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The Ubyssey Oct 11, 1957

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1
IS
WATCHING
YOU
VOL. XL
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1957
No. 10
Tweert> Closses
Five Dollars For
Open House Slogan
FRIDAY
OPEN   HOUSE  —   SLOGAN
for Open House, '58 is still being
sought by the Committee. Please
bring to Open House office,
Brock Hall before Tuesday, $5
prize for best slogan,
* *      *
JAZZSOC presents the Paul
Bley Quartet direct from Los
Angeles, today at noon in the
auditorium. Memberships are
available at the door.
* *      *
PLAYERS CLUB— Auditions
for Fall Plays will take place
today from 2.30 to 5.30 in the
Auditorium and tomorrow from
9.30 to 1.30 at the same place—
the Auditorium,
* *      *
CAMERA CLUB will hold a
general meeting today at noon
in Arts 204. All members should
attend if possible.
* *      *
UNITED    NATfONS    CLUB
presents "Cyprus — Enosis and
Self Determination, Partition or
Colony," today in Arts 100. A
panel discussion led by Dr. John
Norris, John Gibbard, Mrs. Fay
Pearce and Robin Pearce.
* *      *
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB will
hold a general meeting today in
Arts 102, The year's activities,
elections, etc., will be outlined.
* *      *
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB presents the film "Breakdown" in
the Psychology Building, HM-2
today at noon. All ore welcome.
* *      *
S.C.M. invites all who are interested to their Fall Camp at
Ocean Park over Thanksgiving
weekend. Talks by Bishop
Gower and Prof. Ping-Ti-Ho.
More information in 312 in the
Auditorium.
* *      *
BIOLOGY CLUB will show
a film "Northwest Treasure" in
Biology 100 today at noon.
* *       *
ISLAMIC CENTRE will hold
a general meeting today at noon
in Room 102 of the Forestry and
Geology Building. All Moslem
students are invited to this
meeting.
* *      *
C.C.F. CLUB will hold a general meeting in Arts 104. Plans
for the year will be discussed.
All interested please attend.
* *      *
DANCE CLUB presents Ballroom Dancing at noon today in
the Dance Club Room in »the
Brock Extension.
* *       *
FENCING CLUB—There will
be an organizational meeting today at noon in Arts 206. All interested are welcome.
* *      *
VARSITY FLYING SAUCER
Club will meet in Arts 101 today at noon. All interested are
welcome.
* *       *
TUESDAY
PARLIAMENTARY COUNCIL
will hold a general meeting for
all members of all Political
Clubs Tuesday at noon in Arts
204.
* *       *
JAZZSOC presents a distinguished panel ot guests speaking on "My Favorite Piece of
Jazz." The guests will include
famous downtown personalities
and will be held on Tuesday al
noon in Physics 202.
* *       *
FILMSOC and Special Lvonts
— The B.C. Premiere of the
Cannes Film Festival Award
Short "Bespoke Overcoat" will
be shown on Tuesday al noon in
the Auditorium. Admission will
be 2!)c.
* *       *
FILMSOC    presents    Roberto
Rossellini's   post   war   classic,
"Paisan",   on   Tuesday   at   m.'ll),
(!  and  11.15  p.m.  in  the  Auditorium.
* k *
CIVIL     LIBERTIES     UNION
will hold its meeting on Tues
day at noon in Arts lit:; This is
an important meeting Kveryone
out.
£*£*#■' *"*''^i^ffi^ys"*-^-:-'
Value Of Fraternities
Debating Union Topic
With a resounding majority, students in Arts 100 at noon
Thursday decided that fraternities and sororities definitely are
NOT undesirable elements at UBC.
In   what   moderator   Graham*
Mosely called a "battle of principles, not personalities," newly
formed Debating Union presented anti-Greek Jack Giles and
Jim MacFarlan, against fraternity men Terry O'Brien and
Larry Freeman.
DISCRIMINATE
Defending thc topic: "Resolved that fraternities and sororities are undesirable elements at
UBC," MacFarlan alleged that
fraternities discriminate on ea-
cial, religious and social bases.
"You lose your right to choose
your  friends  when  you become
the right to scar permanently
the personality of any individual," he said.
Claiming that Greeks "do not
contribute materially to the facilities they receive," Giles alleged that they "receive $250
worth of services from AMS
each year, and two rent'free
rooms in Brock Extension."
WORTH FAR MORE
Contradicting Giles, third-
year Law student Larry Freeman said that "benefits to the
individual,  to  the  AMS  and  to
sorority   or   fraternity   mem-; charities   are   worth    far
more
ber," he said.
Attacking the "malodorous
practice of dinging," MacFarlan
described an "adolescent" girl
phoning her mother on "screech
day," crying "I got D.G.'s, I got
D.G.'s!"
"What," he asked, "would be
the effect upon her mother if
she cried "I got DT's" or "I got
VD's."
SOCIAL CLUB
Arguing against the topic,
Law student Terry O'Brien said
that a fraternity, from a member's view, is "a social club."
"It is an organization to promote your own interest," he
said.    "You join to have a good
than S'-l.TO per year.
"Can il be said that an organization is undesirable when il
provides housing?" Freeman
asked.
Claiming that the AMS depends on fraternities and sororities for projects such as Homecoming and the Blood Drives,
Freeman added" that "the AMS
realizes the strength of fraternities, and the need for their cooperation."
JUSTIFIES EXISTENCE
"Docs any other organization
on campus contribute $2,000 a
year to a worthy charity?" Freeman concluded.
"This alone justifies their ex-
time with people who are your j istance," he said.
friends." j     Throwing the debate open to
"It is the basic right of every j the floor, Moderator Mosely
individual to associate with j started a tradition to be carried
whom he pleases," O'Brien con-j out at Debating Union meetings
tinned. "Legally there is absol-! "about every three weeks."
ulely nothing wrong with it, and | "Two speakers from each side
I don't believe there is anything : will present their views, then
wrong with it morally, either." anyone can speak for three min-
UNDESIRABLE INFLUENCE     j utes each on either side, then we
Third speaker Jack Giles j will vote," Mosely said,
stated that Greek Letter Socie- Controversial subjects will be
ties arc "psychologically odious, I presented Thursday noon hours
sociologically detrimental," and in Arts 100 throughout the year,
that they "exercise undesirable ! When the final vote was call-
influence in student govern- ed, the negative was supported
ment." by   an   estimated   throe-quarters
"No organization should  have   of the audience.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Organization invites you to hear a
lecture entitled "Christian Science, the Answer to the Human
C'S.B .
