UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 29, 1962

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0125604.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125604.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0125604-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0125604-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125604-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0125604-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0125604-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0125604-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0125604-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0125604.ris

Full Text

 FIREMEN, HEALTH SERVICE AGREE
HAD ONE ONCE BUT.
i
AMBULA
P
By   TIM   PADMORE
There is an intrigue on campus.
An ambulance is the principal character in this
real-life mystery — an ambulance which, like the
little-man-who-wasn't-there —,- isn't here.
An editorial in The uliyssey Tuesday brought out
the fact that the only vehicle on campus, to carry in-
halator equipment is the single university fire truck.
If an ambulance is required it must come from the city.
-. V V TT
Everybody agrees an ambulance is needed.
At least one ambulance has. been offered to the
university.
Yet we don't have an ambulance.
Why?
Two hours of probing produced few answers.
Assistant fire chief, R. W. Rowland, generously
admitted the possibility Of simultaneous inhalator and
fh-e calls but refused to comment on why UBC does not
have an ambulance.
Chief Gerard Foran said that an ambulance was
.bought but later, inexplicably, dropped.
"I don't know what happened," he said.
No one seemed to think it was for financial
reasons.
A conversation with one of the firemen was a
little more interesting.
Apparently there have been simultaneous demands for a fire truck and ambulance.
The fire truck has "oeen tied up for as much as six
hours attending an inhalator call.
At almost every inhalator call an ambulance is
needed; an ambulance which has to come five miles
to the university, search among unfamiliar buildings,
and finally transport the injured perhaps three blocks
to Wesbrook.
v *r ?r
At least 90 percent of this wasted time would be-
saved if an ambulance was based on campus.
There is space at trie iire hall to house an ambulance, and little or no extra staff would be needed
as firemen are already trained in first aid.
The fireman didn't know why we shouldn't have
an ambulance either.
Dr. A. M. Johnson of the University Health Service said an ambulance was "not in the foreseeable
future.
Why? (again).
"Internal,   domestic   problems,"   he   said.   Then,
NEEDED
"correcting" himself, he blamed it on "jurisdictional-
financial-administrative problems."
E. D. McPhee, dean of financial affairs, was firmer:
"Until the volume increases it will be unnecessary
to purchase an ambulance ror the university."
It certainly seems as if there is much dissension in
the ranks.
Perhaps a good start to resolving the matter would
be to look into the "internal, domestic problems."
As for the necessity of getting an ambulance in
spite of the cost, our friendly fireman said:
"Eow can we measure money against human
life?"
*        *        *
The fire department has its problems too.
It is fighting fires with equipment described generally as outmoded. The truck is a modified 1942 air
force surplus model. The longest ladder cannot reach
the top of several campus buildings, and this ladder
is not adequately manned — six men are required t6
operate it and only four are available.
"We are in the same position," said a spokesman,
"as a man with a '41 Ford looking wistfully at a '-62
Cadillac."
r UBYSSEY
Vol. XLIV
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,  THURSDAY,  MARCH   29,   1962
.No.  74
-Photo by Ted Ross
VICTIMS of Social Credit anti-press motion Tuesday were
Ubyssey reporters Ian Cameron (left) and Mike Horsey. Pair
put ears to door after being tossed out of Socred club's
general meeting.
Bombay grad wins  IH
foreign  student award
A graduate student from the University of Bombay
was named "Foreign student of the year" by International
House, Wednesday.
Afnar Kshatriya, 30, currently on a student visa to Canada, has spent two years at UBC taking a doctorate in Physics. He plans to return to India next year to lecture or do
research work at an Indian university.
The award Kshatriya received is given on the basis of
outstanding scholastic ability, participation in extra curric-
ular activities, and pleasing personal characteristics.
Ubyssey staffers barred
from Socred club meeting
By  MIKE  HORSEY
I was kicked out of a Social
Credit   club   meeting   Tuesday.
So were photographer Ted
Ross and another reporter, Ian
Cameron.
We had been assigned as a
team to cover the second Socred
general meeting in as many
days for the Ubyssey. But we
were told to leave because the
club felt the presence of the
press undesirable.
It's the first club meeting we
have been kicked out of. The
Liberals, New Democrats, Conservatives and Communists
didn't seem to mind our presence at their meetings.
Monday the Social Credit
Club called a meeting at which
it was to discuss the B.C. government's Bill 85. A motion was
put forth to send a note of pro
test to Premier Bennett.
However,, when it was noted
that a Ubyssey reporter, Krishna Sahay, was present the motion was tabled and further discussion on the topic was discontinued. The club called another
meeting for Tuesday
That set the stage for us to
go to the Tuesday meeting in
Bu.  317.
We quietly entered the room
ahd made our way to the front
rows. The assembled crowd
murmured a note of disapproval and the current discussion
was stopped.
As soon as it had been ascertained that we were from the
Garbage wrappings
on sale for $5
Ubyssey readers who will
be off campus next year don't
have to miss the scandals and
grudges The Ubyssey reports
to its captive audience.
Graduates, retired professors and others who don't
make it back can have the
rag mailed to their homes for
$5   a   year.
The Publications Office,
Brock Hall will sign up any
suckers who write or see
them giving name, address
and five bucks.
press a motion was put forth
from the floor to the effect that
the presence of the press was
undesirable.
The motion was carried and
we were asked to leave the
meeting.
As we left President-elect
Lome Hudson said that there
would be a statement at the end
of the meeting as to what had
been discussed.
But, when photographer Ross
and I returned about an hour
later we were met with this
reply:
"It has been passed by the
majority that there should be
no statement whatever by the
club."
When I asked several members who had attended the meeting if they had anything to say
I received the reply "no comment".
We will never find out what
happened at that\ meeting.
Neither will you. Can't help
wondering what they were doing in there. They're getting as
bad as their Big Brother in Victoria.
No court access for BCE
House sits in judgement
By  RICHARD   SIMEON
The people who blow up
power poles in the Kootenays
have more rights than the
shareholders of the B.C. Electric Company, Jim Clarke,
chairman of the shareholders
committee for fair expropriation said Wednesday.
"At leasi they have the
right to a fair trial before a
judge and jury," he said.
Speaking with Clarke at a
panel discussion in Brock
Lounge, H. L. Matthews, Victoria lawyer, said the provincial government is threatening the democratic rights of
British Columbians by not
permitting the BCE access to
the courts.
Our committee does not
deny the power of the government to expropriate the
BCE but if there is no right to
negotiation and arbitration,
then the takeover is tantamount to stealing, he said.
If the government can bypass the courts whenever it
wants, then the courts and
the protection they provide
the individual will be finished, he said.
"Not one person in the B.C.
Legislature knows the exact
value of the BC Electric, yet
they sit in judgment," said
Matthews.
The only fair method of
expropriation is to have arbitration, negotiation and judicial review, added Matthews.
The object of the Shareholders Committee is to get
the Power Development Act,
under which the company
was expropriated, amended
so as to allow for a fair price
to be set, said Clarke.
It now has more than 4,000
members. Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday,  March  29,   1962 Thursday, March  29,  1962
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 3
Drift
-*■
WORDS
By MIKE GRENBY
Since tomorrow's special edition is what it is, I'm saying my
farewell today.
It's been an interesting and
eventful year.
At least the campus seems
always to have been bubbling
with activity of almost every
kind  imaginable.
And this, for a newspaperman, is just what the editor
ordered.
The year has gone far too
fast, of course, but 74 editions
of The Ubyssey have shown
that the hours were put to their
fullest use.
And now it's close to quitting
time.
•    •    •
How did you spend the year?
(check the applicable answer)
—I attended most of my lectures and did most of my assignments.
—I only cut lectures when I
went for coffee.
—I diligently studied m y
work every night, (deduct "two
points for checking this)
—I intended to study my work
every night but there was always something more important
and April was such a long way
. away.
—I went out three days a
weekend.
—J went out three nights a
^ weekend.
-."'.—I got through the year losing (?) only three umbrellas,
two overcoats, and a textbook
with all my notes in it.
—-1 made more friends and
enemies than I've ever made
before.
—I suddenly realized how
little I know.
—I've learned a lot that no
examination will ever be able to
test.
—I've had a wonderful/miserable time, (underline two)
—I don't want to remember
some of the things that happened this year.
—T'n never forget some of the
things that happened this year.
Score yourself. Out of 13—
check 10. normal; check 11, abnormal and quite natural; check
12, you'd be an interesting person to meet; check 13. impossible.
And now it's even closer to
quitting time.
•    *    •
I've enjoyed writing this column and I hope you've had
some enjoyment from reading
it.
To those of you who have
told me your reactions to and
criticisms of "Drift Words,"
many thanks.
Without your comments I
should often have been at a
loss in my endeavors.
If some of my words made
you smile. I'm glad. If some of
them made you think, even
frown, I'm glad.
For you returning in the fall,
have a pleasant summer and
I'll see you in September.
For you who are leaving
UBC, best wishes for the future.
For all, good luck and marks
in the coming ordeal.
Au revoir.
-Photo by Won Hume
WORRIED? WHO ME? says Glenn Schultz, Arts 1, who finally
got down to work for final exams. Revised exam schedules
are expected to  be posted this week" by Registrar's office.
New executive
cosmopolitan
Next year's Parliamentary
Council will have a cosmopolitan flavour.
An Englishman, Len
Brown, was elected president
by acclamation.
An American, Dick Arkley,
was elected vice-president in
a close race over Ken Gag-
lardi, whose uncle is the B.C.
Highways Minister.
