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The Ubyssey Oct 9, 1919

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume II.
VANCOUVER, B. C, OCTOBER 9, 1919
Number 1
Freshette Initiation
Highly Successful
NEWCOMERS SPEND LIVELY
EVENING
"The Seniors were born for great things;
the Sophs, were born for small;
But it never has been recorded why the
Freshmen were born at all."
However, on Friday night the Freshettes of '23 were properly and scientifically initiated into the way in which they
should go, in order that, in time to come,
they may play with, wisdom the weighty
part of Sophomores, and, in turn, initiate
the  Frosh. in 1920.
The Freshettes, segregated with care
from the rest of the University, were
ushered first into the presence of a grave
and learned *judge, who heard the
charges of ultra verdancy brought
against them, and dismissed them, to
suffer the just punishment of their sins
at the hands of the outraged Sophomores.
By the time the strangers had acquired
a due familiarity with the hard and
stony stairs of the Arts Building, and
made their way along the endless corridors (a proceeding highly reminiscent
to many of the attempts to reach a definite goal during rush hours since college
opened), full preparations had been
made for the guests in the Auditorium.
Chewing-gum and a highly-palatable
compound of castor-oil and mustard
were doled out to the grateful Freshies,
many of whom displayed a truly praiseworthy unselfishness in their desire to
take no more than their share. After a
sensational trip on an improvised scenic
railway, and a visit to the awful precincts
of Dr. Sedgewick's empty office, the
Freshettes were forced to kneel while a
brief summary of what is expected from
them was given. After swearing to show
all love and reverence for the Seniors,
respect for Juniors, and tolerance for
Sophomores, the newly-initiated were
formally accepted as rightful members
of the U. B. C.
Miss Mclnnes then addressed the
gathering, pointing out the advantages
offered nowadays, in the way of higher
education, as contrasted with the hardships of earlier times. After refreshments were served, the girls of all years
mingled in a lively dance, the guests of
the evening showing their excellent
spirits by entering heartily into the idea
of the entertainment. The general verdict was that the new students showed
a splendid spirit throughout. Our new
Freshettes are real good sports, notwith-
standing their traditional "greenness."
Governor-General
Addresses 'Varsity
U. B. C. RECEIVES VISIT FROM
DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE
On Monday last the University of
British Columbia was especially honored
by a visit from His Excellency the Duke
of Devonshire. Although other engagements prevented our Governor-General
from remaining long, he yet found time
to inspect our buildings, and to address
the members with a few inspiring words.
Amid the strains of student voices, the
vice-regal party entered the Auditorium.
Dr. McKechnie, the Chancellor of the
University, then introduced the Duke to
the audience, and explained to him the
work which is now being carried on by
this institution. Full courses in Arts,
Science, Agriculture and Mining are now
being given. The enrollment, which
four years ago was under 400, now numbers about 850.
In reply, the Governor-General congratulated the University on the splendid work which it has done and is now
doing. No institution, he said, could
boast of a finer record than that established by college men during the last
live years. In every field, and in every
line of service, they have proved their
true worth. Their success has been
great; so should be their credit and their
support.
As Chancellor of the University of
Leeds, the Duke of Devonshire is intensely interested in university work
and development. He is anxious that
the work, so well begun here, shall continue and increase in the future.
The speaker laid particular emphasis
upon the situation which now confronts
our civilization. During the war great
losses have been incurred, and great
changes have been wrought in an incredibly short time. The process of readjustment must be taken in hand by
the college man.
In conclusion, His Excellency wished
the University every possible success in
all its undertakings.
GYPSY SMITH
IS
COMING
Pity Poor Frosh
Initiated to U.B.C,
ARTS '23 MAKES AMENDS FOR
GREENNESS
Nobody passing the Science Building
on Saturday evening could remain deaf
to the fact that something was happening. Need we remark that the annual
initiation of the Freshman was being
carried out?
The torture of uncertainty caused
much trepidation in the ranks of the innocent and unoffending Freshmen waiting dire punishment for no crime but
that of being green. Nor did the welcome met with at the door of the main
lecture-room tend to allay their fears.
Blindfolded and bandaged, with thumbs
bound together, each Freshman was delivered up to torment. On rising from
the floor, which had slipped from under
him most unaccountably, he was dragged
to the decorating-room and branded
with a large "23" on the forehead. Further disfigurement followed at the hands
of the barber, chosen especially for his
unsteady hand. After being electrocuted
in another chair, the exhausted victim
was rushed for treatment to the doctor,
from whose hands various remedies
were received with great relish. The
Freshmen seemed to realize that they
can not be permitted to enjoy the privileges of the University without undergoing some test of merit. Suffice it to
say that they went through this barbaric
ordeal with stout hearts, and joined most
lustily in the cheering and rooting later.
