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The Ubyssey Feb 22, 1962

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 A friend
in need ..
THE UB YSSEY
is the
Red Cross
Vol. XLIV.
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1962
No. 58
AMS   not  liable'
for prank damage
WIMOWEHING AWAY for students in War Memorial Gym
is Harry Belafonte-styJe singer Miriam Makeba, who appeared at noon Tuesday. Appearing on the same program with
Miss Makeba was the Chad Mitchell Trio.
one had told  Robertson of the
conversation.
Gibson said Carrothers has
been fair and honest in all his
dealings with campus fraternities.
Says education minister
Discriminatory   frats
to be revealed soon
Campus fraternities will find out "likely within the next
two weeks" which among them discriminates, Inter-Fraternity
Council officials said.
The fact that there is still racial and religious discrimination
among three fraternities was revealed last week in a report by
senate fraternity investigator A.
W. R. Carrothers. The three
fraternities were not  named.
IFC president Terry Gibson
and public relations officer Mor-
ley Shortt defended Carrothers
refusal to name the fraternities
concerned.
They said a charge by IFC
vice-president, Rock Robertson,
Monday that Carrothers was not
doing his job by sharing the
information with IFC, was a
mistake.
The charge was carried in
Tuesday's Ubyssey.
Shortt said the names will be
revealed when the new senate
committee consults with fraternity representatives.
Shortt said Carrothers had
talked to him and Gibson about
naming the fraternities but on
Senate approves
program changes
in PE requirements
The University of British Columbia Senate has approved a
recommendation changing the
I'ompulsory physical education
program from two years to one
\ear, President N. A. M. Mac-
Kenzie announced today.
The recommendation was forwarded to Senate by the committee on recreation, athletics
dnd physical education, which
lias been asked to study and report to Senate on the compulsory physical education pro-
i gram.
Under the new regulation only
those students in either the first
or second year who are in their
first year of attendance at UBC
will enrol in the program. The
'•uling will not apply to students in third or fourth year
who have transferred from
(ither institutions.
In its report the Senate committee on recreation, athletics
| and physical education said it
was hoped that the new program would be more interesting
and in all ways a better one.
The committee expressed the
hope that students would continue to be interested in physical
fitness, sports and recreation.
The committee said there was
recognition of certain deficiencies in the existing program.
When the program was introduced in 1945 it was well recognized that additional staff
and facilities would have to be
provided to create an effective
program.
The program has been retarded the report states, because
it had not proved possible to
provide additional staff and
facilities to the extent hoped
for.
Insufficient importance, the
report continues, has been attached    to   the    mental health
(Continued on page 3)
See "PE CHANGES"
By   SHARON   McKINNON
The Alma Mater Society will not pay the costs of recent
student pranks, student council decided Monday.
Council made the decision ^
after receiving a request for a
purchase order for $645.70 to
pay for the damages caused by
the removal of toilet seats from
campus buildings and by "the
AUS, Frosh, and Engineers
brawl on February fifteenth,"
from Buildings and Grounds
Superintendent Tom Hughes.
Hughes listed the labor to
repair and replace toilet seats
"removed by EUS students" at
$126.20, and the materials, at
$257.
BRAWL COSTS
The costs of the February
fifteenth "brawl" were stated
as follows:
• three panes of Georgian polished wire glass,  $132.50.
Blood  drive
donations tall
■ The number ot student donors
in the second week of the current blood drive has fallen
short of the number in the first
week, Eldon Kerbes, drive co-
chairman, told The Ubyssey
Wednesday.
"During the first week of the
drive we had an average of 300
students per day come through
the Armory. This week the
daily average has dropped to
well below 200," Kerbes said.
The drive ends Friday.
The faculties competition
stands as follows:
Agriculture       76.0
Architecture      130.0
Arts        55.0
Commerce     47.4
Education         42.2
Engineering     52.2
Forestry      100.8
Frosh       22.1
Grad Studies     16.4
Home Ec.     60.4
Law        31.1
Medicine        33.8
Nursing        85.0
Pharmacy    ,     39.6
Phys. Ed.     38.5
Science _:     77.8
Social Work         2.3
Slim hope of  SUB grant
By TIM PADMORE
The" proposed $2,800,000
Student Union Building is a
good idea but the provincial
government should not be
counted on for specific grants
says the Minister of Education.
Hon. Les. Peterson, in a
telephone interview with the
Ubyssey, said he endorsed the
idea of the building "in principle" but that requests for
cash would require study.
"I would expect a report
justifying the students' needs
with such a request," he said.
Student treasurer Malcolm
Scott has expressed an intention to apply to the provincial
government for a gift to help
cover the additional $2 million
in building costs recommended by planning consultant Porter Butts.
Asked about the possibility
of a government backed, low-
interest loan, he said:
"We would have no authority to make such a loan."
Peterson suggested a loan
might be obtained from the
federal government under the
Central Mortgage and Housing Act.
He said he had no objection to government money
being spent on extra-curricular projects.
"Grants to the university
are made in lump sums, and
are spent as the university
sees fit.
"I have always believed in
the university's autonomy in
this."
Students should share the
cost too, he said. And like it.
"Surely," he said, "students
want a stake in their project."
• three lengths of fire hose,
$105.
• one chrome hose rack, $25.
A letter from Hughes stated,
". . . I assume that the student
discipline committee will take
the necessary steps to insure
that the appropriate student
groups are assessed for the damages caused, but as far as this
department is concerned we
would appreciate the requisition
to cover the cost as listed."
DECISION
Council based its decision not
to pay the damages on bylaw 4
of the Alma Mater Society constitution which deals with the
liability of the. Society and contains the following sub-sections:
(1) The Society shall not be
responsible for the actions and
behaviour of any student unless:
(a) the acts are performed during and in connection with an
AMS event, or (b) the actions
are performed in connection
with a past or future AMS
event.
(2) The Society shall only assume financial liability for those
acts which fall within sub-sections (a) and (b) of section (1)
above, and for damage inflicted
on. the campus by a student, if
that student can be determined.
NO  RESPONSIBILITY
Vice - president Eric Ricker
said that in the present situation no particular society can
be designated as responsible,
and that the activities had nothing to do with a AMS sponsored
event.
"It would be ridiculous for us
to assume responsibility for
these damages," he said. "Instead we must sincerely try to
apprehend the people responsible."
"It is just as impossible for
us to stop a riot as it is for the
Vancouver City Police on Grey
Cup night," he said, "and the
government isn't asked to pay
restitution for resulting damages."
CORNWALL
Council president Alan Cornwall replied to Hughes' letter
Tuesday citing bylaw 4, and precedents established by councils
in past years.
Cornwall's letter stated
"... at the present time it would
appear that the disturbance was
not caused by a particular undergraduate society or other
organization a n d, therefore,
charges cannot be laid to a
specific group.
"There is further information
that the fire hoses used in the
Engineering Building were used
on the advice of a faculty member in order to keep invading
students out of that building.