MUSICAL  SOCIETY  &
CHORAL SOCIETY
General Meeting
Bu.  205 Thurs., Mar. 29
BANQUET AND  DANCE
Fri., March 30, St. Mawes
By The Sea
North Vancouver
Members   $1.75
Totem posts open
Applications are open for the
positions of Head Photographer
and Co-ordinator of Totem. Applications to Bill McDonald,
Publications Co-ordinator, Publications  office, Brock Hall.
Applications must be in before noon, Wednesday, April 4.
Interviews will be held at 5
p.m. the same day.
Room and Board
For Men
m Kitohen Facilities Available for,
Snacks
« Laundry   Included
£ Close  to  Unlverstiy  Gates
m H'tudent Owned and Operated
a Good   Studying  Facilities
APPLY    NOW!!!
Summer Session   Winter  Session
$55 per Montli       $53 per Month
University   Student's   Cooperative
Ass'a.
4082 West 8th Avenue     CA 4-3631
Council approves
eligibility rules
Student council Monday night approved, in principle, the
elegibility rules the 1961 - 62 council proposed to the spring
general meeting.
The rules were not passed at
the General Meeting as there
was no quorum present. I
Council   Vice-president   Peter j
Shepard proposed that the eligibility rules apply to the Spring
Sessional  examinations.
DEFEATED
Shaffer play
on hand soon
"Five   Finger   Exercise"   will
-* -«. * ^~ be    presented   at   the  Frederic
The motion was defeated, and! Wood Theatre, April 6 to 21.
then expunged from the records j     Written by Peter Shaffer, the
of the society. 'play deals with a wealthy self-
Shepard said he wanted "thei made   Englishman,   his   preten-
council and the campus inform- j tiously cultured wife, their college-age son and teenage daughter. When a young and personable tutor of German extraction
ed that if it was legally possible
we  wanted  eligibility  rules   in
GffGCt " I   aw*''    *v»*w~	
. "The motion was defeated byj joins their household, »«»»
only two votes," he said, "and I that have seethed beneath the
bv   that   time   the   issue    was! surface   are   exposed   with   em-
cloudy   because   the   discussion
had continued so long and because Council was  not  sure  of
the legal aspect," he added.
NOT FORGOTTEN
Secretary Barbara Bennett
said she felt the motion should
have been passed in order to
inform the students that moral
responsibility has not been forgotten.
Bernie Papke, Co-ordinator
of Activities said, "I don't know
what Peter is getting at, if he
intends this motion to bind
Council morally it doesn't."
otional impact by the author as
he dramatizes the disorderly relationships between different
generations.
Director is John Brockington,
assistant professor, UBC department of theatre.
ANNOUNCING
SPECIAL
HAMBURGER SALE
SATURDAY, MARCH 31
ONLY
Buy One . . . Get Another for 5c
Deluxe  Burgers — Cheeseburgers — Fish & Chips
Junior Burgers — Cheese Dogs — Hot Dogs —■ French  Fries
Chocolate — Coffee — Ice Cream
PLUS OUR USUAL ICE CREAM SERVICE
DAIRY QUEEN
(Al and Sheila  Browne)
Open 7 Days a Week — 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. — 4577 W. 10th
Kennedy outlines his
cold war strategy
Last year in Moscow, Khrushchev
spelled out his master plan in no
uncertain terms. But what is Kennedy's strategy? In this week's Post,
in an authoritative article based
on talks with the President and
his chief advisers, Stewart Alsop
reports on Kennedy's long-range
thinking. And tells how such crises and Cuba, Vietnam and Berlin
shaped the President's views.
The Saturday Evening
         P«    MARCH 31
■    '     ISSUE/NOW
ON SALE
DO YOU
find
strange
feeling creep over you at nite
after a hard day at the textbooks?
We have the answer here at
PIZZARAMA. The problem is
HUNGER and the an«wer is
FOOD.
Now, we know that late at nite
no one wants to go out to eat,
especially if there are books to
get bar k to. Why not have something delivered right to your door?
This way no time is wasted.
Arent you getting a. bit sick of
Chinese food? There ARE other
forms of food heing delivered in
town. Why not give us a call and
let us deliver anything from our,
varied menu to you tonite? We
deliver up till midnite. Free delivery  on   all  orders  over   $2.50.
Say, do you set the feeling that
this ad isn't   much?  So  do  I.
That's why I'm quitting for the
nite.  Goodbye.
2675   WEST    BROADWAY
BE   3-9916
ST. TIMOTHY LUTHERAN CHURCH
ON CAMPUS WORSHIP
HUT L4 - EAST MALL
11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Everyone Welcome
SENORITAS . . . just arrived at . . .
£JbiAa'A,
(EXCLUSIVE DEALER FOR THE UNIVERSITY AREA)
"Fjorlane" Sweaters
• 100% Virgin Wool
• Genuine   Mohair
• Made  in  Italy
• LOVELY  SPRING  COLOURS
CARDIGANS 29.95 PULL-OVER 24.95
CABALLEROS ... just arrived at . . .
fifoiAa'A*
BEAUTIFUL WINE SKINS (Botas) FROM SPAIN
• Numerous shapes and sizes.
• Guaranteed   to  keep  wine  in   good   condition
PRICED FROM $4.50 AND UP
£JbiAa'A*
4479 WEST 10TH AVENUE
CAstle 4-0848 Page 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday,  March  29,   1962
mMmE UJB YSSJEm
Winner ot the Southam Trophy
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEMBER  CANADIAN UNIVERSITY   PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year in
Vancouver by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial
opinions expressed are those of the Editor of The Ubyssey and not
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
Telephone  CA 4-3242.  Locals:  Editor—25;  News—23; Photography—24.
Editor-in:chief: Roger McAfee
Managing  Editor Denis   Stanley
Associate Editor Ann Pickard
News Editor Fred Fletcher
City Editor -    -   - Keith Bradbury
CUP Jgditpr Maureen Covell
Photography Editor P o n Hume
Senior Jditor Sharon Rodney
Sports    Editor Mike    Hunter
Photography .Manager   ------    Byron  Hender
Critjes Editor,   -   - David Bromige
Editorial  Research   -   Bob Hendrickson,  Ian Cameron
STAFF THIS ISSUE
Layout this issue: Bob McDonald
REPORTERS: Krishna Sahay, Mike Horsey, Richard
Simeon, Tim Padmpre, Heather Virtue, Mike
Grenby, Lynn McDonald,' Nicky Phillips, Eric
Wilson.
SPOJRTS: George Railton, Glenn Schultz, Bert MacKinnon, pill Wiljson.
TECHNICAL: Pauline Fisher, Gail Kendall.
',<^s>^«bS^   •«
T'V^v».!.--x»4tfS--t.  <~** &>$«*«>* ;-fv
Letters to the Editor
now
Well the inevitable has happened—thank God! This is the
last time you'll have to wade through the crap that usually piles
up in this column. This is the last Ubyssey of the year.
The year has been a good one for the University and the
Alma Mater Society. True we've had troubles in getting the
student union building off the ground. The winter sports arena
is finally moving ahead, out of the "proposed" stages.
Our athletic teams are showing their usual prowess and
winning a few games. And The Ubyssey won the Southam
Trophy.
New University buildings are going up and parking lots
are disappearing. More buildings will go up and more parking
lots will go down. Maybe someday a parkade will be built on
the campus. Probably about the same time as the student union
building goes up!
What's going to happen next year? Well we'd like to make
a few predictions.
. Unless the student body gets off its fat ass we're not.going
to have a student government! Why should it. Why should a
handful of people slave their guts out for the rest of you slobs?
Why should council meet every Monday night for six or seven
hours just to keep the operation above water? Why should
council members spend time, that could be spent more profitably on .their studies, attending various meetings just so you
can be represented? Why the hell should they fail, while you,
from the solitude of the library or the relative comfort of the
Georgia, enjoy yourself.
This new system of student government we have was supposed to be the answer to the general disinterest in AMS governmental affairs. Well, obviously it isn't and we don't think
the system can be blamed.
We feel that the blame for this should lie with the people
who have the ultimate responsibility—and that's you!
The Alma Mater Society couldn't even get enough of its
active (laugh!) members to the spring general meeting. Perhaps if the quorum is lowered sufficiently the special fall meeting will be able to transact some business!
When you don't take an active interest in your own affairs
those running them tend to get cocky and irresponsible with
the power you have given them. They have been known in the
past to misuse that power.
Well, if that happens next year, you have ho one to blame
but yourselves! So don't look around for a patsy!
-$•    %•    *£
We have only one regret concerning this year's operation
of The Ubyssey. On occasion we were unable to furnish the
service needed by various campus organizations. We tried our
best, but that's the way it goes. We hear that next year's
Ubyssey staff is taking steps to remedy the situation. We wish
them luck.
A purpose to USC
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Darrell Roberts, last year's
USC chairman, completely
misunderstands the purpose of
USC. He recommends that
USC be disbanded because
"there is no need for a duplice
campus-wide representation".
On the contrary, the new
council system was designed
to increase inter-faculty contacts and help to spread student government functions beyond the doors of the Brock.
Because it is successfully doing this is no reason to disband
the only other body that permits undergraduate society representatives to meet and
work together.
To replace USC with a
council-appointed board would
be a step backwards. USC has
proven this year that it could
supervise elections, blood
drives, charities, inter-faculty
debates and a song-fest, as well
as taking over responsibility
for food services.. In the coming year, I intend to see that
USC relieves council of more
routine   administrative   tasks.
I question Mr. Roberts' declaration that most USC representatives run for the position
without understanding the
functions of USC. Even if it
were true, representatives gain
valuable experience learning
to cooperate with representatives from, other ..undergraduate societies. With the society presidents fulfilling such
an important role in campus
affairs, it is important to provide a body that can provide
training in appreciation of
campus-wide  problems.