The parade through town was most
successful. The Vancouver Hotel was
honored by a visit from the ragged and
black-face crowd of noisy students; more
steam was blown off at the Lodge, and
a grand and glorious uproar raised at
the Postoffice corner. Purdy's was com- .
mandeered till all could secure "'Varsity
Specials" — a favorite dish of the students, put up for their benefit by Mr.
Pu'rdy. To finish off the evening, the
crowd marched to the Arena, filed in
with military precision, and gently, but
forcibly, reminded General Currie and
the host of dancers of the existence of
the U. B. C.
WOMEN'S LIT.
The work of the Women's Lit. commenced this fall with a brief meeting far
the election of officers to fill the vacancies on the executive. The results of
the voting were as follows: Vice-president, Miss Annie Smith; secretary, Miss
Maude Rowan. THE   UBYSSEY
October 9, 1919
Arrow Shirts and Collars
Stanfield's Underwear
Hobberlin Clothing
THIS  IS  THE   STORE
that can always show you
something new, and where
you are always sure of a
smile.
"Our Prices Are Right"
RICKSON'S
Apparel for Men
820  GRANVILLE  STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Jastjtnn - draft
QUALITY CLOTHES
QUALITY   should   be   the   first
thing to look for, especially in
young men's clothes.
QUALITY   dominates   in   all
Fashion-Craft Clothes.
Prices moderate.
Value positive.
SHOP OF
FASHION-CRAFT
®h,0Z. $OBUt $C (Ho.
Sttmitr-u
514 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
A FRESHIE'S GARDEN OF
VERSE
Freshies, you are very little,
And your brains are very brittle;
If you would grow Seniors, stately,
You must learn to act sedately.
You will never venture, surely,
To give opinions immaturely;
Freshies never hope for glory—
Theirs is quite a different story.
The Whole Duty of a Freshie
A Freshie always says what's true,
And speaks when she is  spoken to;
At least, as far as she is able,
She tries—that's her all over, Mabel!
The Prof.
The friendly Prof., so bald and grey,
I love with all my might;
He gives me lessons every day
That keep me up all night.
I have a little Freshie that goes in and
out with me;
And what can be the use of it is more
than I can see.
It is very loud and noisy from its heels
up to its head,
And   at   noon   it   runs   before   me,   in   a
hurry to be fed.
The funniest thing about it is the way it
likes to go
Along with  other  Freshies,  all  walking
very  slow,
In large and compact masses, segregated
in the hall,
Until    there's     hardly    room    for    me,
squeezed up against the wall.
L'Envoi
The   world   is   so  full   of   a   number   of
Profs.,
I'm  sure you  will  presently all become
Sophs.
The death of Jack Webster during the
past summer was one of those events
which, occurring at intervals, serve to
remind us that the events and pleasures
of this life are not, after all, the most
serious details of our existence.
Jack was a happy boy, friendly and
affectionate; a boy of rather extraordinary ability, and with a great natural
gift in th-e use of brush and pencil.
Everyone who knew him loved him for
his many qualities of worth; and his
manner of meeting death proved him,
above all else, to be a man.
Jack, his father, and his younger brother, David, were fishing in a lake near
the head of the outlet, when David, becoming excited, fell out, and the pull of
the river drew him away from the boat.
Jack leaped in, as did also Mr. Webster,
and, though David and his father were
saved, Jack was drowned, having taken
a cramp in the cold water.
Though we cannot but feel sorry for
his loss, yet we can always be glad and
proud that, in the supreme test, our fellow-student was not found wanting, and
that he met death as a gentleman and a
man.
"He that loseth his life . . shall gain it."
GIFTS!  GIFTS!!
A Box of MCDONALD'S
CHOCOLATES is always
acceptable
They are made every day
MCDONALD'S   CHOCOLATES
793 Granville St. (Near Robson)
P.  PARIS
BOOT AND SHOE MFR.
Repairing Our Specialty
51 Hastings Street, West
VANCOUVER, B. C.
ENLARGEMENTS
Vancouver Photo Co.