Need"  by   Arthur  Wuth
on  Tuesday   at   12."0   in
>
'i IV:iics
!()L>
k k        ' k
WEDNESDAY j
PRE   SOCIAL   WORK    SOC.
vviil hold an organizational meel- j
in:; :il   I" "ll  Wednesday  in  Arts
I,) I.
k k k
THURSDAY
THE   CRITICS   CIRCLE   will
hold  its  lirst   meet ing  on Thursday. Oct    17. ol  lifif)ll Cypress Si
(Take   Ihe   Arbutus   bus   and   eel
off   at   mlllii Koeslleim,     Play
"Dark in ■ ■ . al   Noon" will la   di
i'Ua.:ed.
NOMINATIONS OPEN
FOR ASUS POSITIONS
Nominaiionr. open today for
Vice- President, Treasurer,
Secretary, and Second-year
Arts Representative of the
Arts and Science Undergraduate Society.
Those positions became vacant when the previous elected
members (ailed to relurn to
UBC. The deadline for filing
nominations, to Box 4, AMS
office is 4 p.m., Monday,
October  20.
Nominations must be signed
by five member:! of ASUS.
The Vice President, Secretary
■:nd Tr;.'!AU'i«r's nominations
rnu: t bo in Third Year.
UBC Scientists Agree USSR
Technology Well Advanced
Dean Andrew
Calls Story
"Half A Job"
"I have no Interest In attending future Leadership Conferences without consciosness of
the press being present."
This is part ot a statement
given the Ubyssey by Dean
Geoffrey Andrews, Deputy to
the President, regarding a controversial story on alleged inefficiency in the Buildings and
Grounds Department printed in
Thursday's Ubyssey.
The -story arose from statements made to the Ubyssey Wednesday by leadership delegates
and others.
Dean Andrews stated that, "all
the stories appearing in the
Ubyssey arising from Leadership Conference when no one
was informed that students were
there as reporters were "a
breach of faith,"
CRITICIZED
He criticized the story as being only "half a job of reporting" because no one from the
Department of Buildings and
Grounds Department had been
invited to the conference."
"This sort .of thing destroys
a certain part of the value of
Leadership Conference," he said.
Asked his opinion on the
story, AMS President, Ben Trevino said, "When the conference
brings out a situation where
each club feels that it is being
wronged in the same way, this
is  an  accomplishment.
"Previously these people
thought that they were alone
in their problem. I don't feel
that airing the thing in the
Ubyssey is detrimental to anybody."
Instructor Clint Burhans of
the English department said that
he felt the story would serve
to inhibit free discussion at future conferences for fear that
statements made would be printed in the Ubyssey.
"However, the story was intrinsically valuable," he said.
UCC chairman, Chuck Connaghan said, "If there's ineffici
iency on this campus we should
blast it wide open."
Universities
Hit By Mild
Flu Epidemic
TORONTO, (CUP) — What
was described by medical authorities as "a mild flu epidemic"
hit the campus of University of
Toronto here this week, hospitalizing hundreds of students.
NOT ASIAN FLU
The flu, described as "unpleasant but not Asian", filled
campus infirmaries.
University authorities said
classes may be cancelled if the
epidemic increases.
Registrar A. J. Earp posled a
notice warning students to stay
home "at the first sign of a
cold."
Out-of-town students affected
by the virus were asked to report to the health service and
"take to their beds."
None of the medical authorities would hazard a guess as to
when the epidemic would end.
Meanwhile, in Hamilton, Ont.,
McMaster   University   too,   staggered   under   an   attack   of   "la
grippe."
GAME CANCELLED
The virus struck tho coach
and most members of the Marauders football team, forcing
them to cancel a game against
Toronto's Varsity Blues.
LAST CALL FOR AMS
CARDS AND PICTURES
Free AMS cards are to be
picked up at the AMS office
in Brock Hall immediately.
Retakes and those not yet
photographed are to go to E.
M. Allen, Ltd., 2870 West
Broadway, either next Tuesday or Wednesday from 9-12
a.m.
HON. RAY WILLISTON
... to tell all
Socreds Sponsor
Ray Williston
Minister of Lands and Forests,
the Honorable Ray Williston,
will speak on campus next week.
Sponsored by the Social
Credit Club, the Honorable Mr.
Williston will discuss either
"Sloan Report on Forestry" or
"The Proposed U'euner (Jren Development  in   the  Northland."
The speaker, who will be
heard in the auditorium, October 16 at 12::-I0 p.m., is a former graduate of UBC and is
Member of the Legislative Assembly for Prince George.
New Contest!
Project For
Centennial
Ubyssey Editor in Chief, Patricia Marchak today announced
that this paper is sponsoring a
contest to get the best idea for
a Centennial project on the campus.
Students with ideas on a possible UBC project are asked to
submit them forthwith. Huge
prizes are in the offing.
"This is the most momentous
announcement I have ever
made," Mrs. Marchak said, in
releasing the story exclusively
to the Ubyssey today.
Tho prize list has not been released but Mrs. Marchak said
first prize "is the most fabulous
thing anyone could ever hope
for."
Kules of the contest are:
Entries must be typed or written clearly and handed in to the
Editor-in-Chief, Ubyssey office,
basement of North Brock.
All entries must be signed
by the students submitting them.
Entries will be based on originality and imagination. Neatness or practicability not necessarily an issue.
"t want original ideas. I want
students to think," Mrs. Marchak said.
"Anyone can build statues,
fountains and old age homes. 1
want something finely different,
Inioly lvpi'escnlal i\ e of Ihe
spiril  of   UIU'."
Judge ;  decision   will   be   filial.
The launching of the Russian satellite Sputnik demands
that we change our attitude toward scientists according to Dr.
MacDowell, head of the Chemistry Department.
"This proves to the world what Western scientists have
always known . , , Russia is a first-class scientific nation."
~" *, He compared tiie importance
of the Soviet's advance into
space to the invention of the
telescope.
Dr. Jacobs of the Physics Department stressed the fact that
we still know very little about
the Russian model. "More actual
details are needed before coming to any conclusions," he said.
AMERICANS BUILDING
"The Americans have concentrated on building a fine model
but have not yet managed to
get* it off the ground.
"It is, of course, a first-class
achievment £nd a major contribution to the International
Geophysical Year but opinions
about it have been distorted
from a political angle."