I believe that USC has been
of great value and can be of
more value in the future by
helping to free council of
routine and allow it to concentrate on policy - level decisions.
Yours truly,
PETER LEASK,
USC Chairman.
On scouring Jock
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I was very interested to
read Jack Ornstein's article on
the.dire consequences of a belief in immortality. However
he reached several of his conclusions rather hastily and I
think at least part of the confusion lies in his mistakes concerning elemental definitions.
This was particularly evident
in his ideas on sacrifice and
for he sake of brevity I would
like to consider only this aspect.
Ornstein states that real sacrifice constitutes an irremedial
loss and that this is impossible
for the "believer". I would
like to show that such a state
of affairs never arises. All men
desire happiness in life and
their actions are constantly
motivated towards this goal.
A man may be mistaken in an
action, but at the moment of
performing the action, he
thinks it will bring him some
type of happiness either im
mediate or remote. A sacrifice
is, then, an action in which a
desirable object is given up in
behalf of a higher object. It is
quite inconceivable that a person would make a sacrifice if
no higher happiness, which
may or may not be a spiritual
one, attracted him! It is a fact
of    human    experience    that
people  never perform  actions
without    some    happiness    in
mind,   and   thus   in   Orstein's
sense   of   the   word,   sacrifice
would   always   be   impossible
for everyone, believer or not.
In fact Ornstein has seriously misused the word and I suppose  that   a  further r scout   of
his   article   will   reveal   other
examples of special reasoning.
Yours truly,
M. K. MacVICAR.
The proper view
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
After reading Mr. J. Ornstein's article dealing with immortality, I felt very curious
to know in what kind of God
he would think the church believes. From a few remarks I
gather that he sees nothing
more than a being that permits
suffering of little children and
allows such things as mongolism to occur.
I am sure Mr. Ornstein completely overlooked the fact that
man first of all suffers from a
free will. For example he is
completely free to pursue free
love which very often engenders children having no normal
environment to provide a harmonious development and are
therefore bound to suffer; he
is completely free to seek marriage even if he suffers from
some hereditary disease or congenital disturbances even
though such things as mongolians can be engendered by him;
he overlooks the fact that man
is completely free to aim only
at the satisfaction of his desires
even if this is harmful to his
neighbors and eventually leads
his society to war which creates
the worst kind of suffering yet
invented by man.
I don't say these things to
prove that free will should not
have been given to man because after all this is one thing
that distinguishes us from animals. What I want to show is
that those men who utilize their
free will in such an individualistic fashion (e.g. the existentialists) are in fact responsible
for most of the sufferings we
see around us. It is a very pitiful subterfuge to put the blame
on God because this blame
would be nothing but saying
that God has been very wrong
to give man free will.
Subjection of one's free will
to a ruling or moral code, be
it the natural law, is as far as
I can see what the Church calls
sacrifice since it involves relinquishing the pursuit of
things that are good for the
individual but not for his fellow neighbors, even for "his
family.
Even if one does not believe
in immortality, he is just as
well bound to follow the ascetic life proposed by the Church
since we know from scientific
observation that natural law
imposes even more stringent
restraints on human behavior.
Observations on human behavior enable us to list the three
main requirements of natural
law:
—each man should preserve his
own life and society should
strive after survival;
—each man should work at the
reproduction of the species;
—society should  rise by mastery of the mind over nature.
Let me illustrate this by an
example:  Consider a man with
mental   disorders   or  with   an
hereditary disease. Natural law
forbids him to marry since the
chances are that his progeny
will suffer from the same disease. On the contrary, the
moral code permits marriage
in such a case and it is left to
the conscience of the individual
to make the proper decision. If-
one abides by natural law,
euthanasia becomes unnecessary because the harm has been
prevented at the root, "Mieux
vaut prevenir que guerir".
It is a historical sorrow that
man became master over nature much before becoming
master over his own self. This
is the reason why man continues to use his technological
findings without subjecting
himself to any moral code, not
even the natural law, thereby
engendering more sufferings
and more destructive wars.
The commands of natural law
are completely independent of
the question whether man's
soul is immortal or not and
must be obeyed eyen if there is
no after-life.
It is a very interesting fact
that long before science was-
able to list the commands of
natural law and their consequences, the Church has given
us from the teaching of Christ
a moral code which is in fact
even less restrictive than the
requirements of natural law.
One should not believe in_
immortality for metaphysical
reasons no more than he should
believe in the existence of protons and electrons for mathematical reasons. A person hav-;
ing a minimum of scientific
culture would not ask the question: "are electrons and protons mathematical monstrosities?", if they are at all monstrosities, they are physical ■■
monstrosities. As for immortality, if it is a monstrosity, it is
a theological monstrosity. But
even monstrosities exist and
we must cope with them.
Metaphysics can be compared
to science if one recognizes the
fact that in science man proposes hypotheses that must
check with nature's answers
when experiments are performed. Hypotheses that are contradicted by experiments must'
be rejected and new hypotheses
looked for. In metaphysics, hypotheses are also proposed but
cannot be checked by any physical experiments. The conclusive evidence to check metaphysical hypotheses is to be
found in the Revelation of
Christ. Nature's answer is here
God's answer. If the hypotheses
are contradicted by revelation
they must be rejected whatever
the beauty of the system in
which they fit.
If one believes in immortality, he must also believe in
God and in everything Christ
revealed since Christ is the only
final authority in metaphysical
matters. From Revelation it is
clear that man's soul is immortal and personally I would
be very glad to spend eternity
with a Being who was generous
enough to give His creature
free will to decide his destiny:
spend eternity with Him or
without Him. I MEAN THAT.
The trading stamps of "obedience" and "sacrifice" you will
cash in on eternity are those
of obedience to natural law or
to moral law and the sacrifices
involved in this obedience.
Yours truly,
MARCEL BANVILLE
Grad Studies Thursday,  March   29,   1962
THE        UBYSSEY
Page   5
By Jack Ornstein
"Adieu  mes  amis!"
This will likely be our last meeting. But I refus;e to get
sentimental. I'd just like to leave you with a few non-controversial thoughts. Like — the most, important thing in life is
love. Love of a woman ranks first. Then love of creating. Then
love (respect) of self. Without these things, life would be pretty
empty and meaningless.
The dessert of life is a keen sense of humor — usually accompanied by a perspicacious outlook. You have to be able to
think straight in order to see things crooked.
It's not that "The unexamined life is not worth living." It's
just that such a life isn't worth examining. There must be times
when you sit back, so to speak, and ask yourself how you're
doing. Even if the question isn't cognitively significant (can't
be empirically verified), still one ought to take a minute now
and then to reflect on the course of one's life. (Browning—
"When is man strong until he feels alone?") Particularly today
what with the threat of annihilation over us all. I'd like to ignore
it too — but every time I open my eyes it's still there. (Maybe
I should try closing my mouth?)
Well, there's no use trying to philosophize to you. Most of
you are "out here" to get a better job or to while away the
time. You wear ivy league clothes and an empty smile. You're
the hollow men. And you who(m) I write to — you don't need
rite to tell you how to live. So I'll say good-bye with a quotation
from my uncle Mel Swartz who, on the occasion of my bar
mitzvah (when I still sang soprano), reminded me that:
-   ' "Not in the shouts of the crowds in the street,
Not in the clamour and plaudits of the throng,
But in yourself
Is triumph or defeat."
S_
Sargent
Sales   &   Service
1205 Seymour
MU 4-3933 MU 4-7730
European and Small Car
SPECIALISTS
Qualified Mechanics
Guaranteed  Satisfaction
"Vancouver's Leading
Citroen Dealer"
Rental  Service
TUXEDOS
Black Suits, Formals,
Costumes,  Make-up
Special  Student Rates
New York
Costume Salon
4397  W.   10th       CA  4-0034
Near UBC Gates
ATTENTION GRADS '62
-Get  your   tickets  for  cruise  from   class   rep's   or  Alumni
office at noon hours.
-FREE Convocation Ball Tickets available NOW! — at Alumni office — 252 Brock, Extension.
Letters to the Editor
Just didn't say sj
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Sir:
I would like io extend my
personal thanks to the Ubyssey
staff for the comprehensive
and unbiased reports it has
featured about the Canadian
Peace Research Institute and
myself. I was truly sorry to
see what I regarded as almost
a record of fair reporting
broken in your last issue by
the front page report of my
meeting at Lord Byng high
school on Mar. 21. I refer to
Richard  Simeon's opening
statement:
"The fund-raising campaign
of the Canadian Peace Research Institute has been hurt
by the support given it by
partisan groups such as the
B.C. Committee for the Control of Radiation Hazards,
Dr. Norman Z. Alcock said
Wednesday."
This is not a "misleading
remark" or a "misinterpretation". In an otherwise well-
reported article, it is a completely erroneous statement,
and utterly damaging to a
group whose co-operation and
leadership with regard to helping the Peace Institute get set
up has been unexecelled.
I deeply regret the embarrassing position into which
this places the B.C. Committee
for the Control of Radiation
Hazards and would greatly
appreciate an editorial apology.
Yours truly,
NORMAN Z. ALCOCK.
Cooler only lack
Editor.
The Ubyssey;
Dear Sir:
Upon receiving my copy of
the student union building survey, I was impressed by the
number of childish alternatives offered. A craft and
hobby room in which to make
things for your room. Indeed!
My room lacks only a beer
cooler.
I was angered at the suggestion our stadium might be
torn down, after investing
something like $60,000 in 25
years, to build a union. A replacement would cost much
more and deprive us of pleasure and revenue for 2 to 3
years.