(Established 1911)
649 GRANVILLE STREET
(Down the Marble Stairs)
Evans & Hastings
 Are the	
Proud  Printers
of
((
The Ubyssey "
For 1919-1920
We make a Specialty of
COLLEGE ANNUALS
MAGAZINES
BALL PROGRAMMES
Etc., etc.
BOYS!   Give us a call before you
go elsewhere
578  Seymour Street
VANCOUVER, B. C. October 9, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
SHELLY'S
4X BREAD
7JTHE FINEST FOOD in the
^^ world. Serve it to your
family and watch them grow; eat
it yourself and notice the difference from any other bread.
AT YOUR GROCER'S
 OR	
PHONE FAIRMONT 44
W. D. McLEAN    L. S. POWELL
McLean & Powell
Iron Works
358.398 Dufferin Street, W.
Phone, Fairmont 1546
GENERAL   FOUNDRY
AND   PATTERN - MAKING
We specialize in  Mill and Marine
Boiler Grates
Satisfaction    Guaranteed
If you come once, you will
come again; for you will
appreciate our PROMPT
SERVICE.
WOW!
According to present indications, this
year's Musical Society will be a howling
success. The executive has planned a
much more extensive programme than
that of former years. In addition to the
two major performances to be held in
November and March, other entertainments   will  be  provided  by   the  society.
Mr. E. H. Russell, who has given so
much time and care to the work in past
seasons, will be the leader; and the
Musical Society is indeed fortunate in
having so able and enthusiastic an instructor. The aim of the society is to
provide funds to purchase a grand piano
for the University. Everyone should
help! If you can sing, think you can
sing, or even if someone ever said you
could sing, join the Glee Club. An expert knowledge of music is not essential.
Any players of violins, 'cellos, trombones, cornets, etc., will be very welcome for the orchestra. The 'Varsity
needs that piano, and the Musical Society needs your help.
RUGBY
Everything indicates that the coming
year in Rugby is going to be the biggest
yet known in the University. Between
forty and fifty men are turning out at
each practice, in this number being included many old stars that are getting
back into the game. In Lord, Plummer
and Rolston, U. B. C. has three of the
best forwards in the city; while Heyland
and Wallis, in the back division, will
take a lot of stopping. There are also
quite a few younger players turning out
who will keep up a brisk competition for
places  on the  Senior team.
Last Saturday, after the practice at
Brockton Point, the playing officers were
elected. Art Lord was chosen captain
and H. Gwythers was made vice-captain.
Under the leadership of these two able
men, it is certain that 'Varsity will make
a good showing against any team it encounters; and it is even thought probable
that, before the season is over, three
cups will decorate the University's halls.
ELECTIONS
As is usually the case in our uncertain
existence in U. B. C, many of the newly-
elected student officers have been unable
to continue their work. The resignation
of Mr. Morrison from the presidency of
the Alma Mater left open the most important office of our student societies,
and an office, moreover, to which is attached a most unpleasant amount of
hard work. After the opening of the
session, nominations were called for, and
the names of Mr. Nelson and Mr. Coates
were submitted. Mr. Nelson, however,
refused to allow his name to stand—the
result being the election, by acclamation,
of Mr. Coates.
The present incumbent is a member of
Arts, and has held many official positions
in student activities — offices which he
has filled in a capable manner. With the
support of the student body, Mr. Coates
should be able to lead the Alma Mater
through a banner year.
If there are any subjects
in which you need special
coaching, try the new
SPROTTSHAW
ACADEMIC
DEPARTMENT
All our teachers are highly
qualified
Special  Evening  Classes
This   department,   as   well   as   our
Business   Department,   bears   that
well-known
Sprolt Shaw $tamp**QuaHty
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Mgr.
Phone, Sey. 1810
"TUUM EST"
PATRONIZE YOUR ADVERTISERS
Close Prices on
QUALITY
RAINCOATS
CASHMERE PARAMATTA COAT,
$25.00—This coat is made of an all-cashmere top and back, thoroughly proofed
with pure rubber; made with regular or
raglan shoulders.    An exceptional coat for
*Z.T": $25.00
RUBBERIZED    RAINCOAT,   $22.50—
A high-grade paramatta raincoat, with
solid cashmere top and union back; thoroughly proofed with pure rubber. A really
good coat at a moderate
price, for	
TWEED    FINISHED    RAINCOATS—
Our stock of these popular raincoats is
very large. Three of Canada's best makers
are represented. The patterns and colorings shown this season in tweed finished
raincoats   are   particularly   pleasing.   Sizes,
34 to 44 <^ft no
Prices,   $25.00   to    *OU.UU
$22.50
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED THE   UBYSSEY
October 9, 1919
CLUBB   &
STEWART
LIMITED
Headquarters for Young Men
for the past 30 years
Our slock of Young Men's Suits
and Overcoats this season is.
better than ever
SEE   OUR   WINDOWS  for
New Models
309    to    315
Hastings Street W.