"In any case, there is a great
deal of investigation to be done
and the AMS disciplinary committee is engaged in doing that
work at the present time. Therefore it is impossible for us to
forward the amount you request
immediately." Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
Winner of the Southam Trophy
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department.
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEMBER   CANADIAN  UNIVERSITY   PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year in
Vancouver t>y the Alma Mater Society. University of B.C. Editorial
opinions expressed are those of the Editor of The Ubyssey and not
neeessarilv those of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
Telephone   CA  4-3242.   Locals:   Editor—25;  News—23;  Photography—24.
_ Editor-in-chief: Roger McAfee
Managing   Editor    --------    Denis   Stanley
Associate Editor ' -    -    -    - Ann Pickard
News Editor    ----------    Fred Fletcher
City Editor Keith Bradbury
CUP Editor    -    -    - Maureen Covell
'     Photography Editor    --------Don Hume
Senior Editor    ---------    Sharon Rodney
Sports    Editor Mike    Hunter
Photography   Manager Byron   Hender
Critics  Editor David Bromige
Editorial   Research    -    Bob  Hendrickson,   Ian   Cameron
STAFF THtS ISSUE
Layout: Bob McDonald
REPORTERS: George Railton, Heather Virtue, Tim Pad-
more, Pat Horrobin, Sharon McKinnon, Mike Horsey,
Glenn   Schultz,   Lynn   McDonald,   Krishna   Sahay,
Dick Simeon.
TECHNICAL: Pauline Fisher,  Ted  Ross,   Gail  Kendall.
THE      U B'Y SSE Y"
Thursday, February 22, 1962 v
*■     • t>
:>v>
- ^>s. v *
The Catcher
Well, seems like Ubyssey Features caused some controversy when it hit the campus Wednesday. Seems like some
people disagree with an article under the pen name of Holden
Caulfield, describing, Salinger-style, the Mardi Gras pep meet.
Seems like some other people were offended.
The Ubyssey doesn't necessarily agree with the facts presented in the article. In fact we downright disagree with many
of them. For instance we don't think half the Greek Letter
set are millionaires. Mr.  Caulfield's facts are  certainly  open
to question.
However, we feel obliged to point out that Mr. Caulfield's
article is one of opinion. He expresses an opinion held by a
minority of students on the campus and as such is a valid
opinion, and worthy of appearing in the paper.
The form of Mr. Caulfield's article then comes to question.
Why did he choose the method of expression he did? He
matched the form to the content as he saw it, a technique used
for years by the poets and authors university students read
almost every day.
Mr. Caulfield did not experience what is usually classed
as the "normal" feeling at the pep meet, therefore his article
wcs written in a style not normally used. The article was a
piece of literature. How successful it was is a difference of
opinion.
Mr.; Caulfield's style is, of course, an imitation of that
used by J. D. Salinger in his amusing, well-known book "The
Catcher in the Rye."
We have met people who felt the article was in poor taste
and others who thought it was brilliant. We'd like to hear
some more comments on this;
However, since it seems some people are offended we'll
probably have to meet with the university president this morning to try to justify this type of article in a university publication.
After all, can university students take this sort of thing?
vance
back ?
Among the bundles of crackpot literature that arrive
daily in the offices of university newspapers, a great part is
in the form of propaganda for communists or anti-communists.
This week isn't shaping up any differently.
Monday, The Ubyssey received the first edition of a new
publication—called Advance—put out by an anonymous outfit
called the Students for Liberty, which hides behind Post Office Box 4074, Station D.
"The appearance of this publication on the UBC campus
is easy to understand and justify. It comes as the logical reaction to our student nerspaper (sic), The Ubyssey, and the
open censorship practised by a group in The Ubyssey," says
the mimeographed sheet which was distributed widely on
campus.
This   group   is   anti-communist   first,   and   anti-Ubyssey
second.
But, who are the Students for Liberty?
To the right, on this page, is a letter—signed only Students
for Liberty.
Their publication carries no names.
This group is not registered with the AMS.
It is not a student club.
These people—whoever they are, imply that the staff of
The Ubyssey is using its columns for its own benefit — or
worse, for the communists.
Even supposing we were, there's one difference.
You can see who we are by looking at the top of this page.
We'd like to know who they are. Perhaps they lack the
guts to say.
K.B.
Letters to the Editor
Noted references
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
The fellow Buchholz might
refer to Ubyssey editorials of
dates 2 Oct., 8 Oct., 9 Oct.,
and 16 Oct., all of 1959, and
stop bothering us with his
nonsense.
M. P. SINCLAIR
Right accepts
Editor,
The Ubyssey, s
Dear Sir,
Regarding Mr. Hebb's and
Mr. Frazer's letter of Feb. 6
we, "The Students for Liberty"
accept the proposal of the debating union to a public student debate between two representatives of this movement
and to members of the Communist Club.
We accept the suggested topic: "Be it resolved that an anti-
communist league should be
formed   on the campus."
We urge the Student Com-»
munist Club to accept the challenge.
Yours truly,
"STUDENTS FOR
LIBERTY"
Left questions
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
In answer to the challenge
to debate the resolution, "Be
it resolved that an anti-communist club should be formed
on campus," the Communist
Club states that anti-communism is not the issue at UBC.
The basic issue is not the
conflict between "factions" of
the left and right. The principle
in Question is whether all
groups and people are going
to maintain and extend their
basic civil liberties — this is
the basic issue of contention.
We believe that individuals
and groups whose entire plat-
lorm is one of anti-communism, do not advocate the continuance of freedoms for any
individual or group that disagrees with their policy. It
seems that the logic of the
right wing is that if you do not
support them, you are a Communist and must be suppressed.
This thinking has been evident this year on campus. The
Ubyssey, in preserving the
democratic and liberal tradition of a free student press,
has been branded as a "r e d
sheet." The Nuclear Disarma-
, ment Club and the Canadian
Peace Research Institute, two
organizations which have as an
objective world peace, have
been attacked as "communist
fronts." The NDP, a political
party of progressive social reform, was smeared as a tool of
the "Reds."
Unfortunately, such attacks
on various peace organizations,
political parties, trade unions,
and other progressive groups
and individuals are becoming
more and more prevalent in
Canada. Curtailment of civil
liberties in the name of anti-
communism is being advocated
more and more widely. This
suppression of liberties has historical precedents. There is a
striking   parallel   between the
curtailment of liberties in
Germany, Italy, and Spain before WW2, and the abrogation
of liberties in the United
States  today.
First the civil liberties of the
Communist Party are prohibited. Subsequently come the attacks on all forms of liberalism. Hysteria and hate are
powerful weapons. The failure
to counteract these with weapons of reason and truth leads
to disaster.
Pastor Niemoller, a famous
German Lutheran pastor, learned this brutal lesson in a nazi
concentration camp. Upon his
release from the camp at the
end of the war, Niemoller
stated: "I saw the Communist
Party banned but did nothing.
I saw the trade unions sfhash-
ed and did nothing. I saw the
Jews persecuted and did nothing. When my church was attacked, I spoke up, but then
it was too late."
