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The Ubyssey Feb 28, 1939

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 CO-ED BALL—
—CRYSTAL BALLROOM
—THURSDAY
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
OO ED BALL—
—CRYSTAL BALLROOM
—THURSDAY
Vol. XXI.
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1939
No. 36
FIRM  UNITED  FRONT AS
"TOTALITARIANISM" CHECK
PROFESSOR   LASKI   ATTACKS   APPEASEMENT
POLICY OF GREAT POWERS
Bitterly awnre that tho prestige of the democratic powers has
reached its ebb and that these powers ore not to be depended
upon, the smaller democracies of Central Europe are only too
eager to make their peace with the dictators, thus swinging into
aependence on Hitlerized Germany, Prof. Harold J. t-aski of the
London School of Economics told a combined faculty and student
audience which filled the university auditorium Saturday noon.
THROE-POINT PROGRAM
During   hla   one hour   apeeoh  on
,     "The   Aftermath   of   Munich",   Prof.
Laski   brilliantly  and  forcefully   (1)
made    a    acathlng    attack    on    the
,    Chamberlain    appeasement    polloy:
(9) traced the actions of the militant
nations alnoe Munich and (8) warned
hla audience that only firm and united   aotlon   by  tha  progressive   •!•-
I    msnts   In   tha   democratic   nations
would oheek tha spread of "Totalitarianism."
Analysing the motives attributed
to Chamberlain for hla appeasement of the dictators at Munich,
the speaker showed clearly that the
"credits" went to the Hitter side on
the "balance sheet" ot the Munich
agreement.
"The time gained In this breathing
space for further French and British
preparation also afforded both Oermany and Italy time to inoreaae thalr
own rearmament program," he said.
"But   it   must   be   remembered   that
there   ia   no    complete    rearmament
program."
.     CZECH BETRAYAL.
k       The   ruthless  betrayal  of  Csecho-
^k Slovakia, former "bastion of demoo-
^■aoy in  Central Europe," whioh the
HSVs<_ker  described   as   now  being  a
"syllabic in the mouth of the German
Allah,   Its   future   dependent   on   the
Will of the Oerman Collossus" opened
the   Oerman   road   of   expansion   to
the East.
"This road," Prof. Laski stated,
"gives access to raw materials on
the one hand and strategic opportunities on the other, both ot
which strengthen the striking and
the reserve power of the Oerman
t       Belch,"
In the Far East, the Munich appeasement "served notloe to Japan of
the weakness of the democratic powers" whieh warning, the speaker observed, resulted In increased and
concentrated Japanese aggression in
l^*- South China close to the British settlement of Hong Kong.
COtONV QUESTION
The present colonial demands of
both Hitler and Mussolini are a direct outcome of the Munich settlement in the opinion of the speaker.
Ironically stating that the dictators have "objectives Incompatible
with peace" though they do not desire conflict, the speaker maintained
that the present Italo-French border
disputes may be settled by the "reorientation of the frontiers of the
colonies in question.
Scorning the lack of opposition and
criticism to Chamberlain's refufal to
convene parliament during the pre-
Munich days, Prof. Laski warned
that this was a step towards "To- i
talltarlanlsm".
"In 1914", the speaker said, "parliament sat all the time; the policy of
the Asqulth cabinet was explained to
the leaders of the opposition and all
critics."
DEMOCRATIC IDEOLOGY
"Chamberlain is a menace to the
principles of democracy," he added,
"who must be replaced by progressive forces prepared to build the
foundations of a now and more effective collective security."
In maintaining that the ideology
of the Democracies could not live In
the same world as the Ideology of
the fascist nations, he urged that the
democratic powers of the world present a united front against th_ dictators In future crises lest "Europe
be turned into a concentration
camp."
"It is the choice between the concentration camps and the battlefield," he averred, "there ls no other
alternative."
DR. I. SMITH
TO OUTLINE
' DEMOCRACY'
SIDNEY GRADUATE TO
LECTURE HERE
FRIDAY
Dr. Ingram Smith, world traveller
and economic graduate of the Sidney University in Australia will
speak to the university studenta Friday noon, March 8. His topic will be
"Youth Looks at Democracy."
Dr.     Smith.     while     travelling
around the world for the past six
years, earned his way by writing
magaslne  and  newspaper  articles.
In America he attended the Youth
Congress    at    Ploughskeeple,    N.Y.,
and   twelve  universities.
He alao appeared on the NBC network with Tommy Doraey.
Hare in Brltloh Columbia Dr. Smith
worked with and greatly assisted
the Minister of Labor, Oeorge Pearson, on the unemployment situation.
PUBLISHING DATES
Beginning next week, the Ubyssey will be published only on Fridays, till the end of March. The
remaining Iss-jhs will come out on
March  3,  10,  inland  34.
 n	
Scholarships
At McGiil
Notice of a number of graduate
scholarships offered by McOlll University In Geology, Mining Engineering or Metallurgy has come to the
Registrar of this university.
The scholarships, one, two or three
of which will be offered for the next
two years, have been made possible
through the generosity of Slsooe Gold
Mines, who, ln 1937, contributed $4.-
800 for scholarships in Geology, Mining and Metallurgy.
CONDITIONS.
The awards of aggregate value, in
1939-40, may be $3000 and are tenable
under the following conditions:
1. Scholarships  may  be  held  for
more than one year.
%. In awarding, preference will be
given  to  subjects  In  the  following
order: Geology, Mining, Metallurgy.
Candidates   must   be   graduates   of
McOill or of another institution recognized for this purpose.
Candidates must undertake to work
on a problem of which the solution
would be important to the mining
industry ln the Province of Quebec.
Candidates must send to the Registrar of McOlll, 1. a letter of application preferably with a description of
the problem they wish to investigate,
and, 2. a certified copy of their academic record to date.
Applications must reach the McOlll Registrar before April  1, 1939.
INDIAN SCHOOL HEAD
SPEAKS TO TEACHERS
The Inspector of B.C. Indian
Schools, Captain Baruy. will address
the teachers and education class, on
Wednesday, March 1. at 12.30 noon,
In  Arts 204.
This meeting Is open to all students and after the address Captain
Barry will answer questions on the
subject of Indian Education.
All those who have had experience
In Indian Schools are Invited to submit questions to Stan Bailey or Doris
Turnbull Immediately.
DIRECTOR
COMMERCIAL
DISTRIBUTION
IS  OUTLINED
MALIN    STATES    EVEN
PRODUCTION
N
Sidney Risk, alumni member
of the Player's Club, who is directing "The Curtain Rises,"
which will be presented in the
University Theatre on March
15-18.
FELLOWSHIPS
AT TORONTO
There are several graduate fellowships being offered by the Toronto
University School of Graduate Studies.
In the Department of Physics some
part-time teaching positions are
open. For the period extending from
the middle of September to the middle of May, the salary ls $600.
The teaching duties occupy approximately one-third time. The
free two-thirds at the "Mme is required to be spent on graduate
work.
The National Research Council at
Ottawa offers a number of annual
scholarships ln research for graduates of any Canadian University. Details may be obtained from any University Registrar.
The University of Toronto offers
several group courses of Instruction
leading to the M.A.  degree In the
Department of Physios.
The  courses  to  be  given  will  include   Meteorology,   Geophysics,   and
Analysis  by  Spectrographlc  and  X-
Ray Methods.
In addition to these courses, the
laboratory is especially suited and
equipped for research work ln Spectroscopy, Low Temperatures, High
Frequency Currents, and the physics
of surfaces and colloidal solutions.
A. O. Malin of Se**tion 14, Regional
Division 11834, Los Angeles, addressed the Technocracy Club yesterday
on the topic "Where Do We Oo from
Here?"