THOMAS
& McBAIN
The
Young
Men's
Tailors
Semi-Ready Shop
655 Granville Street
Issued every Thursday by the Publications  Board
of  the   University   of  British   Columbia.
Extra mural subscriptions, $3.00 per session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief A.   A.   Webster
Senior   Editor Patricia   H.   Smith
{Lillian  Cowell
H.   L.   Keenleyside
D. Taylor
Chief   Reporter A.   H.   Imlah
Exchange  Editor T.   P.  Peardon
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager J.   Weld
Advertising   Manager L.   Fournier
Circulation   Manager A.   Crawford
Editor for  the  Week H.   Keenleyside
The coming winter should be the most
successful in the history of college athletics. With the greatly increased enrollment and the large number of returned athletes, there should be a superabundance of candidates for all 'Varsity
teams. When the Victoria trip is made
this year, we hope to take with us not
only the Rugby and basketball teams, but
an ice hockey team, a soccer eleven, and,
possibly, still other representatives of
our college.athletics.
And everybody should take part.
There are very few in U. B. C. who are
so far physically unfit that they cannot
find some branch of athletics in which
to take an active interest. The individual
who comes to college only to study—to
become a storehouse for facts—is not
getting an education. A well-stored mind
in a feeble body is a pitiful sight. Nay,
more—it is criminal; for in almost every
case the weakness of the body can be
ascribed only to the careless indifference
of the sufferer himself. Pick your sport
and stick to it. Don't try everything—
take one branch and do it well, and thus
be an honor to the college and a satisfaction to yourself.
*
*
The "Ubyssey" is glad to note that at
last some attempt is to be made to give
our University the outward semblance,
as well as the inward grace, due to an
institution of higher learning. We refer
to the agitation in favor of the wearing
of gowns by Seniors and the proper apparel of Freshmen. At the present time
a casual visitor to our spacious corridors
would hardly be impressed by the dignity and air of wisdom, disseminated by
knickerbockered boys and the flowing
tresses of embryonic maidens.
Why the regulation regarding the age
of admission to the University is not enforced has always been a source of mystery to the average undergraduate. As
long as those in charge of the registration of students allow any infant to
enter the first year (provided it has
passed the matriculation examination),
regardless alike of mental or physical
development, so long shall we retain the
appearance of a mediocre preparatory
school.
However, much may be done by regulation (by the students themselves) of
the dress of the incoming Frosh. Attired
in long trousers, even the most innocent
and appealing of our young friends
must, perforce, take upon himself somewhat of the dignity of manhood. A properly arranged coiffure and a lengthened
skirt would go far toward adding age to
the most tender damsel.
That gowns should be worn by Seniors
is an established precedent in nine-tenths
of the colleges, even of this continent.
Gowns will help to add a touch of dignity, a finish and a distinction, which is
often lacking in our crude and makeshift western civilization. While we do
not desire to have all originality and
spontaneity strangled by Eastern convention, nevertheless dignity is not conventionality, nor is virility lost by refinement.
So, Twenty, will you live up to your
traditions, and again lead the way for
the other years; or shall to a later class
be left the honor of instituting this
needed reformation?
GREETINGS
To former students who have returned
to resume their college work, and to the
Freshmen class of this session, the Alma
Mater Society extends a welcome. Many
men who were at one time members of
classes, which have since graduated,
may be found in our halls this session.
Their return to academic work is a magnificent tribute to the type of student
who left the University to go overseas.
We shall look to them to spread among
us that spirit of fellowship so characteristic of the true soldier, and to give to
our ranks the solidarity which marks
more mature  organizations.
For the larger number of Freshmen,
however, this session means the immediate passing from High School into the
University. It is often Jilficult to step
out of such an atmospher; and adjust
oneself to the new conditions. It is
hoped, however, that, after three weeks
of college, they have learned that no
longer are they "going to school" or
"studying their lessons" or "staying in
for teacher," but that they have passed
on to an entirely new stage in their experience, where individual responsibility
has become the predominant force in
their lives.