At present only the Brock
caf, the club rooms and the
lack of a large dance floor pose
any problems. I suggest that
Brock be used as the nucleus
for a union complex by erecting an integrated 2 or 3 story
structure on the present site
of the club huts.        v
It appears that Mr. Mitchell
and the members of council
are suffering from delusions
of grandeur which may prove
exceedingly costly to the student body.
Yours truly,
PAT MEEHAN,
Engineering I.
The Ubyssey wishes to
thank ail letter writers for
their   undying   criticisms.
If you still have an urge to
write — wait. Next letters
page will come out in September.
Kennedy sums up his
first year in office
"Idon't think most Americans realize," says JFK, "the way the situation has changed." In this week's
Post, in an authoritative article
based on talks with the President
and hischief advisers, Stewart Alsop
tells how Kennedy has revamped
U.S. strategy. What was behind his
struggle with the Pentagon. And
how the new plans are working out.
The. Saturday Evening
^~~^T M ^    MARCH   31
""■" ISSUE/NOW
ON   SALE
LACK
POT
LKOST   THEE!    Yes,   the   Spot
o»    cifeis    the    almost-free    ad
isicn uiice of (?;c) lowest ever.
(Juite  fitting,  too,  for  inside  can
e he.: rd Canada's almost-gfreatesf
azz group, featAiing1 sesontl-greiit-
-t    .pianist,     all-time    .foremost
rummer   and   ether   honourable
enticn   musicians.   Great   music
a the ''jazz" or "hot music" idiom,
na each player handles a talented
riza-racldle   between   sets    (Can
in's   greatest   pizza-makingf   jazz
irnist?)
It    is    not    often    that    a    .
ianist    can   or   will   play    good
utic in a place where fine pizza,
offee   and   elsewise   are   served.
sir or see fcotn done aliy night
xcept Mton. at the BLACK SBOX,
l""5 Duirtar (also for wannest
ukeiox AHTTWiiEBS!)
1
FOR
THAT
SMART
LOOK
IN
GLASSES
LOOK
TO
Pteschbtion Optical
JSL
We use genuine CORECTAL lenses
— clear frc m edge to edge —
"Ask Your  Doctor"
Contact  Lenses — Zenith   Hearing Aids
Special Discounts to Students
th. MILDEST BEST-TASTING cigarette Page 6
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday,  March  29,   1962
IDEAS at large
PROPAGANDA	
By BERT MacKINNON
Ubyssey Staff Reporter
Listening to the radio news
broadcasts on my way to university in the mornings I realize just how biased reporting
can become.
I wonder whether the officials in charge of gathering
news on a national level give
us even a slight view of the
other side of the story.
The occurence that brought
my thoughts to the surface and
made me decide to write this
column was a report of the
results of the recent elections
in Argentina.
I have waited to hear official censure from the western
nations and have been sadly
disappointed. It seems that
democracy only extends to
other countries if it has a desirable result.
*       *       *
So what if in a free election the people of Argentina
decid&d they wanted to be
headed by a Per on government. The western powers do
not--want the Peronists in
power so they try to hush up
the steps taken to nullify the
results. I can see that the West
would not want to have the
Peronists in power and they
have the right to think any
way they want; this is democracy. But democracy must
be extended to all countries if
it is to work.
I believe that the news
agencies should give both sides
of the story and then let the
people make up their own
minds. They should give, and
label, the views of both the
western and eastern powers.
Another incident that has
me wondering is the Berlin
problem. I wonder if the west
ern forces are completely free
of blame m the incidents that
have taken place recently. If
a person has had a chance to
read the pamphlets that are
put out by the Communist
powers he realizes that the
people on the other side of
the fence are told the exact
opposite from what we are fed.
*       *       *
Men have fought for democracy and truth. Aren't we entitled to the object of two
world wars?
We do not get the whole
truth. We are not told lies,
we're just not told.
When you read the Communist bloc countries news
releases they look very familiar. If you were to substitute
the U.S. for Russia and vice
versa you would have an almost exact duplicate of an
American propaganda release.
However, we of the West do
not look on our release as
propaganda.. *   ¥   *
Everybody knows that propaganda is something that the
other side engages in and that
our news media give the true
story. There can be no doubt
that the press releases given
out by our high officials are
meant to inform the western
people of the truth. I will admit that what -we get is the
truth. But is it the whole truth
and is it reported as what it
really is?
I ask that in the fields that
effect our way of life, in fact
our very lives, that we get
more comprehensive news coverage and questioning of the
policies that make the news.
I want the truth, the whole
truth and nothing but the
truth.
One-owner 1960 Vauxhall
Cresta, mint cond. Two-tone
black grey, new leather upholstery, w.w.s. Phone owner
AM 6-6157 evgs. or wk-ends.
tDBO  STUDENTS
15% Discount
Imported   Car  Part*  am*
Accessories
'Overseas Auto Parts J
112th  and Alma
BE 1-7686
ROOM AND BOARD FOR MEN
• Kitchen Facilities Available for Snacks
• Laundry Included
• Close to University Gates
• Student Owned and Operated
• Good Studying Facilities
A P P L Y   N O W ! !
Summer Session Winter Session
$55 per Month $53 per Month
UNIVERSITY   STUDENTS' COOPERATIVE   ASS'N.
4082 West 8th Avenue CA 4-3631
IT COSTS NO MORE TO HAVE YOUR
WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHED BY
Qanajda'A leading
Wedding Photographers*
See  samples  in  your home.
29 Albums to choose from . . . priced from $37.50 to
$219.00 complete (add $10.00 for Sundays and legal
holidays).   60  to  100   pictures   to   choose   from   .   .  .
posed and candid  .  .  .
HOME      •       CHURCH       •       RECEPTION
Free M.C. Services if Desired.
PHONE TODAY I
RE 8-6707
JmIulA   £kcre
WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHERS
* MORE BRIDES CHOOSE JULIUS SHORE WEDDING
FHOTOGRAPHERS THAN ANY OTHER STUWO.
Council leaves housing
till summer meeting
Student council won't be able to do anything aLuut poor
student housing conditions in the university area until at least
this summer.
AMS president Doug Stewart
said council won't be able to discuss the matter until its regular
monthly summer meetings
which don't siart until after
exams.
SURVEY
A recent survey by geography
professor Walter Hardwick, revealed that nearly one-quarter of
UBC's student population lives in
conditions of semi-saualor outside the gates.
"This is clearly a matter of
council concern. If city authorities are hiding on the issue we
should do something about it,"
Stewart said.
Secretary Barbara Bennett
said it was not so much a matter
of whether council should take
action but whether it could do
anything effective.
BRIEF
A brief on the subject of student housing was presented to
the mayor and city council in
May, 1960. The brief requested
that more areas be zoned to
allow suites in private homes
and that students be exempted
from zoning regulations restricting the number of boarders
allowed in each home.
City   council   "received"   the '
brief but took no decisive action
on it.
Student treasurer Malcolm ;
Scott said the city should recog- j
nize the \v est Point Grey area j
was a heavy transient area and |
allow self-contained suites in it. i
NO RESPONSIBILITY
UBC administrator John Haar
said the university does not assume any responsibility for accommodation outside the gates.
'We do, however, assume a
I moral responsibility for student
housing conditions," he said.
Homecoming queen
to represent UBC
Lynn Galbraith, 1961-o"2
Homecoming queen will be
UBC's candidate for "Festival
Queen" at the Annual Football Festival in Berkley, California.
Co-eds from several universities will compete at the festival from Sept. 10-16.
The candidates' expenses including aid fare to Berkley, are
paid by the Berkley Junior
Chamber of Commerce, sponsors
of the Festival.
THESIS TYPED
RUSH JOBS
25c per page
Phone  RE   3-1935
Special Prices for UBC
Cornette
Beauty Salon
Miss Barbara with European
ideas . . Mary, beauty care
consultant and stylist . .Lynn
Adv.. stylist of Carmon Dur-
ans of Los Angeles .--. Mr.
Roberts, one of the leading
stylists of the House Of Beauty, has joined our staff . .
Ella Chambers, specializing
in extra fine hair styling and
tinting.
OPEN FRIDAY TILL NINE
4532 West TOth Ave.
CA 4-7440
Directly across from
SAFEWAY  STORE
Black  Spot
DIRECT
FROM L.A.
This weekend we are featuring authentic monogram-
med pizzas shipped direct
from Harvey's Pizza Palace
and Soul Warehouse in fabulous Los Angeles, reputed
America's greatest pizza
wholesaler, and perhaps the
greatest anywhere. Drop in
and mouth one of these contemporary, synthetic, funky
r.Teataions, rolled direct to
B.S. by age-old traditional
pizza-rolling artisans. You'll
find, too, piano stylings on
traditional upright piano-machine. All-inclusive prices
from a near-free 75c.
The Black Spot   4345 Dunbar
■nun MitiMicn in. nSUtM IfaM 8l«m • 1^ JbM^ • lKt(^ ^
New.. .Philips Battery Tape Recorder
Small Wonder-with a Big Voice
fHere*** reatty new recorder that goes
where the fun » and brings it back
alive. It records and plays -back anywhere, any time because its all-transistor
circuit is powered .by.
Push a button and yoa're in record «r
playback position ... in the car, at the
ski lodge, in the concert hall or the jazz
loft. See and hear the Continental '100
now at your Philips
;<«M^J&Wfttfto.'-    Slid it?S Ollly $144.95     tape recorder dealer. Thursday, March  29,   1962
THE
UBYSSEY
Applications open
for WUS conference
Page 7
TORONTO (CUP) — World
University Service is offering
six scholarships to students
wishing to attend the 1962
Couchiching  Conference.
The annual meeting, to be
held July 28 - Aug. 4, will deal
with the theme "The New Europe."
Awards pay for accommodation and meals at the conference. Recipients will be expect-
er to perform certain administrative duties at the meeting.