Mr. Malin outlined the conditions
of commercial distribution. Two requirements of successful distribution,
he said, were scarcity of the product
and the maintenance of an even flow
of produce.
INDUSTRIAL PROBLEMS
To show how it was becoming increasingly difficult to maintain value,
Mr. Malin gace as an example the
problem of the grapefruit Industry
whloh necessitated destruction of
40% of tis crop In order to make any
profit.
"Selling  of   the   surplus . at   the
low prices It would entail,, would,"
he said, "Incur the growers nothing
but freight bills."
Mr. Malin next dealt with the problem of maintaining an even production flow.
PRODUCTION
"Formerly," he said, "this was done
by the producer who put his returns
into increasing equipment and men."
"Now,  when the money  reaches
' the producer  there  Is  no  way  by
which he can get It back   In   the
stream  because man-labour  Is being replaced by machinery."
"One solution to maintain the flow
was   to   have   the   Oovernment   take
flavor the prerogative," he said. "This
was done ln some places and the result ls the mounting of debts In  the
government hands."
MAN-LABOR
EMPLOYMENT
"The only other way ls to re-employ man-labor. This would Increase
production and then not a semblance
of the desired scarcity would remain."
"This Is the problem which ls before the young people to-day," said
Mr. Malin.
"You have a hlgh-energy-consum-
Ing mechanism whloh Is being operated by a set of controls built
for a low-energy-consuming machine."
Mr. Malin spent the remainder of
the meeting In answering the questions on Technocracy proposed by the
assembly
CRYSTAL BALLROOM SCENE
OF ANNUAL COED DANCE
MASCULINE    WALLFLOWERS   AND    FEMININE
STAGLINE TO FEATURE BALL
Genial Dean Of
Likes Short Noon Hours
By MIMI SCHOFIELD
Monday afternoon I descended to
the cafeteria and bearded Mr. Frank
Underhiil, the genial dean of "Caf.
1, 2, 3, 4 and sometimes 5," in his
culinary  den.
Mr. Underbill's aotlvities ln the
catering line have been many and
varied. He was flrst with the C.P.R.
on their dining-cars.
He then joined the staff of Spencer's   in   Vancouver.   From   there   he
moved   to   U.B.C  where  he   has  remained  for  11 years.
EXPENSIVE AND UNTIDY.
In his role of manager of the Caf,
Mr. Underhiil has much with which
to contend. His main objection ls the
general untidy state in which lt ls
left.
Not only are the students untidy,
but they are also distinctly expensive to maintain.
Examples of this are found in the
purloining of Caf "silver" which
probably furnishes numerous mountain cabins; and the elusive Coke
bottles, which can be found everywhere from the theatre "fly-gallery"
to Marine Drive.
Another source of Irritation Is the
amount of debris that ls left lying
around the tables. "In fact," says Mr.
Underhiil. "we find everything from
books to football boots."
EASY TO PLEASE.
In spite of these trials and tribulations, Mr. Underhiil finds the student body very easy to please, and
patiently bears their sins of omission.
He Is very pleased with the new
arrangement whereby the students
have  one hour  for  lunch.
He finds that with this system, the
number of people in the underground
eatery at once ls cut almost in half,
thus facilitating, service.
HOME  FOR HOMELESS.
The students also benefit by this
because they no longer have to stand
for a seat, (to be Irish about it). The
new plan, however, does mean that
his duties begin earlier.
At  8.18  he  opens his concession,
because, he says, "the students look
so homeless without It."
Often  the  Caf remains open  after
the usual closing  time when various
campus clubs hold their dinners. The
waitresses  who serve at these  functions   are   given   Saturday   afternoon
off   by   their  manager  ln  return' for
their services.
SERIOUS   SUMMER  STUDENTS.
Even in the summer, the Caf remains open, and, according to Mr.
Underhiil, it offers a very different
spectacle from the activity of the
winter session. This is because the
summer school students seem to take
life more seriously.
They do not spend all their spare
time loitering at the tables, playfully throwing lunch-wrappers at
one another and dumping the sugar Into their unfortunate friends'
soup.
They   file   ln   quietly   at   noontime,
(Continued on Page Two)
See CAF
Along with the proverbial mad March winds comes the Co-ed
Hall, the annual dance of the Women's Undergraduate Society.
Next Thursday evening, conventions will be reversed, and
co-eds will escort the boys to the Crystal Ballroom of the Hotel
Vancouver, where, from nine to one, they will dance to the musio
of Mart Kenney's orchestra.
CANDIDATES
FOR COUNCIL
Up till noon Monday there had
been no official nominations handed
in to the Students' Counoil for this
year's slate of officers,
Rumors state that the prexy
office wtll be a four cornered flght
between Darrell Braldwood, John
Garrett, Jack Stevenson ando Johnny Pearson.
The latter two if defeated may
flght It out for treasurer, ■while
Braldwood will oppose Osborne Durkin  for L.S.E. head.
The only suggestions for the
position of secretary Is Ruth Hutchinson, whose experience has
been vice-presidents of the Musical
Sooiety and a Phrateres Executive.
Basil Robinson, Arts '40 president,
and Len Zink ao far are the only
ones rumored to clash for MUS honors
Another triangle flght ls rumored
for the position of 'W.A.A. between
Ruth  Wilson,  Pamela  Runkle.
There Is a possibility that Janet
Fleck may also enter the contest
either as W.A.A. or WUS where she
Is expeoted to be opposed by Biddy  McNeill.
Charlie Nash, Bus Ryan and Jim
Harmer may flght lt out for the position of Junior Member.
"Punishment"
For Debate
Capital punishment will be debated
at the next regular fortnightly meeting of the Parliamentary Forum on
Thursday night, March 2 at 7:30 in
Arts 100.
Ray Anderegg, who obtained a recent victory in a debate on the public utilities question, will uphold the
affirmative of the resolution "That
Capital Punishment be Abolished."
Austin Delany, experienced Law
Society debater, will oppose the resolution in command of the opposing
members.
Professor J. Friend Day will preside.
EXAMINATION MARKS
SENT HOME IN MAY
A statement of marks made on
the April examinations will be
sent to each student about the middle of May.
These statements are sent to the
home addresses unless requests
that they be sent lsewhere are left
with the Registrar.
Students   should,    without    delay,
see that their correct addresses are
in  the Registrar's offlee.
Any student graduating this
spring who has not already filled
out a card of application please
do  so  at  once,
DELANY AND KIRBY
OPPOSING LAWYERS
An arson charge arising out of the
recent chem. lab. fire will feature tho
mock trial of the Law Society next
Thursday, March 2, in Arts 100, at
12.30.
Austin Delany will defend the prisoner while Oeorge Klrby will act as
crown  prosecutor.
WALLFLOWERS
Men will have no voice In their
choice of partners for this annual
affair. For once they will danoe
with the girls who want to danoe
with them; or, if the girls prefer,
the men may sit by the wall In the
traditional wallflower manner.
However, rumor haa lt that there
will be a long stag line on hand
to enliven proceedings.
The dance will be Informal as In
other years, and the vainer males
will have a chanoe to set the standards for sartorial excellence for the
coming spring.
ICE WATER
AND FLANNELS
Light suits in grey will be popular
and set off by buttonholes of spring
flowers or carrots.
In variance from the usual procedure,   Ice-water  will   be    served
Instead of punch.
Tickets will be on sale Wednesday
and  Thursday noons at the  foot of
the caf stairs.    They are going fast,
and co-eds are  advised to purchase
them soon as there might be a shortage at the door.
