxe Chevrolet sedan.  (It hits on all
6 cylinders tool) KE. 7260L after 6 p.m.
SKI BOOTS, SIZE 9. PLEASE PHONE
West 279M after 6 p.m.
1928 WHIPPET SEDAN. TWO GOOD
tires, 2. brand new. One owner. KE.
3615Y.
SKIS, NO. 7, SIZE 7'3" WITH STEEL
edges, homers, super diagonals,
Chrome steel poles and size 11 boots.
All for $32. Phone AL. 05O9R.
"PSYCHOLOGY and LIFE" TEXT
Third Edition-F. L. Ruch. FA. 3943L,
Ted.
Wanted
VARSITY SWING BAND REQUIRES
trumpet and sax players. Phone Syd
Lawson, CH. 0417.
TUTOR FOR ELEMENTARY CAL-
culus, Phone CH, 7081. '
SATURDAY & SUNDAY JIM
Jimmy Morris the man with
4923 songs is featured both
Saturday and Sunday on NW.
Hear him at 4:30 p.m. broadcasting from the "Ranger's
Cabin" on CKNW.
im i ah:;
EDITOR,,
THE   UBYSSEY
Dear Sir:
■Because our provincial government
give us insufficient information about
their activities, I am unable to form
an opinion Mipposedly necessary for
representative   government.
A weekly bulletin of informal ion
value to supplement the already present lie'A's value bulletin would he
appreciated, we presume. Possible
evening newspapers of Vancouver
could be intciested in promoting Ihi,
service.
A ■Citizen.
Students Offered
Five Scholarship
By United Kingdom
Five Scholarships are offered lo
Canadian students who will lo im -
Iher their education in the E'rilhh
Isles.
Candidates belween 215 and a,">, who
have obtained a university decree ar •
eligible for tli" scholarships which
covers all expenses ineludinr; boohs
and   travel.
Applications should be made la
Professor Alex S. Mowal. .secretary of
the Canadian Selection Committee.
Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova
Scotia, not later than neeember 1.
1941).
Sludents must return to their own
count ry on i om; let ion of t Iu ir imiii'v
: nd mu-,I n il he aeenmpanied lo :he
t'm'e. 1 Kingdom hy Iheir wiv -s er
families-..
No iunilal io;i , ,,i e .ni| iom\I w itli i'i -■
,;a. ll      to     I lie     s.tlhjel",      ill     w Inch      I he
e.'.ndiil.ilr h i ■  si edie.!, hut student    m
lhe   fine   arl-    a"e   pn I'err ai.
Ahhh - such colors!
Yessir... there's an Aratone
shirt-tie color combination to
flatter any suit in your
wardrobe! Shirt shades from
soft pastels to deep tones,
with smooth-knotting Arrow
Ties to harmonize.
Ahhh -such collars I
They're all Arrow collars . . . and
that means always perfect-fitting.
Four up-to-the-minute styles: new
Dover button-down, new low-slope
Contour, Windsor, and the regular
fused Standish. Aratone shirts are
quality broadcloth, in plain shades,
wide stripes, pin stripes or checks.
And SANFORIZED. At your
ARROW Dealer's.
Look (or tho Registered Trade Mark ARROW I
ARROW flltotfjMC
Harmonizing Shirts and Ties
4560 W. 10th
ALma 2009
CASTLE JEWELERS
Open Every Saturday till !) p.m.
Use   our   Xmas  lay-away   plan.   AnyfflFJKHjr^'J I- iVi'»!•'>•■'?*
deposit will hold articles until Xmas.
Expert watch repairs Work guaranteed
Special Discount
To Students
We Proudly Present
Sorooooo0oo°oOOoog^^|
So THE   ARROW  FAMILY
~p OR Or
SS   5 WAYS TO DECK YOUR  NECK   2;1
rtVOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO-'/
Ask for these college-favorite models by name .. .
Dnvor
New medium point
button-down soft
collar.
Windsor
Smart wide spread
soft collar with
inserts.
From
Contour
New low slope soft
'collar with inserts.
Standish
Regular Arrow fused
non-wilt collar.
Arno
Wide  spread   non-
wilt fused collar.