And so it becomes evident
that the basic question is not
the "left" versus the "right."
It is a question of those people
who wish to preserve their
civil liberties protesting themselves from those who wish to
usurp these rights.
In conclusion, the Communist Club states that we fully
agree with the principles of debating and are willing to debate on genuine issues. Our
club advocates the preservation
of civil liberties, peaceful coexistence, neutrality, full employment, and total disarmament. To stimulate discussion
and interest in these and similar main issues of the day, we
stand fully prepared to debate
with anyone.
Yours  truly,
EXECUTIVE,
Communist Club.
Two rebuffs
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
May I kill two birds with
one letter? In last Thursday's
edition a Mr. G. Blount expressed his great pleasure that
101 people on the campus "had
the courage to vote for the only truly democratic party in
Canada today," the Communist party. He then went on to
remind us, in effect, that this
party is the only one that has
all the answers to all problems in all parts of the world—
we, poor misguided individuals
that we are, did not have the
courage of our convictions and
strength of character to vote
for  it.
Mr. Blount, in writing the
article that he did, provides
forceful evidence that he is
both bigoted and fooHsh—not
because he believes in the
Communist party, since he
could write the same sort of
letter, believing in any other
party, but because of the following  considerations:
He is bigoted in that he believes only 101 people had the
courage of their convictions
and the strength of character
when they voted (those who
supported Communism).
He is foolish in that he directly implies that the rest of
us have not the sense to see
how wonderful Communism is
Despite the apathy of students (which, incidentally,
must surely be of benefit to
him more than to anyone else),
a fair-minded person would accept that the elections supported the convictions of those
who voted in a perfectly
straightforward and direct
sense. If this is so, then the
thing which clearly comes
out is that the vast majority of
voter* do not think highly of
the Communists.
Mr. Blount must be annoyed
about this, but his annoyance
cannot change the fact that
almost all of us don't like the
Communist party.
To try to get votes before
the election by such statements
as those he made is an accepted part of campaigning. To do-
so after people have expressed
their opinions in the ballot is
not only absurd and fruitless, .
but is also poor sportsmanship.
When you have lost the game
(even if it is a serious game)
you do not moan about the
stupidity of the victor, but rather you congratulate him, and
you don't moan about the fact
that you lost, but rather you
look inside yourself to see why
you lost.
If Mr. Blount does this he
may well be forced to admit
that other people see things
differently. If he then acknow- s
ledges that they may be at least
equal to him in intelligence
and understanding, he will
conclude that he may possibly
be wrong.
3ft if.
*
The other object of my scath- ._
ing wrath is the condemnation
exp-essed by Mr. Richard Allen in the same edition as the
above. The Ubyssey, in which
he tells everybody how superficial and decadent this paper's
reporters are. His tirade is vicious and statements are value-
judgments. He wonders how it,
is possible that the paper won
the award which it did.
No one need use Mr. Allen's
type of emotional presentation
to get students to think about
the points he wishes to make.
I submit, in defence of this
paper, that at worst the award
went to the best of a bad lot.
A number of people might
wish to adopt this view. I
think the situation is somewhat
better than this, however. In
the past four years I have been
concerned with five university
papers regularly, and with one
other irregularly, and The
Ubyssey ranks with the top two
of these by a clear and consistent margin.
It is shortsighted to expect
any paper to approach an ideal
standard; what is a more reasonable expectation is that it
should be fairly good consistently, with occasional exafnpl- '-■
es of extreme badness and extreme goodness. It should also
be borne in mind that different readers (and editors') have
different criteria of goodness.
If Mr. Allen wishes to say
that the example of badness
are rather more frequent than
to be called occasional, I would
probably agree—but I would
certainly not go along with the
viciousness of his condemnation.
Yours truly,
JOHN DILLON,
Grad. Psych. Thursday, February ,22, 1962
THE     -U,B,Y:S SEY
Page 3
IDEAS
at large
OPINIONS
By  PETER PENZ
A few days ago one of my lecturers suggested that the National Federation of Canadian University Students should be made
into the megaphone of student
opinion on political issues. The
question is: Do we have a student opinion? Is there anything
that   the  students   as   a   whole
' could bring to the attention of
the public at large?
. Of course, there isn't. The
problem is not so much one of
disagreement; it is rather one of
indifference toward public affairs. It seems to me that many
students say, "What the heck I
-can't do anything about the way
things are. So what's the use of
sticking out my neck?
When the pacifists and the
"fascist protectors of liberty"
wage their vociferous verbal
wars on this campus, a lot of
students just shrug their shoulders and smile stoically, affecting the profundity of uncom-
mitting wisdom. "They're all
nuts," they will say. Apparently,
the sane student minds his own
business, gets passable marks the
easiest way possible and has a
good time over the weekend.
That's all he is'concerned about.
This is what bothers me: this
giveupitis as far as the world at
large is concerned. After all, as
long as we are at university, we
have a much greater freedom of
expression than later on, when
we must watch whose toes we
step on, because the owner of
those toes might, be able to retaliate and endanger our economic, professional or social position. It is then not always safe
to speak freely. But why not
speak up now?
Not only are we free from the
hindrances which burden the
family man, but also from the
- conservatism which elderly men
tend to be afflicted with. The
world needs new ideas and the
university is an ideal breeding
ground for it.
Since our political leaders seldom have the courage to be imaginative in their approach to
public affairs, the students
should take it upon themselves
to try to find new remedies for
the ills that afflict the world today and actively propogate them
and thus try to influence public
opinion.
NFCUS should therefore first
of all stimulate political awareness among students, encourage
them to discuss political issues,
to dissect the complexities of
these issues and to emerge with
an imaginative solution when
possible. If fortunate, we as students might actually influence
public opinion. The minimum
benefit, however, will be an exercise in political consciousness,
a characteristic which every democratic state depends upon in
order to remain democratic.
Council to be
irresponsible
WOLFVILLE (CUP) — The
Students Council of Acadia University has voted to remove all
responsibility of initiation from
it and to place- it in the hands
of the administration.
This was the first concrete
action taken since last September when the faculty surprised
the students by banning initiation activities because they were
alleged to be derogatory to
human dignity.
The unanimous approval of
the recommendation by council
brought the initiation issue back
into focus at Acadia.
The September announcement
resulted in a mass demonstration before the university president's home (Dr. Watson Kirk-
connel) and a later meeting between students and faculty.
Candidate
claims smear'
WINNIPEG (CUP) —Rumors
that a candidate for the presidency of the University of Manitoba Student Union, Don Forbes,
has been receiving campaign
funds from the University's
New Democratic Party and
Combined , Universities Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament
have been denied by the parties
concerned.
The executive of the CUCND
issued a statement calling the
rumor a "gross falsehood."
Forbes said he had never been
a member of either the NDP or
CUCND and called the rumors
part of an "organized smear
campaign."
Marshall Rothstein, the other
candidate, said: "I know that
many of my opponent's active
supporters are also prominent
members of CUCND."