PATRONS AND EXECUTIVE
Patrons for the occasion will include Chancellor and Mrs. R. E. McKechnie, Dr. and Mrs. L. S. Klinck,
Dean and Mrs. Daniel Buchanan,
Dean and Mrs. F. M. Clement, Dean
M. L. Bollert, Dean and Mrs, J. N.
Finlayson, Miss Mabel Oray and Miss
Oertrude  Moore.
In charge of arrangements is the
W.U.S. executive including Jean
Stordy, Janet Fleck, Betty Bolduc,
Barbara Hall, Rosemary Collins,
Amurl Johnson, Betty Moxom, and
Bunty Soott.
Prooeeds-from the danoe will go towards the Women's Furnishing Fund
of the Brook Memorial Building.
Sweepstakes
For Canada
Sweepstakes for Canada! With this
as their slogan the experienced Forum team of Bob Bonner and Bob
Hayman clash with the Young Liberals ln the first Vancouver Debating
league encounter of the ourrent season on Wednesday noon ln the Auditorium.
These debaters will uphold the
affirmative for U.B.C. on the resolution, "That Sweepstakes in Canada be Legalized."
Bob Hayman ably represented the
Forum at the Lemoyne encounter in
November, while Bob Bonner ls recognized as a potent and dynamic
debater.
This   marks   the   Forum's   fourth
contest   In   the   Vancouver   League.
Forum members   so   far   have obtained one victory—that  of Darrell
Braldwood and Paul Volpe over the
Knights of Columbus early last fall.
The   other   two   contests   were   lost
by   narrow   decisions  to   teams   from
the  Junior Board  of Trade  and  the
Young Liberals.
VICTORIA LEAGUE
FRIENDLY SOCIETY
Students contemplating taking
post-graduate work in England may
meet students from other parts of
the Empire through the Victoria
League. The main aim of this society is ,to promote f riendllnessthrough
personal   contact.
The Young Contingent of the
League issues an invitation to all
young Canadians visiting In England
to go to the head office lh London.
Students taking advantage of this
invitation will gain a better knowledge of England through the contacts they will  make ln the  league. Two
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 28, 1939
THE  UBYSSEY
Issued twloe weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Offloet >06 Auditorium Building ... Phone Point Grey 806
Oampus Subscriptions, $1.60 Mall Subscriptions, $2.00
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Dorothy Cummings
SENIOR EDITORS
Tuesday
Irene Eedy
Friday
Jaok Mair
Sports Editor: Orme Dier
ASSOCIATE   EDITORS
Rosemary Collins Lester Pronger Ted Underhiil
Associate Sports Editors)  Basil Robinson, Myrne Nevison.
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Oaay Durkin       Florence Hurndall       Helen Hann
BUI Backman.
Joan Thompson
Aaalatant Sporta Editors) .Lionel Salt, Jim Harmer. Austin  Frith,
Charles Craig.
O.  V. P.  STAFF
Editor
James Macfarlane
Assistants
Van Parry Ann Jeremy Joyce Cooper
PUB. SECRETARY CIRCULATION MOR.
Virginia Galloway Harry Campbell
REFORTORf AL  STAFF
Jaok Margsson, Pat Keatley, Joan Haslam, Jaoques Metford, Ruth Millar,
Janet Walker, Brlta Vesterbaok, Bob Manson, BUI Osborne, Ken Vernon,
Dick Jarvis
Advertising Office
Standard Publishing Co., 1037 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.O.
Telephone:  SEYMOUR 4484
All advertising handled exclusively by Standard Publishing Oo.
Editorials
OOUNOIL ELECTIONS
No matter is more important at the present moment than the
choice of an Alma Mater Society President. In the last three
years, the position has become a very heavy one. This is the result,
not so much of increased demands made on the student executive,
but of the ability of the last three presidents to meet demands
which were not made directly on them. The A.M.S. presidents
of the past years have all been older and more serious than the
average student. As n result they have taken a very important
place in university affairs. The very pertinent question which
faces the students now is the choice of a successor who will be
-able to fulfill the duties which the past presidents have taken
on themselves.
It is commonly said that the choice of an inadequate man will
have disastrous effects. This is even more true than even a
thoughtful student realizes. It will not be disastrous because the
man cannot carry out his duties for, to a great extent a man imposes presidential duties on himself, to the extent of his ability.
To choose an adequate president, then, is necessary not because
another man cannot fill the position, but because a good man is
necessary to maintain the weight of student opinion in the eyes
of the university and the city.
As yet no nominations hove been filed and it is still a matter
■of speculation, whieh junior has done sufficient work for the university, and has a sufficient knowledge of university affairs, to
(enable him to take on so heavy a duty. It is to be hoped thnt the
nominators of candidates, as well as the electors will pause nnd
consider the merits of a man before they suggest him for, or elect
him to, office.
It will always be the curse of student democracy thnt a man
is elected for his ability to kick a football, drop n boll into the
hoop, or sprint. There will always be candidates elected to offices
requiring thinking ability, whose only recommendations are their
.■muscular development or their social grace.
Sometimes these Hercules, or Adonis, possess brains but, if
they do, it is only a matter of luck—more luck than their electors
deserve. Therefore it is the duty of every student to inquire into
tho campus achievements of each candidate before casting a vote
nnd to elect the man who has shown greatest ability in organization and executive work, rather than the man who is the finest
orator.
Further we would like to suggest to the fraternities who
intend to nominate candidates, that they should choose their most
■capable member. We hnve no fault to find with the habit of
fraternity nominations for any man should be sponsored )>y those
who know him best. Hut the fraternity itself might do well to
put   forward  a capable  man.
BROCK ARTIST
Jean de Rlmanooay, who will
appear ot the University auditorium on Friday evening with
Ira Swartz in the "Sonata Evening" in aid of the Brock Memorial Fund. The affair is under the sponsorship of the Alpha
Oihicron Pi sorority.
I
Diamonds, Watches, Personal Gifts
FIRBANK and LANGE
USE  OUR  CREDIT  PLAN
Seymour  and  Ounsmuir
Opp. the Bin Depot
RIMANOCZY
HERE _FRIDAY
Debussy's Sonata In O Minor will
be performed for the first time In
Vancouver Friday evening, March 3,
when Jean de Rimanocsy, first violinist of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, and Ira Bwatz appear in the
University Theatre in "Sonata Evening" under the auspices of Alpha
Omicron Pi Sorority in aid of the
Brock Memorial Fund.
Also on the program will be the
outstanding Sonata, Op. 40, in C.
Minor, by Orleg, and Cesar Franok's
Sonata in A Major, which is Judged
by music critics as the finest Sonata
that has come from the French
School of composers, and among the
three or four greatest Sonatas written for violin and piano.
Reserved tickets are available today at the University box office for
the last time, and at M. A. Kelly,
Oranvllle St., Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday of this week. All seat*
are reserved, and reservations may
be made at the above places on tickets already secured.
(1*111111 HMH"HMIIIIIIMIMIIItlMIII"HI'*lll,*llttlHIIIHII
Spring Thoughts
At Home
 HlltlHHHIIMHIIHIMMM IMIMIIIIIIII MM II
Marbles are ln the offing and soon
there will be the thwack of skipping
ropes on pavement. Blythe young
co-eds will be whlshtng by on roller
skates and birds will be building nests
ln readiness for you-know-what.
DIAMONDS.
Out on the baseball diamond the
followers of Ruth and Cobb will hit
and run and slide and chase away
their winter hangovers.
The snap of willow on leather and
the faint aroma of tea ushers in the
grand old game of cricket, and when
the haltch.s begin to be Ignored ln
the vicinity of the pitches hither and
yon, you can bring in the sulphur
and molasses for SPRINO (without
the Jump) is here.
