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The Ubyssey Feb 1, 1962

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 WE US YSSEY
gym
noon
Vol. XLIY
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANBAR¥-30, 1962
No. 48
r-ee. \
Activities curtailed-Scott
Irresponsibility
charged by
Alan Cornwall
By  SHARON McKINNON
Student president Alan Corn-
*wall   Monday   charged^.student
-council with flagrant -Tpsregard
ifor   its   responsibilities- to   the
"Alma Mater  Society.  He  made
"^Jhe   charge    when    councillors
4-were unable to come to an agree-
-i||ntent   on   satifaetory   eligibility
' rules. /*
"If this council cannot make
a decision after all the discussion we have had we are irresponsible," Cornwaill said, "and
none of us, including myself,
should  be  holding  office.
"Here we are supposed to be
responsible and we cannot even
set up eligibility rules" for the,
people who will follow us in office," he added.
Eligibility rules have been un-
:   der discussion for the last three
council meetings.
NO MAJOMTY
The rules are a part of the
code and no prpposafi offered
had been able to obtain the
three-quarters majority neces-
sairy for amending the code.
Council passed a proposal
which states:
"To be a candidate for office
. he (a student) must be eligible
as to one of the following categories: *
These rules take effect immediately and will govern nominations for the first slate.
"If his previous Christmas examination marks have been registered with the registrar he
must have passed the equivalent
number of units to that required by the registrar for the attainment of credit at sessional
examinations and have a 50 per
cent average.
IN ADDITION
"If he did not j»ss his immediately previous sessional examinations he must in addition
to the unit requirement stated
above achieve a 65 per cent
average.
"If his immediately previous
Christmas examination marks
have not been registered with
the registrar he must have passed the number of units required
by the registrar for the attainment of credit at his immediate-
- ly previous examinations.
*If he is not eligible as to his
immediately previous sessional
examinations and his Christmas
marks have not been registered
with the registrar he may demonstrate elegibility by presenting letters from a professer in
(Continued on page 5)
See "ELIGIBILITY"
NFCUS levy means
less money locally
Some student activities will be curtailed if student council
support an additional ten-cent-per-student grant to the National Federation of Canadian University Students, treasurer
Malcolm Scott said Wednesday.
"There     is     only    so    much — •
DOING HER BEST to back up claims by campus women that
the women in Brock are sexier than those in the bus stop
cafe, this unidentified girl shows lots of leg in typical Brock
Lounge pose.
Girls decide question —
Brock females sexier
By TIM PADMORE n
Brock girls are sexier than Bus Stop girls, says the experts . . . the girls.
> Nominations for second
slate Alma Mater Society of-
will close next Thursday.
The second slate includes
treasurer, coordinator of activities and first vice-president.
After the Frosh-Engineer debate reached an impasse on the
question Monday, The Ubyssey
decided to ask those who should
know.
A survey was made in Brock
and at the Bus Stop. Brock won
7-0.
Liz Wood, Arts II, said, "How
often do you see a girl in one of
those shapely lab coats in
Brock?"
Gina Macfarlane, Home economics I, liked Brock's lack of
engineers.
Bev Grossmen, Education I,
pointed out the number of "society types"  in Brock.
Agnes Fahlman, Arts I, agreed,
"Bus Stop girls are likely to be
Science students, less interested
in looking sexy."
Brock's sorority girls got another vote from Lorna Gee,
Arts I.
There was one dissenter.
Karen Youell, Nursing III,
thought the sexiest girls were
to be found in the Library. Into
the stacks, men.
AMS posts
all contested
All positions for the Alma
Marter Society first slate elections  are  being  contested.
The two presidential candidates are Nicholas Omelusik,
Arts II and Doug Stewart, Law
II.
Three candidates are running
for second vice-presidents' position. They are: Robert MacKay,
Comm II, Ronald Pollard, Arts
II,  Edward Lavalle, Comm. II.
The two candidates for Secretary are Miriam Sapiro, Arts II
and Barbara Bennett, Arts III.
Nominations for first slate
elections should be submitted to
returning officer Dairrell Roberts before 4:00 p.m. Thursday.
First slate elections will be
held February 7th.
money," said Scott, "and if we
give NFCUS the full ten-cent
grant, there won't be money for
certain other activities."
Scott said curtailments would
come in the areas of faculty editions of the student newspaper,
and activities of clubs and undergraduate societies.
Scott said the AMS finance
committee, although knowing
money would be needed for the
NFCUS grant, had not planned
on the full ten-cent per student
levy.
"This is a voluntary grant and
w-e   expected   to   consider   how
much we  could  afford to give
NFCUS," Scott said.
APPALLED
Earlier, student president Alan
Cornwall had said he was appalled by the state of AMS
finances.
"If indeed our financial position is in jeopardy we should
have known this months in advance," Cornwall said, "as council grants supplements to peti-
ioning organizations practically
very meeting."
Scott   denied   that  the AMS
inances are in trouble.
"Either   we   turn   down   the
TFCUS grant, or we turn down
11    our    other   organizations,"
icott said.
REFUSAL
"There's no problem."
The finance committee Monday recommended to council
that it refuse to pay the ten-cent
voluntary increase in the NFCUS
grant. The committee also favored complete UBC withdrawal
from NFCUS.
Student council, however,
after long debate, decided to
approve the grant in principle
and pay it if finances look good
in four weeks.
Scott said he found it "hard
to swallow that Mr. Cornwall is
suddenly appalled by the total
expenditures made at meetings
chaired by himself."
"I consider his comments
neither a reflection on myself
nor on the finance committee
but a sad comment on his ignorance of the financial facts of
life."
INVESTMENT
"Mr. Cornwall stated that an
investment in NFCUS is an investment in Canada, and surely
no one would disagree, but an
investment must be sold and
Mr. Cornwall as the local representative of NFCUS has never
mentioned NFCUS, let alone
tried to sell it to the society,"
Scott concluded.
Cornwall said Tuesday he had
referred the question of the additional grant to NFCUS to
finance committee last fall.
"The fact that note was made
of this in the budget yet there
was no provision made for the
(Continued on page     4)
See "FINANCES"
T. C. DOUGLAS
.   .   .  secret pact?
Secret pact
possible —
NDP leader
By MIKE  GRENBY
Canada may have made a secret pact to use nuclear weapons,
New Democratic Party leader
Tommy Douglas charged Tuesday.
"^Either the government has
already made the pact and is
waiting until after the general
election to announce it or Canada is wasting millions of dollars on defence spending," he
told students.