Credit omitted for
Feature article
Due to a printer's error,
credit for the article "The
Sorry Business of Book Reviewing" was omitted from
the Feb. ,21 edition of Ubyssey Features. It was reprinted
from The Canadian Forum.
Summer job
sign-up opens
Group registration for summer employment begins Monday. Here is the "schedule:
Monday, 12:30-1:30 p.m., Arts
100, men in Arts and Science 1,
Education 1, Social Work, Music.
Tuesday, 12:30 p.m., Arts 100,
men in Arts and Science 2, 3,
Pharm., Med., Grad. St.; 1:00
p.m., Arts 100, Men in Arts and
Science 2, 3, Phys. Ed., Commerce, Law.
Thursday, Mar. 1, 12:30-1:30
p.m., Eng. 200, men in App. Sc.
1, For. 1, Agric. 1.
Friday, Mar. 2, 12:30-1:30
p.m., Eng. 200, men in App. Sc.
2, 3, Forestry 2, 3, Agric. 2, 3,
Architecture.
Monday, Mar. 5, 12:30-1:30
p.m., Arts 100, women of all
faculties and years.
Wednesday, Mar.. 7, 12:30-1
p.m., Arts 100, men in Education 2 and up.
SLOGAN    FLORIST   LTD.
2523 King-sway
Specializing' in corsages and wedding bouquets. 10% off to all
University students. Call HE
4-1614.
Varsity Fabrics
4437 W. 10th Ave CA 4-0842
Yard Goods, McCall Patterns
Sewing Supplies
Open Friday 'til 9
Council refuses referer
on nuclear arms for Canada
Student council Monday defeated a resolution from the
National Federation of Cana^
dian University Students Committee that a referendum on nuclear weapons be put to the students.
The referendum proposed
stated, "Be it resolved that no
nuclear weapons be accepted by
Canadian forces or be allowed
on Canadian soil."
"We  wouldn't    get  a   proper
From page 1
PE changes
aspect of the activities and fitness program.
We are living, the report adds,
in an age of increasing tensions,
and stress disorders are on the
increase. "If a proportion, however small, of the graduates of
this institution acquire a continuing interest in an activity
... as a direct result of the compulsory program, this must be
regarded as a plus of no little
importance,"   the   report  states.
A factor of no little importance in relation to the element
of compulsion that exists in the
present requirement is the lack
of any uniform approach to
physical education in this province's public and high schools,
the report continues.
"Because of this," the report
states, "students coming- to this
University are in a somewhat
different position from university students in some countries
where the opposite situation
prevails in the schools and
where it may not be considered
essential to follow through with
compulsion at the University
level."
The committee said it was
possibly more fitting to regard
the required program as a serv-
j ice to new students, comparable
I in some respects to other serv-
j ices   such    as the   UBC   health
service.
The committee also drew to
the attention of Senate several
new factors which were not evident last year and which can be
expected to have considerable
bearing on the required program.
The committee then listed
new facilities such as the seven-
acre Wolf son field for all-
weather use, and the new winter sports centre which will provide facilities for curling,
hockey and ice skating.
The committee also drew attention to the recent federal
legislation to provide assistance
for a national fitness and amateur sport program-
Universities are being looked
to provide a great deal of
the leadership and initial impetus for the program, the report states, and the position of
our school of physical education
in respect to staff and facilities
conceivably can be so changed
as to make possible an entirely
new approach to the physical
education requirement.
sampling of opinion," treasurer
Malcolm Scott said. "We'd just,
be getting propaganda for certain segments."
He also objected to the wording on the grounds that it
sounded like council was endorsing  the referendum.
Second vice - president Pat
Glenn termed such a referendum "a dissipation of council's
energy and inconclusive in result."
Vice - president Eric Ricker
said the referendum would not
be worth the hundred dollars it
would cost.
The resolution came to council from the NFCUS committee,
who intended the referendum to
provide direction for the council president when he "is called
upon ... to express student
views on national and international  affairs."
The NFCUS committee minutes contained two other motions intended as directives to
the student president in voting
at the national NFCUS Con-
egress at Carlton next September.
NFCUS chairman Dave Anderson said the motions were
passed because of Council criticism of the resolutions passed
at the  last Congress.
"These motions are intended
to give the president some direction rather than "having him
go and vote on resolutions without knowing what the students
think about them," Anderson
said.
Second vice - president Pat
Glenn said that the local" NFCUS
committee seems to be laboring
under a mistaken impression.
"Our delegates are delegates
not representatives," he said.
th. MILDEST BEST-TASTING cigarette Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 22,  1962
Federal   loans   beneficial
if  interest  rate  low-Gage
By LYNN McDONALD
If the federal loan fund, proposed by the student Progressive Conservatives, provides
funds at a rate lower than the
5V2 percent charged on current
provincial loans, it will be beneficial to students, says Dean of
Inter - Faculty Affairs Walter
Gage.
The student Progressive Conservative Federation at its annual meeting asked Prime Minister Diefenbaker to establish a
federal loan fund for university
students. They pointed out that
only five provinces "now provide pure student facilities" for
loans.
*    •    •
The B.C. government made
interest-free loans prior to 1949.
At that time it established the
Student Aid Loan Fund whereby the University could borrow
money from the banks and re-
loan it to students. The government then ceased to give its
interest-free loans.
The university borrows loan
money at five and  a half per
cent and re-loans it at the same
rate.
"Other provinces make loans
interest-free; our interest rate is
a real drawback," said Gage.
Close to $1,000,000 has been
loaned by this scheme since its
inception in 1959. In addition,
$350,000 is loaned each year
from privately donated loan
funds. These private loans are
usually interest free or at lower
rates of interest.
*    •    •
"We got this money by going
out and convincing donors to
give it,"  said Dean Gage.
"It's been a real hard fight,"
he said.
The university can borrow up
to $2,000,000 under the act. "If
necessary, and as enrollment increases, there's no reason why
the university could not borrow
more," Dean Gage said.
"The trouble with this fund
is that it limits borrowers to
B.C. residents," said the Dean,
who administers student loans,
bursaries and scholarships. "And
it is not open to graduate students,"  he added.
Providing funds for graduate
students is one place where the
federal government should move
in said the Dean. "The flow of
students between the provinces
and from other countries is such
that the federal government
should have the responsibility
rather than the provinces," he
said.
•    •    *
The National Research Council in the sciences and the Canada Council in the arts already
provide such funds. "But," said
Dean Gage, "we are not doing
nearly what the United States
is doing."
Dean Gage said that more
money is needed for bursaries.
Sometimes students who have
the second class standing required for a bursary have to
take    loans    instead.
"A federal loan scheme, if
adopted, should be administered
by the universities themselves,"
Dean Gage said. "The scheme if
operated from Ottawa would be
cumbersome. The more flexible
the scheme the better," he said.
Deficit pa
education
OTTAWA (CUP) — One of
the reasons the government has
a deficit is because it has increased federal aid to education
since taking office, Prime Minister John Diefenbaker told the
annual meeting of the Conservative Student Federation here
Saturday night.