Oolf pellets begin to suffer battery
and assault and the tennis courts get
a good going over ln the best flatfoot
manner. The hockey player hangs up
his blades and hies him to the nearest lacrosse field where the grand old
Irish Donneybrook festival is carried
on with reckless abandon and skull-
cracking vigor.
Then working around to' the all-
American pastime that has been
making the front pages for years.
Poets claim it makes the world go
round' and the skeptics assert lt has
made Reno a paying proposition for
years.
WOO PITCHING.
From the athletic viewpoint, Bob
Feller and Dizzy Dean just don't enter . into the picture, and they say
woo pitching ls at Its best on a campus anywhere, and particularly at
U.B.C.
Ah Spring! Where ls thy sting?
Every Joe Is a Don Juan and every
Josephine a Juliet. The sky ls blue
and the birds are singing; the leaves
are greenest green and the wind a
zephyred sonnet.
Even the professors are ln raptures
over the economic aspects of the
fourth dimension in meadows green
with  daisies  pled.
The hillside's dew pearled, the
lark's on the wing, the Dean's ln his
office and all's right with the world.
Oh, hearken all: If Springtime
comes    can  Exams  be  far behind?
Algy
Goes
Bac\stage
Y'know, that now the "Lemonade"
has been drunk to the full, I think
that the noises, profanity, and other
evidences of backstage endeavour
should really have stopped. But they
still continue, louder and for longer,
than ever! In fact, almost every
night, one can see lights glimmer ln
the west end of the Auditorium. Well,
a few evenings ago, I decided to venture into that little passage which
bars the campus hoy-polloy from
back-stage, and see what was Jolly
well what.
I sUd ln, y'know, In the good old
Sherlock Holmes manner, and the
first thing I saw was a person in a
paint-smeared lab. coat, pointing
what seemed a lethal weapon at a
fellow-worker. I was Just about to
Interfere for the peace of the world,
when the Individual spoke.
He said, "Do you think there are
enough staples in this for this flat,
Johnny?" I drew hearer, as Oliver
Ooldsmith would say, and introduced
myself, producing the ever-useful
press card. I found that the lethal
weapon was really a stapler, a dinky
sort of paper-clamp gadget, for fastening canvas onto the flats. (A flat,
Oh Best Beloved, ls a rectagonal
frame of one-by-three which ls covered with canvas and painted to
make scenery.)
They have quite a lot ot stuff like
that ln there, even a sort of machine
gun affair which sprays paint, in a
spray (get the Idea?). It is a great
little Jigger: it sounds like a small
motor-bike when the Juice Is turned
on.
WORKING   SPARE  MOMENTS.
These people, there are several ot
them, are the Players' Club Stage
Crew, and the reason so few people
know about them Is because they are
always working on the stage. They
come out early ln the mornings, and
then do a little between lectures.
Then they put ln a bit of work during lunch. They come out ln the afternoons, until it Is time to go home
for supper. Then they come out again
and work most of the night.
They're really most frightfuUy en
ergetic chaps. I mean, they don't
waste any time about what they're
doing. You'll see one chap painting
a flat, while another ls putting on a
splatter-coat (I won't tell what it is
because it Is a secret, and I promised,
but it's very Important Just the
aame). You may be watching someone doing this, when there is a yell
from above, and you Jump aside to
see a large mass of scenery come to
rest about two-thirds of an Inch from
the ground, having been lowered with
the ease of experience from the paint
gallery.
DAREDEVIL CREW.
Flop I A rope hits the ground behind you, and you turn about—you
are a little dizzy by now—to see a
daredevil in overalls and a black
shirt come tearing down the rope to
the floor. I asked him why he did it,
once, and he replied, with pungent
expletives, that lt was quicker. Singular chap, what?
Come around and see what they're
doing, some time. They may welcome
you for a chat, or they may throw
you out with loud words. But you
must pardon them If they do, because,
they are the stage crew, and they are
very busy. (If you drop tn any hour
of the twenty-four, you will probably
see someone there.)
CONCLUDING VESPER
SERVICE WEDNESDAY
Mr. A. E. Jukes will be guest speaker at the last regular S.C.M. Vesper
Service for this term, to be held on
Wednesday, March 1, at 3.30 p.m. in
the Union College Chapel.
Dr. and Mrs. J. O. Brown have extended a very kind invitation to those
who attend to have tea with them in
the College Parlour immediately following the service. An invitation is
extended  to all.
SOCIAL   SCHEDULE
March 2—Co-ed Ball, Crystal Ballroom.
March 9—Arts "41 Class Party.
Commodore  Cabaret.
March 15-18—Spring Plays, University  Auditorium.
April 38—Brock Memorial Ball,
Hotel   Vancouver.
LOST
Slide    rule    on    Thursday.    Finder
"Let me serve your oar and your oar will serve you"
"Frank" Fioke
U.B.C. SERVICE STATION
24-Hour Emergency Se.vice.
SOUTH END OF MoOILL ROAD
Oomplete Repair Faculties.
PT. OREY S3
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UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.i 0 a.m. to B p.m.j Saturdays B a.m. to noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS, EXERCISE BOOKS AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Graphic Engineering Paper, Biology Paper,
Loose Leaf Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink
and Drawing Instruments.
XMAS CARDS
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SPECIAL UNIVERSITY RATE
Saturday Night—$1.00 per person
PRE.8E.NT YOUR STUDENT PASS
Commodore Cabaret
872 Oranvllle Street
Sey. 41 for Reservations
"GOVERNMENTS' CHANGING
VIEWS" BY ROBERT H. TUPPER
"Government ls the attempt of a
certain society to rule itself," stated
Mr.  R.  H.  Tupper,  Vancouver  barrister and grandson ot the late Sir
Chas. Tupper, one of the "fathers of
Confederation" at the Vancouver Institute Saturday evening in Arts 100.
"Changing   views   of   government"
was the topic of his lecture and ln
preparation Mr. Tupper gave a brief
outline   of   the   development   of   the
government In Anglo-Saxon England.
"The character of government la
formed on  the Ideas of our forefathers," he   said,   "and   ln  their
age,   the   words   freedom,   Roman
virtue, and Uberty, had an Intense
significance and expressed the Ideas
of those times."
"Today," he continued, "outwardly
the form of government under which
we live has not changed apparently,
but Inwardly there are changes going on continuously."
OOVERNMENT HISTORY.
Fifteen thousand years ago our
government was started In Anglo-
Saxon England. The country was
completely immune from attacks ot
outside nations.
For   six   hundred   years   our   society had an opportunity to develop
Its government ln peace—this Is a
unique  feature in  the  histories of
European governments.
Mr. Tupper then described the historical background of the government
of Italy, with its series of Invasions
from outside nations.
NATIONAL UNITY
"We achieved national unity one
thousand years before Italy," he added. "The development of a sense of
Justice is the only quality ot which we
can be proud."
Whan the Normans Invaded England,   the   Anglo-Saxons  submitted
only on condition that the Normans
carry out the administration of the
land  In  accordance  with  the laws
the Anglo-Saxons had -Bade.
After the death of Queen Elizabeth,
modern government started with the
beginning of Uberty and individuality of personalities—everyone   had   a
right to express his personal view.
TWO-FOLD  FUNCTION
The cabinet of today's government
ls exercising its right of government
in two functions, i.e., legislative and
judicial.
In our present day and age of speed
lt is necessary to contract the powers,
the speaker pointed out and said that
he was for that reason not critical of
the cabinet's Increasing power.