For many, the entering of college
marks the first serious decision which
they have made. If they have not registered in that spirit, then they have no
excuse for being in attendance. Life is
not a frivolous thing, and academic
training for one who views it as such is
futile. May those entering upon the
work this year do so with a full appreciation of what a university course
means to them, so that their efforts here
may result in preparation for making a
valuable contribution to society.
In regard to the proposed institution
of the wearing of gowns, why not start
with the Professors? October 9, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
Recently, one of our new twelve-year-
old friends was heard to make the following remark:
"When I got to school this morning
the teacher wasn't there, so we didn't
have any lesson; and I had all my homework done, too."
For the benefit of this type of verdancy, we wish to remind the culprits
that they have left the kindergarten, and
should endeavor to convey that impression by their language, even if their appearance is irremediably childish.
OUR NEW PRESIDENT
If rumor speak true, the Ubyssey will
soon have the pleasure of welcoming another compatriot in the field' of university literature. We wish all success to
the newcomer.
During the vacation students in all
parts of the province received with unusual pleasure the intimation of the appointment of Dean L. S. Klinck to the
presidency of the University of B. C.
In the classroom he had proven himself
a scholar. While filling the position of
acting-president he had displayed the
tact and ability of a successful administrator. And as a man he had earned
the esteem of all who had the privilege
of his acquaintance. The students shall
always feel that they have a true friend
in the new president. British Columbia
may regard herself fortunate in the
choice of one who is so uniquely adapted to guiding the early growth of our
Western University.
HISTORICAL SOCIETY
The latest addition to the rapidly-
growing list of student organizations
is the newly-formed Historical Society.
Interest in historical matters is steadily
increasing in U. B. C, and, with the assistance of Dr. Eastman and Mr. Sage,
history enthusiasts have banded together for the discussion of current or ancient problems of humanity. At the
initial meeting a committee was appointed to draft a constitution. Members will be classed as Ordinary, Associate and Honorary, the first two headings including undergraduates, members
of Convocation and Alumni. The Ordinary membership is restricted to students of the third- and fourth-year Arts.
MEN'S LIT.
The first meeting of the Men's Literary Society was held in the Auditorium
on Thursday evening, October 2nd.
After a short sing-song, the meeting
came to order. The honorary president,
Mr. Henry, gave a short and interesting
address on the purpose of the society
and the value of public speaking.
It was decided to hold the meetings
of the society on the first and third
Wednesdays of each month. The president outlined the programme for the
year.
The meeting was then turned into an
impromptu discussion; Messrs. Peardon
and Peebles setting an example in oratory, which the other members were not
slow to follow. Nearly every one present spoke, either voluntarily or by request. Every one enjoyed himself and
much new talent was uncovered, which
augurs well for the success of the
oratorical contest and the international
debate.
Y.W.C.A. RECEPTION
Mention must be made in this first
number of the "Ubyssey" of the excellent work done by the members of the
advertising staff. The following men
have been particularly . busy securing
ads.: Smith, '21; McKee, '22; Mclntyre,
'22; Wallace, Sc. '21; working under the
advertising manager, Fournier, '21.
The first organization to take an active
part in helping the bewildered Freshettes
to forget the trials and troubles of the
first days of University life was the Y.
W. C. A., which held a very successful
reception on the afternoon of September
24th. Mrs. Klinck and Miss Lowe were
both present, and joined with Miss Leila
Coates in welcoming the new students.
Each Freshette received paper and pencil, and, properly chaperoned by a Senior
girl, was encouraged to guess the status
of the different students, a successful
guess being rewarded by an autograph.
Many were the compliments showered
upon second- and third-year students in
the question: "Are you a Senior?" Some
new camp-fire songs closed the programme, and the guests departed—many
wondering audibly what lapse from
dignity had occasioned their being several times classed as Sophomores.
Stylish and Serviceable Footwear
For the Young Folk who are Particular
FITTING   SERVICE:    THE   VERY BEST
<ike INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
666 GRANVILLE STREET THE   UBYSSEY
October 9, 1919
ART   CLOTHES   SHOP
Say, Boys!
"When it's a Hat or a Cap
—we have it"
See our window for a full range of
the   newest   and   most   up-to-date
styles shown
NECKWEAR
Don't   overlook   seeing   our   large
showing of Silk Neckwear at
$2.50
Ben  Petch
752 Granville Street
(Opposite Orpheum Theatre)
P.S.—Our Shirt and Underwear
stock is most complete. Investigate.    Prices moderate.