Pointing to such items as
$22,000,000 in loans for university residences, Mr. Diefenbaker
said his government had "done
all it could" to help education,
.Because of payments in this and
other fields such as pensions,
hospital insurance and northern
expansion, the government has
found itself with a deficit.
BRIGHT  OUTLOOK
However, he told the delegates, "the outlook for 1962-63
is bright" and "Canada is entering the threshold of a new development." Using the PC
"vision" as a fundamental beginning, he asked the students
to join with him "in a great
crusade" and help tell the nation of the PC "new concept" in
national development.
PROBLEMS
Mr. Diefenbaker said there
was a need to develop and expand the quality of education,
but it must be recognized that
there are constitutional problems involved. "But there is one
problem that will have to be
solved and that is the assurance
that in the battle of the brains,
Canada does not fall into second place," he said.
Chiding both students and
press — who hoped he would
give some clue to the election
date — he said one student
asked him not to set it in April
because   of   exams   and   not  in
rtly due to federal
grants—Diefenbaker
May    because    a    month    was
needed to recover.
Earlier in the day Minister
of Immigration and Citizenship
Ellen Fairclough told a plenary
session of the difficulty in finding summer jobs for foreign
students. She estimated that
.20,000 students were looking for
jobs last year, with only 5,500
jobs available. "About 6,000 of
these students were students
from foreign countries," she
said. She declared that the government would be able to be a
little more generous this year
but warned that "the door could
not be left wide open" because
many Canadians who did not
have jobs might complain.
Late-registration tee hike
termed 'presumptuous'
Greeks  to  stage
Songfest at Q.E.T.
The campus Greek Letter Societies will hold their annual
Song Festival Feb. 27 at 7:30
p.m. in the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre.
Eight sororities and 10 fraternities will be represented.
Tickets are available at the
AMS office.
An in-coming member of student council says he will try to
get the student executive to oppose a University administration
move to raise late registration
fees.
Bernie Papke, co-ordinator of
activities-elect, said it is presumptuous to think that any
fine will stimulate tardy students.
"We should certainly protest
it next year, both formally and
informally,"  Papke  said.
The University Board of Governors has ruled that the late
registration penalty should be
increased from $20 to $25 with
an additional $5 fine for each
additional day the student is
late registering.
The board said consideration
would    be    given    to    students
claiming extenuating circumstances.
First vice - president Eric
Ricker described the fine as
"stiff."
"I wouldn't accuse the administration of trying to pad its
coffers because I don't know
the state of its finances," Ricker
said. "I myself am not pleased
with the raise, but it's the type
of think I don't think you're
going to get any action on anyway."
Student president Alan Cornwall said he .doesn't expect his
council will protest the raise.
"We can't condone late registration by the students and the
administration has said it will
give consideration to extenuating circumstances. Probably this
will drive it home to the students."
3rd slate a needless expense
and a nuisance, says Glenn
The third slate of campus elections should be abolished
in their present form, second vice-president Pat Glenn
told Council Monday.
"These officials could easily be elected by the interest
groups or appointed by Council," Glenn said.
This slate is nothing but a nuisance and an expensive
bother," Glenn said.
Council decided to refer the matter to the Constitutional revisions committee.
First vice-president-elect Peter Shepard said the only
justification for the third slate being campus-wide was
to obtain publicity for the groups involved.
"If this is the only way they can get publicity they
should disband," he said.
Peace research institute
to seek council support
Student representatives of the Canadian Peace Research
Institute will appear before student council to appeal for aid
for the organization.
\\
THE REEF
a
Point Roberts, Washington, U.S.A.
DINING & DANCING
Featuring "the Fabulous Ian Smith Trio"
FRI., SAT. & SUN.
OPEN YEAR ROUND
10 Miles South of Deas Island Tunnel
Large Parties by Reservation Only: Dial 945-2233—945-2579
No minors allowed on premises
Proof of age must be available
Councillors Monday tabled a
motion from the National Federation of Canadian University
Students committee that council
endorse a fund-raising campaign
tor CAPRI.
President-elect Doug Stewart
said the motion should be tabled
until student representatives of
CAPRI could speak to council.
Representatives have agreed to
appear.
NOTHING WRONG
'1 see nothing wrong with
endorsing a fund-raising campaign," Stewart said. "The students don't have to contribute
if they don't want to."
Vic e-president-elect Peter
Shepard said CAPRI is a controversial matter politically and
he felt council should not endorse it.
Treasurer Malcolm Scott said
he felt council endorsation
would not do CAPRI much good.
LEAVE ALONE
"I think we should leave it
alone," he commented.
"If this organization wants to
have a fund- drive they should
approach the university administration and do it on their.own,"
he said.
"I think CAPRI has a worthy
purpose, b u t it may possibly
prove to be extremely controversial especially if it becomes associated with the nuclear disarmament body, as this issue is
going to be very significant in
the pending federal election,"
Scott added.
Scott said he felt council was
not elected to choose on behalf
of the student in this type of issue.
Councillor Pat Glenn said
council should support CAPRI
"right down the wire."
"•I am personally convinced of
the sincerity of the people and
the value of the project," he
said," and I think it merits
Council's support.
Applications open
for NFCUS Seminar
The National Federation of
Canadian University Students
committee is seeking nine students to attend the fifth annual
NFCUS seminar at Carleton
University in Ottawa, Sept. 1-8.
Applications close Feb. 28.
Any student intending to return
to UBC next year may apply.
Application forms and information may be obtained from
NFCUS chairman, Dave Anderson, Brock Hall.
Theme of the seminar is "The
University in Canadian Life."
The 150 student delegates from
across Canada will hear speakers from Canada, the United
States, Britain and France.
To be well informed
about Soviet affairs
GET  THE   FACTS
FOR  YOURSELF
Documents of  the  22nd Congress
of the Soviet  Communist
Party
• Central Committee Report
20c
• New Draft Program Report
20c
• New 20-Year Program
20c
• New Rules of CPSU
10c
• Amendments to Rules
lftc
All five for 75c
307 W. PENDER ST.  VAN., B.C.
JUST    OFF    VICTORY    SQUARE
MUtual 5-5836 Thursday, February 22, 1962
THE      UBYSSEY
r*age 5
Massive Mass
Production
• The Vancouver Symphony,
Sunday, February 18, 1962.
Berlioz's love of massiveness
was presented rather strikingly to a Vancouver audience
last Sunday with the Vancouver Symphony's performance
of his Requiem, Opus 5. The
Symphony of approximately
seventy-two memhers was supported by the two hundred
twenty-two members of the
combined Vancouver Bach
Choir and University Choir.
Berlioz, who felt that the
perfect orchestra was two
hundred seventy-two strings,
thirty-two harps and thirty-
two grand pianos, plus any
other available instruments
excelled in works of such scope
size   and   dimensions  as   this.
,     DEDICATED MUSIC
Irwin Hoffman, symphony
conductor, dedicated this performance to Bruno Walter, the
great German - American conductor who died suddenly Feb.
16, of a heart attack.