However,   cabinet  government  is
the    proper    body    to    Introduce
changes In our  laws,  but It  must
not be allowed to do It unchecked,
and  this  latter   function   must  be
performed by parliament.
The  government   of   democracy  la
taking   upon    Itself   non-democratlo
powers and to retain a democracy we
must  reserve  the right  to   criticise,
and be allowed a hearing by an Impartial Judge, concluded the speak***
NEWMAN ELECTIONS
K
"A
AT WEDNESDAY MEET
The executive for next year's Newman Club will be eleoted Wednesday,
March 1, at 8 p.m., at the home of
Margaret McDermttt, B48 West 38th
Avenue.
A panel discussion on the Personalities of the Reformation will be the
topic for the evening.
On March S at 8 p.m., a symposium
will be given by members of the olub
in the churoh hall at Orown and
Tenth. There will be a program for
the evening and all members and
friends are invited.
CAF
(Continued from Page 1)
and leave to work Immediately they
are finished eating. Thus it ls a simple matter to keep the Oaf clean and
orderly through the summer months.
But In spite of his troubles, summer or winter, Mr. Underhiil likes his
work eo well that he wouldn't dream
of leaving it.
VARSITY  CHRISTIAN   UNION
Rev. W. M. Robertson, pastor of
the Metropolitan Tabernacle, will address an open meeting on the subject: "Christian Certainties," Wednesday, March 1, at 12.45 p.m- ln
Arts 206. Everybody  welcome.
.  w   w  * * * ■
*******
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( Tuesday, February 28, 1939
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
On Thursday evening the Co-ed" Ball will form the highlight
of every feminine undergraduate and graduate's social life. . . . One
way to make a success of the evening is to have an appetizing and
attractive dinner set before the man in your life. . . . The secpnd way
is to take him to the Dolphin a minute's drive on Marine just behind
the university. . . . Here one is assured of the most tempting dishes
that one could desire. . . .
Phone Point Grey 103 though, just to be certain that there is
room for your party, and make your reservation with Mr. Harwood. .
Then there is the story of the girl who was locked out after a party one
evening, who, ever since that fateful evening wears her key around
her neck . . . just in case . . . with a strenuous evening ahead of him,
the partner lad will need a good meal before the long program of
dancing that the co-ed has outlined for him . . . and the Dolphin is
an excellent place to dine ... a tip for the boys . . . take your favorite
girl for tea at the Dolphin and cinch that date. . . .
fi        fi        fi
Co-eds, your informal outfits need a special pair of hosiery . . .
and if your shoes are the open toe and heel type, it is even more necessary. . . . Treat yourself to a pair of tricky mesh toe and heel hosiery
... at Phoebe's 71) Dunsmuir Street, and in the most ravishing new
colors. . .
It will improve the appearance of your sandals a hundred per cent . . .
and the crepes are sheer yet wear resisting. . . . Thre are times when
we wish we had a candid camera handy. . . . One occasion was when
we caught the stage manager and the mother superior blithely kissing
each other. . . .
New spring gloves have arrived at Phoebe's and are in fabric or
kid , , , in the following shades . . . lime green, violet, fushchia, sheba,
gold, japonica, navy, black, and the price is only $1.09 and up. . . .
70***?*""
Co-Ed Ball Etiquette
FOR BOYS
To be a gracious partner for an
evening here are the few fundamentals to observe for the forthcoming
Co-ed Ball:
1. Profusely admire the flowers or
buttor ,e, even though you find Its
perfu-.ie overpowering and the color
clashes with your hair or ensemble.
2. Spend a few moments extra on
that much needed shave, then tactfully alleviate her anger with delicate
apologies.
3. Be sure to turn on the verandah
light so that she will be able to read
the number from the car.
4. Answer the door yourself.
6. Remember to be helpless; never
be independent about cars, coats and
doors.
8. When ahe ia tipping the check
girl look thoughfully in the opposite
direction.
7. Smile agreeably on that two-ton
apparition and thank your lucky stars
she Is only for one dance—you hope.
8. Smile on your last partner If
you should be fortunate enough to be
cut-in on, and have a stock of small
talk to fill in the gaps.
e. Be nonchalant if you're a wallflower—or If dancing with a 'dud' sit
out because your feet hurt.
10. Bmlle bravely and accept her
apologies for taking half the night
trying to find your-ooat.
11. When she asks you where you
want to go after the danoe, use your
mind reading qualities, oross your Angers, and hope that you have guessed
correctly.
12. Be sure to intimate what a lovely time you had—even if you didn't
—and from here on its up to the individual.
FOR GIRLS
"Why did they evict the pre-med.
student   from   the   library?"
"They caught him removing the
appendix from the book he was reading."—Digest,
OET VALUE
IN PRINTING
for the activities
of your—
SORORITIES
FRATERNITIES
SOOIAL
and
OLUB FUNCTIONS
THE
CLARKE & STUART
OO. LIMITED
Stationers and Printers
550   SEYMOUR   STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
aag-sa-Si ■B,-«Bi,_a"ga *** mz. ■an
1
Qlrla: With the Co-ed Ball Just
two nights away, the following ls a
list of helpful suggestions ln social
demeanor for that all-ausplclous occasion:
1. Arrange to have hla corsage—
animal, vegetable or mineral—delivered to his home ln the early evening
so that he has plenty of time to decide where and how to wear lt.
2. Oall for him quite a bit later
than when you had arranged; the
suspense la good for him, and besides,
he'll get a rough Idea of how it feels.
3. Be sure to go up to his door—
no honking outside, please; and have
you got the right address after all?
4. Ward off Inquisitive little broth-
era with a disarming smile, and escort
the apple of your eye to your vehicle
of locomotion, hold open the car door,
and tuck him ln nice and cosy.
8. When you have found a place to
park not more than a half dosen
blocks from the hotel, assist him to
disembark and escort him to the
dance, walklnk on * the side nearest
the road. It will probably make you
feel awful, but keep your chin up and
remember that you're protecting him
from goodness knows what.
6. By now you're approaching the
ballroom and must therefore check
both coata—i.e., yours and his. Remember to keep the checks and not
to get them mixed.
7. Now for lt; your program will
have been arranged ln advance, so all
you have to do is rush about and
round up his partners.
8. When a cut-in comes along, introduce him to "her," even if you detest "her," and gracefully relinquish
him.
0. Do some cut-ins yourself. Now's
your chance, Babe"
10. After the ball ls over, join the
madding crowd and extract the overcoats; this ts a matter of time, but ls
veil worth it.
11. Back to the car again, and take
him to some eating place if he merits
it;  here's where you pay again.
12. Straight home—depositing him
on the door-mat. From here on It's
up to the individual.
SIMPLE  SAOAS
From  Paree  went  a   dashing   apache
To London to be an attache—
But  the going got tough
So he said "I am through!"
And he's back in belle France with a
headache.
Some college boys like ties with
dots In 'em, suits with stripes In 'em,
and letters from home with checks
In   'em.—Beaumont  Digest.
Exclusive Camera PORTRAITS
At Popular  Prices
CHANG SUEY
AND
The Case of the Thirsty
Thirteen
CHAPTER SIXTEEN
Herb We Oo Again
"// all the people that eat at boarding houses were laid end to end, they
■would reach," — Chang Suey, Li.
(invulnerable).
Dark, shadowy figures crept stealthily through the inky blackness of
Hogan's Alley, flitting from drunk to
drunk as they closed ln on the town
house of the fiend, Chang Suey.
Carslse McMIre, cleverly disguised as a three-storey tenement, cupped his hands and bugled the call
of the she-moose.
He  was answered  immediately  by
the honk of the male, and he hurried
off In the. direction of the sound.
MOOSE INTO MOOSE.