Trob Cut Tlowers.     Tuncral Work a Specialty
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
florists, nurserymen, Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head Office:
48 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 9513
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For Light Refreshments
Ice   Cream  and  Candies
at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
THE   YAMATO
Direct Importers of
Japanese Silk and Fancy Goods
460 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
Phone, Seymour 2288
PROFS. ON VACATION
As reporter of that lively and up-to-
date weekly, the "Ubyssey," it has been
our pleasant duty, during the past week,
to interview certain members of the
Faculty concerning several manners
whereby they were enabled to endure
the monotony of the past vacation.
We first approached Prof. F. G. C.
Wood, and, after promising faithfully to
publish everything he said, we prevailed
upon him to give us the only true and
authentic account of his life during the
past five months.
It seems that, last spring, Mr. Wood
undertook to chaperone the class of Arts
'20 upon an excursion up Grouse Mountain. The Professor was so struck with
the scenic' beauties and dramatic and,
incidentally, romantic possibilities of the
surrounding country that he determined
to pass the entire vacation upon the
mountain top. Accordingly, early in
May, Mr. Wood made the arduous ascent
entirely by himself, accompanied only by
the necessary accessories of camping life
—a tent and a sewing-machine. For some
time, it appears, Mr. Wood has cherished the dream that the day would come
when every individual within our University would wear the college gown.
His mind's eye caught the vision of
many black-robed figures stealing silently and mysteriously through our spacious corridors. He saw, in imagination,
Mr. Tansley sweeping majestically
through the library, garbed in flowing
black. After five months' hard labor,
assisted only by the sewing-machine,
Mr. Wood completed the manufacture of
a single gown. He was pleased to show
us this remarkable production, and has
promised to appear in it at an early date.
We next raided Dr. Sedgewick's office,
demanding admittance in the name of
the Press, with threatening references to
last year's still-uncorrected essays. We
were admitted. Dr. Sedgewick, however,
was very reticent: he desired his past to
remain a blank; but, after many hints
and leading questions, we succeeded in
drawing forth the following account:
Dr. Sedgewick's intention had been to
join the Geological Survey going North
for the summer. On the day of departure the Doctor mislaid his pipe, and
the journey had to be given up, as he
was totally unable to cope with the
situation.
This  last account gave us the idea or
our young life.   We went to Dr. Hodge.
"Look here," we said, "we have to
write a genuine, all-round, ripping story,
full of pep, entitled, 'The Profs. Summer
Vacation.'    Can't you give us a tip?"
The learned man fixed upon us a
benevolent gaze of mild surprise.
"During the vacation," he began, with
his usual eloquent deliberation, "I have
been much interested in the intimate and
extraordinary relationships existing between Literature and Geology. I have
made a carefully-detailed study and
memorization of the 'Rubaiyat of Omar
Khayam.' That section dealing with the
jug in the wilderness is especially of
interest. I have no doubt this same jug
is to be found in the Ordovician limestones underlying the Desert of Sahara.
If not there, it is probably among the
Highlands of Scotland."
After this interview, we got a headache; and the editor-in-chief, being a
humane gentleman, let us go home early.
(To be continued next week.)
The new system of compulsory athletics for Freshmen is on the verge of
its first year. Rigid examinations are
being arranged with a view to ascertaining for what form of sport the men
are fitted.
In making this new step, the University is carrying farther its task of preparing men for the world. Hitherto, it
has merely provided opportunities for
physical as well as mental training, and
left to the student the choice of taking
them or leaving them.
Colleges which have tried compulsory
physical training have found that a far-
greater number of their students have
turned out during their last three years,
with compulsion during their first year,
than under a strictly laissez-faire system.—Harvard "Crimson," Sept. 23, 1919.
YOUR ADVERTISERS
EXPECT. RESULTS
SKATING STUFF
IS COMING ON
Skates this year are back to the old prewar basis of quality. The STARRS are
tougher than any other steel made, and yet
they're hard. No skate stands so much
punishment. We'll be in a position, to show
them in a week or so.
LISLE FRASER
Sporting Goods Store
Cor. Robson and Granville Streets
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
MAKE   OUR   STORE   YOUR
HEADQUARTERS  FOR
LOOSE-LEAF  NOTEBOOKS
AND SUPPLIES
We   specialize   in   fine   Stationery •
Che Uancouver Stationers Ctd.
683 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Seymour 5119
U.Morimoto & Co.