Dr. Conway, History Department, said that is is up to us
to "take some lead in another
diplomatic field now, while the
world is still in doubt as to the
meaning of the whole thing."
He suggested that a concrete
stand on disarmament could be
taken.
SATELLITE IMPORTANT
"We must realize the importance of the satellite. They gain
in political prestige by this
scientific lead. The satellite, is
reverberating terrestrially as
well as stratospherically."
Dr. Conway expressed agree-
NFCUS Fails
150 British
Students
TORONTO, (CUP): —• More
than 150 British university students were left stranded in Canada this summer by NFCUS,
according to the University of
Toronto newspaper, The Varsity.
The Varsity says that "The
students,   mostly   Scottish,   had
been promised jobs and accommodation by National Federation of Canadian University
Students before they left Britain. They arrived to find
neither waiting for them.
CAME BY PLANE
"The students arrived in three
planeloads. They came on return flights of planes which had
been chartered by NFCUS to
take Canadians to Europe. The
first flight of 68 students was
greeted by NFCUS travel agent
James Pickett, and told there
was nothing for them.
"The plane, which carried, several girls, ran out of water during the    flight.    The    students
were given no food wheri they  ment with scientists wlho main-
arrived  in     Montreal.    Pickett i tain that phyicists be substituted
greeted them and took them by
bus into McGill. After completing immigration forms, Pickett asked them if there were
any with jobs.
"When almost all the students
said no, he laughed and told
them they were not much good.
"When questioned about train
time tables to Toronto, Pickett
said that he did not know.
"Some students reached Toronto, and were given help by
Students' Administrative Council. Others had to sleep in railway stations. Some were in
trouble with the police.
"Pickett laughingly warned
the second planeload "not to
land in jail like the first lot."
Some disgruntled students wi*ote
home to thc Scottish Union of
Students which had acted for
NFCUS in encouraging the British students to come to Canada.
LAST STRAW
"The last straw for the stranded Scots came when Pickett
ordered the students to return
forms to him .giving their addresses and jobs within ten days
of arrival.
"Currency regulations require
that the British return to England with the same amount of
money in dollars as they took
out."
for troops.
"The launching of the satellite reveals Russia's advances in
technical education," states Dr.
Farr of the History .Department.
He said that participating in the
! IGY does show a certain amount
of co-operation on Russia's part.
"Of course she gains a large
amount of political prestige oy
being the first."
SPIRITUAL VALUES will be
aired by Arthur P. Wuth of
Denver, Colorado Tuesday
noon in Physics 201!. Meeting
e, sponsored by I'lH' ('In stun
Science Organization
Socred Gives
No Comment
By HELEN ZUKOWSKI
Provincial Minister of Education, Les Peterson, registered an
official "no comment" on an
article run yesterday in a downtown newspaper.
The article alleged that "The
Provincial Government is believed to be adopting a take-it-
easy policy on its capital expenditure program ... so it won't
be over-committed should general economic conditions slide
and buoyant revenues fall off."
NO CHANGE IN POLICY
By telephone from his Alert
Bay furniture store, Peterson
said he was "not aware of any
such announcement (about the
policy) and as far as I am concerned there has been no change
in the government's policy towards UBC."
Peterson added that "As to
the economic condition of the
country we have to be realistic
and meet the situation as it
arises. I have no predictions to
offer as far as how this policy
might affect the university. We
all know what they (UBC) need
. . I have no dark predictions
to nuike and I am sure that the
Ubyssey would not want to
make any either, now would
they""
PLAY IT SAFE
The policy, as outlined in the
mentioned article, was being
considered not because "it is expecting a recession or a depression, but it wants to play it on
the safe side."
PUBSTERS . . . there will be
a general meeting at noon today
in the Croat White Mother's
mansion to discus:; plans for a
party. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 11, 195T
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail.   Post Office Department, Ottawa.
MEMBERS CANADIAN   UNIVERSITY PRESS
Student subscriptions $1.20 per year (included in AMS fees). Mail subscriptions $2.00 per
year. Single copies five cents. Published in Vancouver throughout the University year by
the Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or the University. Letters to the Editor should not
be more than 150 words. The Ubyssey reserves the right to cut letters, and cannot guarantee
publications of all letters received.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF PATRICIA MARCHAK
Associate Editor  Ken Lamb
News Editor Al Forrest
Assistant News Editors: Bob Johannes
and Helen Zukovvski
Managing Editor .- Dave Robertson
Business Manager : Harry Yuill
Make-up Editor  Dave Ferry
CUP Editor Marilyn Smith
Features Editpr    Barbara Bourne
SENIOR EDITOR BARRIE COOK
Reporters  and   Desk:— Sonia Thomas, Robin Sherwood, Sputnik I,    Audrey    Ede,
Judy Frain, Paul Tennant,    Neva Bird, Caroline Bell, Etc.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial and News Offices .. - , AL. 4404, Locals 12, 13, 14
Business and Advertising Offic es AL. 4404, Local 6
Board Of Governors
And Recent Appointment
The UBC Board of Governors has long
been able to boast of high calibre membership. Senate Elections and Provincial Government Appointments 'have always gone to
persons noted for their academic leanings,
their understanding of the problems and
philosophy that constitute •.he university,
and their personal knowledge of university
affairs. *
Such calibre is represented in Chancellor A. E. Grauer, Justice James M. Coady,
His Honor Judge J. B. Clearihue, and recent
appointments Mrs. Frank Ross, Walter
Koerner, and Nathan Nemetz.
But we question whether the government appointment of Mr. Einar Gunderson,
former Social Credit MLA, falls in line
with the policy of composing a board of
members who have proven their ability to
conduct the affairs of a university and particularly of the University of British Columbia.
Mr. Gunderson's biography gives no
indication of his having displayed particular interest in the affairs of this university*
Neither does it indicate any partcular leanings toward academic achievement or exceptional executive ability. In fact, one
look at this biography suggests that Mr.
Gunderson's major claim to the position is
his personal friendship with Premier Bennett.
Mr. Gunderson is a chartered accountant who has a private business. In this he
is no different from hundreds of urban
middle-class middle-aged men and women
all over the province. It certainly could not
be this background that has given him tho
right to one of the 11 coveted board posts.
In 1952 by virtue of his holding onto
the Socred bandwagon, Mr. Gunderson won
handily the election race in the Similka-
meen riding. For a short while he acted as
Finance Minister to Mr. Bennett.