It was with mutual dissatisfaction
that Oasrize and the moose ran into
one another on a side-street.
The moose never recovered, dying
with the conviction that h» had
been double-ordssed by a C. P. R.
freight.
Colonel Oee (Makemlne) Rum and
twenty (20) of his trusty recruits of
bubbled the boose, and passed out
with an ease that made the recruits green with envy.
"Men," said Colonel Rum generously, "that building ls the hide-out
of Chang Suey. I want volunteers
willing to go ln there to take one
step forward I"
ARABESQUE.
Then tears came Into his eyes, as,
to a man, every one of those twenty
recruits took one step backwards.
"Very well," he sniffed, "surround
the place I"
"We   oan   have   more   fun   surrounding a place down the street,
sir," quoth Wiggins.
"I  hate  you,  Wiggins I" cried  the
Colonel. "I hate you, I hate you, I
hate you0"
LAST IN THE CELLAR.
Then, Carslse and Rum felt their
way cautiously Into the blackness of
the damp, ghastly ceUar. Startled
Freshmen scuttled across the slimy
floor ln front of them. Suddenly, the
horrible voice   of   the   fiend,  Suey,
WIOOINS waiting tor a streetcar
the C.O.T.C. (Songs and Sayings for
all    Occasions),    were    sneaking    up
from the other side.
ONE DOLLAR DOWN.
Suddenly, a wild shriek rent the
air, and the twenty recruits jumped
Into the Colonels arms. Disengaging
himself from this unusual show of
affection, the' Colonel sent back a
one-man detail named Wiggins to •*>?
what the trouble was. Wiggins reported almost immediately.
"The crowd In the Boll Theatre
caught somebody In their midst
who wasn't a solenoeman. sir,"
quoted Wiggins, and started to go
back again.
."Where are you going now, Wiggins?" asked the Colonel, pleasantly.
"I thought you-might want a more
detailed report, sir," quoth Wiggins.
SKI TOOS.
"Walt until tomorrow night, and
we'll all go, Wiggins," said the Colonel glibly. "By the way, Wiggins,
how long have you been wearing skis
while on duty?"
"I'm not wearing skis, sir," quoth
Wiggins.
"Well, Wiggins, you had better
start rolling your feet. It's getting so
I can't tell whether your lying down
or standing up, and I see you in both
positions  quite  frequently,   Wiggins."
"Yessir," quoth Wiggins.
CADAVERS.
At that moment, Carsize Joined the
group, and pointed a quivering finger
at a dark form ln the gutter.
"There's a body there!" he whispered hoarsely.
One of the medical corps lifted
up tbe prone man's head, and pronounced him dead.
It was then that the body opened
one  bloodshot  eye  and  solemnly  regarded the group over lt.
RECIPES.
"Thlsh," lt mumbled wistfully, "ish
a Hashtlngsh Easht Haymaker. Take
three quartsh gin, two quarter, rye,
one pint turpsh, one pound butter,
three raw eggsh, and a bucket.
Sherve wish antidote. Enough for
eight   plpple   or   one   longshoreman."
Wiggins stared at the stew, his eyes
glowing with admiration.
"Boy! He's pretty drunk. Isn't he?"
"Aw,   I'm    pretty    all    the   time,"
broke  through  the silence.
"Halt I"
The voloe   was   coming   from  a
queer looking phonograph ahead of
them. It must have been set off by
some mysterious ray.
"So  the foreign devils have dared
to  force  their  way  Into  the  den  of
the mighty Chang Suey!" it snarled.
MR. NOAH.
"Why we were Just waiting for a
atreet car, and lt started to rain . . ."
babbled Carslse.
"Quiet!" shouted the phonograph.
"You   must   die!   Vnder   the   floor
where  you  stand  Is  a  time-bomb
set   for   12.38   a.m.!   You   shall   be
blown to pieces "
Carslse fumbled for his watch.
"Say I"   he  cried.  "It's   12.40   now I
Why hasn't lt gone off?"
"Aha!" cackled the phonograph.
"So you're wondering too?"
And with  that started to swing
out on "Jeepers Creepers."
But at that moment, the floor gave
way, and Carsize and the Colonel felt
themselves falling  through darkness.
(Well! It doesn't look very good,
doea It? Will Mandy Lou be shot by
the trappers? Does Peter Rabbit
know Jimmy Skunk's capacities?
We oan only hope so. I know;
Where's Osear Scrlbblewell. He was
the third on the left, next to Aunt
Boogie. So our ace reporter Is on
the Job!   !) „
The   Hotel   Vanoouver
presents
MART KENNY
nt   the  Spanish  OrUI
SHORT STORY AND POETRY
CONTESTS
Prizes are being offered for short
stories 100 to 3500 words ln length;
poems not to exceed 32 lines. The
contest closes on March 31, 1930. Full
particulars and rules upon application. The Writer's Studio. Box IB.
Toronto, Canada.
PERMIT   LOST
LOST: A stack permit belonging
to Frances Jones. Please return to
Miss Smith, Librarian.
Now Offermd
In the familiar pouch or new
slide packages. A tattler, milder
cigarette made from much
better tobaccos. Try them.
behind
the
MIKE
Rod Poisson and his oast of the
new University Radio Society feature, 'U.B.C. Presents . . ." last Sunday surprised listeners with their interpretation of Dick Diespecker's
"Whom the Oods Have Loved." A
dramatisation of the life of Rupert
Brooke, beloved Kngllsh poet of the
early 20th Century, the play, was exceptionally  well-cast  and  well-acted.
The double problem of directing
and of taking the leading role was
carefully handled by Rod himself,
with very creditable results. Bob
McDougall, Sheila Wilson, and Pat
Keatly showed much ability, and
handled their parts with sympathetic
understanding.
The script, which was written by
Dick Diespecker, program director
of station CJOR, showed an Infinite
understanding and respect for the
young British poet.
Basil Robinson was narrator of
the story, and Bill "Nickerson and
Beorge Kldd also took part. Van
Perry, the news voice of the university, took a "double-voice" part, playing a reporter and a Sootch captain.
Next week another drama half-
hour will be arranged under "U.B.C.
Presents . , ." and details will appear
ln Friday's "Bbyssey."
POEMS . •.
and STUFF
CompUed by LEWIS ROBINSON
With the Ball approaching, many
*t Co-ed is'beginning to wonder if his
rushing during the past few weeks
didn't have some ulterior motive after all.
...
She took him to a restaurant
And filled him full of food.
But when he tried to cuddle,
She wasn't ln the mood.
She took him to a movie,
And thought It would suffice.
And when he tried to kiss her.
She claimed it wasn't nice.
The Oo-ed has her chance to pay,
She takes it with a smile.
She doesn't feel like necking, boys,
She'll be broke for quite a while.
...
The roadster skidded around the
corner, Jumped into the air, knocked
down a lamp post, smAshed three
oars, ran against a stone fence and
stopped. The co-ed climbed ou)t of
the wreck. "Darling." she exclaimed,
"THAT is what I call a kiss I"
SERENADE CONCLUDES
WITH GALA RECEPTION
With the conclusion of "Serenade"
on Saturday evening, one hundred
and fifty members and alumni were
the guests of Dr. and Mrs. W. L. McDonald at their home on West Third
Avenue.
Among those present were Dr. and
Mrs. A. F. B. Clarke, Mr. and Mrs. C.
Hayon Williams, Mrs. O. G. McOeer,
and Dr. and Mrs. J. T. Schofleld.
APPUCATI0NS FOR
LETTERS CLUB DUE
Applications for membership in the
Letters Olub should be given this
week to President Bob apRoberts, or
secretary Marian Vance. There are
vacancies for second year and third
year students.