Laiter, at a press conference,
he said that since the money is
being spent, there must be some
undertaking afoot.
Speaking to more than 1,700
students in the Armory, Douglas
condemned the idea of Canada
becoming a nuclear power.
"The best contribution Canada cam make toward peace is
to do all she can to restrict the
present membership of the Nuclear Club to four," he said, "and
she should start by not accepting nuclear weapons."
The  former  premier of  Saskatchewan said he agreed that
nuclear  arms have been a  deterrent and he wouldn't agree to
(Continued on page  6)
See  "DOUGLAS" Pooe 2
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday,  February   1,   1962_
THE
News item: UBC gets dentist for president
Winner of the Southam trophy .
Authorized as second class mail by the-Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year In
Vancouver b-y the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial
opinions  expressci  are  those  of  the  Editor  of  The  Ubyssey  and   not
•3.-i.-'lv       t ris*'        f    <l}p     \ Tmi    ^"f.ip    Po^'f>ty    r\r    * b 0    I'nM'nr':+v    '~»r     *-t '
Telephone    CA    4-2242.    Locals:    Editor—25;    News—23;    Photography^—24
Editor-in-Chiei: Roger  McAlee
Managing   Editor .    .
Associate   Editor .    .
News Editor      . .    .
City Editor      .    . .    .
CUP  Editor       .    .    .
Photography Editor    .
Senior Editor      .
Sports Editor      ...
Photographv  Manager
Critics Editor .    .
Editorial Research    .    ,
 Denis   Stanley
        Ann   Pickard
.    .    . . Fred Fletcher
 Keith Bradbury
 Maureen  Covell
.    . Don Hume
       Sharon  Rodney
 Mike Hunter
         Byron   Hender
David RromiBP
Bob Hendrickson, Ian Cameron
STAFF THIS ISSUE
Layout   this   issue:   Bob   McDonald
Reporters:   Sharon  McKinnon,   Bill  Wilson,   Ron   Kydd,
Richard  Simeon,  Pat  Horrobin, Mike Horsey,  Mike
Grenby, Krishna  Sahay.
Photographers:  Ted  Ross, Barry Joe, Bob Flick.
Technical:  Gail Kendall, Pauline Fisher.
Right? Lett? Centre?
With local politics becoming more "interesting" and with
the birth of new political factions, both rightists and leftists,
we feel a statement of our political policy is necessary.
WE ARE NOT:
! Liberal
Conservative
I Communist
I Anti-communist
1 New Democratic
t Socialistic
Social Credit
In short, The Ubyssey neither supports nor rejects, in
print, the policies of any political party in this country.
This does not mean the editors of The Ubyssey have no
political views. They do, but in an operation such as ours
wviere the editor-in-chief is responsible for the content of the
paper, and therefore sets the policy, it would be unfair to
expect the staff, who do most of the actual work, to- continue
working if we followed a political philosophy with which they
did not agree.
This paper is staffed by full time students who give up
their free time, voluntarily, to produce it.
WE HAVE BEEN CALLED:
Communists—by the anti-communists
] Anti-communists—by  the communists
i Liberals—by the Conservatives
| Conservatives—by the Liberals
J New Democfatsr—by the Liberals, Communists and
~ Conservatives
Capitalists—by all Socialists.
^ All of ffeese groups, at times, seem to operate on the old
political priniciple, "if you're not with us you're against us."
Well, ladies and gentlemen, The Ubyssey is not against any
of you and it's not with any of you either.
We believe in democracy, which, at least under Canada's
political system, allows all parties to expound their philosophies
and theories.
Listen — choose
Next year is going to be a tough one for the Alma Mater
Society. A new president is coming to head the university.
He may not be as student^conscious as the present one.
The Student Union building program will be just nicely
off the ground, and the Winter Sports Arena should be under
way. A couple of million dollars is going to be spent.
It is student responsibility to elect capable student officers
to deal with any problems that will surely arise.
In tJhe forthcoming AMS election campaign, The Ubyssey
urges you to listen carefully to candidates' statements. Then
choose the candidates you think will best meet the challenges
they will have to face.
mmmmmim
Letters to fhe Editor
'-*v"*-
Swept off feet
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Ornstein is emotionally motivated!
Swept   off   his   feet   by   a
frenzy  of misdirected  animosity,   the   "philosophical"   Mr.
■ Ornstein  made   this  ludicrous
statement regarding MRA:
"They preach absolute love
and unselfishness. If they really believed these things they'd
be communists."
Using the same form of argument one might say: All
ducks have two legs and a
head; all men have two legs
arid a head. Therefore all men
are ducks.
It doesn't work,  Jack.
Yours truly,
TONY  BUZ AN,
Arts'II.
Mardi Gras redefined
Editor,
The Ubvssey.
Dear Sir:
Regarding your Editor's note
in last Thursday's Ubyssey re
Mardi Gras, I wish to point
out that the source of donations
fOr the B.C. Society for Crippled Children is not limited
just to the Mardi Gras raffle.
In fact there are five separate
sources which include:
1. Pep Meet profits
2. Dress Rehearsal profits
3. Dance profits
4. Mardi Gras raffle
5. Cash  donations
It is hoped by both my committee and myself that this correction will be noted by all
those interested to eliminate
any confusion that may have
arisen.
Yours truly,
DAVID C. PEGG
Mardi Gras Co-ordinator
B & G law
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
Having just witnessed the
latest skirmish in the parking
war, I feel that I must express
my own views on the subject.
As I see it, the main reason for
the present bad feeling is the
apparent belief of Buildings
and Grounds that they are the
law and of the Parking Committee that they are above the
law. I feel that the Only way
to curb this rampant absolu^
tism is through the due process
of law.
Accordingly, I suggest that
next year the AMS fees be increased by one dollar per person to provide a legal fund.
With this $13,000 plus legal
fund a test case could then be
fought in the legal courts to
control our domestic dictators.
Even if the fund was never
used, its very existence "would
be a real protection for the
rights of the individual -whom,
I feel, is victimized precisely
because he lacks the financial
resources to fight back.
R. F. BEHN
Education II
Panic
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I see our communists are in
panic. They appear to be more
interestedLin our freedom than
anybody else on this campus.
Poor souls, some of them. The
idealistic and poorly informed
ones, I mean.
Athough Mr. Boylan and his
friends know very little as yet
about real communism at work
< otherwise I coud not imagine
they would be supporting it),
they have already learned to
repeat party slogans and double speech. Just listen: fascist,
nazis, totalitarian-fascist state,
Birchism, McCarthyism, rightist etc. Let's add some mOre
comrads, say warmongers, reactionaries, capitalistic bandits,
imperialists, lackeys of capitalism and so on. They think the
more of these smear words
they attach to an organization
or individual the less dangerous they will be for the communists. Thus instead of argument they come with smear.