P.S. AU Arrow shirts arc SANFORIZED—guaranteed
never to shrink out of lit.
(/X.      y     / i/
(i.17  GRANVILLE STREET Friday,    October   28,    1949
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3
Homecoming
On this page are stories which Ubyssey editors have
culled from the musty files of bygone years.
In welcoming the graduates of former years back to the
University, The Ubyssey felt it would be fitting if it reprinted
stories that made the news years ago.
Nostalgic and past glories are here, as are the disappointments and the crusades.
The Ubyssey hopes that this page will help cement the ties
that are indispensable to the continued success of the University.
Feared Brock
In War Years
From the Ubyssey, October 22, 1943
"Unless students relieve UBC's critical labor shortage
the Brock Lounge will be unavailable for long periods after
every function," Employment Bureau personnel announced
Wednesday.
Review
Official Opening Of
New Stadium Sat.
Forty Thousand Dollar Alma
Mater Investment becomes Reality
October 1st, 1937 — by Dorwin Baird
^n the presence of a crowd estimated to exceed 4,000
persons, the new UBC stadium will be officially opened Saturday afternoon.
 . <s>   jj. wjjj k0 an ac^ua]i as weu as 0£fi_
Plans Released
Reductions
From the Ubyssey, Oct. 21,1932
(It seems to us we've heard
this song before department)
As the result of a fall of approximately $2500 in Alma
Mater fee receipts this year,
hacking slices off budgets and
seeking new sources of income
formed the principle occupation
of Students' Council, Wednesday night.
Departments of student activity affected in greater or lesser degree will
include the Musical Society. Rowing
Club, Men's and Women's Basketball
Clubs, the Big Block Club, the Canadian and English Rugby Clubs, Men's
and Women's Grass Hockey, Women's
Volleyball, Students Council Administration, legal expense, miscellaneous
expenditure, and.the Players Club.
As a potential source of additional
revenue, the idea of a small admission
charge to the Christmas Plays this
year was looked upon with favor by
the Council. It was suggested that a
charge of fifteen cents to students,
twenty-five cents to others should be
made.
This proposal, however, met with
strong protest from, the Players Club.
through their president. Bill Cameron.
Breaking a tradition, fall in attendance
with consequent discouragement of
actors, and the necessity of paying
royalties amounting to one hundred
dollars more than in former years
were presented as necessary results of
such a policy,
Mr. Cameron further pointed out
that the Christmas plays were private
performances and that their quality
could not be guaranteed. And finally,
hc contended that if the student body
had to pay admission the money
spent by the Council on the Players
Club would benefit only the sixty
members of that club, instead of the
sludents at large. He pointed out that
the Players Club already yields a net
revenue to the AMS. No decision in
the matter has yet been made by
Council.
It was decided to sell off at greatly
reduced prices all old Totems and
Handbooks. Prices were fixed 'as
follows:
1025-,'30 Totems 25 cents
1931 Totems 50 cents
1932 Totems  75  cents
1931-32 Handbooks 10 cents
Wilh regard to next year's Totem,
Council is anxious to avoid losses incurred by Totems in former years. If
the annual is published this Near i'
seems probable lhat changes therein
will include omissfftn of the usual
Literary supplement, and curtailment
of the various write-ups.
4-' Duo t'o the impossibility of replacing
janitorial vacancies, student help is
essential at this time and Ed Friesen,
director of the bureau calls upon
every university man to help in the
emergency.
"Students at other colleges, both
here and in the States, have faced
similar labor crises," he said, "and
have managed to overcome them
through co-operation in part-time
work."
Thc Bureau will place Brock workers in shifts, arranged so as to coincide with spare periods. To facilitate this scheme, all able bodied
undergrads are urged to register for
at least one hour's work a wegk, and
are asked to leave copies of their
timetable with Bureau  officials.
Another aspect of the Brock problem   is   the   question   of  whether   or
nol' to open the dining room. If some
student   organization   will   launch   a
campaign  in favor of re-opening  the
dining room, the Bureau will undertake   to  .supply  the  necessary   labcr.
In    fact,    three    enterprising    co-eds
have already registered as waitresses.