Thoae who have already made applications are aaked to meet the
prealdent or secretary ln Dr. Sedge-
wick's office at  12.30.
B MINOR MASS BY
BACH AT RECITAL
The Carnegie Record Salon today
will be given over entirely to a per-
formance of Johann Sebastian Baoh'a
massive B minor Maas.
Dr. W. L. McDonald, himself an
authority on the aubject, will apeak.
Students are asked to be ln Arta 100
promptly at 12.35 prompt.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
"Oerman Culture Before Hitler"
will be the subject of an address by
Miss Madeleine Vance when she
speaks to the Psychology Olub on
Tuesday, February 28, at 8 p.m.
The meeting will be held at the
home of Mlas Vance, 4800 West 8th.
Members are requested to be present.
WALLET  LOST
Black leather wallet, zipper fastener, belonging to D. Markham, Sc. '41.
Vour Turn
GIRLS!
In suggesting Brown Bros,
oorsage for the Oo-Bd. Ball,
we're addressing this ad to
the ladies. You've wanted
one before. Now you oan
get it for yourself. You'll
be delighted with the appearance—and economy—of
a corsage from Brown Bros.
JOE BROWN   (Arts '28)  Mgr.
FLOWERFONE
8BY. 1484
New
Spring Samples
of Distinctive
TIP TOP CLOTHING
at
Esquire Men's
Apparel
2604 Oranvllle
Bay. 0680
PURSE LOST
Will the person who took a brown
leather purse from one of the stacks
on the third floor, return lt to the
stack and oblige the owner, Frances
Jones.
I...11.tIMI..,,,.,,,..,,,,,,,(,1,111,,,,,,,,,,ll>,,,,(,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
Just   about   all   you   could   ask
for    .    .    .
ARISTOCRATIC
HAMBURGERS
Limited
10th and  Alma
TAKE    SOMK    HOME     f
 -ItlKllltllHl-lllllUIMIIIItMIIIIIIIIIIMIIMMIllinUlU*
Co-Eds
After the Dance
WHITE   ^3  SPQT
Granville St. at 67th Ave. THREE   VARSITY RUGGER SQUADS BAT .000
RESULTS:
Varsity 3—Meralomas 10
U.B.O. 0—Rowers 30
RESULTS:
Varsity Soooer 1—South Van. 0
Thunderbirds 9—Viotorla 10
Four
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 28, 1939
Varsity   Soccermen   Upset   Leaders
H1TCHENSMEN
SMASH SOUTH
VAN UNITED
BEN  HERD  SCORES
ONLY COUNTER
By BASIL ROBINSON
It's lucky that the language
contains the word "unpredictable", or there wouldn't be any
appropriate means of describing
the "Varsity soccermen.
For Saturday at Wilson Park,
the cream of the campus soccer
group staged another devastating upset and stole all the glory
from the ballyhooed ruggermen
by defeating the league-leading
South Vancouver outfit 1-0 in a
thrilling V. and D. league battle;
FIVB OUT OF SIX
. The win of the collegians was the
seoond ln three games againat the
league-leaders, while the remaining
tilt ended in a tie.
Minus their clever centre-forward
Rod McMillan and smarting from
the 8-0 defeat handed them last week
by St. Regis, co-holders of top plaoe
in the standings, the - Hltohensmen
settled down from the start to uphold the Jinx they have maintained
thia season over the rugged South
Van. bunch.
HERD SCORES
The only tally of the game came
halfway through the first half, when
Ben Herd got his head to a classic
cross from right-winger Irish, and
gave the campusmen the lead they
never relinquished.
PENALTY  FAILS
The rest of the enoounter was
closely fought with exchanges about
even until the last ten minutes when
the home team seemed to lie down
and submit to the Varsity onslaught
Three times Doug Todd came within
an ace of raising the oount for the
Blue and Oold team, while Irish was
continually sending over perfeot
crosses just asking to be converted.
LEONG. OOOD
Highlight of the second half was
provided when a penalty awarded
against a Varaity defender with but
U mlnutea to go waa brilliantly turned aside by Goalie Dennle Leong who
dived fuU length on his stomach to
save the day.
Outstanding for the collegians was
"Mis" Misuhara on defense, Jaok
Rush, who broke up many a promising sally with his storming tactics
and Irish on the right wing.
FOUR THUNDERING THUNDERBIRD SOCCERMEN
ALAN CROLL, captain and long tune
star of Varaity soccer teams, Is the
chap on the left above. He Is the
fuUbaek star.
JACK RUSH, half-back stalwart, is
the gentleman next to Alan. He
sparks the forwards with his long
accurate passing up front.
THE NEAREST BANK IS
The Canadian
BANK OF
COMMERCE
Tenth and Sasamat Branoh
"A general bank business
is transacted and aooounts
of the faoulty and students
of the University of British
Columbia   are   weloomed.''
BANKERS   TO   THE
AT.MA MATER
SOCIETY
0. R. Myers, Manager
SKIERS HAVE FUN
LAST WEEK BUT
WASHINGTON WINS
Varsity skiers held the spotlight
over the week-end as the annual
Northwestern Intercollegiate Ski
Meet went over with minor reverberations through bad weather conditions and strong opposition from
colleges across the line.
Friday morning the cross country
was run off over a long series of
bumps and hills through a blinding
blizzard. Barto from Washington did
the course ln 26 minutes to win the
event while Al Fraser of the locals
came home third ln 28 minutes flat.
The jumping on the same day was
won   by  Scera   of  the  University   of
Washington.
JUST FUN.
Saturday, weather was a little more
in favour of the snowmen but not for
the Thunderbirds of the white outdoors. They had held on to seoond
place until the slalom and downhill
were held and then they took one
long slide and not on their skis.
When the events were all run off
the general Impression was that maybe the Blue and Oold team didn't
know much about the fine old winter
pastime, but even so they all had a
lot of fun and learned plenty from
the visitors.
In the Vlskie Classic on Sunday
the University of B.O. was represented but once more that is that. Audrey Ohowne was the only one of the
fairer sex, while Pogue, Ware, Hark-
ley and Sharpe were out to do or die
for the boys.
The teams and coaches of the
visiting colleges all expressed their
satisfaction and pleasure ln the trip
and in the handling of the eventB
which were well managed by officials
of the Vancouver Ski Zone. Ski Hell!
THIRD TEAM RUGGERS
LOSE 16 - 9 SATURDAY
Fortunately the Frosh rugby team
was not ln action on Saturday, or
perhaps Varsity's perfect batting
average would have been ruined. Victoria School over-powered the third
team ln the flrst half of the lower
Brockton battle, and lost 10-9.
The Varsity squad started with
only 12 men, and at half time the
Victorians had a commanding 13-0
lead. The students came back strong
after the breather but although they
got three tries, they were too far behind.
Speed...
Seymour 4484
Quality..*
Service...
MITCHELL PRINTING and
PUBLISHING  OO.  LTD.
1037    WEST    PENDER    STREET
And here la CHARLIE HITCHENS,
the master mind behind the success
o.' the Thunderbird soccer team this
year, and one of the most popular
and   efficient  coaches   In  Vanoouver.
BASKETBALL, RUGBY
CHAMPIONS CROWNED
IN INTRAMURALS
Meet the new champs! In the intramural basketball tourney, Arts '41
came through and yesterday Arts '40
captured the lnter-class rugby trophy.
Last Friday the Sophomores nosed
out the Arts '38 quintette 10-10. It
was a nip and tuck battle all the
way, but ln the closing minutes, Arts
'41 grabbed a three point lead and
held on to the finish. Menales, Barton
and Charlton shared the scoring
honors for the winners. The team has
been consistently playing great basketball and they came through the
tough  tournament  without a  defeat.