The performance of the "Requiem et Kyrie—Introitus", the
first of the ten sections of this
Requiem, opened movingly.
The strings worked nicely together, and the climaxes were
generally good, but entries and
endings often sloppy.
INTERLUDES OF STRINGS
The "Dies irae prosa, Tuba
mirum", the second section,
contained well wrought shadings. The orchestral interludes,
led by the string section were
exciting. It moved at a comparatively brisk pace and a
well accented beat was maintained. The fanfare, followed
by the explosive force of the
tympani, followed in turn by
an excellent drop from forte
possible to piano over a beat,
would have been more effective had the brass section been
rhythmically secure and had
the tympani not drowned out
the vocal part. The second climax of this movement was
rather spoiled by the fact that
the performers reached their
maximum height of volume
-before the peak had arrived.
The opening of the "Quid
sum miser", of woods to bass
to voice and round to woods
again, was excellent.
DOMINANT BRASS
The "Rex tremendae" opened
rather poorly, but produced
some lovely shadings of tone.
Crescendoes were effected
rather well but the voices were
a little overpowered by the
brass at times.
The "Quaerans me" showed,
in parts, some nice work by the
choir. Their entries were clean,
but endings weak. However,
the ending of the movement
was excellently executed.
The performers needed time
to warm into the "Lacrymosa",
but once into it worked very
well. The throbbing bass provided by the string section was
especially effective. The brass
did however, at times, overpower the voices and something was lost on climaxes for
they were being reached too
soon. However, the section
ended beautifully with a very
well handled and controlled
diminuendo.
WELL EXECUTED
The "Offertorium — Domine
Jesu Christe" was very well
handled. The orchestral "organ" sounds and the choral
"angelic choir" sounds were
very effective. .   •
It could have been hoped in
the "Hostias" that the flute and
French horn would enter together more often than they
did, but otherwise the- movement was well handled.
The "Sanctus", in which
Raymond Manion (tenor) sang
the solo, was the best performance of the afternoon. Mr.
Manton, and his rich tonal
qualities, were excellent. The
soloist - string balance and the
chorus - full orchestra balance
were very well wrought. The
quasi-Handelian fugal section
was vigorously treated by the
choir; the almost imperceptible
cymbals and bass drum added
strength to. the movement; and
even the unwieldy tubas lent
melodic depth. The ending was
the fullest and cleanest of the
afternoon.
CHORAL WORK
The "Agnus Dei", the final
section of the Requiem, recapitulates the opening choral
lines. Here there was a strength
without force which culminated in a delicately handled
vocal ending, reinforced by the
arpeggios of the strings and
the ominous throb of the tympani.
Mr. Hoffman and his performers gave, then, a generally
well balanced and sincere presentation of this very massive
and heavy church work. They
were roundly applauded for it?
—Bob McDonald
It's the ads thai counl.
They're why we're here today
and here tomorrow. Among
Friday's attractions: Kineo, of
course; the Soon-Seen Scene;
arid, who knows? Mebbe some
Bromwegian qualifications of
Bowering's euphoric ravings in
today's Placebo.
Damned Films
On Monday, February 26, Cinema 16 will present an evening
f "Damned Films" at the UBC auditorium at 8 p.m.
■■" In presenting these films, Cinema 16 offers no moral, sexual,
thical or political viewpoint nor necessary support for any of
le styles you will see. The purpose is merely to lay before you
ie films and allow you to judge for yourselves. Most of the films
an be fell rather than understood; their meanings may be im-
enetrable on the level of consciousness unless cne resorted to
sycho-analytical technique. They are tied together often by a
mtinuity of mood and feeling rather than by any formal story
ne.
Renunciation. U.S.A. 1958, by John Schmitz. Music by.Bela
artok.
Flesh of Morning, U.S.A. 1956, by Stan Brakhage.
Opera Mouffe. France 1958, by Agnes Varda.
Lot in Sodom. U.S.A. 1933. Produced, written and directed
r J. Sibley Watson, Jr. and Melville Webber".' Music "by Louis
egel.
A Movie. U.S.A. 1960, by Bruce Conner. Music by Respighi.
_. Trumpit. U.S.A. 1956, by Larry Jordan.
tie Wicr PACE
EDITOR: DAVE BROMIGE
Layout: Jones
-placebo-
by george bowering
EUGENE,    OREGON
HASTILY  TO  SAY,   A TRIP   ALL   THE
way down to the middle of Oregon in a compact car with Bromige is not as horrendous an
experience as the facts would promise. In fact
it was rather pleasant. With the splendiferous
scenery of US 99 whisping by in boulevard
bounty, and Bromige in the back seat eating
Cried chicken and hollering "Slow down, for
chrztlk sake!" the trip was perhaps the nicest
feature of the jaunt. Other than sleeping in a
bed you don't have to make yourself, that is.
THIS WAS THE THIRD ANNUAL UNI-
versity of Oregon Manuscripts Day, and it was
a big show. Writers from Idaho to San Francisco, college writers, that is, congregated at
Eugene to show their work to each other, hurl
criticism at each other, and to buy each other
drinks. It was a fine time. Bromige felt so relaxed and friendly that at one time he lay down
in the middle of the floor at the welcome party
and pretended he was something made up by
Norman Mailer. (Details from David Bromige;
write the critics' editor.)
UBC CAME OFF QUITE WELL. THEY
thought Jacob Zilber's criticism and kindly remarks extremely astute and perceptive. They
thought the poetry of Bromige was earthy and
exciting. They thought my play was incomprehensible. They were right on all counts.
It would appear, from what we saw in
reading great sheafs of manuscripts, that the
college writing in the Northwest splits  right
down the muddle. Most of the poetry was of
the traditional kind, and a little too timid or
ostentatious to respond to life. Most of the
prose was a series of attempts to approach ordinary life from an experimental point of view.
On the whole, the prose was more mature and
closer to professional standards. All in all I
would say that UBC is the most promising
university in the area of Northwest writing.
THE PEOPLE IN EUGENE ARE INTER-
ested in what's happening up here, too. The
visit there by Earle Birney last spring has left
the U. of O. regulars with the idea that our poet
is a great messiah. They love him. They think'
he is great. Everywhere we went we were
asked if we knew Earle Birney. One has the
impression of the poet striding thru the streets
of Eugene, hands jammed in pockets, head
lowered and eyes looking straight ahead; and
sidewalk student reaching out to touch a hem
of his quiet sports jacket. This is fine. In fact
I caught Bromige imitating that hands jammed
in pockets stride while we were on the streets
of Eugene.
WHICH LEADS TO AN IRONIC ASIDE.
You'll never believe it, but amongst the piles
of manuscripts, Bromige's were the sole Beat
poems there. I was proud of him.
THINK, THOUGH, THAT THE MAJOR
impression we got was of the size and development of Creative Writing programs in the
American   colleges,   especially   Oregon.