But in 1954, with a change in riding
to Oak Bay, the chartered accountant lost
one election and, in a later by-election in
Victoria, lost a second run. Although no
longer in name, in fact Mr. Gunderson has
continued since that time to act as financial
advisor to Mr. Bennett.
His duties, however, have extended
further than the $28 tax rebate. Since
climbing on the Socred trailer he has also
become Vice-President of the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway, a Bennett Socred appointment.
On the top of all this, tiie chartered
accountant has now become number two}
man on the Board of Directors of the.B. C.
Corporation of Wenner-Gren Association,
the multi-million dollar association that last
year gave Mr. Bennettt's government a big
big boost.
These achievements, though political in
origin, apparently have convinced the
Premier that his right-hand man merits a
raise in status. But is it cricket that this
raise should come in the form of an appointment to the Board of Governors of the
local university?
In view of the fact that only 11 persons
in British Columbia can sit with the steering committee of the university, this political appointment is a questionable one. These
11 members must, after all, be chosen from
countless highly-educated, personally successful and well informed persons who have
proven their interest in the university. Does
Mr. Gunderson fit into this group?
Of course it may be argued that this
appointment supplies the university an "in"
with the government during our campaign
year. But is this a fair justification for the
action? A board of this nature should not
need to be supplied with a personal friend
of the government in order to gain provincial aid,
This board is the upper echelon of
academic circles, the mainmast of university
policy and planning, the supposed upholder
of higher education and education's running mates, truth, honor, and sagacity. But
the recent appointment suggests that it is
regarded in Victoria as nothing more than
a political "plum"; a paradise for political
favorites and/or failures. A provincial alternative to being kicked upstairs.
Letters to the Editor
Martin Support Strong
Liberals Could
Lose Lester
By TERRY O'BRIEN
Lester Pearson's election as the new Liberal leader
isn't shaping up as a pushover. Since June 10 when
Pearson appeared as the obvious choice, there have been
considerable second thoughts and re-alignment of supporters. Pearson has long been the pin-up boy for the
young Liberals and the intellectual group, ♦ commonly
known as eggheads. The support of these two groups is
not too difficult to understand.
Pearson has been exclusive-^
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
Is one of the last refuges of
intellectual and pseudo-intellectual life on our campus to
be destroyed? Are meaningless classes and lectures to be
allowed to interfere with the
most important function of a
university, the stimulation of
thoughts and ideas? Has the
education faculty's regimented
ideas so taken over this campus
that we are not to be permitted to skip classes and harmlessly rationalize it away with
"I didn't notice the time?"
Will the guilty conscience replace the guilty smile?
I am referring of course, to
that hideous cacophony which
passes for a bell which some
misguided pedagogue has had
installed in the Brock. This
piece of sacrilege not only
brings the harsh and unpleasant reminder that the trivial
part of university life, lectures,
is about to commence its somnolent course, but also by the
very screeching of its sound
serves to break a train of
thought and push any valuable
ideas out of the mind, so leaving it open and susceptible to
the dangerous orthodox ideas
of the lectures Not only is the
mind left open anil innocent,
hut when the termer discussion is recalled all that'remains
js a conl used muddle of one's j
own  ideas,   the  ideas  of  one'sj
opponent and, worst of all, the
ideas of the lecturer. Surely,
not a way to produce a truly
educated class of people.
Secondly, is not the very
notion of controlling a student's movements, implied in
this infantile move, obviously
antithetical to all the concepts
of individualism embodied in
university. Obvious too, that
the one most affected by this
seditious device, the freshman,
will also suffer from it the
most.
He comes to the university
expecting a change from the
routine and confinement of
high school, expecting individualism and self-direction and
what does he find. A pathetic
scene of blank-faced students
scurrying here and there in response to bells and buzzers,
like trained dogs in a circus
act. Young eager minds which
could be absorbing and testing
opinions, breaking down and
tearing apart prevalent theories and most important of all,
originating ideas, being stultified by bells summoning them
to absorb dull and useless facts.
Eventually the freshman will
fall into the habit so disturbingly prevalent throughout the
university, agreeing with the
professor. Where are our future Mills, our future lUissclls,
our future Marx's in such an
atmosphere?
Perhaps if the trend continues we can expect regulations compelling the wearing
of Ivy League suits on campus,
rules forbidding beards and
DON'T SIT ON THE GRASS
signs.
Before that time, however,
I am sure some enterprising individualist will find a way to
short circuit the wires of that
goddamn bell.
LION J. SHARZER,
Arts III.
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
Tell your readers that something new has been added,
that we can all cheer up because our scientists are test-
ting for a  "Clean Bomb."
It seems we SITTING
DUCKS can now remain quiet
and comiposed because of this
dubious benefit and that we
should refrain from becoming
"hysterical people". (Viscount
Cherwell.   Time, June 3.)
The fact is we should be
grateful to the scientists and
the POWERS that be that our
lives may not be snuffed out
by  a  'Dirty  Bomb."
How miuch more civilized
and hygenic that they be
snuffed out by a "Clean
Bomb."
MRS. FLORENCE Y >VNQ
ly concerned with Canada's external affairs at a time when
international relationships were
becoming more important and
Canada's influence on them
more pronounced. Naturally,
much of the credit for Canada's
rising stature in external affairs has rubbed off on to Pearson himself.
The Young Liberals think
this can be turned into votes,
while the eggheads have a
vague feeling that Pearson is
a progressive and hence one of
themselves.
But what the pros of the
Liberal party aren't forgetting
is that external affairs is largely bi-partisan, the issues are
not usually conscientious, and
parliamentary debates on the
subject are seldom heated.
The main differences on foreign policy between the major
political parties are ones of
emphasis and not of basic attitude.
Pearson, during his tenure in
office was always careful not
to become involved in contentious national issues and the
Liberal pros know this.
The Hon. Paul Martin, Pearson's chief rival for the Liberal throne, has, on the other
hand the full backing of the
professionals. Martin is a
skilled and able politician,
with parliamentary abilities
considerably more developed
than Pearson's. He has been
extremely interested and very
active in internal Canadian
politics with a substantial
background in external affairs
also. On June 10, Martin held
his huge majority quite easily,
while Pearson's was badly cut.
Martin's chief disabilities
are that he is French-Canadian
and Catholic, and is not nearly
as well known as Pearson.
However, at fifty-three, he is
seven years younger than Pearson, and thus far more suitable
for a long haul in the wilderness. He speaks in fluent
French and Pearson doesn't
speak in French at all. But to
many Liberals, fearful of being
permanently tagged as a
French-Canadian, Quebec and
Catholic party, the background
and religion of Paul Martin
seem to be the kiss of death.