Somebody said something
something about Mr. Barker's
emotional dislike of communism. That may be true, and
again it may not be. But is
there anything more emotional
and slanderous than the letters
of our campus communists to
Ubyssey? They do not know
the   first   thing about this so-
called anti-communism group,
but they have, without any
hesitation given it so many
names.
We know this communistic
vocabulary very well. It has
been practiced for years. But
we are really surprised and
shocked to see the editor of
Ubyssey use practically the
same language. In your Jan.
26 edition you started the article on the front page as follows: "UBC's ultra-right-wing
anti-communist group . . ." Do
you really have any proof that
this is an ultra-right-wing party
or something of that sort? The
fact that they oppose communism does not qualify them for
such a name. Mr. Editor, you
are an intellectual. You cannot
use words that lightly. And,
what is more important, you
cannot treat people in this
manner.
If you insist on democratic
rights for the leftists, why do
you refuse the same rights to
the rightists? In view of the
present world situation and the
threat that is directed at us by
the communist world, it seems
to me, that your attitude is
emotional and immature. I
would say, thank God that
there exists among us people
who care more about common
interest than about their popularity and  personal gain.
Yours truly,
JIM SMITH,
Arts II.
Long gone
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
There is one upon this campus who has gone too long unsung:
MICHAEL MATTHEWS
(An epic tribute to  the prognathous   vanguard   of   UBC's
literati.)
On our campus a Sage has
appeared
Who has furniture-polished
his beard,
And with chin outthrust
In the stacks gathers dust
From old books, hoping
Truth has adhered.
Yours truly,
JOHN HOWARD-GIBBON
Arts IV Thursday, February 1, 1962
THE UBYSSEY
Po^ye 3
Letters to the Editor
Represent the voice
This space was reserved for
a letter from Mr. Helmut Sku-
jins, Arts II, When he came to
our office Tuesday morning to
complain that a letter by him
had been cut in a manner
which destroyed its sense. He
was informed at that time the
letters column on Tuesday was
overset and that his letter had
been cut at the printers for
that reason. He was also assured the letter would run in
its entirety in this edition.
It has since come to our attention that Mr. Skujins has
!had his letter circulated in another manner and we feel it unnecessary to print it again.
Fight for right
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
I will fight for the right to
choose!
Today, as a Canadian citizen, I have the right to choose
on my own behalf, between
socialism and capitalism. That
is, I may lawfully choose to
support the development of one'
or the other. Citizens of the
U.S. could also lawfully make
this choice — two months ago.
Today they may freely choose
to support the growth of capitalism.
On our campus, in fact in
our country, a threat to my
freedom of choice, the ultra-
rightist movement, is developing and growing — with at
least the same speed it began
to  grow on U.S.  campuses a
very few years ago.
At every opportunity, I will
oppose the growth of this antidemocratic movement. Will I
be alone in my opposition? No,
I don't think so. The right to
choose concerns every person
who has not already chosen.
That is, every person who
actively supports the growth of
neither socialism nor capitalism..
This I feel is not only the
position of the majority of the
students in progressive organization such as the New Democratic Party, but also, in fact,
the position of the majority of
the students at UBC.
Yours truly,
BILL MAHONEY
Arts and Science II
Current controversy
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
In the . current communist
right wing controversy, the
major issue appears to be whether we should exert strict controls over Canadian communism, or unite against the infiltration of American style
Birchism. Those on the right
claim that communism is a
menace to democracy and freedom, while those on the left
say that we are being overrun
by fascists and neo-fascists and
neo-nazis. Each, invoking their
democratic right to be heard,
implies that our freedom will
be lost if we do not muzzle the
other.
However, looking at it from
the "extreme" centre, I am able
to discern very little difference
between the policies of the extreme left and right. Either, in
power, would amount to a dictatorial police state limiting our
basic freedoms. However, if
democracy is the best way of
life, is there really any danger
of it being replaced by constitutional means?
We should not have anything
to fear from letting the various
extremist groups say what
they believe or profess to believe, but we should take an
active interest in government
so that they will not be able to
expand their infuence. Radical
revolutionary and subversive
movements can only thrive
where freedom is ailready inhibited and there are valid reasons for criticism of the governing regime, or where the
general populace simply does
not care who rules them.
Yours truly,
JOHN ARMSTRONG,
Petition
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
A petition calling on the government to practice "John
Birch-style" activity was circulated on campus January 15.
This, however, is but one sign
of a movement which poses a
threat to civil liberties.
Last term, for example, I
witnessed an incident which
gave every indication of being
a re-enactment of a scene so
often witnessed in Nazi Germany — a scene of a Gestapo
agent publicly intimidating an
individual.
In reality, it was a young
man's attempt to intimidate a
girl who was a representative
of the Communist   club.   Bel
lowing like an enraged bull,
the screaming fanatic refused
the girl the opportunity to reply. Instead, he continued hurling personal insults.
Since that time, I discovered
that the frenzied student is
considered by his associates
"an ultra right winger" and in
fact he himself has admitted
being a fascist. Recently, the
ideas were substantiated. It
was this same fanatic who distributed some of these "John
Birch-style" petitions,
These petitions demanded
that the Communist party be
outlawed, the membership be
forced to register, that their
convention be prohibited and
that citizens be obliged to inform on communists and
alleged communists. The idea
of having Canadians become
informers, or rather members
of a conspiracy to refuse freedoms, most definitely appalls
me. At the same time, the news
of the possible formation of an
"anti-communist league" further confirms the presence of
a movement against civil liberties and further assures me
of the necessity of a civil
liberties union. :
All Canadians who support
the ideas embodied in this petition are subscribing Canada to
the same fate as that which is
developing for the U.S. In ar,
effort to "defend democracy"
freedoms of individuals are being limited to a greater and
greater extent. The result is
thaj; democracy is becoming a
mere vestige of the institution
of the past. It is crumbling
under the heel of the exponents
of the "John Birch-style" ideology.
I would strongly urge the
students of UBC to oppose this
petition and the ideas which it
represents. By so doing, they
would strike a blow in defence
of civil liberties for which
Canadians in the past have
fought and died.
DENNIS RANKIN
Yours truly,
Science I
Over the moon
Editor,
The Ubyssey. ^
Dear Sir:
The superficiality of the U.S.