Selective Service officials have given
the Bureau authority to contact downtown firms and to solicit employment
through   phoning,   circularizing   and
advertising.   Registration   fcr   Christmas   wcrk   will   also   be   handled   at
Varsity,   and   will   take  place  during
the second and t'hird weeks of November.
FROM THE FILES
Novcmlier 18. 1938.
If you have a weak heart, or ; re
subject to stitches, hang around the
rrym on Tuesday, November 22, for
at that time the Students Council
play ils annual basketball game
against   the  Publications Board.
The Pub-Council game i.s known far
and wide a.s one of the side-splittingesl,
scrcwhallest, and most riotous tidbits of entertainment to hit this fair
city since Burrard dug the Inlet.
The Kight Smokfi
at the Right Price
for Young Men
it\d$
*iam
DANCING
TO FRED MASSEY
ORCHESTRA
Tea I ut'ing
Song StvlitiG' of
BOBBY HUGHES
60c
Big Parade Will
Lead Homecoming
Activity Program
Homecoming, October 5, 1937
One of the largest Homecoming programs in the history
of the University was releasr -1
yesterday by Junior merr'jor
John Brynelsen. Comm-.-.cing
with the reunion dinn?v on Friday, October 29, it will swing
into main program the following day.
A pep meeting will be followed by
a mammcth parade of cars through
the downtown district, returning to
the Stadium for the traditional Occasional — Varsity Rugby tilt at 2
p.m. Following this, t'he Hardy cup
series game with University cf Alberta will bring th- Canadian footballers into action.
A Tea Dance in the gymnasium
at 5 o'clock will continue the day.
Those who find tea inadequate will
dine  in  the  Caf  at' 6.
Evening functions will start with
a basketball game between the grad
team and the Senior A Varsity five.
Scene will then shift to the Auditorium
for plays by both the Graduate
Players' Club and the Undergrad
Society.
cia! opening, for Saturday will bc
the first time that a game will be
played in frcnt of the new stands,
$40,000 investment of the Alma Mater
Society.
DR. WEIR OFFICT. ^iNG
Hon. Dr. Geor- i Weir, minister of
education, an ! UBC professor on
leave of ; -nee, will declare the
stadium _n in a ceremeny scheduled '■ .   j:15 p.m.
T opening will be preceded by a
i"   idier pep rally in t'he auditorium
.  noon.
Music, yells and speeches are being
planned for the gathering, expected
by student officials to be tho most
enthusiastic in the history of the university.
CHANCELLOR KICKS OFF
At 2 p.m., Varsity and Rowing
Club will meet in an English Rugby
match.
Chancellor Dr. R. E. McKechnie
will kick off to start the game,
opening match in the present senior
league series.
A. 3:10 p.m., when the game is
finished, ceremonies will commence
with the singing of "O, Canada."
FROM THE FILES
September 23, 1938
At a meeting of the Student Campaign Committee Tuesday, September
20, 1938, it was moved that the Board
of Governors be asked to suspend
payment of fees until after the fall
session of the legislature has had an
opportunity to pass on increased appropriations for the University of
British  Columbia.
FROM THE FILES
September 27, 1938 | on September 26, 1938. The Governors
The plan proposed by tlie Students : under this plan, would grant the
Council whereby the Board of Gov- j students n sum of $25 000 in ten yearly
ernors would assist the sludents in I payments, With this grant anci money
the paying of a bond issue, floated ! available from lhe students' three
for the purpose of constructing the | dollar building fee, the Union Build-
Brock Memorial Union Building, had , ing could be constructed within the
not yet been considered by the Board   next year.
^l^aSfg^Kwa^
um^^&ty
II 11^ 5
6H^
tl/jittractivcly designed and set with
brilliant rhincstones and colourful
imitation stones.
Exclusive to Dirks,   '
Bowknot
Brooch   4.00
Basket of
Flowers    5.00
Dancer
3.00
COSTUME  JEWELLERY DEIMHTMENT
VANCOUVER
EATO N'S Presents a Fashion Favourite
... by NANCY
. . . modelled by ATMALIE FRASER
MEMO: To A Fashion Conscious Co-Ed
Pick a dress that will go everywhere vuth
clever versatility, a dress they won't forget
Choose a colour, spicy and vibrant, a 'fall inlo
winter' shade . . . choose a fabric, light-ao-c leof
sheer wool . . . choose a silhouette, with nippcJ-
in or free and easy styling.