The other chief contender,
the Hon. Walter Harris, suffers
from what is an insurmountable difficulty. He was badly
defeated in the Federal Elections. There is a rumor that
he will contest the election of
Canada's new External Affairs
Minister in traditionally Conservative Riding of Hastings-
Frontenac. As such, his
chances would not seem very
good and another electoral defeat certainly won't enhance
his prospect for leadership.
Younger than either Pearson
or Martin, Harris' best chance
would be as a compromise in
a stalemate, but those are
pretty long odds.
These are some of the forces
at work for and against the
individual contenders. The
choice is not as obvious as
many people thought. Opposition Leader St. Laurent seems
to have backed no favorites,
and it could develop into a
wide open race. As such it
should make politics better
known and understood throughout Canada.
MEET
Mr. A-C
CANADIAN
ALLIS-CHALMERS
LACHINE, QUE.  •   ST. THOMAS, ONT.
MacEwen Arts
5760 University Boulevard ALma 0090
SHIVA ARTIST COLORS — ART SUPPLIES
.GIFTS — GREETING CARDS
Students' Discount
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
at the
University of British Columbia
CORDIALLY INVITES YOU TO ATTEND A
CHALLENGING LECTURE ON A
PRACTICA LRELIGION.
''CHRISTIAN SCIENCE: THE ANSWER
TO THE HUMAN NEED"
BY
ARTHUR P. WUTH, C.S.B.
of Denver, Colorado
ON
Tuesday, October 15, 1957
Physics 202
12:30 p.m.
Mr. Wuth, who is a member of the Christian Science
Board of Lectureship, will be interviewed following the
weekly program "How Christian Science Heals", Sunday,
8:45 a.m. on CFUN.
WHO IS HE?
Mr. A-C ropmontt Canadian Allit-Cholmert, and off at Mlt-
.Chalmert. YWvo soon Mm in tho cfivrcfwi, ichoofi, store*...
or mot him at civic, socio/ and profeuional mootingt. You'vo
toon him in the shops and off/cos producing for tho bottormmnt
of people everywhere, whether in peace or in war.
Jutt who it Mr. A-C ? Becavte tho antwer to a quostfoft liko
that it complex, it it eaty for people to pick op mistaken
impreuiont.
For the take of the record, lef't take Mr. A-C apart and
mo who ho really it.
WHO IS CAPITAL?
Capital doesn't wear a silk hat at Allis-Chalmers.
"Capital" consists of more than 47,000 shareholders.
Mr. Capital might be a grocer, a farmer, a widow,
a school teacher, or YOU. He might be a company
employe in the office or shop or an officer of the
company.
This is an example of democratic ownership distinctive in the history of large corporations.
WHO IS MANAGEMENT?
Management is the guiding hand (or head) hired by
the owners to make an organization tick—and click!
Management coordinates the efforts of individuals
and sets- the direction the company travels.
Who is Mr. Management at Allis-Chalmers? Not
just the officers and division heads of the company.
Management is the salesman in the field, the foreman in the shop.
tfonogomonl it every employe from errand boy lo president who
conlribuloi by word and deed to the pr09r.fi of Ihe company.
Speaking of errand boys, one of the top officers of
Allis-Chalmers started with that job. Three others
started as student engineers. Five began in the sales
organization, while another officer started as a
machinist in the Allis-Chalmers shops. All Allis-
Chalmers officers know the business from the ground
up—through experience with the company.
Mr. Management doesn't wear a high wing collar
at Allis-Chalmers. Neither does lie have any monopoly on his job.
WHO IS LABOR?
The man who works in the shop is spoken of in tho
newspaper as "labor". Actually, he may be a skilled
craftsman, as much as master of his trade as a
dentist or a surgeon.
Actually he may be part of Capital through ownership of company stock.
The fact that he works with his hands makes him
no less a part of Allis-Chalmers than the man or
woman who works at a desk. The terms "Capital",
"Management", and "Labor" are indefinite and
overlapping. Many a man who works in the shop is
actually a part of all three groups.
INTRODUCING MR. A-C
Who then is Mr. A-C? He is a combination of
47,000 shareholders, 40,000 employes, more than
5,000 dealers and their employes, more than 10,000
suppliers who furnish in excess of 100,000 separata
items for manufacture.
His is a company which contributes something to
better living in nearly every home in Canada and
the United States—in supplying machines to grow
and process food, generate electricity, pump water,
build roads, produce building materials.
Mr. A-C ia a potent contributor to the welfare and
livelihood of millions of people. It takes the right
hand, left hand, head, heart and pocketbook to
achieve such results. No one part, of him can do
tiie job alone. Friday, October 11, 1957
THE    UBYSSEY
Page a
By   BARRIE HALE
Asiatic flu? Bronchitis? Pneumonia? -Streptococcus? Common cold? Pick a virus, any
vims.
Or perhaps you are one of tho
few hundred loft who have not
yot succumbed to one of tho autumn ailments? By Jingo, you
doa'i know what you're missing.
If you aren't half dead, brother,
you Just don't belong any more.
AD over campus, you may
find men and women greeting
each other with the solemn ceremonial bows of those seised by
violent coughing fits; all races,
colors, creeds, political beliefs
now speak a common language
of consideration in soft, moist
gutterals.
The infested also share a common apparel and imperiamentia:
dosons of knotted, sticky handkerchiefs, boxes and boxes of
ineffectual pills and drops. And
•very now and again, the dewy,
bitter laugh of someone who
started taking antihistamines
ioo late.
Aside from the camaraderie
of ill health, there are more artistic advantages lo be gained
from foiling a four-way cold tablet. Try taking notes while running a high fever, for example.
Everything reverts to its true
perspective: the lecturer's voice
becomes, properly, a mere murmur, just barely discernable
through the pounding of your
ears.
Perception becomes sharper;
that vague feeling of nausea
that sweeps over you as you
walk into the cafeteria and inhale is not imaginary, nor is that
all-pervading ache you feel as
you rise from the seals of Arts
100; they are both miserable,
you just haven't been sick enough to realise it.
In this state of heightened sensitivity, it might be added, you
may fully appreciate the TIE
BAR'S vibrant selection of Ivy
League ties; full range of dull
Ivy colors and widths.
Special feature this week —
one dozen only. Ivy square-end
cross-bows. The TIE BAR at
712 West Pender is the only
place in town that has them.
Wipe your nose and stagger
on down.