The awards are open to men
and women undergraduates or
recent graduates. Applicants
must be mature, of good academic standing and have shown
leadership qualities through active participation in extra-curricular activities.
Interested students should see
their local office for details.
Charity drives to go
through USC committee
Student council Monday passed a motion directing all fund i
raising drives on campus to the charities sub-committee of the |'"»»»™
"* Undergraduate Societies Committee.
Council   passed   the   motion
after discussing the Charities
^ Committee report contained in
the USC  minutes.
First Vice-president Peter
Shepard said he felt the action
"^ was long overdue.   ;
"There definitely should be a
central authority to direct all
the various appeals for funds
-  on this campus," he said.
Co-ordinator of Activities,
Bernie Papke said he felt the
motion would only affect charities associated with USC.
"Clubs already concerned
with doing charitable works
will probably just ignore this
motion," he said.
Buster's si
RCMP non
The RCMP is not planning
any added enforcement of traf- \
fie rules on campus, unless ap-!
proached by university officials.'
We have not been advised'
of any special problem, but if;
there is one as the President's
Committee on Accident Prevention suggests, we will oe prepar-
"'' ed for stricter enforcement, said
an RCMP spokesman.
Considering the large number
* of cars and pedestrians on cam- j
pus there are very few acci-j
dents, he added. i
The RCMP cannot have a car
on the campus all the time as
- it must enforce the Motor Vehicle Act in the whole University  area,   the  spokesman  said.
Treasure van
rolling in $
TORONTO (CUP)—Treasure
Van is still living up to its name
for World University Service of
Canara.
Figures for the tour of universities this year show that
more than $80,000 was amassed
by the rolling showcases of international goods.
The University of Alberta at
Edmontonp led the way in sales,
bringing in $8,437.
The 1961 total is the highest
yet, and is approximately
$15,000 more than was collected
last year.
TEMPORARILY out of order
the sign says in one of five
phone booths where phones
on campus have been stolen
recently. In this one, in the
Brock extension, telephone
company has replaced the
phone at a cost of $200.
Winrom Insurance
Ltd.
SPECIALIZING   IN
AUTO INSURANCE
1678   W.  Broadway.   Vancouver   9
RE   1-5338
Room and Board
May—September
$70 Month
on Campus — Kappa Sigma House
2280 Weebrook Cresc.
Phcme   Pete  Bildfell   CA   4-4912
Varsity Fabrics
4437 W. 10th Ave CA 4-0842
Yard Goods, McCall Patterns
Sewing Supplies
Open Friday 'til 9
The Ideal Place To
Meet Your friends
Look  For Oor  Ddily  Special!
Full. Course   Meals   Within
Your Income
DO-NUT DINER
4556 West 10th Ave.
Fish & Chips,  Donuts to GOl
//« DnMatithH
is extended to members of
the 1962 graduating class in
ARTS, COMMERCE or ENGINEERING
to investigate a * career., in
CHARTERED ^CWNTANCY i
by   contacting -v.. »s».
Mcintosh, McVicar, Dinsley & Co.
1075 Melville  Street
To  arrange  an  appointment,   please  telephone
Mrs.   Teal   at  MUtual   4-8221
squabble
(SKWOD^Gl),   ;/, A noisy quarrel.
Frequently caused by Saturday Night's controversial articles.
Joift in the fun. Subscribe.
Bsaft a postcard to 55 Tor* Street,
Toronto l.  Pay la*»r.
SNCC men indicted
for gov't opposition
BATON ROUGE, LA. — Student Nonviolent Coordinating
Committee Chairman Charles
McDew and Field Secretary
Robert Zellner were formally
arraigned on Tuesday, March
13, in Baton Rouge and charged
with being "members of the
Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, an organization
which is known to advoca'e,
teach and practice opposition to
the government of the state of
Louisiana  by unlawful means."
McDew and Zellner were arrested Feb. 17, when they visited SNCC Field Secretary Dion
Diamond at the Baton Rouge
jail. Diamond was arrested Seb.
1, at Southern University. He
was charged with trespassing,
vagrancy, criminal anarchy and
two counts of disturbing the
peace.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
• 1000 Garment* to
m Full   Dress
a> Morning Coats
a Director's   Coata
• White and Blue
Coats
• Shirts   *
Accessories
• 10% UBC Discount
E. A. Lee Ltd.
One   Store   Onlyi
623 Howe St.      Ml) 3-2457
SIpOCAW  florist  ltd.
2523  Kingsway
sfpeciaVxirtg in corsages and wedding bouquets. 10% off to all
University     students.     Call;    HE
Jim Piarsail's wife asks:
"Why do they call
my husband crazy?"
To the fans Jim Piersall is a hot-
tempered screwbaH. But to his
wife, he's "calm and sensible, art
understanding husband." In this
week's Post, Mary Piersall tells
how the fans made Jim "a marked
man." Says how close he came to
a breakdown in 1960. And why
she's confident about this season.
The Saturday Evening^
ISSUE/NOW
ON  SALE
attractive
positions
open now...
The Hudson's Bay Company has the following positions open NOW to young
Arts or Commerce graduates, who desire challenge, rapid advancement and
attractive   executive   salaries.
• Trainee for Accounting deportment — for young
man desiring to take further training leading to
an accounting degree while working with the
Company.
• Merchandise Trainees—to advance to department
manager and  merchandise executive positions.
You will receive
intensive training including:
• 4-month induction period covering all store
functions.
• 2-year   lecture   course   in   merchandising.
• On the job training under an experienced department manager, in Sales Management,
Buying,  and   Departmental  Administration.
Take this opportunity to achieve management status within 3 to 5 years.
Make an appointment now for an interview by phoning the Hudson's Bay
Company personnel department, fifth
floor, at MU 1-6211, or drop in between
9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through
Friday.
ACT  NOW SECURE  YOUR   FUTURE
WITH   CANADA'S   MOST
PROGRESSIVE   COMPANY!
INCORPORATED   2"!?   MAY   1670.
$Mi*i»«t GronvMe .... Phone MU. l-«ll Page 8
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday,  March  29,   1962
Protesters greet Kennedy
at California convocation
BERKLEY, CAL. (CUP) —
U.S. President John Kennedy
was greeted by picketers protesting the resumption of nuclear tests, segregation in the
south, and American spy trials,
when he arrived in Berkley to
speak at the University of California convocation last Friday.
* * *
California Attorney General
Stanley Mosk called on students
planning to picket to reconsider
and "join all their fellow Cal-
ifornians in paying tribute to
the head of the greatest nation
on earth."
_ The chairman of the anti-Kennedy   Ad   Hoc   Committee   said
that picketing was the only way
his group could effectively make
their opinions known to the
president.
An Ad Hoc committee member said the group "didn't give
a damn" about arguments that
picketing was in bad taste.
About 200 pickets joined in the
Committee's demonstration
against the resumption of nuclear testing and segregation.
Another group of pickets lead
by Mrs. Morton Sobell, protested the sentencing of her husband to 30 years in prison in
connection with the Rosenberg-
Sobell conspiracy espionage
case.
A demonstration in support
of Kennedy's policies was held
by the Charter Day Support
Committee.
RENT A GOWN
25%
OFF
For
UBC
MARIE BRUCKER SALON
Designers and Dressmakers
Expert Alterations
Evenings   by Appointment
4683 Kingsway   HE 1-1160
Lovely
selection   for
Brides,
Attendants,
Formal Wear
Fur  Stoles,
White Fox,
Dinner  Jackets
Matz & Wozny
548 Howe St.      MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and  Gentlemen.
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
We specialize
in
Ivy League
Clothes
Special Student Rates
Campus Barber
Shop
Monday - Friday 8:30 - 5:00
Saturday   8:30   -   12:00
LOCATED IN
BROCK EXTENSION
FREDERIC    WOOD    THEATRE
presents
"FIVE FINGER EXERCISE"
by   Peter   Shaffer
Stai Tins    DOROTHY    FOWLER    and    BILL    RUCKIXG HAM
A  Gripping  Drama
Directed by John Brocking-ton
APRIL 6th TO 21st at 8:30 p.m.
Tickets  $2.00  and  $1.50
Phone  CA 4-1111   — Local  540 — for Reservations
.
On this, our last edition for the school term, the Ubyssey Advertising Department would
like to thank the following Ubyssey Advertisers for their regular support during the
past University year;
ABBOTSFORD AIR SERVICES LTD.
ALEXANDER & AXELSON APPLINANCES LTD.
ALUMINUM COMPANY OF CANADA LTD.
AMERADA PETROLEUM CORPORATION  (CALGARY)
ATOMIC ENERGY OF CANADA LTD., (CHALK RIVER)
AQUALAND DIVING CENTER
BANK OF MONTREAL
BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA
BELL TELEPHONE CO. OF CANADA LTD.
BENSON & HEDGES CO: LTD.
ALPINE CIGARETTES
CYANAMID OF CANADA LTD.
CAFE DAN CABARET
CALIFORNIA STANDARD CO. LTD.
CAMPBELL'S STUDIOS LTD.
CAMPUS SHOES LTD.
CANADA PACKERS LTD.
CANADTAN IMPERIAL BANK OF COMMERCE
CANADIAN CHEMICAL CO. LTD.
CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. LTD.
CANADIAN PRATT & WHITNEY LTD.
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION
CAVE SUPPER CLUB -        -
THE CAVALIER SHOPPE
CHANEL No. 5
CHARLTON & MORGAN LTD.
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION OF CANADA
COCA-COLA CO. LTD.
THE COLLEGE SHOP
COLUMBIA CELLULOSE LTD.
CONSOLIDATED MINING & SMELTING CO. LTD.
CORNETTE BEAUTY SALON
CREATIVE SHOES LTD.