SPRING ££/ SPECIALS
LADIES
GROUP 1
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MEN
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LADIES AND MEN'S VALUES
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ARLBERG (SKI HUT) SPORTING GOODS
608 ROBSON - AMPLE PARKING ON SEYMOUR MUtual 5-9411 Page  6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 22, 1962
Debate audience decides
Capital
By PAT HORROBIN
Just the "garbage" of the
English criminal community
ever gets hanged.
Former English criminal
lawyer, Dr. Graham Parker,
referred to England's way of
hanging to support the resolution "Capital Punishment is a
good thing."
But his case was defeated
by the audience in Bu. 102.
England puts murderers under the jurisdiction of the
Home Secretary, Dr. Parker
told students. He sifts through
the elements of each case,
making dispensations on the
killer's behalf.
Parker called the occasional slip-through, when a
hanged man turns out to be
entirely    innocent    "one    of
ishment -morally"wrong
March 5 deadline
set for Alma Mater
Society positions
Applications are open for the
following Alma Mater Society
positions: Advertising Manager,
College Shop Manager, Frosh
Orientation committee chairman, Homecoming committee
chairman, Raven editor, and
National Federation of Canadian University Students chairman.
Deadline for applications is
March 5 at 3 p.m. and council
interviews will be held the same
night.
Applications must be submitted by letter to the AMS .secretary stating name, phone, address,- faculty, year, age, position sought, experience and platform.
Deadline for the second set
of appointments is March 12 at
3 p.m. Positions open are:
Academic Symposium co-
chairman, High School Conference chairman, Leadership Conference chairman, Special
Events Committee chairman,
Student Court clerk, Totem
editor, World University Service
committee chairman, and Coordinator of Publications.
TUXEDO
RENTALS
Special
University
Student Rate
only
$3 00
at
TUXEDO
JUNCTION
643 HOWE STREET
MUtual 1-1643
JOHN HOWES
.  .   it's immoral
those boo-boos" every system
makes.
Prof. John F. Howes, of
the Asian Studies department,
revolved his attack around
the only thing he said Parker
had missed—the moral question.
"This isn't the area to balance the treasury in," he said,
countering the argument that
imprisoning is too expensive.
How can the public take
revenge for an act conceived
in blind panic, Howes demanded.
"The only way a man can
square his ethics — which
are against killing — with his
desire for self-preservation
— which brings revenge in —
is by the same kind of nervous
laughter I hear right now,"
Howes said.
Editor reprimanded
for unapologetic letter
CALGARY (CUP) — A letter of apology that was not
"apologetic enough" brought
the editor-elect of the University of Alberta campus
paper a reprimand from the
student  discipline  committee.
Corbett Locke was charged
by incumbent editor Alan
Arthur with writing an unauthorized letter, which en- -.
dangered relations with the
Board of Governors.
GRAHAM PARKER
.  "garbage" hanged
Federal Election
is Coming
Persons  Interested   in
Receiving
LIBERAL PARTY
LITERATURE
During the Summer
Contact  FRAN  at
CA 4-7800 or put
Name and   Address   in
Box 116, Brock Hall
How much will it cost to be a happy wanderer?
Two hundred dollars? Two thousand dollars?
Travelling can run into real money. Fares ...
food . . . shelter .. , clothes- -it all adds up.
When you go depends on when you can pay.
But you'll probably find The Bank of Nova
Scotia can help you go sooner than you'd expect. Here's how:
Starting today, when you earn extra money,
keep it—not in your pocket but in a Scotiabank
Savings Account. There you'll find your deposits
quickly build up to a healthy total... and soon
you may be sipping cafe au lait in a sidewalk
restaurant in Paris.
Just one dollar will start you saving at The
Bank of Nova Scotia. Drop in at your nearest
branch and open your Savings Account—today!.
NK
THE BRNK OF NOVR 5C0TIR
University and Allison Branch: K. D. Carter, Manager '■« Thursday, February 22, 1962
THE      UBYSSEY
Proportional  representation
out for Model  Parliament
Page 7
< Model Parliament will retain
its weighted majority system of
allotting seats, a general meeting of political club members
decided Tuesday.
The members voted 62-38 to
approve a motion that 41 of the
■80 House seats go to the party
getting the highest percentage
of the vote. The remaining 39
seats will be divided among the
remaining parties in proportion
to the vote received. .
OLD SYSTEM
j The weighted majority system has been in use for the past
three model parliaments, but at
a recent meeting of Parliamentary Council, representatives of
the five campus political clubs
voted 3-2 to do away with the
system.
Instead, they proposed that
all parties, including the party
getting the majority vote, be
allotted seats in proportion to
'their percentage of total vote.
In favor of changing the system
were representatives of the Conservative, Social ' Credit and
Communist parties.
On the basis of the weighted
system the Liberal party this
year will get 41 seats, NDP 20,
Progressive Conservatives 10,
Socreds 8, and Communists 1.
x REPRESENTATION
On the basis of representation
by vote, Liberals would have
received 36 seats, NDP 22, Conservative 11, Socreds 9, and
Communists 2.
New Democratic Party president Phil Waddell, who proposed
-that the weighted majority system be kept, said representation
by vote would possibly lead to
the defeat of the government on
the first day.
"The NDP (the official opposition) couldn't support a Liberal
throne speech unless they gave
up their principles in writing
it," Waddell said.
Parties, he claimed, would
have to prostitute themselves to
stay in power.
Tory president Colin Ross said
the main advantage of changing
the seat allotment system would
be to increase the standard of
debate. Under the weighted system, he said the government
party does not have to present
convincing debates supporting
its legislation because it knows
it is going to pass.
RIDICULOUS
Liberal President John Deachman said Jhe system would be
"ridiculous" if it was changed
because a government would
have no stability unless it was
able to get a majority of the
vote in the campus elections.
NDP    representative     James
Balderson said that the Tories,
Socreds and Communists had
banded together in "some sort
of alliance."
"Your people go Liberal," a
voice hollered from the audience.
UNRULY
At least five times during the
meeting chairman Pollard had
to call for order as apposition
party members carried on side
debates in the audience.
Peter Hebb, Law 1, attempted
to get the meeting cancelled,
minutes after it started, claiming there was not a quorum
present.
However, Parliamentary Council president Ron Pollard ruled
that 20 percent of total membership constitutes a quorum by
Parliamentary Council constitution and he ruled a quorum was
present.
U
ft
THE SNACKERY
3 LOCATIONS
3075 Granville- RE 3-5813
4423 W. 10th Ave. CA 4-0833
5075 Kingswoy - HE 1-8818
FREE  HOT  &  FAST  PIZZA
DELIVERY
There is
food for thought
in this book
It is about IBM, the company, its philosophy, its products and the dynamic industry in which IBM is aa
unquestioned leader.
But mostly the book is about the positions available at
IBM for graduates in Engineering, Commerce or
Business and Arts. It explains how the work at IBM is
tailored to a graduate's degree and describes the positions of Applied Scientist, Sales Representative, Programmer, Instructor and Systems Representative. It
indicates, too, how stimulating and satisfying these
jobs can be.