JAPANESE FANCY GOODS
MAIN STORE:
673   Granville   Street      Phone,  Sey. 6410
BRANCH  STORES:
57 Hastings St., W.       Phone,  Sey. 2313
932  Granville   St. Phone,  Sey. 8723
VICTORIA BRANCH:
1235   Government   St. Phone 4742 October 9, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
LITERARY SUPPLEMENT
We gratefully acknowledge the receipt
of a new volume of verse by the already
renowned poet, Mr. R. F. Had'em.
Readers of the "Ubyssey" are already
familiar with some of the earlier efforts
of our friend, and it is only necessary
to quote a few choice selections to win
universal  commendation  for the poet:
Ideal of Feminine Beauty:
Here   came   a   sun-browned   maiden
into view,
Her  face  and  form  and  raven-shining hair,
And  I  was  madly conscious  of  her
fair
And  passionate  beauty.     She  would
often stay
And    gaze   at   me    from    dawn    to
hushed  noon-day.
I wonder why?
The Most Fitting Death:
"We died on young green wheat."
The Queen:
"And  thou  in  thy  blue-domed  halls
does  queenly move."
Famous Chorus:
Lonely she,
From the sea,
Think of me,
Oh, gee!
Pertinent   Query:
here?"
Poet's    Answer:
friends."
Ode on  Himself:
"Thy croaking   tongue   ne'er   seems
to rest
In thine o'er-flowing glee."
"Why  are   we   living
To    "Kiss    and     be
TENNIS RESULTS
Friday, October 3rd, saw the completion of the first tennis tournament held
in U. B. C. Dr. and Mrs. Clarke had
offered cups, respectively, for the men's
and women's singles championships, and
the club executive was not slow in arranging the competitions.
The men's finals were played between
George Dixon and "Mickey" MacDou-
gall, and some good games featured the
play, though MacDougall's superiority
was evidenced from the start. The final
score was 6-3, 6-4, 6-3, in Mickey's favor.
For this victory, coming, as it did, as
the climax of a succession of hard
matches, MacDougall is to be congratulated; and Dixon also should not be forgotten for his game display.
Miss Muriel Munroe won the ladies'
singles in rather an easy fashion from
Miss I. Mounce, the results being 6-2,
6-2. Miss Munroe's placements were
particularly exact, and in her use of the
back-hand displayed an ability very unusual in the fairer sex.
The cups which were won at this
tournament are to be presented Friday
night at the reception.
From a purely masculine viewpoint,
the chief assets of the young lady contestants in the recent tennis tourney
were their dazzling sweaters. At least
one garment that we saw could be guaranteed to frighten the opponent into a
nervous state of terror for quite six
games.
Students' Loose'Leaf Supplies
RING BOOKS and RING BOOK SHEETS for ALL BOOKS
FOUNTAIN  PENS,   HIGH-GRADE   PENCILS  AND   PENS
WE   WILL   APPRECIATE   A   VISIT   TO   OUR   STORE
WESTERN  SPECIALTY   LTD.
PRINTERS and STATIONERS  -   572 GRANVILLE STREET, VANCOUVER
MORE NOTES
We welcome the appearance on the
stairs of the Arts building of a striking
notice, "Keep to the Right." Some means
of policing the traffic on the stairs has
been vitally necessary, and it is to be
hoped that this comparatively gentle
hint will prove effective.
A business meeting of the recently
organized Historical Society was held on
Wednesday, and a constitution adopted.
The officers for the coming year were
elected as follows:
Hon. President, Dr. Eastman.
Hon. Vice-Pres., Mr. W. N. Sage.
President, H.  LI.  Keenleyside.
Vice-President, Patricia H. Smith.
Secretary, F. H. Buck.
Treasurer, Edna Marwick.
Corresponding Secretary, Jessie A.
McBeth.
w. u. s.
The first general meeting of the
Women's Undergraduate Society was
held on Tuesday. For the benefit of the
newcomers in Arts '23, Miss Pillsbury
outlined briefly the objects of the so-
■ c:ety. After the meeting the Freshette
elections were held, the following officers
being appointed: Honorary president,
Miss Simpson; president, Miss E. Eveleigh; vice-president, Miss C. Allardyce;
secretary, Miss P. McKay; treasurer,
Miss M. Gordon; Lit. representative,
Miss N. Cordingly; Athletic representative, Miss J. Buckerfield; class'reporter,
Miss K. Stuart.