UNIVERSITY HILL
UNITED CHURCH
(Union  College Chapel)
Morning Worship
Sunday, 11:00 O'clock
STUDENTS   WELCOME
.WITCH FROM      TO THIS
WITCH TO r^SBBBBsf   SHIRTS
Ufsface it...
AMS   Largesse   Reaches  $157,1
•  I
Your $19 AMS Fee:
Who, Where, and Why
By GEORGE MORFITT, AMS Treasurer
The figures on this page constitute my budgetary
proposal for the University year, 1957-58. It represents, to my mind, the most equitable distribution
of your money possible. Every active, full fee-paying mem*
ber of the Alma Mater Society contributes $19.00 to rev*
enue, while income from athletics and other activities adds
another $15.00 per person. Because each of you is paying
more in student fees than ever before, I urge you all to
take a keen interest in the manner in which your money
is allocated. In addition, I would suggest that you take full
advantage of and participation in the organizations which
are of the greatest interest to you.
BUDGET  PERCENTAGES
Administration 13%  Activities         3%
Brock Extension Payments 26%  N.F.C.U.S     2%
Men's Athletics 21»/o Somen's ***»*»     •*
Funds        8%
Publications     8% Margin        50/o
World Univ. Service     5% 	
Clubs     4%
Undergraduate Societies .    4%
Cost Of Activities
Administration 	
Brock Extension Payments 	
Men's Athletics 	
Publications 	
World University Service 	
University Clubs 	
Undergraduate Society Committee 	
Activities 	
Funds  	
NFCUS 	
Women's Athletic Directorate	
Margin	
1957-58  AMS  Estimates   And   Expenditures
Statement of Proposed Income and
Expenditure for Year Ending Mey 31, 19S6
EXPENDITURES RECEIPTS
College Shop Inventory  8 6.500.00
Publications  Board    47,250.00
Men's  Athletics    - 48,850.00
Undergraduate Society 24,655.00
Women's Athletics      4,300.00
Undergraduate Clubs Committee  26,431.00
Campus Activities   - 17,450.00
Administration    - 21,350.00
World University Service     8,150.00
Alma Mater Society Fees 1158,800.04
Rental  Income  tOOAO
Interest  Income    lrtOOJBO
Miscellaneous Income   . . ..... 700.00
Income from Subsidiary Organisation)
College Shop   ....... .. V.800.M
Totem Handbook    13,100.00
Advertising     23,100.08
Men's Athletics   15,4*5*0
Nat. Fed. Canadian University Students     2,870.00 Undergraduate Society      11,700.00
Brock Extension Payments 40,780.00
Registration Photos       2.700.00
Funds         10.735.00
Margin    -     »"900
Women's Athletics         200.00
Undergrad Clubs Committee      10,506.00
Campus Activities    11,808.08
$269,0*0.00
6111,250.08
BREAKDOWN OF COSTS
Administration
Clubs
100%
$ 21,350
40,750
34,400
10,350
8,150
5,931
5,955
6,450
10,735
2,970
4,100
5,959
$157,100
Office  Salaries   y ~ $13,450
General meeting   600
Honoraria, Awards  1.800
Public Relations Officer   45°
Stationery and Office Expense   1.000
Postage   40°
Telephone and Telegraph   2,000
Insurance   500
Audit and Legal  •• 1.000
Bank Charge  -•■• 10°
General Expense  50
CLASSIFIEDS
WANTED — Girl unbound
by corsets of convention, object
companionship. CH. 8291.
FOR SALE — Leica camera,
lense M3, almost new, $350.
Please phone BA. 3765.
NOTICE
Become a fast accurate
render, improve your concentration and memory, with
specialized individual training in reading skills. Full
course in 7 weeks. Special
student rates. Take a free
preliminary skills survey
now. Western Reading Laboratory, 936 Hornby, Phone
TA. 3720.
WANTED — Ride from vicinity of 29th and Earles Road
or Kingswny and Earles. Phone
Don. DE. 2641.
TYPING — Theses, essays,
term papers, etc. Call Mrs.
Grant. BA. 2671.
McGILL FEELS PARKING
PINCH; NO CAMPUS LOTS
MONTREAL (CUP) — The first twinge of growing
pains pinched McGill University here, when it was announced recently that students must relinquish their only
campus parking lot to provide space for a new, eight-story
engineering building.
The 100-car lot is the only one provided on the campus
for students; faculty may park where they  find  space.
Approaching city council for an off-campus parking
lot to be reserved for students, spokesmen suggested a park
area near the city reservoir.
They were told that the city "does not feel it should
give up one of the few remaining grassy spots in Montreal
to provide parking for McGill students."
To Be Satisfied Visit
CAMPUS BARBER SHOPS
• 2 Locations
New Brock Extension and 5734  University  Boulevard
in bottle? only
NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
9:30 a.m. to (i:00 p.m.
Try Our Home-cooked Meals
oHojuM.   Sp&riaL
HOME-MADE CHILI
MARINE  DRIVE-IN
Marine Drive at Jericho Bcuch
$21,350
Activities
WANTED — Hickman's "Integrated Principles of Zoology."
Also require a dissecting set.
Phone Gerry, CHerry 5719.
FOR SALE — Volkswagens,
new and used. Tel. Bernie, YO.
3446.
Open House  - $1,000
Frosh Orientation (Cr.)    500
Homecoming       —~~
Special  Events  2,100
High School Conference      1°°
Conferences    ? 2,300
Leadership Conference      800
Student Executive Program     300
Academic Symposium     350
$6,450
WANTED — One girl to
share furnished apartment only
15 minutes from UBC. $35 per
month and share expenses.
Phone Rosemary, KE. 9156 after
7  p.m.