Space Administration policy
and consequently of the American people, becomes evident
when we realize that the moon
goal is not so much the exploration of the unknown as it
probably is to claim title to one
of the moon lunar seas and
name it "Jackie", when, if naming is necessary, more proper
would be an ordinary household name such as Elliott.
Yours truly,
RONALD ANDERSON,
Engineering II.
It is the policy of The Ubyssey to print letters on all topics of student interest. These
letters should be as short as
possible, and remain within 150
words. We. of course, reserve the
right to edit.
Letters can be sent to the
editor of The Ubyssey through
campus mail, put info box 149
in the AMS office, or delivered
to The Ubyssey editorial offices
in the North Brock basement.
Three films on art and artists
LEONARD  DA VINCI
- AAAN OF MYSTERY
THE OPEN WINDOW
ROME,   ETERNAL  CITY
NOON TODAY - BUCHANAN 106 - 25c
* BAR OPENS AT 9 p.m.
* DANCING UNTIL 2 cm.
* COCKTAILS SERVED AT 7:30
* DINNER STARTS AT 8 p.m.
Everyone Welcome
On Friday, Feb. 2, the Newman Centre will host its annual
formal, the Crystal Ball. This year the dance wiil be held
in the beautifully appointed Copper and Crystal rooms of
the Capilano Gardens. Cocktails will be served at 7:30, and
dinner (baked-salmon entree) commences at 8:00. The bar
will open and dancing begin at 9:00 and continue to 1:00.
Tickets are $7.50 per couple and can be obtained at the
A.M.S. Office or from any executive of the Newman Centre
at St. Mark's College. Everyone Welcome.
TICKETS   AT  A.M.S.   OFFICE
and ST. MARKS COLLEGE
..•"■j
.•?
MEN the COLLEGE SHOP invites you to come in and see the
NEW UBC JACKET now selling at 16.95
We also have ...
Blazer Crests S^~ 6.50
Dress Shirts—snap tab & eyelet .__"il_ 5.00
button down --»-y-i-- o,®0
Full selection of ties -  2.00
Socks - 1.25. and 1.50
UBC Lighters  1.25
GIRLS the COLLEGE SHOP stocks ...
Nylons 1.09 Charm  Bracelets 4.25
UBC Charms 1.50 Pennant Pins 1.50
We also have:  Kleenex, Cough Drops, Aspirins
and other sundry items.
BROCK EXTENSION -  11:30-2:30 - MONDAY - FRIDAY Page 4
T*ffi,t«YjS5BY?
Thursdpy, Ffbruqry., 1 j,. 1962;
From page 1
Finances
grant in the margin seems to
indicate a lack of consideration
of the grant on the part of
finance committee," he said.
"The duties of the finance
committee go further than just
considering groups that petition
for funds, particularly when the
matter was referred "directly to
them for study," Cornwall
added.
IGNORANCE
A statement released by the
finance committee, excepting
second vice-president Pat Glenn
said, "The AMS finance committee rejects any suggestion
that the society's funds are in
jeopardy.. Any statement to this
effect is the product of ignorance or a lack of consideration
of the facts.
"The society has ample funds
available for the fulfillment of
all commitments. There will be
no financial problems providing
that the same sound financial
policies are followed for the rest
of the year that have been followed to date."
The finance committee statement went on to list the criteria
applied in consideration of
granting requests for funds as
follows:
• ^he availability of -funds.
• .-.the value of the, proposal to
the society in financial and other
terms..
• ihe amount of cash and
effort the petitioners, are willing
to put into the project.
• ^he financial status of the
petitioners.
• ,i£uch other: minor criteria
■a? may be applicable to the proposal in question.
^ "The requests that, provoked
the recent controversy were not
presented to the finance committee by . any representatives of
NFCUS", the statement, continued. "There was no informa-
tion    made,   available   to   the'
finance  committee. to back   up
those requests."
WRONG B ASJS
"This resulted in these requests bejng considered on the
basis of whatever information
happened to be found within
the committee, rather than on
the criteria outlined above."
Glenn, disagreeing with the
other members of the finance
committee, said council had.approved the grant in principle
but tabled the motion because
it was told that if it passed, it
would seriously jeopardize the
AMS financial position.
"Now the next day we are
told that the AMS is in no financial difficulties whatsoever,"
Glenn  said.
"If that is the case, let's simply pay the increase and let the
finance committee quietly slip
out of the hole into which it
has worked itself," he added.
QUESTIONED
Cornwall also questioned the
reasons for Scott's presentation
of-a serious financial state Monr
day night when finance committee declared Tuesday that
there was no problem.
"If the picture isn't as grim
as it was presented Monday
there is no need for controversy," he said.
"Council has already approved
the NFCUS grant in principle,
so let's get on and pay it if there
are no financial problems,"
Cornwall said.
Cornwall also said that if
finance committee didn't have
enough information on NFCUS
it should have approached himself or Dave Anderson, local
NFCUS committee chairman,
for added information.
COURT BROUSSON
.   .   .   leads Birds
Bears meet
T-Birds at
noon today
By  RON  KYDD
The UBC Thunderbirds
meet the University of Alaska
Polar Bears today at 12:45
noon in War Memorial Gymnasium.
This is the first of two
noonrhour basketball games
the 'Birds will play this year.
Next Thursday the touring
Peru national basketball team
will meet the 'Birds at 12:45.
The Polar Bears, also
known as. the Nanooks, which
is Eskimo, for polar bear, are
an unknown quantity to the
UBC. coaching staff.-
"First they clobber the St.
Martin's team," said UBC
coach Jack Pomfret, "and
then they lose to Seattle Pacific 106-58. We don't know
what to expect."
Pomfret also denied that he
is hoping Alaska uses a man-
to-man defence.
"ilt wasn't Saskatchewan's
zone that upset us last Saturday night," he said. We just
couldn't hit the basket. We
couldn't care less what kind
of defence Alaska uses."
The Thunderbirds should be
back at full strength for today's game,, after suffering a
minor epidemic of foot injuries. The. only possible exception is Wayne King, who is
still running at half-speed.
The 'Birds defence, which
was very disjointed at the
stSirt of the season, is finally
beginning to show a bit of coordination.
"We're still a hot and cold
team, however," Pomfret said.
"••Deadly one night and can't
hit a thing the next."
The big gun for the Polar
Bears is their 6'5" centre, Bill
Stauffer. . Tuesday night in
their loss to Seattle Pacific,
he scored 22 points.
Stauffer also has one other
claim to fame. He shoots his
foul shots, not in the orthodox
manner,  but  as   jump-shots.