CUNNINGHAM DRUGS LTD.
CURTIS PUBLISHING CO. LTD.
(SATURDAY EVENING POST)
DEAN'S RESTAURANT
DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE
DEFENCE RESEARCH BOARD
DOW CHEMICAL CO. OF CANADA LTD.
DUPONT OF CANADA LTD.
DUTHIE BOOKS LTD.
T. EATON CO. LTD.
JACK ELSON LTD.
FAMOUS ARTISTS LTD.
FENGATE PUBLISHING CO .LTD.
(SATURDAY NIGHT MAGAZINE)
U.B.C. FILM SOCIETY
FORD MOTOR CO. OF CANADA LTD.
GLENAYR KNIT LTD.
MURRAY GOLDMAN LTD.
GREYHOUND LINES OF CANADA LTD.
GUYS &GALS LTD.
HIGHLAND HOUSE
HUDSON'S BAY CO. LTD.
HUDSON'S BAY OIL & GAS LTD.
HYDE PARK CLOTHES INC. (NEW YORK)
IMPERIAL OIL OF CANADA LTD.
IMPERIAL TOBACCO CO. LTD.
(BRAHADI'S PIPE TOBACCO)
(PLAYER'S MILD CIGARETTES)
(PLAYER'S FILTER CIGARETTES)
INQUISITION COFFEE HOUSE
INSTITUTE OF CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES LTD.
INTER FRATERNITY COUNCIL
INTERNATIONAL NICKEL CO. LTD.
R. L. FRISBY,
Advertising Manager,
Alma Mater Society
IRON ORE OF CANADA LTD.
KAUFMAN RUBBER CO. LTD.
KEN'S AUTO TOWING LTD.
SMITH, DAVIDSON & LECKY LTD.
LEADER BEAUTY SALON
E. A. LEE FORMAL WEAR RENTALS LTD.
THE LION'S DEN
THE LION'S DRIVE-IN
MACDONALD TOBACCO LTD. (EXPORT CIGARETTES)
MacLEAN HUNTER CO. LTD.
MacMILLAN, BLOEDEL, POWELL RIVER LTD.
MATZ & WOZNY LTD.
MOBIL OIL OF CANADA LTD.
U.B.C. MUSICAL SOCIETY
MUTUAL LIFE ASSURANCE OF CANADA LTD.
NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL
NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE
NATIONAL TRUST CO. LTD.
NEW YORK COSTUME LTD.
NORTHERN ELECTRIC CO. LTD.
NOBTHAM WARREN COMPANY LTD.
CUTEX NAIL ENAMEL
OVERSEAS AUTO PARTS LTD.
PAN AMERICAN PETROLEUM CORPORATION
PETER JACKSON CIGARETTES LTD.
DU MAURIER CIGARETTES
PHILLIPS APPLIANCES LTD.
PITMAN OPTICAL LTD.
B. C. PIZZA PRODUCTS LTD.
POINT GREY JEWELLERS LTD.
PRESCRIPTION OPTICAL CO. LTD.
PROCTOR & GAMBLE CO. LTD.
PROGRESS PUBLISHING CO. LTD.
ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE
ROYAL CANADIAN ARMY
ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY
READER'S DIGEST ASSOCIATION OF CANADA LTD.
RICHARDS & FARISH MEN'S WEAR LTD.
ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
RUSHANT CAMERAS LTD.
SHELL OIL CO. OF CANADA LTD.
THE SHIRT  N TIE BAR
JULIUS SHORE PHOTOGRAPHS
THE SNACKERY
SOUTH SEAS IMPORTS LTD.
SPOTLESS STORES LTD.
STRASSER TRAVEL SERVICE INC.
SUN LIFE ASSURANCE OF CANADA LTD.
THUNDERBIRD CHEVRON SERVICE
TOTEM SHOES
TRADER'S FINANCE CORPORATION LTD.
TRANS CANADA AIR LINES
TROYKA BOOK STORE (TORONTO)
UNITED AIR LINES
UNITED TAILORS
UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY LTD.
UNIVERSITY THEATRE DEPARTMENT
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PRESS
THE UNIVERSITY TRAVEL BUREAU (TORONTO)
UPPER TENTH BARBERS LTD.
PETER VAN DYKE BARBER SHOP
VANCOUVER OPERA ASSOCIATION
VARSITY FABRICS LTD.
VARSITY JEWELLERS LTD.
VARSITY THEATRE LTD.
WINRAM INSURANCE CO. LTD.
R. B. MocKAY
Vancouver Sales  Manager
The Ubyssey Thursday, March   29,   1962
THE        UBYSSEY
Page  9
UBC delayed by fight
U of M started on $250 grant
University beginnings .unorthodox'
By PAUL BECKER
Vice-President  of  NFCUS
The history of Canadian
higher education is strewn
with unorthodox foundings
and strange namings.
One of the oldest and most
famous universities, Dalhousie,
was established with 10,000
pounds collected as customs
dues at the port of Castine, in
Maine, held by British troops
during the War of  1812.
The University of Manitoba
was launched at a time when
there were not ten thousand
-white settlers in the province,
and provided by the legislature with a grant of $250 a
year. It did no teaching for 23
years, had no president for 36
years and no alumni associations for 44 years.
Ten and two
Mount Allison was empowered to begin conferring degrees "when it should have ten
students and two professors."
Queen's mustered only this
many students when it opened
in a small house on a Kingston
.side street; and a now forgotten university never possessed
any buildings at all, and after
;conferring one or two degrees
Quietly folded: the University
jof Halifax.
In the days of the University
of Regiopolis, which was located in Kingston with Queen's,
the Ontario shore was crowded
with universities. There was
Albert College in Belleville
and Victoria University in Co-
bourg. When Regiopolis closed
and Albert College lost its
charter, Q u e e n's was left
alone.
Both Toronto and McGill
took many years after securing their charters to erect
buildings and begin teaching.
Dalhousie, which was able to
put up a building immediately
with the previously mentioned
customs funds, did not begin
teaching for twenty years, and
then closed shortly afterwards
for another twenty.
Old    McGill
Old McGill, as it is known
to its students, still operates
under a corporation styled The
Royal Institution for the Advancement of Learning.
The foundation of the University of British Columbia
was delayed until after World
War 1 because Victoria and
Vancouver could not agree on
which of the two cities should
be the site.
For years, therefore, university courses . were taught in
British Columbia in high
schools and prescribed by McGill.
Perhaps the factor which
most effectively delayed the
development of the French-
speaking universities of Quebec was the widespread devel-
UBC CLASSIFIED
WANTED: Ride to Montreal April 28 - May 7. Share driving
and gas. Phone Sandy, RE 8-
8751.
WANTED: Saxophone in exchange for a B-flat trumpet.
During these summer months
many new .techniques in art
of blowing can be learned, so
why not take advantage of it.
Phone Mike, AM 1-6632.
RIDE WANTED: Dunbar and
30th, Mon. to Sat., 8:30-5:30.
Phone CA 8-8700.
SUMMER RENT: Self-contained
legal 3-room basement suite.
Available May - Sept. Phone
AM 6-8283.
FOR RENT: Apartment for the
months May - Aug. Furn., on
on campus, 2 bedrooms, kitchen, private phone, quiet. $75
monthly. Call CA 8-8644.
FOR RENT: 2-bedroom furnish-
.. ed apartment inside university
gates for sub-lease. Available
May 1 or for summer school
students. Phone CA 4-6739 or
CA 4-6113.
FOR RENT: Light housekeeping
room on main floor, hot plate,
fridge, good view, at 4696
West 4th Ave. Call CA 4-5229.
FOR SALE: Typewriter, brand
new condition, cost $65, will
sell for $20. Complete with accessories. John Kadrill, Hut
13, Fort Camp. Phone CA 4-
9925.
FOR SALE: 1953 Chev. 4-door:
good tires, body and motor,
radio, $365. Contact T. Nisbet.
local 600 days or LA 1-6992,
eves.
FOR SALE: Going east—selling
17" Philips TV, 24" GE range,
1948 Pontiac sedan, Philco
full-freezer frig., portable radio, clock radio, records and
household effects. Bargains.
Phone CA 4-7341 evenings.
FOR   SALE:   1956   Volkswagen
deluxe,  r  and  h,  w/w,  $775
cash.  Available  end  of May.
• Phone TR 9-4181, anytime.
FOR SALE: 1957 Chev. station
wagon, 2-door 6-cylinder model, new tires, 47,000 miles.
$1,425 ($1,350 cash). Phone
RE 1-5653 evenings.
LOST: Bucherer wrist watch
with a broken strap on Wed.,
Mar. 14. Call Pete, CA 8-8677.
LOST: Jade bracelet (five stones)
at Blanca loop Mar.13. Finder
please phone Celia, HE 4-8190.
FOUND: Man's wrist watch, on
Tues., Mar. 27 near gym at
11:30 a.m. Owner contact
Bruce, YU 5-1288.
$5 REWARD: For the return of
brown rimmed glasses, lost in
Buchanan washroom. Name
and phone inside. Urgently
needed. FA 7-1209.
U
THE SNACKERY
3 LOCATIONS
3075 Granville - RE 3-5813
4423 W. 10th Ave. — CA 4-0833
5075 Kingsway - HE 1-8818
FREE  HOT  &  FAST  PIZZA
DELIVERY
u
opment of the petit seminaire
and classical college. Although
Laval University's origins go
back to the Grand Seminary
of 1663—still an integral part
of the University—it was not
until 1852 that Laval received
its royal charter.
Six years old
Even until after World War
I, Laval had only 2000 students, contrasting with today's 5,000. The present University of Montreal was then
only a branch of Laval and the
University of Sherbrooke is
only six years old.