PATRONIZE YOUR
ADVERTISERS
CUSICK
SERVES
GOOD EATS
692   BROADWAY, WEST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
R. €. Purdy, Dd.
Famous Chocolates
and
Home-Made Candies
Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
675 GRANVILLE STREET
SAY YOU SAW IT IN
"THE UBYSSEY"
%. 3idt <L ©o.
©Tcclusi'tfe v-Turriers
800 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C. THE   UBYSSEY
October 9, 1919
.. The ..
Western Life
Assurance Co.
Offers   in  its   Guaranteed  Security
Policies   one   of   the   best
investments for  to-day
Every Student Should
Carry One
See the  Manager,  or  one of their
many agents, for particulars
Head Office for B. C:
701 LONDON BLDG.
626  Pender  Street,  West
VANCOUVER, B.C.
C.  E.  MAHON,  Manager
J. W. FOSTER
LIMITED
TWO STORES:
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
FIT REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, W.
We sell clothes for young men
men  who  stay  young
ALUMNI
The Alumni Association has commenced activities again after a summer
of comparative rest. At a general meeting held on September 26th, several new
organizations were formed, including
the Athletic Association, with Mr. John
Allardyce as president. The final arrangements for the commencement of a
Dramatic Society were completed on
October 4th. This society, as yet without a name, has as its first president
Miss K. Peck, '17. Dr. Sedgewick, although he claims he does not know a
"darn  thing"  about  coaching,   has   kindljr
consented   to   assist   and   advise   when
needed.
On October 4th the Alumni entertained at the first of a series of monthly
luncheons at the Hotel Vancouver. The
address was given by Mr. A. Lee Struth-
ers and was an interesting demonstration, with Dr. Ashton and Mr. Pat Fraser as subjects, on that new commercial
study,  "Character  Analysis."
The association is making plans for
the holding of a memorial service for
our University comrades who have
fallen.
Steps are being taken to help the busy
student by the establishment of a student vocational employment bureau, and
a committee is considering the matter
at present.
AGRICULTURE NOTES
The rally has been sounded, and many
have responded; so many, in fact, that
we hear the Faculty of Agriculture are
having visions of becoming a greater
factor in the life of the LIniversity than
in the past.
We take this opportunity to welcome
the new members of the staff, and hope
that the'r connection with their branch
of agriculture will be a pleasure. The
Freshmen we wish to congratulate on
their recovery from the ordeal of Saturday evening.
The Agricultural Discussion Club held
its first meeting- in the Auditorium on
October 1st. The interest shown seems
to assure a successful year.
On Saturday afternoon the Junior ai'd
Sophomore years held a theatre party
at the Orpheum.
SCIENCE
The first meeting of the Applied
Science Men's Undergraduate Society
was held in the Physics lecture-room on
Friday, October 3rd. The noble office of
president was ably filled by our recently-
elected dignitary, Mr. J.' Kingham, of
Science '21. Mr. Banfield, of Science '22,
was assigned to the office of secretary;
while Mr. Wallace, of Science '21, was
appointed  literary representative.
SAY YOU SAW IT IN
"THE UBYSSEY"
CLOTHING
SERVICE
SOMETHING    N E W    EVERY
WEEK FOR MEN
Special display of Suits,
l."ght and heavy Overcoats,
also combination Raincoats,
in our Hastings Street
windows
Every garment represents the very
latest in styles, the very best in
quality, and values unsurpassed at
$30, $35, $40, $45, $50
J. N. HARVEY LTD.
123, 125, 127 Hastings Street, West
Also 614-616 Yates Street, Victoria
Look for the big Red Arrow Sign
INDEX   TO   ADVERTISERS
Page
Fashion-Craft     2
Rickson's     2
McDonald's   Chocolates     2
P.   Paris     2
Vancouver Photo Co  2
Evans   &  Hastings  2
Shelley's     3
McLean & Powell Iron Works  3
Sprott-Shaw     3
David   Spencer  3
Clubb  & Stewart  4
Thomas & McBain  4
Ingledew  Shoe  Co  5
Ben   Petch  6
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd  6
The   Bungalow  6
The  Yamato  6
Lisle Fraser  6
U. Morimoto & Co  6
The Vancouver Stationers,  Ltd  6
Western  Specialty  7
Cusick's   7
B.  Holt & Co  7
The Western  Life Assurance  Co... 8
J. W.  Foster,  Ltd  8
J. N. Harvey, Ltd  8
R. C.  Purdy  7

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