The Thunderbirds are hoping for a win today to turn
their five game winning
streak into a six game streak.
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'Led dawn gcvrden path'
female politician charges
Canadians were led down the
garden path when they followed
John in 1957, Liberal MP Judy
LaMarch told UBC students
Wednesday.
Miss LaMarch said Prime Minister Diefenbaker took office
with the greatest public confidence any government leader
has ever had, but that he has
failed this trust in the years
since then.
She said the five years of
Conservative rule have diminished Canada's stature both externally and domestically.
"Canada's indecision at the
United Nations and her petulant
childishness in opposing Britain's entry into the Common
Market have made her the
laughing stock of nations," the
lady politician said.
"Mr. Green is an ineffectual
minister of external affairs,"
she added. "No one cares what
Canda thinks today."
Miss LaMarch said Canada
has lost the prestige built up by
Liberal leader Lester Pearson
when he was minister of external affairs.
Domestically,    she     charged,
Rightists give
free warning
UBC's ultra-right-wing anti-
communist group has been distributing free copies of last
Saturday's Vancouver Province which carried an article
warning Canadians about the
dangers of communism.
Copies of the paper were
found at regular Ubyssey distribution points Tuesday morning. The editions had "Free,
See Page 4" pencilled across
their front page.
Gera Benko, spokesman for
the group, admitted that members of the group had placed
the papers on campus.
the Conservatives have • brought
five years of deepening debt
and the worst unemployment in
Canadian history.
The government should create jobs by providing tax incentives, making money available
to municipalities for public
works and by subsidizing export
industries," she said.
Miss LaMarch said the government has not tried to negotiate with the European Common Market for more open
Atlantic trade. Instead, they
have raised tariffs and slammed
the door on British attempts to
get lower tariffs between Canada and Britain.
"Canada's position as a trading nation has declined from
third to fourth in the world in
the last five years," she said.
"The future of both the United States and Canada depend
on good foreign trade," she said.
"What happens in the next few
years will make or break Canada."
She said steps must be taken
immediately to begin providing
the one million jobs that will
be needed by 1965.
| Miss LaMarch predicted Cana-
j dians will decide to substitute
| "live Grits" for "dead Tories"
' in the next election. ■
Cuba   cold-shoulders'
Canadian  students
HAMILTON (CUP) — Four
McMaster University students,
just returned from Cuba, say
they were cold-shouldered by
officialdom despite pre-trip assurances that they would be well
treated.
David Hitchcock, editor of the
Silhouette, suggested that the
snubbing was typical of the
bureaucratic inefficiency common throughout Cuba.
A second traveller, John Mc-
Menemy asserted "We had the
feeling that if we had been
Soviet students or Czechoslova-
kians, we would have been
greeted with open arms and a
rousing cheer, and Castro himself would probably have come
to meet us."
The quartet had been told by
the head of the student external affairs off ice.that arrangements would be made for them
to meet with government officials, and to stay at inexpensive
lodgings. When they arrived on
the island, they found they had
to plan their own program and
to find their own  lodgings.
"Our arrival was no surprise
to them," said Edmond Feld-
man, a graduate student at McMaster. ^
"We had informed them of
our intended visit by letter almost one month prior to our departure."
Hitchcock pointed out, however,, that many of the individual students they met were
very kind and hospitable.
What NOT to Tell a
Child about God
"Mummy, why did God let
Grandpa die?" . . . "Why didn't
He answer my prayer?" In
February Reader's Digest the
mother of a minister gives 5
"don'ts" which will help parents
give understanding answers to
the difficult questions many
troubled children ask.
Don't miss this and 39 other
absorbing and rewarding articles and features in February
Reader's Digest —on sale now!
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THfe^UB^SSlfr
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BECAUSE our photographer is too shy to talk to girls, we don't
know who these campus beauties are. We do know,  how-
ch
cold war tool
UBC prof
By KRISHNA SAHAY
Canada should not join the organization of American
State?, Assistant Economics Professor Dr. Robert Will said
Wednesday.
"The OAS today is merely an
instrument of the cold war," Dr.
Will said.
For centuries the people of
Latin America have suffered
under conditions of economic
want and political dictatorship
but only now has anybody taken
interest in them, he said.
THREAT
The sudden surge of interest,
Will said, is due to the threat
of communism, rather than a
desire to emancipate poverty-
stricken individuals.
"Our interest in Latin America today is not entirely selfless,"  he charged.
<■ If Canada should join the
OAS, many South American
countries would believe Canada
had been influenced by President Kennedy's urging when he
was here in May, he said.
COLLECTIVE POLICIES
Will also charged that if Canada joined the OAS, it would be
bound, by treaty, to follow collective policies.
"Does Canada want to have
its diplomatic and trade relations dictated?" he asked.
Will refuted the argument
that    Canada   should   join the
OAS on the grounds that it will
be able to aid the under-developed countries in South America more easily^
"If we channeled much of our
resources into South America
we would have to quit the Colombo plan," he claimed. Canada cannot afford to spend so
much money, he said.
If Canada wants to do its bit
towards fighting communism it
will have to be prepared to
spend more money or foreign,
aid than it  is doing now.
"This will require a lot of
sacrifice," Will said.
From page 1
New school asks
seat on council
Student council will recommend to the spring general meeting of the Alma Mater Society
—that the society's constitution
be altered to give the School of
Rehabilitation Medicine a representative on council.
Vice - president Eric Ricker
said council made its decision
because the school satisfied the
:riteria necessary for representation — it offers a degree and is
a school, faculty or college of
the University.
•The School of Rehabilitation
Medicine opened this year and
lias nineteen members in first
pear.
Senior matriculation is re-
(uired for entrance to the School
Hid a degree.,is.conferred upon
i completion of a four-year
iourse and field work.
Eligibility
etch of his courses to show that
he is passing the equivalent number of units required by the
registrar for the attainment of
credit at sessional examinations
and a 65 per cent average."
"WE'RE  TRYING"
"Nobody is being facetious,"
replied treasurer Malcolm Scott
to Cornwall's charges. "We are
simply trying to make up our
minds.
"If you don't agree, you have
every right to vote against it for
infinity or until someone convinces you that you are wrong."
Scott said Tuesday, "I believe
that this is a matter of concern
to every member of the society
as it affects fundamental rights
and privileges, Eind should be
the subject of a by-law rather
than changed at the whim of
council especially when councillors can be stampeded from
their considered opinions by a
tirade of petulant verbosity."