Publications
Ubyssey    •' $ 7,850
Totem       800
Raven: Pique        600
Handbook      1-100
Directory ,      	
$10,350
Alpha Omega Society  ••$ 25
Amateur Radio Society  01
Archaeology Club  13
Am. Inst, of E.E.-lnst. of R.B.  -  40
Badminton  Club  60
Blue and Gold Society   50$
Camera Club   55
CCF   20
Civil Liberties Union  -  58
Critics  Circle     15
Criminology Club ..... ._ -  15
Economics  Club    15
Eng. Inst, of Canada „  100
Eng. Physics Society  ~  20
UCC Administration  -.. - S00
German Club  If
Indian Students Association  20
International House  : -  20
LPP  #
Liberal Club   45
Lutheran Students Association  - -  21
Marketing  Association    80
Music Circle  25
Musical Society, Operetta    1,000
Choral   400
Pre-Med  „  85
Psychology   1$
Players Club  #M>
Progressive Conservative  -...  85
Radio Society  $&&
Social Credit _ — 50
SCM   50
Sports Car Club -  30
United  Nations     120
Unitarian Club  i0
Undergraduate Writers  80
Varsity Christian Fellowship   100
New Clubs   850
|5,W1
Funds
Accident Benefit $5,445
Brock Management   4,200
WUS Capital Improvement     250
Art Fund     840
Mens Athletics
$10,735
Revenue:
Football ~ . • 8,750
Basketball    *    2,700
AMS Fees ~. 34,400
Rugby  -    1,000
Athletic Card Sales     1,000
Undergrad Societies
Undergraduate Society reserve $  300
Undergraduate  Society  Administration     250
Agriculture  200
Commerce     645
Forestry     140
Engineering   1,200
Sopron  Joint  Funds  90
Frosh Class  65
Home   Economics     220
Law  375
Medicine  *.  310
Nursing     200
Fhajrmacy     145
Physical Education   100
Social Work   65
Education   1,000
Architecture    ."  90
Arts and Science  600
Sopron     50
$5,955
OPEN HOUSE
ST. ANDREW'S HALL
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2:30 to 5:00 P.M.
Morning Worship: 11 a.m.—Thc Chapel.
Vespers and Fireside: 8 p.m.—The Chapel and Lounge.
REV. J. A. ROSS, M.A., B.D., Ph.D.
YOU ARE WELCOME
The Presbyterian Church in Canada
$49,050
Expenditure!:
Administration   — $ 3,000
Stadium Maintenance   1,700
Trainer's  Supplies    ~  900
Athletic Equipment   200
Public Relations and Publicity  700
Football -  10,434
Basketball  5,100
Ice Hockey  - -  2^6P
Rugby   3,399
Soccer -  795
Badminton  , ~  252
Baseball  630
Cricket    335
Fencing   150
Golf .:  300
Grass  Hockey -.... 335
Rowing     1,765
Skiing  850
Swimming     988
Tennis   375
Track   405
Cross Country    520
Volleyball     100
Weight Lifting   100
Big Block Club  -	
Gymnastics    .,	
Sailing	
Curling  	
Waterpolo  .	
School of P.E. Grant 	
Contingency Fund 	
1,000
.     450
50
50
.     115
.   8,580
2,467
■MMMMSMl
$49,050 Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
>.V1
Friday, October 11, 1957
Gnup Will Try New Offence
Against Eastern Tomorrow
Feetmen
Defeated
By A6lN
Varsity's two soccer teams,
the Thunderbirds and the Chiefs,
will see act ion again this weekend as the 'Birds meet Grand-
view Legion at McGinnis field
on Saturday at 2 p.m., and the
Chiefs face Westminster Legion
on Sunday at 2 p.m. at UBC.
The 'Birds, in their first game
of the year were defeated last
Saturday, 5-1 in a hard-fought
game by a fast, tough Army and
Navy team who have three
games experience already this
season. But coach Frank Kruse
is looking for a win on Saturday, with his team whipped into
shape by a few practises and the
experience of one game under
their belts.
Ritchie Higgins, centre half,
and Leon Phillips, fullback, .are
two good men to watch on the
Varsity team.
The Chiefs, surprisingly strong
for a junior team, lost a tight
game to North Van. Celtics last
Sunday, but should do much better this Sunday now that they
have settled down to regular
practises.
SPORTS  EDITOR KEN  WIEBE
Women's Sport Representative  ELAINE BISSETT
Staff: Lynn Clark, Peter Irvine, John Dressier,  Bert Davis,
Audrey Ede
Girls Meet
For Election
There will be a general meeting of the Women's Athletic
Association next Thursday at
12:30 in Arts 100. Purpose of
the meeting is to elect a treasurer of WAA who must be a
women in her junior or senior
year. Nominations and campaign
speeches will precede the secret
ballot, and all women on campus are asked to attend.
VOLLEYBALL
Women's intramural volleyball begins Monday, with 30-odd
clubs, faculties and sororities
expected to compete. Under the
management of Penny Lowe,
teams can practice till the 24th
when league play begins* Time
for practices and league games
are from 12:45 to 1:15 in the
Women's Gym.
SMALL TURNOUT TO FIRST
1957 BASKETBALL PRACTICE
The UBC basketball season got underway yesterday
at noon hour at the War Memorial gynasium as the first
practice of the year was held.
There was a comparatively small turnout of players
trying out for the three teams, the Thunderbirds, Jayvees
and Braves, as only 30 to 40 boys made an appearance.
Practices resume this afternoon at 4:30 and again Tuesday afternoon, also at 4:30. All practices are held at the
War Memorial gynasium.
Jayvees Scrimmage
With Thunderbirds
By BERT DAVIES
A pile of enthusiam, three helpful additions, and Thurs>
day afternoon scrimmages with the Thunderbirds are helping
to shape the Jayvees football team into a first class junior
squad.
By October 19, when the Jay
vees have a tentative game with
the Surry Rams, the Jayvees
should bear no resemblance to
the team which was humbled by
Vancouver College last Saturday afternoon.
Coach Al Hammer's eyes shine
with a sudden gleam when the
names Donaldson, Bruce, Ross,
Blair, Clark, Thornly, Knight,
or Dale are mentioned. All have
been looking good lately.
Bob Donaldson, a good man
on defence, will probably move
up to the Thunderbird squad.
With Leagh Farrell, Frank Tarling, Don Ellerby, and Sandy
Harvy out with injuries, possibly for the rest of the season,
some of Jayvee's best men may
go along with Donaldson.
The centre situation is still
not too good, but some of the
boys arc rounding out and Ham
mer   will   not  have  too  much
trouble filling this slot.
There will be a short practise
tonight at 4:30. Hammer requested that everyone turn out.
WOMEN'S SPORTS
The two boys-rules basketball
teams entered in the Vancouver
Senior "B" Women's League will
play their first games on Wednesday, October 16 at 8:30 p.m.
at King Edward Gynasium.
Practices will be held on Fridays from 5 p.m. till 6 p.m. and
Wednesdays from 4:30 p.m. till
6 p.m.
*      *      *
Badminton: Club members
may play in the Memorial Gym
on Tuesday and Thursday from
8:15 to 10:00 p.m. and in the
Woman's Gym on Sundays from
2:00 to 5:00 p.m.