N.B. Make YOUR selection of Fall wa-U fr ..-n
EATON'S grand array of tantalizing fashions
Alhalic models a wool crepe dress
featuring a low 'Parisian' neckline,
double file of covered buttons and
soft front panel pleats. Colours of
magenta, cocoa, wine and meridian
blue. Sizes 14-20. 29.50
Eaton's—Dresses—Second Floor
#
•>7
V
A hat with a side-long look is this
black   velveteen   beret   ...   10   be
worn more    ways    than    one. 7.!)5
Eaton's—Millinery—Second Floor
.*
T e:aton c°
■  •  BWUI5H    COLUMBIA   ^^UMtTCP
Mtat r&i Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
Friday,    October    28,    1949
All UBC Teams Out To Please
Weekend Homecoming Grads
I
Birds Try
For Upset
Saturday
By  RAY FROST
That old college spirit and
never-ending fight is predominant in the ranks of the
Thunderbird football team as
they look forward to making
the 1949 Homecoming a rousing success by whipping the
unbeaten Pacific University
eleven Saturday at 2:15 p.m. in
the UBC stadium.
Homecoming games have in the past
always been the most exciting contests of the season for local audiences.
possibly because the boys know that
some of the university's all-time
greats are watching them.
GOOD CHANCE
But whatever the reason, Thunderbirds have a good chance of copping
the victory honors from Pacific University  for the Homecoming classes.
At least, every indication is that
'Birds will continue to ptay Saturday
just the way they have been in the
last few weeks.
Head Coach Orville Burke claims
that UBC will play as good if not
better than they did against Central
Washington College last weekend.
when they handed the league-leaders
the biggest scare they had experienced
this year.
IN BEST SHAPE
Team is in the best shape it has been
since the season opened, few injuries
plaguing them, and every man at condition peak.
Centreman Bob Murphy is still out
of action after almost three weeks
layoff, but 'Birds played fine ball even
without him before and they can do
it again.
Biggest disappointment to the team
was th'S' ahh'ouncement that passing
artist Will Kennedy, halfback from
the east who had played for Toronto
Oakwood Indians, has decided not
to play for Thunderbirds.
BEHIND IN STUDIES
Registering after school had been
in session a month, Kennedy is too
far behind in his studies to continue
playing footbr.ll.
Possibly making up for the loss of
Kennedy is the addition of diminutive
Freddie French to the team roster once
more.
French will be put into the lineup
as blocking back, a position that he is
quite capable of filling despite his
slight  131   pounds.
Rest of the team is in good shape
including the idol of the campus
Doug Reid. Chances are that Reid will
be playing his best this Saturday,
since this will be the last Homecoming
game that hc will be playing in.
REID   LUND TO PASS
With pass master Kennedy out of
the football picture, Reid will probably be assigned some of the flinging
jobs, along with diminutive quarterback Leo Lund, who handled some of
tlie passing against Central Washington.
But the usual injury handicap is
almost non-existant this week, so tlie
'Birds will have absolutely no excuses
.or the outcome Saturday.
But from the way that Thunderbirds have played lately, they won't
need any excuses at all for the Pacific
contest.
Tomahawks Beat
Redskins 5-0
Varsity   Tomahawks   defeated   llvir
.fellow Redskins fi-l)  in  a clo.ie second
division  tilt on  the upper field of the
campus   Wednesday   afternoon   at  Ih.'ill
p.m.
Both side.; played .•-iiortlianded in
a see-saw bailie which .saw Russ
Stanway break aero.s fur a try in lh"
dying minuies of Iho game. The try
was converted making, lhe final score
Tomahawks."),   Redskins   I).
'Mural Soccer
MONDAY.   OCT,   III   FIELD   HOI'S!'.
I.   Nesvman   A   vs   Zotes   A
'2.    Pharmacy    A    vs    ATO
II    Zebes   A   v.s  VCF
TUESDAY,   NON'.   1.   FIELD   UOl'Si.