Scott last week challenged the
right of student council to rule
on eligibility in view of a clause i
in the constitution which states:
RIGHTS PROVIDED
"The rights and obligations of
the members of the society shall
be as provided in the by-laws pi
the society."
The, code, which contains the
eligibility rules is not a by-law
of the constitution.
ever,
show
that they  modeled clothes,
in Brock Hall Wednesday.
etc..
in  the  Frosh fashion
Board  of   Govenors  okays
preliminary arena plans
The University Board of
Governors has approved preliminary plans and site of the
proposed Winter Sports Arena
"but a construction date is still
not;in sight.
Dean of Administration and
Financial Affairs, E. D. MacPhee said Wednesday, "The
Board of Governors has asked
the architects to prepare detailed specifications and working drawings to be submitted
to the Board of Governors and
the Student Council."
Student Council approved
the preliminary plans for the
$500,000 building Monday.
The site agreed upon runs
parallel to and east of the sta-
•dium track. It will include
what is now the east centre
stands.
Its width will be" equivalent
to extending imaginary lines
from either end of the Empire
Pool. Its length • will be approximately from the Field
House to the south end of the
central stands.
Liberal  Federation
says  no  nuclear arms
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canadian University Liberal Federation said Sunday that Canada
should not accept nuclear arms
or allow "foreign nuclear bases"
on Canadian soil.
Delegates to the two-day annual CULF convention here laid
down their stand on nuclear
arms at a policy' committee
meeting weighed down with
procedural motions.
Although the students voted
against nuclear arms and bases
they left the door open to future
acceptance by adding "at this
time". They also defeated a motion asking that Canadian troops
abroad   not   be   equipped' with
nuclear weapons.
The student, politicians also
declared that Canada should join
the Organizations of American
States, and recognize the Republic of China.
Because of the lengthy discussion the delegates were only
able to complete the external
affairs and defence part of the
platform and just touch upon
cultural affairs.
"ONCE UPON
A
MATTRESS"
. . . A Laugh. Riot!
— New York Times
named Canada's best
- UBC Liberal Club has been
named the best: university
Liberal Club in Canada.
The club was given the
award at the Canadian University Liberal Federation
convention in Ottawa last
weekend.
To win the award the club
bad to present a list of activities and a scrap book of press
clippings.
Bruce Johnstone, Commerce
1, had also progressed to the
finals in the Liberal oratorical
contest. The subject of the
contest is the "Challenge of
Confederation".
Lounge wont
open nights
Council Monday night approved a Brock management decision not to open Brock Lounge
for general student use in the
evenings.
Engineering   president   Terry
Guest had earlier proposed that
the  lounge   (which   closes at   5.
p.m.) facilities   be   available  to
students.
Councillors felt there would
be insufficient demand to warrant expense of hiring personnel
to keep the lounge open.
Co - ordinator of Activities,
Doug Stewart, pointed out that
the Common Room in Brock is
open in the evenings and is
never overcrowded.
Campus Barber
Shoo
-Monday - Friday 8:30 - 5:00
Saturday   8:30   -   12:00
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THE UBYSSEY
Thursday,-February 1, 1962
Only richest students
can deduct their fees
Only those students whose incomes exceed their_ personal
exemptions may claim the tuition fee deduction when they
fill out their income tax forms
this year.
Tuition fees may be deducted
from the student's summer earnings, thus bringing his net income below taxable income or
tuition fees may be counted as
an exemption, say tax officials.
A student may claim the full
tuition fees for the academic
year or he may claim half from
this year and half from last
year.
For example: a first-year student paying a tuition fee of $161
for each term may claim the full
amount on this return although
he paid his second term fees in
1962. If the student chooses to
do this he will eventually be
only able to claim one session
fees in his final year.
On the other hand, the first-
year student may claim just his
fees paid in 1961 and claim the
full  1962  amount next year.
SECOND-YEAR STUDENTS
Second-year students may
claim all 1961 fees, that is, last
term of 1960J61 session and first
term of 1961-62 session. The
same applies for all upper year
students.
"Normally, it would be expected that a 50-50 split would
be made", said H. M. Craven,
University Accountant.
"I must stress that students
must pick up tuition fee receipt
forms from the enquiries wicket
at the Accounting Office. These
are the only official forms which
can be sent to Ottawa," he said.
Students fill out the forms
and then the Accounting Office
verifies them. They send two
copies in the mail to the student
so that he can file them with
his forms.
It is the student who is entitled to the income tax deduction and not the student's parent
or some other person, Craven
said.
"The only advantage to the
parent is that if the student
makes less than $950 he can
still be claimed as a dependant.
"Under normal circumstances
this would be $950 but the student is now able to deduct his
tuition fees from his net income.
If this brings his income down
to $950 or less then he can still
be claimed as a dependent,"
Craven said.
PROCEDURE
Students will find the procedure explained on the back
of the Tl short forms which can
be picked up in any post office.
Fees covering student activities, ' athletic activities, health
insurance, health services, the
cost of books and supplies, and
residence fees are not deductible.
Students cannot use receipts
received on payment of fees
from the Accounting Office.
They must use the special form
sent out by the Accounting
Office.
CLASSIFIED
LOST OR STOLEN: Six pieces
of assorted chains accompanied with 6 locks (locked), neair
the vicinity of the Engineers'
building. Will finder please
return to the Organized Arts-
men Society. Reward.
Irwin Hoffman and Vancouver Symphony appear today
at noon in the auditorium.
-i.-t-y u.
From page 1
, UBC  STUDENTS
15% Discount
Imported  Car  "Parts  and
Accessories
'Overseas Auto Parts]
dispose of them until all the
members of the Nuclear Club
agreed to do the same.
"But now we have more than
sufficient deterrent in the world.
Does ainybody think eight or
nine nuclear weapons in Canada could add to the deterrent?
Such a move would only start
a spiral increasing membership
in the Nuclear Club," Douglas
said.
He criticized Prime Minister
John Diefenbaker for failing to
taike a definite stand on the issue.
External Affairs Minister
Green is against accepting nuclear arms for Canada while Defence Minister Douglas Hark-
ness is for the move, Douglas
stated.
"On Monday, Wednesday and
Friday  Mr.   Diefenbaker   is   in
UBC  grads  following girls
as  teachers  in    Ghana
Two more UBC graduates will leave for Ghana in February  to  teach  at Achimoto grammar  school,  where  Prime
minister Wwame Nkrumah was educated.
They are Graeme Balcom, 27, an employee of the B.C.
Electric, and Lome Lane, 25, who works for the Hudson's
Bay Co.