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted suits
modernized in the new
single breasted styles.
Matz and Wozny
SPECIAL  STUDENT RATES
548 Howe St.      MArine 4715
FOR ALL YOUR
Pharmaceutical Needs
and Prompt, Efficient Prescription Service
SEE
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
5754 University Boulevard
Jack and Millie Burchill
Birds Add Two
Tackles To Line
By KEN WIEBE
Three things will be at stake when UBC Thunderbirds
clash with Eastern Washington College at UBC Stadium tomorrow afternoon at 1:30.
Coach Frank Gnup has vowed
that, on condition that the student spectators fill their section,
that is the eastern stands in the
Stadium and the Birds do not
come up with a win for them,
he will quit smoking.
(No more will students complain about that vile smelling
weed — or will Gnup start
chewing the stuff?)
Gnup's new offensive forma-
tion*(he wouldn't say much
about it, except that it might
blow the big Eastern defensive
line wide open) will be at stake
in the game.
BIG TACKLES
Two prospective tackles that
will match some of the big Eastern linemen might see action in
the game.
Paul Brlggs, 6' 5" and 282 lbs.
and Bill Kane, 6' 7" and 270 lbs.
have turned out for practice and
show signs of becoming future
Thunderbird greats. Neither of
the men have had much football
experience, but they might play
if they are found eligible.
Several Birds who have not
seen much action this year be
cause of injuries will be back in
the lineup, although Gnup does
not know how much they will
be playing.
HENWOOD BACK
Jackie Henwood, member of
last year's All-conference team,
will definitely see action.
Oscar Kreutziger, just recovered from an ankle injury sustained in pre-season practice,
will play part of the game.
Frank Tarling, Leagh Farrell
and Sandy Harvey, suffering
from pulled leg tendons, will be
out for the rest of the season.
FLU HITS BIRDS
Three or four of the Birds'
squad are still reported in the
sick bed with the flu.
Thunderbirds will be facing a
formidable opponent in Eastern,
however. The Savages have a
tackle weighing 267 lbs. in their
lineup — in fact, their whole
team averages over 200 lbs.
Eastern's backfield is rated as
one of the fastest in the Conference, and they will be sure contenders for the Evergreen championships.
Varsity Ruggermen
Better Than Ever
By PETER IRVINE
The UBC Varsity rugger squad will probably have its
best season in the last decade.
This may sound like a publicity puff from the B.C. Lions'
front office, but, at least on
paper, the team looks like a sure
winner.
VANCOUVER. B.C.
DISTINCTIVELY STYLED
• SUITS
• TOP COATS
• CASUAL WEAR
86f> Granville Street
TAtlow 5617
Alms JRater
£ocfttU
STUDENT PASS, 195?-58
..Mm*** Jm*nM
40JKU, .wi*...if•*..-.	
. 1. Qvmw-*.
DANCING
from
9:30
till
2:00 a.m.
ENGLISH RUGBY IGNORED
In thc past few weeks, much
has been written and said in thc
downtown papers and radio stations concerning our Thunderbird football squad. The unhappy state of the Gnupmen has
been discussed and debated to
great lengths. Meanwhile, what
could be considered the most
successful major sport at UBC
— namely English Rugby — has
all but been ignored.
We think that it can be fairly
said that the UBC rugger team,
from last year's record, ranks as
the top team in North America.
Trie winning of the McKecknie
Cup and the World Cup and the
placing of five of its members
on   the  B.C.   All-Star   Team
ample proof of its status.
MORE  PLAYING RUGGER
Head Coach Albert Laithwaite, when asked for his opinion of this year's prospects,
stated: "Fourteen of last year';;
team are back and 3 or 4 top
flight Old Country players have
recently arrived — what more
can I ask?" He also emphasized that there are more people
playing rugger than ever before.
The Varsity team plays its
first game against Rowing Club
tomorrow at Lower Brockton
Point. This writer of course-
predicts a win for UBC.
UBC WILL WIN
Disillusioned gridiron fans:—
Here is a team which will win
and, possibly more important,
play a hard and exciting game.
Give it a look!
On Presentation Of
You and Your Party (guests) Will  Be
Admittted Free
TO
DANTE S INFERNO
AT WHITE ROCK
Next Dour to Ihe Park Theatre
Western  Canada's  Leading  Ni.Efht  Spot
With   (1,()()(>   Sq.   Ft   of   Unobstructed   Dance   Floor
MUSIC BY DEVIL'S OI'' UY'IIIM (The Prowlers)
IVY LEAGUE
The college style that received
national acclaim now showing
at Bob Lee Men's Wear    .    .    .
IVY LEAGUE JACKETS
$45.00
Homespuns and Shetlands.
IVY LEAGUE SLACKS
$21.50
Worsteds and Melanges.
BOB LEEltd.
Men's Wear
B2:i W. Hastings
TA 0049
CLOTHES FOR TIIE MAN'S MAN
ROY JORANOVICH, co-captain of the UBC Thunderbirds
will start at the tackle position when the Birds meet Eastern Washington att UBC Stadium Saturday afternoon.
Gametime is 1:30.
Cross Country Team
Running This Saturday
Cross-Country's first meet of the year will be held this
Saturday at 10:30 at UBC Stadium, when seven runners from
UBC will compete with the Vancouver Olympic Club.
Those running from UBC are:  ——-—■—■■■—■—■^™B
FENCING CLUB MEETS
TO-DAY IN ARTS 206
Jack Burnett, Jim Moore, Cole
Harris, Dave Taylor, Stan Jough-
lin, Warren Wilson and Doug
Van Ness.
All will compete in the senior
division, a four and a half mile
run. Coach Peter Mullins has
high hopes of taking this event.
Bobby Hindmarch can nearly
kick a field-goal' from a distance
of 40 yards.
-. -The manager of the Fencing
Team announced that a meeting will be held today at
noon in Room 206 of the Arts
Building. All those interested
in learning the art of fencing
are invited to attend.
thi MILDEST BEST-TASTING cioambtts
AUSTIN SALES AND SERVICE CENTRE
TENTH and ALMA ST.      CEdar S10f
DROP INTO OUR NEW LOCATION
at
4544 West 10th Avenue
(Oppo.aile Sal'cway  Pail:in;;  Lot)
* I INF. FOOD
it FINK SERVICE
* AM) DAILY SPFHAFS
*TOITll> OIF WITH MELLOW WHIP l( F (UF. AM
S CAFE

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