Most notable and oldest of
the bilingual institutions is the
University of Ottawa. Originally founded as the English
language college of Bytown, it
was teaching pure and applied
science shortly after Confederation.
Today, there are nearly 350
institutions of higher learning
—including only those which
teach college and university
level courses—of which 45
possess the authority to grant
degrees.
Eight of these institutions
hold their degree powers in
abeyance while they remain
in affiliation or federation
with another degree-granting
institution.
Degrees offered
Thirty-one of these institutions offer master's degrees
and, in turn, 18 of these offer
the doctorate.
Laval and Montreal whose
enrollment consists primarily
of the graduates of classical
colleges who have already received the baccalaureat are, in
truth, primarily graduate
schools. •'   : i
Last year, Canadian institutions of higher learning enrolled approximately 114,000 full-
time students. If present indi
cators are correct, a conservative estimate would indicate
an enrollment of over 300,000
students at the end of the present decade.
Within ten years of time,
then, the present total university budgets must rise from
over 100 million dollars to
over 400 million if the increased enrollment is to have basie
facilities and if the staff-student ratio is to be kept even at
its present 1 to 13 level.
PORTRAITS
PEOPLE
GRADUATION
INDIVIDUALISTS
for...
PORTRAITS
FINE ART PHOTOG'Y
APPLICATIONS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
FINE PRINTS
JCon,   VyUOJUiAtejL
PEOPLE
ALSO STUDENTS
CA 4-5340
4331   West   10th   Ave.
"He never gave an
inch," says Kennedy
Last spring, Kennedy and Khrushchev faced each other for the first
time. Says the President grimly:
"He never gave way at all." In this
week's Post, in an authoritative article based on talks with the Presi-
den t and his chief advisers, Stewart
Alsop reports on why the meeting
was so "somber." Why Kennedy
feels the Reds have the "advantage
of a dictatorship." And what
JFK's own cold-war strategy is.
The^SoturdayEvening
MARCH 31
ISSUE/NOW
ON SALE
HIKERS!     CAMPERS!
MOUNTAINEERS!
The summer climbing and camping season is fast
approaching! For the specialized needs of the climber
and lightweight camper you can't beat the selection at
Arlberg - Vancouver's foremost recreational store,
HERE ARE A FEW OF THE HARD-TO-FIND ITEMS!
Climbing & Hiking Boots
La  Fuma and Berggn's
Rucksacks
Ice Axes
Climbing Hardware &
Ropes
Specialized Clothing
Light Tents
Lightweight Cookware
Small Stoves
Concentrated  Foqds
Goggles gnd Sun Glasses
"Skreen" for Sunburn
Camping With a Sportscar?
LET ARLBERG SOLVE YOUR PROBLEMS
WE SPECIALIZE IN SKIN DIVING EQUIPMENT AND INSTRUCTION
Write or Drop in For a Free Catalogue
Mail Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Arlberg (Ski HutJ Sporting Goods
608 ROBSON - AMPLE PARKING ON SEYMOUR
MUtual 5-9411 Page  10
THE        U B Y S S E Y
Thursday,  March- 29,   1962
THE END OF THE BEGINNING FOR THE ARENA   |
ARTIST'S CONCEPTION of the new Winter Sports Arena as viewed from the  northwest corner. The War Memorial Gymnasium is seen in the background.
Arena may be present for Christmas
By G. E. RAILTON
The university will have a complete winter
sports arena for a Christmas present next year, the
architects say.
The clients, or joint student-faculty committee,
will receive the final plans from Thompson, Berwick and Pratt April 9 at their final meeting.
The, committee will make minor changes to the
plans, tenders will be called and construction begun
in the ■•'latter part of June, officials said.
. UBC team officials have seen the second stage
plans and have made recommendations to the clients
committee, in preparation for the April g meeting.
To date, only two things are definite. The chosen site is north of the War Memorial Gym and east
of the stadium.
The $500,000 arena is to contain a hockey rink
and eight Curling sheets.
A winter sports arena has been under consideration for years tout actual headway was not begun
until three years ago.
In 1955, the university was negotiating with
the University Endowment Lands but the plans fell
through.
In 1959, the students entered an agreement
with the administration to ; provide an arena and
student union building, splitting the cost of construction in half.
Last year the two plans were divorced and the
arena and SUB have gone their own ways.
During the last academic; year the most progress
has been made. A student-faculty committee was
organized to draw up minimum facilities and standards. .    - ■ ■ ■ '
After six months, -the committee returned their
recommendations to the board of governors and the
student council. After several meetings both groups
accepted the recommendations with- several changes.
The facilities planned are: a 195' by 85' nockey
rink, eight curling sheets, a coffee-shop, first aid
room, skate shop equipped for rentals,.large dressing  room  facilities  (small  ones  for  intramurals),
and a press gallery.
The hockey rink will be equipped with 1,500
permanent seats and with provisional room for 1,500
more. There will be capacity for 200 spectators in
the curling area.
The planned building is a three-storey structure with skate shop and equipment rooms in the
basement.
Clients committee chairman Dean A. W. Mathews has said priority of use will go to the students,
then faculty, physical education programs, and lastly, outside organizations	
His committee had also considered a secondary
building to house squash and handball courts and
an indoor swimming pool. These plans were cancelled in favor of a better building for the arena.
The clients commicLee lias also chosen a management, committee to run the building. This also
will be a joint committee; two students, two faculty
members and-a chairman appointed by the university president.
Rugby Birds face
end of the world
By GLENN SCHULTZ
The University of California Golden Bears bring an 18-man
squad with them to help UBC's rugger Birds round out their
1962 season Thursday noon and Saturday.
These   last   two   games   also
wind up the World Cup compe.
tition for this year.
Bears have a 13-point lead
going into the third game of the
four game series. UBC lost both
games in California last month
by scores of 9-3 and 16-9. Bears
will win the cup if they win or
tie Thursday's game.
HUDSON UNHAPPY
Since the last two Cup games,
Bears have won four of seven
matches, but coach Miles Hudson is not too happy with the
record. The only excusable loss
was the 11-t) one to New Zealand; he f6els.
California also lost to Stanford 13-fl, and in the Monterey
Rugby P e s t i v a 1 they were
knocked out in the first round
3-0 by University Club of Berkley.
SUBSTITUTION
Only substitution for the
Bears since they played the
Birds last is Jerry Walter in the
first 5/8 position. He r-eplaces
Brian Reid. California's current
record is eight wins and four
losses.
Coach Albert Laithwaite's
UBC fifteen hasn't been up to
par either since their California
trip. They have not won a game
since their return, losing their
last game 32-3 to New Zealand.
However, that game was not as
bad as the score indicated.
for the games, only a few minor
injuries reported.
A   doubtful  starter   is   Dave
Howie,   who   was  hurt   in   the
New Zealand game.
LAITHWAITE
Birds have won the cup 13
times in 22 previous series.
Coach Laithwaite has led the
team to six cups since he joined
the UBC staff in 1947. This is
his first year back after a two-
year absence.
The short, stocky coach from
Lancashire, England, will lose
at least five players through
graduation this year. Playing
their last games will be Roy
Bianco, Bill Dubois, Neal Henderson, captain John Phrllips,
and Dave Lee.
SINCE 1920
The World Cup was first set
into competition in 1920 by the
publisher of the defunct Vancouver World (now the Province) , John Nelson.
Game time Thursday is 12:30
and Saturday 2:30. "A" cards
will be good for both games/
UBC women host
volleyball meet
Two UBC women's volleyball
teams will compete in the annual Western Canadian championships Saturday at the Worn-
Birds are in fairly good shape | en's gym.
Coaches needed
for kids' grid
Coaches are urgently needed
for several peewee and bantam minor football leagues in
the Vancouver area this summer.
Any students interested are
asked to contact Lorne Davies
at FA 1-2563  anytime.  Experience is not a necessity
Who IS the Fairest One of All?
YOU ARE YOU ARE YOU ARE YOU ARE
YOU ARE YOU ARE Y
YOU ARE YOU ARE
And Kitten makes you
look that way with this
exciting new medium-
weight Orion
cardigan. Campus
kittens will delight
in this chic new
style with eyelet
full-fashioning and
tiny, ribbed collar!
In exciting new
spring colours!
Style #230. Sizes
34-42 . . .$12.98.
At better fashion
shops everywhere
Without this label
E YOU ARE
YOU ARE
$fiUL(
it Is not a genuine
KITTENI
GLENAYR Thursday, March   29,   1962
TH  E
U  B Y SSE-Y
Page 11
i*OII THE BIRDS
By   MIKE  HUNTER
Why the hell would anyone want to write a sports column
anyway?
I mean, all you get is crap. Crap from your staff, crap from
the editor, crap from the copy desk, crap from the printers, the
readers, the players^ the managers, the coaches, the Men's Athletic Committee, the Women's Athletic Committee, the Men's
Athletic Association, the Women's Association, and all these people's public relations officers.
Your labs and. essays and assignments are always late because you sat up all night Sunday night trying to think of something funny or something which you can attack, or somebody
you can glamorize, slander; or something. You think it's hard to
write a letter home once a month. Just try writing 750 words
about some lousy football game which your team lost 42-0. and
write it on a Sunday night, at that. I mean, in a letter home,
you can always talk about the weather and how you're reeling,
but in a sports column, weather's usually only good once a year,
and your health, well, who cares about your health? Most people wish you were dead, anyway.
I have never been able to figure out how some of those
daily columnists manage to turn out their 500 or 750 words a
day every day, let alone how they manage to keep them interesting, funny, infuriating or whatever their column's supposed to be.