Balcom graduated with the degree of bachelor of applied
science in electrical engineering in 1957 and will teach math-     _
ematics. Lane received his bachelor of science degree in 1961
and will tach chemistry.
At present, two graduates of UBC's school of home economics, Judy Foote and Jocelyn King, are in Ghana taking
part in a rural education program for women.
Douglas
favor of Mr. Green; on Tuesday,
Thursday and Saturday he's in
favor of Mr. Harkness—and on
Sunday he's a Baptist like myself."
"This is the most importamt
issue of all, for if we don't solve
this problem, it won't matter
about any others," he added.
In the press conference Douglas answered questions:
• on federal aid to universities:
"These grants are going to
have to be increased tremendously. But I don't think the
provinces can do a lot more unless the tax-shairing agreements
are changed to the provinces'
advantage."
• on the NDP's lack of success
in campus model parliament
elections:
'Most students are from upper-
class families with a fairly deep«
ly-rooted adherence to the old-
line pairties."
• on the next election:
"it will probably be held ia.
June, possibly in October."
• on  the  NDP's   chances  In
that election:
"It's  still too early to mak*
any   definite   predictions."
POINT GREY
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Students   desiring  summer   jobs   in   Europe   requiring
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giving general job description and application form.
Mail to:
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What's doing at ALCAN for
UNIVERSITY GRADUATES?
Here are some of the booklets and brochures about
the opportunities at Alcan for graduates. Please
write for the copies in which you are interested I
~k Presenting Alcan to the University Graduate.
"k The Role of the Physical Metallurgist in Alcan
and its Associated Companies.
k The Role of the Chemical and Extractive
Metallurgist in Alcan and its Associated Companies.
k The Role of the Mechanical Engineer in Alcan
and its Associated Companies.
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STAFF PERSONNEL DIVISION, BOX 6090, MONTREAL 3. P.O. w. Thursday, -february 1, 1962
THE UBYSSEY
Page 7
FCU S committee to #et
st udent coun c il look
UBC's National Federation of
Canadian University Students
committee is about to take on
the look of student council.
Chairman Dave Anderson said
Tuesday the committee will be
completely reorganized following a visit by NFCUS national
head Walter McLean, who criticized the committee for a general lack of activity.
Anderson said the NFCUS
committee will in future have
representatives from each faculty who will be appointed by
faculty representatives on student council.
The chairman will still be appointed by  student   council.
CLOSER LOOK
Anderson said the committee
will also take a closer look at
^.j^tional and international issues
and pressure student council to
t,ake stands on the issues.
' "This year, our committee has
been doing the same as the committee has done last year and
the year before, but Mr. McLean has come up with some
new ideas for the committee and
•we'll follow his directions," said
Anderson.
"With the new system, we'
hope to keep a flow of UBC
opinion going to the national
office."
Anderson said that in the past,
the feelings of the whole council had been represented by the
president who attends the national NFCUS conference each
year.
UNABLE TO SPEAK
"This year, with the new
council set-up, where each councillor stands or falls. by himself,
the president was unable to
speak for the council as a
whole," Anderson said.
"The new siystem will aid the
president too, in that he will
have an idea of what his council
feels on particular issues."
Anderson said the local committee has mainly been involved
with the administrative end of
national projects such as interregional   travelling   exchanges.
the   NFCUS   literary   con-
and
test..
"The idea now is for the committee to act as a sparkplug of
opinion on outside matters," he
ssid.
With regard to McLean's criticism, Anderson said he felt McLean could  have told him per
sonally what is expected of the
UBC NFCUS group rather than
expressing his feelings at a meeting with the press.
"It is possible we suffer from
a lack of imagination, but it's
his job to make sure we don't
get in a rut, and he's just doing
his job," Anderson said.
Six  students  needed
for summer  in Japan
i Applications for the 1962 summer student' exchange with
I Japan are now being accepted. , commodation and sorne spending
This year it is hoped that six  money
Forms are obtainable at the
Department of Asian Studies.
Deadline is February 10. 1962.
UBC students will take part in
this program, which is primarily
cultural in purpose.
The students will live with
Japanese families, tour with Japanese students, and attend special lectures as well as an inter-
nritional student seminar in
Tokyo.
Some knowledge of Japanese
is a decided advantage but is
not essential. One student v/ill
! be able to attend part of a semester at International Christian
\ University, fiiother may be exchanged with a student from
Tokyo University, while four
will exchange with students
from Keio University.
The cost to each student will
be approximately $525 which
will  include  transportation,  ac-
Wanna be a editer?
Applications are now being
accepted for the position of
editor-in-chief of The Ubyssey
for the 1962-63 term. Applicants should apply by letter
to Editor-in-chief Roger McAfee in The Ubyssey offices
or Box 149 in AMS office. Include year, faculty, age and
newspaper experience.
Applicants will be interviewed by a selection board
Feb. 13, 12:30. Applications
close Feb. 12, 5:30 p.m.
ffl oi
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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1st - 12:30 - AUDITORIUM
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Your Student's Pass, shown at the ticket desk, entitles you
to a 50c discount, per person,
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SMOOTH MUSIC BY: 1:
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and singer FRAN JORDAN
Make  reservations   now!
MU 1-7838
MU 3-9413
African info wanted
The Ubyssey wishes to interview students with firsthand knowledge of student
participation in the political
or economic affairs of Africa,
especially of Kenya, Ghana,
South Africa and the Congo.
Please contact Joyce Holding at CA 4-3242 .Local 23 or
24, or inquire at The Ubyssey
office from 12:30 to 1:30 any
day next week.
160 billets needed
for prep delegates
Billets are urgently required for the high school conference, to be held at the university Feb. 23 and 24.
Conference officials said
more than 160 out-of-town delegates will need a place to
sleep and breakfast both days.
The officials asked that
anyone willing to take a delegate for the weekend contact
them in Brock 306 or call CA
4-3242 (local 46).
Rental Service
TUXEDOS
Black Suits, Formals,
Costumes, Make-up
Special Student Rates
New York
Costume Salon
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Near UBC Gates
Julia Henderson, director of
the United Nation's Bureau of
Social Affairs, will address
Vancouver Institute Saturday
in the auditorium at 8:15. p.m.
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To be associated with IBM is to become a part of a
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It means working with a company that is continuously
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What can IBM offer you? Write
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THE UBYSSEY
Thursday,  February   1,   1962
'Tween classes
Israeli evening at IH
INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE
Israeli evening at IH 8 p.m.
Sat. Israeli folk songs and
dances.
V V     T°*
JR. CHEM. CLUB
Dr. Frost speaking on "Mass
Spectrometer" Fri. 12:30 Chem.