We believe this book will show you why a position at
IBM can be one of the most rewarding ever offered. Ijy
you would like to have a copy, write or telephone.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES COMPANY LIMITED
944 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C. MU. 3-3331
Branch Manager—J. L. Yellowlees
'Trade Mark
IBM
.J
NEW   DEVELOPMENTS   in  the
field of nuclear magnetism
will be discussed by Dr.
George Volkoff, head of the
UBC physics department, at
Vancouver Institute meeting
Saturday at 8:15 p.m. in
Buchanan building.
FOB   BENT
Modern furnished 2 room pent-
tiouHe apt. for 4 months, beg"- April
1st. Close to Vancouver General
Hospital and s-ood shopping' area
on Granville. 401—2726 Alder,
corner 11th West. Telephone RE
3-8783.
Tories fall
at McMaster
HAMILTON (CUP) — The
Progressive Conservative government of McMaster University's Model Parliament fellon
a vote of no confidence on the.
first day of session. Opposition
members condemned the Throne
Speech as being "inadequate
and not deserving the confidence of the House."
Larry Wright, Liberal leader,
was chosen as Prime Minister.
Campus Barber
Shew
Monday - Friday 8:30 - 5:00
Saturday   8:30   -   12:00
LOCATED IN
BROCK EXTENSION
Acadia Camp!
STUDYING TOO HARD?
I
KEEP ASPIRIN WITH YOU
AT ALL TIMES
ASPIRINS!
UNIVERSITY     PHARMACY      LTD.
5754 University  Boulevard CA. 4-3202
Who IS the Fairest One of All?
YOU ARE YOU ARE YOU ARE YOU ARE
YOU ARE YOU ARE YOJL/£ARE YOU ARE
YOU ARE YOUARE/^ ^VVOU ARE
And Kitten makes you
look that way with this
exciting new medium-
weight Orion
cardigan. Campus
kittens will delight
in this chic new
style with eyelet
full-fashioning and
tiny, ribbed collar!
In exciting new
spring colours!
Style #230. Sizes
34-42 . . . $12.98.
At better fashion
shops everywhere
Without this label
KITTEN! Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 22, 1962*;
'Tween classes
Conference needs guides
HIGH SCHOOL CONF.
Tour guides needed for Friday from 9:30 to noon. Please
come to meeting noon today in
Bu. 225.
* *   *
ACADEMIC SYMPOSIUM
All delegates are invited to
renew discussion at 3:30 today
in Mildred Brock. Refreshments
provided.
* *   *
SCM
"Missionary stay home," a
panel discussion on aspects of
overseas missions. Bu. 102 noon
today.
* *   *
NEW DEMOCRATS
Two films, "Racial Prejudice"
and "Assignment Children —
with Danny Kaye," Bu. 104. Z5
cents.
* *   *
SAILING CLUB
General meeting at noon in
Bu. 202. All those seeking PE
credit must attend.
* *   *
NISEI VARSITY
Meet the "Seattle Invaders"
at get together party at Grad
Centre   Friday    at   8  p.m.   50
cents.
* *   *
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Dr. Borden speaks on the
early peopling of North America, Friday noon in Bu. 205.
* *   *
VCF
"Asia's Spiritual Crisis," a
lecture by Mr. David Adeney of
Hong Kong Friday noon in Bu.
106.
* *   *
PRE MED SOC
Special meeting for those to
attend the Medical Career Conf.
in W. 200 at noon Friday.
Cornette Beauty
Salon
Special  Prices for UBC
"Individual  Attention"   by
Male and Female Stylists,
OPEN   FRI  TILL NINE
4532 W. 10 CA 4-7440
UPPER
TENTH
BARBERS
4574 W. 10th AVE.
One Block Past the Gates
featuring European Trained
Barbers
Rental Service
TUXEDOS
Black Suits, Formals,
Costumes, Make-up
Special Student Rates
New York
Costume Salon
4397 W.  10th      CA 4-0034
Near UBC Gates
CINEMATOGRAPHY GROUP
Meeting in Bu. 221 Friday
noon for those interested in
forming a group for making
films.
* *   *
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
"Catharsis Capers," the annual dance of the psychology
club, Friday 9-1. Five-piece
orchestra, lunch and bar. Tickets
at the AMS office.
•k    -k    *
JR. CHEM CLUB
Dr. Reeves speaks on "Chemical Information from Nuclear
Magnets" Chem. 250 noon Friday.
* *   *
NATIVE FELLOWSHIP
Native Canadian Indian Night.
Indian dances and relating of
Indian Legends and film. Foreign students are urged to attend, 8:30 Friday at IH.
* *   *
UBC CAMERA CLUB
Anyone interested in touring
the New Kodak processing plant,
please sign at club room.
* *   *
FOLKSONG SOC
The Folksong Soc. will be
having elections today in Bu.
2239 at 12:30. IMPORTANT.
* *   *
SCM
A seminar on Overseas service will be held this weekend,
including a presentation of opportunities for work and^study
in other countries. Apply SCM
Hut L-5.
PHILOSOPHY  CLUB
Elections next Monday noon
in Bu. 212. Everyone out.
*   *   *
CHINESE VARSITY
Semi-formal Banquet and
Dance, Gai Paree, Saturday,
March 3, 7-1.
Scott scouting
for financial aides
Student treasurer Malcolm
Scott is looking for six students
as assistants and members of
next year's Alma Mater Society
finance committee.
Positions open are: executive
assistant to the treasurer; administrative assistant; and four
positions on the finance committee.
Further information is available from Scott in the treasurer's
office in Brock Hall. Applications should be made there,
also.
-Experienced Typist available
at reasonable rates fox Thesis and Terih paper typing.
Work completed promptly.
Phone YU 8-9483.
[UBC  STUDENTS
15% Discount
Imported  Car  Farts  an*
Accwcozie*
'Overseas Auto Parts J
Il2th and Alma
BE 1-7686'
DON'T UNDERMINE
your Savings Account
Here's the way to keep
it well propped up. Open a
separate Personal Chequing
Account for paying bills. Keep
your Savings Account strictly
for saving. Ask at any branch
about this new Royal Bank
Two-Account Plan.
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
University Branch
10th and Sasamat
TODAY
12:30
AUDITORIUM — ADMISSION 50c at the Door
U.B.C.  MUSICAL  SOCIETY   PRESENTS
NEW YORK'S SMASH  MUSICAL!
"ONCE UPON
A MATTRESS"
Student Performances:.. Today at Noon and this evening at 8:15 p.m.
Tickets for this evening's performance 75c at Alma Mater Society and at the
door.
PUBLIC PERFORMANCES
TONIGHT, FRIDAY and SATURDAY at 8:15 p.m.
UBC AUDITORIUM
Ticket Prices:   $1.50, $2.00 and $2 .50
On Sale at Alma Mater Society and Famo us Artist's Box Office, Hudson's Bay Co.
It's the Greatest Sleeper Ever to Hit the Musical Stage !
Starring BARBARA JAY
Directed by James Johnston; Musical Direction, Bev Fyfe; Choreography, Grace MacDonald

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