V        -V       •!•
During the past two years, I have written some 50 articles
under this head. Migawd, what a waste of time, I sometimes
think, because most of them were mediocre, lousy, or just
straight filler. I haven't even been writing long enough to come
up with a good one, maybe. Anyway, how do you know whether
a column's good? The biggest question in the minds of any writer is, well, what do the readers think of it? I mean, why write
a column, anyway, especially when you're not getting paid for
it? Sure, you get a big charge out of seeing your name up there
maybe for the first 10 times or so, or maybe you just like the
sound of your own typewriter.
Most of your satisfaction, I think, comes from knowing that
people read your stuff. Unfortunately, I sometimes get that awful
feeling that the only people who read my column are the editor, the copy desk, the printers, and the proofreaders (because
they have to); and the players, the managers, and the coaches
(because they're all egotistic and like to see their names in the
paper because they have some silly idea that it's a sign of greatness, or something, to get your name in the paper); and the
MAC, MAA, WAC, and WAA (because they think the newspaper
might be slandering them); and those goddam public relations
officers (who read it because they want to see if all that crap
they gave you the day before got in the paper, for some silly
reason). ¥     *'   ¥
The only consolation to the writer after all this is that there
must be somebody else out there — Joe Student, or something—
who reads your stuff, too. I mean, if nobody else reads it, why
do the PRO's and MAC'S editors and proofreaders worry about
what it says? Anyway, sometime I must write a column on that.
What I'm trying to say is, I won't be writing any more of
these columns. I'm being promoted. At least that's what the editor says. They're going to put nfe on the copy desk. Instead of
sitting here and copying people like Red Smith, you sit over
there in a ridiculously-shaped desk with a bunch of mad makeup
girls and headwriters and city editors and photography editors
buzzing about you and sort of look important. You know, with
your shirt collar undone and your hair messed up, and your
glasses on the end of your nose and a cigarette hanging out of
the end of your mouth. You get a big, black, dirty copy pencil
and wield it over those rookie reporters' stories like Lizzie Borden wielded that axe over her father.
The idea is, see, they do all the work. You don't take any
crap from them anymore. Nosiree. You don't get nasty looks from
the players and the coaches arid the MAA and their public relations officer. All you get it from is the Social Credit Club and
the Communist Club and the Liberals, Conservatives, NDP's,
Behkoites, all of. UBC's hundreds of clubs, committees, and
councils, from faculty members, and even (gasp) student coun-
cillors. Add to all these at least one public relations officer per
group, and those same printers and proofreaders.
All Students and  Faculty of U.B.C. are requested to
participate in the April 21
fflsauoL WjoacIl
Start 9:30 at Fraser and Kingsway (Robson Park), going
along Kingsway to Broadway, Burrard, Pacific and Beach
Avenue to Second  Beach, Approx.  12:30.
THEME:    "NO NUCLEAR WEAPONS
FOR CANADA"
Similar marches will be Hei« xn England  (Aldermast<;n),  U.S.A.,
and in every major Canadian city.
Sponsored   by   the   Canadian   Campaign   for   Nuclear
Disarmament, formerly  Canadian Committees on
Radiation Hazards
COFFEE AND  SANDWICHES WILL  BE  AVAILABLE
Sports shorts
Ramblers top intramuraIs
Ramblers have clinched their
third aggregate men's intramural championship in four
years, with play in only three
sports still to be completed.
Ramblers climaxed a season-
long race with Engineers, Frosh,
and Phi Delts with a fast finish,
winning the track and wrestling
championships March 23 and
the basketball Wednesday.
Engineers had got off to a fast
start with first-place finishes in
swimming and touch football.
Phi Delts moved ahead after
Christmas with a victory in golf,
while Ramblers stayed up high
with seconds in cross-country,
football, tennis doubles and soccer.
With only ping pong, bowling,
and   Softball   remaining   to   be
played, Ramblers are now out of-1
reach of all competition. j
GYMNASTICS — Local gym- \
nastic  fans  will  get  their  last!
chance to see the UBC's team in !
action ABrjJK&7. when they host
the , Pacific    Northwest    AAU
championships at Memorial Gym.
Teams from all over B.C. and
the   Pacific   Northwest   are   ex
pected, including those from
Washington Athletic Club,
Seattle YMCA, University Hill
Turners, Eastern Washington,
Washington and Washington
State, Richmond and Vancouver.
The meet starts Friday at 7:30
p.m. and continues Saturday
afternoon and evening.
TENNIS — Western Washington meets the Birds at. 1:30 on
the Memorial Gym courts.
Students!
For a new dining pleasure
try our daily special.
DEANS
4544 W. 10th
Open 'till 11:30
STUDENTS!     1
STUDYING TOO HARD? |
KEEP ASPIRIN WITH YOU
AT ALL TIMES
ASPIRINS!
UNIVERSITY      PHARMACY
LTD.
5754  University  Boulevard
CA. 4-3202
Wen- Prtud to tfithounce
the opening of
The <jaij filacfe
£foft
" a store within a store"
Our new young man's
shop is now open.
Clothing the well-dressed
young man of toddy takes
a specialist . . .Our new
Gay Blade shop is that
specialist. Catering to the
college and young business man with one shop
specializing in the basics
of the new look. The natural shoulder, the pleatless trouser and the correct look accessories. This
new shop puts them all together in a casual young
man's a t m o sphere we
think you'll enjoy — drop
in soon and often.
jack CUm M
545 GRANVILLE ST., MU 1-9831
Clothes   for   Men   and   Young   Men. Page  12
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday,  March  29,   1962
Iween classes
Communist
to speak
Mr. Nigel Morgan, Prov.
Leader of the Communist Party,
speaks at noon today in Bu. 100
on "A New Power Policy for
B.C."   All welcome.
* *       *
vcr
"Decade of Decision" the Billy
Graham   story,   noon   today   in
Bu. 100.
USC
Interfaculty debate Bu. 104
Social Work vs Grad Studies
Grand Final. Resolved that "The
Only Good Communist is a Dead
One."
* *       *
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
General meeting Thursday
noon at Psych Lounge. All members please Jrttend. Reports and
elections.    ~:
*"" .   *       *
■'~mcmr-- -';*&-.
i>"<iBfiRi&i"1-:?t|tnburg speaks on
"The War For Peace", a message
from London, Berlin and Moscow.   Bu. 102 at noon.
* * .    .*
SAILING CLUB
Elections meeting at noon in
Bu. 202.
* *       *
ROD AND GUN
General meeting noon today
in Bu. 217. Elections of next
year's exec, will take place.
* *       *
NDC
A film showing on "The VII
World Youth Festival — Vienna" in Bu. 217 at noon on Friday.   Everyone welcome.
* *      *
LSM
Pastor Emberg of St. Paul's
Lutheran Church in Haney
Ispeaks on topic "Who Murdered
i ;God."   Monday at noon in Hut
' 12.
* *      .*
I JR. CHEM CLUB
Film on 'Steel Rhythms",
Chem. 250 at noon Friday.
* *       *
FILM PRODUCTION GROUP
Club room now every noon
i3pur. Members please check
notice board for summer activities and script ideas.
AMS aids in
tux reduction
Education Minister Les Peter-
=son says legislation for reduction of sales tax on text books
resulted from an AMS brief.
- He declined to say what further immediate action" may be
promoted by the brief since such
action takes time.
Peterson said that legislation
often originates from just such
briefs and the government is
always willing to hear from the
people.
Maiming talk Friday
Dr. John Jackson, a visiting
professor from the University of
Manchester will speak on community planning, traffic and
land Use on Friday, April 6 at
8:00 p.m. in the Graduate Student Centre.
Student warning
Unless students studying in
Buchanan building and extension classrooms stop using
chalk to write signs on the
room doors, said classrooms
will be locked up after classes finish for each day, a
janitor told the Ubyssey today.
INCORPORATED   2N°    MAY    \&?0
ORDER BY MAIL OR PHONE
CALLMU 1-6211
Georgia at Granville . .. . Open daily 9 - 5:30, Fridays 9 - 9
Academy r
Award
WlNNE
BEST
FOREIGN FILM
25 OTHER
MAJOR
AWARDS
( This is a great
actress in a great
film. The story
of a betrayed
little Roman
Streetwalker. J
—Johnson, Montreal Star
Everybody is talking about
GIUL1ETTA MASINA as the woman hi
FEDERICO KUINS'S
VARSITY
IQth.l TRIMBLE CA 4-3730
Feature   7:80,   9:30
Coronlete  Show
7:00,   S:10
SSs&Sis&vSS
high voltage colours of tiger,
yellow, lime . . .
Brighten your Spring wardrobe
with one of these!
only $6 and 6.95 each
NEWEST POPOVER SHIRTS, just in, and adding sparkle to
every wardrobe. Long sleeves or short sleeves for Spring,
with that neat, tapered fit you've come to appreciate.
Choose from button-down or snap tab collars; button or
zipper fronts. Fully washable 100% cotton in plains and
fancy stripes. In colours of tiger (orange), yellow, arid
lime. . . . S, M, L.
BE FIRST TO WEAR ONE OF THESE NEW POPOVER SHIRTS
. . . order yours today . . . use your PBA ... at the Bay
Career and Campus Shop, second floor.
CAMPUS
CASUALS
essential
/■ •
as    '   '
books
of course
they're...
BY CREATIVE
•RAMP"
(Antique leathers)
Black, Copper-tan
Bone. Red
Only   ~"
995
All styles available
IN AA AND B WIDTHS
4 TO IO SIZES
*GIDGET«
White, Black
Tan, Bone
•* 7.95
"GIMPY"
"Bone & Straw
Beige Leather"
AVAILABLE AT ALL LEADING SHOE
AND DEPT. STORES IN B.C.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0125604/manifest

Comment

Related Items