1, Kappa  Sig A v.s Sigma  Foo
2. Phi   D, ll   A  v-   Fhaimaey   A
!!.   1!11l.-.llii'I -  vs  Fiji
<;y.m
-♦
CjsKLNMM* \W1H A!\ 1 It ll* A HUN over the poss !    Tie
of Saturday's Homecoming football game when the 'Birds take
on the powerful Pacific University Badgers at 2:15 p.m. Reid,
pictured in pass position, is slightly out of place here since most
of his yardage is gained by sparkling runs. But Reid wil probably be called upon to toss a few if things get too tough.
Soccer Games End
Homecoming Sports
Varsity Plays At Callisrer
Again; UBC At Oak Park
Soccer finishes the weekend Homecoming picture on Sunday afternoon when the Varsity roundball eleven face off
against St. Helens at the Callister Park pitch once again at
1:15 p.m.
After    last   Sunday's   stirring   per
fcrmunce by vhe Varsity troup who
completely over-powered the leading
Kerrisdale crew to end up in a 3 all
tie, Varsity has a good chance to take
another win.
LINE-UP  UNCHANGED
No changes arc anticipated in thc
lineup from last week, since the team
played so well together, and Manager
Gordie Baum is assured of another
equally  starry  performance.
Noticeable faults from the game
last weekend have been corrected
during the week when the team
wont through their workouts,
j Varsil'y score sheet now reads one
win,  two draws, and  two  losses  with
j the certainty  of another win Sunday.
UBC SQUAD PLAYS
UBC squad also has  its hands  full
thi.s  weekend  when   they   tangle   with
jv/arpile   Athletics  al   Oak  Park,  SOi'h
| and   Oak.
Still wit'houl a win this season.
U15C are sure to come through for
theii' first credit performance in
keeping wilh the Homecoming tradition.
(lame time foi' the UBC contest, is
selieiiiU'il   fur  2:111)  p.m.
Women's 'Mural
Volleyball
MONDAY. OCT.  III.  GYM
i:!.'!() \
Ails   IB   v-   Arts   IC
PF.   Ill ami   IV vs  Hillel
Fill)
Commerce   vs   Aggie
A IV A vs A IV I)
WEDNESDAY. NOW 1! EIEI.D HOUSE
ail)
:n   Dee 'h  vs.  is.11
Slat  I is DC A
Ail.    IA   v.s   Ans   2.\
Alls   al?   v.-,   Ails   211
Nur.-, S   Vs   Are,   ,|C
Art,  ::.-\   v.s   Ails  -IP.
\.   V. II   ail     S Al,  ,     IF
TT   a.     An.    ID
Braves Trounce
Victoria Road
In Hoop Opener
Hot Second Period
Set Up 40-27 Win
Varsity Braves in their debut game
against Victoria Road, Wednesday
night at King Edward gym, played
a gtijne packed full of action, outplaying the hapless Victoria five to
take their first game by the score of
40-27.
At half-lime the Braves were being
trailed by a score of 22-21 by Victoria,
hut the hoys put on the steam and
held lhe Victoria team to six points
during the second half. The Braves
played well, and show signs of a top-
notch  team.
The Braves have lots of height and
were getting in for all lhe rebounds.
High scorers Herd. Bowan and Drosses
were up ill the bucket pulling down
most of thi- points for the E'raves,
each   garnering  eie.ht   points.
Oilier good signs of a great team is
lhe fact lhat they have twelve men
fielded, all of whom are potential
throats   to   any   opposing   learn.
'Mural Volleyball
MONDAY.   OCT.  DI.-
1. Sign':.   Foo   \-s   Phys   Ed
2. Robots    Vs    Kappa    Sig
TUESDAY.   NOV,   I
1. Eng.  2  v.s  Koots
2.    Architects   vs   UCF
TUESDAY, NOV. .'!
1.  Ails Senior vs Psi  TJ
2.  Alpha  Dell  v.s Dawson Club
FRIDAY.   NOW   1
1     Fed .liii is   v •   Sesna    Alpha
2. Deke,    v,    ATI)
Chief Ruggermen
Anticipating
Fourth Straight
University's Chiefs will be
attempting to stretch the^r present win streak to four games
Saturday when the blue and
gold ruggermen tackle Vindex
club at Connaught Park, to
give the Homecoming classes
something to talk about in the
field of sports.