In yesterday's rugby battle, Arts '40
shellacked the game Aggies 11-0 and
now have the hono rof being the first
to possess the new rugby trophy.
SMITH  SCORES.
Freddy Smith of football fame gave
the Juniors a 4-0 lead early in the
flrst half by dropping over a sensational field goal. From then until the
end of a good game watched by a
large crowd, the Aggies Just couldn't
get started.
FOUL!  FOWL?
Maury has announced that on Friday noon the basketball foul shooting
contest (no ducks please) will be
staged. Each team must have Ave
men. Ten shots each and the highest
.coring team will be the winner and
will chalk up twenty valuable points
ln the race for the coveted Governor's Trophy for Intramural supremacy.
Pavement pounder should be getting ln shape for the Arts '30 to be
run on March 7 and the Arts '20 on
March 15. Practices are held every
night at the stadium at 4 p.m. and
the intramural track meet comes off
on  March 22.
DOUO TODD, next In line, Is a halfbaok or Inside left and one of the
slickest little bootballers at present
In Vanoouver.
BEN HERD, left wing, brings up the
procession on the right. He soored
the only goal as Varsity defeated
South Van on Saturday and ts noted for his long loping stride.
_j-____Bsr.«i2Bsa»ra«
MILLER CUP
CHASE BOGS
UBC'S    WHITEWASHED
BY ROWERS 30-0
LOST
Lost  in  Aggie  100,  on  February  6,
library   book   "Race   Psyhcology"   by
Garth.  Please  return   to  the  Library |
immediately.
By JIM HARMER
Ah ! Woe is us. woo is us, novor
has tho "Tuesday of tor" portrayed such a sod and Bloomy
situation as that which it now
sets before you. Soon may it be
forgotten in local rugger annals.
We refer of course to the big
double fiasco on Saturday in
which both our,oval leother-luR-
K.n« squads took rather decisive
socks on their respeetive chins. Varsity were set down by an inspired
Meraloma team to the tune of 10-3,
while the UBeeCees were dumped by
th powerful  Rowing Club 30-0,
MUST PLAY TWO
Fortunately, especially for the Varsity crew, neither game means a
great deal as far as league standings go, but it meana that the aforementioned must ploy their two postponed games, one with U.B.C. and
t'other with the New Westminster
squad. By winning both of these encounters Varsity -would retain possession of the Miller Cup. So much for
statistics.
The game at the Stadium was far
from being an Impressive affair from
either the victors or vanqulshed's
point of vie**-, especially the latter
who were ln rare form, so rare that lt
was  odious.
The orange and black boys missed
tour easy penalty kicks ln the first
half which helped to keep the score
down, but even this bit of cousinly
attitude failed to shake the Studes
from the lethargy Into which they
were plunged for most of the afternoon.
Vic Moore, appearing for the first
time this year, was easily the standout from the local slant. Vic consls-
ently outhooked the Meraloma heeler
only to see his efforts wasted -by the
backfleld as*the close-checking 'Lomas spilled the two McPhees, Robertson and Tremblay all over the
greensward. John Bord was super
but the task of carrying the team
was a little too much to ask.
Ted McPhee plunged over near the
flag to save the blue and gold from
a shut-out but missed the convert.
Down at the Point U.B.C. had the
misfortune   to   run   up   against   the
FOR VARIETY
9feH saris
FIVE
DELICIOUS
FLAVORS
LIMON
OKANOI
STRAWBIRRY
VANILLA
BORDIAUX
THE   BEST   CHDCDLPTE   MODE
offside
  arm* dier
Now that Spring ls Just around the first corner and exams are Just
around the second and supps are Just around the third, lt Is high time we
said something from our corner (the fourth, of course, now we can have
a game  of bldge)  about  thl athletic  situation  on  our  fair  campus.
Out here where lt never rains but It pours and where the grass Is
evergreen, we have one of the finest educational Institutions this side of
New Westminster. Our Alma Mater U.B.C. has turned out more first class
scholars than any other university of Its slse in any equal area exolusive
of certain sections of Baluchistan and one corner of the Malay Archipelago.
AW, YOU LOOK, I'M TIRED
Yet look at what the officials ot our oollege are pleased to call our
system of Physical Education.
Oranted, of course, that we have the finest Director of Physical Bducation for men in the person of Maury Van Vllet, and the ilnest Director
of Physical Education for Women in the person of Miss Oertrude K. Moore,
but why are there not plenty more of each, and a lot more of both kinds.
The alms of higher eduoatlon should not be all baldly Intellectual nor
frankly inquisitorial, with the pyramid of book worming grading down
from the professor at the top to the poor harassed caf hound at the bottom,
all slaves to a little mathematioal Idol shaped suspiciously in the form of
fifty per cent.
YUH GOTTA BIS FIT
It takes at least a bit of physical fitness to get along In the grim
struggle for life outside our cloistered halls, (yes, my little sub-deb, there
really ls a struggle), and we think the place to learn to keep ln good
physical trim  ls during the formative  oollege  years.
So what Maury and Miss Moore need now are at least two assistants
each and the co-operation of a number of Btudent class leaders to really
put this P.T. business across. After all, it may be a fine thing for a man
to be able to spout history dates by the hour when there ls nothing better
to do, but a little Btamlna and physical endurance ls also a fine thing when
you have to work late at the office.
YEA  TOO,  THE FACULTY
At any college of equal enrollment ln the U.S. would have about four
full-time Instructors ln the department of physical education to say nothing
of a host of student assistants. It might be an awful bore to some people
to have to get out and sweat a bit, but lt really would be good for their
souls. We might advocate compulsory physical education for all the faculty
too Just to see If the professors are human after all, but we have to writ.,
exams like  the  rest  of  the  herd,  so we  dare  not  run  the  risk.
And that brings up the point that there should be absolute compulsion
In this gym work and all students whether they are out here to haunt
the stacks or clutter up the Caf should be chased over to the hoop hall at
least three times a week to be put through their paces by our efficlon*
friend  Vim and  Vigor Van  Vliet  and  his  five  should-be  helpers.
They say there Is something in the air about all this coming and  if so,
we are on  the  right side of the # fence for  once.
Garoon, deux!    Vlte, vite!
COLLEGE   HELPS'
Write for our free catalogue listing College Outlines, Helps,
Translations.
THE BOOK EXCHANGE
••Canada's  Book-Clearing House"
370 Bloor St.  W., Toronto,   Ontario
and
Rowers on one of their better days,
and when the Club are in form they
are unbeatable.
This Wednesday, tomorrow, Varsity and U.B.C. tangle at the Stadium
in   a    much    postponed    battle;    the
Ubees threaten to Import a flock of
Canadian football stars to make the
game Interesting, so If anyone is anxious to see a bit of gore spilled, rally
around the grounds at 3:00 to-morrow.
IIIIHMIHIIIIIH1HllllllltimltHI*IHIII*IMMIItllM«HMIMttlHHHIMtMMtlHtMI«llnm,HI<H,««,,Mt,,,,,,,, ,,,,,, I Mil 11 Illllll
HOW'S YOUR
GOLF GAME?
To be accurate you
must learn the Fundamentals ot the Oolf
Swing. The winter season Is the time to Iron
out your difficulties and
learn how to enjoy
Golf.
Hal Rhodes Goll School
1155 W. Pender Street        Seymour 5333
IHHH ItlHIIMHIIIIMIIIIIIIH
III1111**111111111)1llllIIIllllIIIII
lllllltlHHIHIltIllll llllltllllllllllli

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