The Chiefs will be facing an aggregation studded with many of their
last year's star lineup including Bill
Dunbar, Hartt Crosby and Dave
Storey. Vindex will fight hard for a
win which could well determine
whei'her they obtain a playoff berth
or not. A win for Varsity could put
them in a first place tie "with Rowing
Club.
MILLER CUP MATERIAL
Chiefs are in fine fettle and the
Laithewaite men are a strong challenge again 'this season for the Miller
Cup.
Bui' Vindex is not to be scoffed at.
They have been putting good teams
into the league for many years, and
wdth the crop of UBC graduates filing
into their line-ups, they may be a
threat to the rest of the teams, and
to  Chiefs.
On the other hand, UBC's winless
Braves will try to handle Ex-Britannia, the same team that fell prey to
Chiefs last weekend by the score of
17-0,
With needed experience under iheir
belts, Braves will be in there pitching.
Two second division tilts are plan-
nod for the weekend, each as an
opener to the first division matches.
Varsity Tomahawks tangle with the
Vindex Seconds at' Connaught while
the Redskins precede the Brave tilt at
Renfrew where they take on the
Ex-Britannia   "B" 's.
Sports Editor — RAY FROST
Associate Editor—SANDY MANSON
Brylcreem
At all times when good grooming counts, a single application of BRYLCREEM
"The Perfect Hairdressing" keeps your hair in place, and easy to manage.
Brylcreem supplements the natural oils
of the hair and helps
remove loose dandruff.
Available in handy
tubes everywhere. 9.49R
Put A Pause For Coke
On Your Program, Too
CAMPUS SPORT
PROBLEMS AIRED
ON ROUND TABLE
"What can be done to improve
the sports status nt UBC?" will
bc the problem discussed on the
University Round Tabic of thc Air
Saturday night at 8 p.m. over
CJOR.
Debaters arc Reg Moir, Daily
Province Sports Editor, Frank
Fredrickson, UBC ice hockey coach,
Ray Perrault^ CJOR Sports Announcer, and Ray Frost, Ubyssey
Sports Editor.
Ask for it either way... both
trade-marks mean the same thing,
COCA COLA — VANCOUVER
TOMMY
DORSEY
1    PLAVS THE ROLLICKING R+iVT+tM TUNr
V
z.
/^
SCA VICTOR'S NEWEST HIT BACKED
UPBY 'SUMMERTIME" TROM "
MUSICAL PRODUCTION>'PORGYi.BESS
■#£A& TH£$£ Lt%TSST    "^
*CA V/C7VK RCCORPS
• DRY BONES
SUMMERTIME (from the Mus. Prod. "Porgy and Bess")
'lummy Dnrsi'y and his Onb. ■ 20 3523 (45 RPM - 47-3002)
• THE MEADOWS OF HEAVEN
A DREAMER'S HOLIDAY (with The Fontane Sisters)
i'ary I'.nmo - 20-3543 (45 RPM Version 47-3036)
•k VIENI SU (Say You Love Me Too) (V.R.)
BLUE FOR A BOY—PINK FOR A GIRL (V.R.)
\ tiugbii Monroe and his Orch. - 20-3549 (45 RPM - 47-3042)
* YOU'RE IN LOVE WITH SOMEONE       (from the
ENVY film "Top O' The Morning")
I run V arren ■ 20-3551  (45 RPM Version 47-3044)
* THE LAST MILE HOME (V.R.)
HAWAIIAN SUNSET (V.R.)       Suin, ,md Sua, uiih
Sanim,  K./.w - 20-3545 (45 RPM Version 47-3038)
^Ai/O/ 4&XPW R£CO/?t>S, TOO/
This tiny "plug-in" player is all you need
lo enjoy lhe ns'w RCA Victor 45 rpm
system ol recorded music through your
present radio or radio-phonograph. Its
the world's fastest record changer and
plays up lo 10 records — more than 40
minutes without need of attention. RCA
Victor Model  9-JY only  $29.95.
THE STARS WHO MAKE THE J4(TtfAR€ ON
RG4 \fiCR>R RPCOROS

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0125606/manifest

Comment

Related Items