250. -
if.  }{•  >(•
FROSH  UNDERGRAD.  SOC.
Song-fest today, free in Brock
Lounge. Hear faculty teams compete Aggies, Education, Frosh
and Home Ec.
V T*      T*
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Sports car club, tech clinic
lecture. Thurs. noon Bu. 220.
All UCC reps must attend
general meeting Thurs. noon
Bu. 203.
PEg BAND
Band is playing at basketball
game in Memorial Gym. All
members please come to Gym
instead of Armory.
* * *
NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY
New Democrats present three
films: "Battle of Britain", "Rise
of Hitler", "Russia Stops Hitler".
Thurs. noon in Bu. 104. Adm.
25c.
# *  #
SOCIETY OF BACTERIOLOGY
Meeting Fri. re trip to Provin
cial Health Labs. All those going please attend. 12:30 W. 113
if,    ?£,    Sf*
VCF
Mr. John Williams speaks on
"Paul, the Rabbi from Tarsus".
Fri. noon in Bu. 106.
•r   *j*   •St*
use
Inter - Faculty Debates. Commerce vs. Social Work. ."Resolved: All women should be
prohibited from attending university". Thurs., Feb. 1, Law
South,  12:30.
Sft      Sft      Sft    ^
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
CVC presents the annual Ice-
Skating Party at the rear rink
of Forum, Hastings and Renfrew, Saturday, Feb. 3, 9:30-
11:30 p.m. Tickets at door —
everybody welcome!
V    V    V
CAMPUS COMMUNIST CLUB
Mr. Harold Pritchett, city secretary of the Communist Party,
speaks on "Peaceful Co-existence". Fri. noon in Bu. 100. All
welcome.
v  •"£  3f*
GERMAN CLUB
"To Help Humanity", a film
on the Nobel prize winner, Prof.
Dr. Domagk, the T.B. and cancer specialist. Plus the "Reck-
linghous Miners" and the latest
newsreel. Fri. noon Bu. 204.
Guest only leadership
malcontent — Cornwall
Student council president Al
Cornwall says Terry Guest must
have been the only councillor
unhappy with last fall's leadership conference.
Guest, Engineering president,
told council the conference was
mainly a   social weekend.
Guest had commented on conference chairman Bryan Gates'
report, which recommended several changes for next year's
jtudent-staff parley at Camp
Elphinstone.
Council, Cornwall said, obviously didn't feel strongly enough
about the "failure" of the week
end to adopt Gates' report.
"We only received it. I personally feel you can't spend all
your time in discussion," he
said. j
It's up to next year's leadership conference committee now
to decide whether big changes
are needed in its format, Cornwall said.
VANCOUVER SUN columnist
Barry Mather, federal New
Democratic Party candidate in
the next election, will speak
on "Confessions of a Candidate" Friday noon in Bo.  104.
Acadia U. students
get mid-term break
WOLFVILLE, N.S. (CUP) —
A three-day mid-term break has
been granted students at Acadia
University.
The dates of the break, March
15-17, were settled on by a joint
decision of the administration
and the Union president.
UBC CLASSIFIED
WANTED: Which considerate
graduate inflicted side damages on my cream '49 Hillman
parked opposite Fort Camp
graduate lot on Friday, Jan.
19? Please contact me at 1933
West 2nd, suite 5. j; : :
WANTED: Ride to vie. 12th &
Oak M. W. & F. at 3:30 p.m.
Phone RE 6-0989.
WANTED: Two tickets for Frosh
Stardust Ball, Feb. 3. Will pay
$4.00 for each ticket. Please
phone HE 3-7529.
WANTED: Two tickets for Stardust Ball. Phone MU 1-5978
aifter 10 p.m.	
WANTED: Ride for two urgently
needed for 8:30's Mon. to Sat.,
returning. 10 p.m. weekdays;
vicinity 41st & Larch. AM
6-5870 or AM 6^6408.	
WANTED: 2 riders would like
a ride from Capitol Hill area,
, in North Bufnaby, for 8:30
• lectures from Monday to Fri-
. day. If'interested please phone
J   Lynne at GY 8-1S68.
BIDE WANTED: from 49th and
Larch Monday and Saturday.
If possible Dhone Dolores, AM
6-8101.
RIDE WANTED: Vicinity 19th
and Trafalgar for 8:30's. Di-
ane, RE 6-0570.	
RIDERS WANTED: From 55th
& Knight Road towards campus, via 41st or 49th. Arrive
on campus at 8. Leave 9:30
Monday-Thursday; Fri. & Sat.
4:30. Phone Rod, FA 5-5865
after 1Q.        	
RIDE WANTED: From West
Vancouver (21st and Marine
Dr.) to UBC. Please phone MU
4-8685.
FOR SALE: Motor scooter, 1957
NSU Prima. Low mileage, rebuilt motor. AM 1-6408 after 6
FOR SALE: Orchid corsages,
$3.50. We have a limited supply of blooms, phone early to
avoid disappointment. CA 4-
3531 between 7:30 & 9 p.m.
Ask for Jean.
FOR SALE: Top quality climbing boots. Men's, size 10, used
once. Phone Harvie, TR 6-2998
LOST: Man's gold signet ring
in vicinity of Brock. Phone
BR 7-5666.
LOST: Would the person attempting to return the green
raincoat found at Mardi Gras
with motel keys in the pocket
qontai-t WA 2-6530.
LOST: Wedding ring, possibly
on campus. Phone CA 8-8660
(evenings).
LOST: Wallet in curric. lab.
Keep money but return other
things. Calf CY 8-8597 or turn
in at curric. lab.
LOST: Physics 200 notes. Return
to lost and found or call Don
at FA 7-6553.
LOST: A sterling silver hand
engraved inch-wide bracelet
on Saturday, January 27 in
the vicinity of the commerce
huts   or   the   Faculty   Club.
Please phone Loc. 313 at CA.
'4-9985  or CA  4-9984.
FOUND: Boy's wrist watch in
front of Brock, Jan. 19. Phone
Brian, AM 6-4457.
LOST: K&E slide rule in black
leather case in vicinity of Hut
M10 on Friday, Jan. 26. Reward. FA 7-7379.
LOST: One locker Bu. no. 77.
Urgent*^ needed. Keep books
bat please return locker. It
has sentimental value for a_l
occupants (4). Reward offered—honest.
LOST: Jan. 25. Blue Esterbrook
fountain pen, between library
& Anglican college. Phone
Kim, CA 4-9020.
LOST: Human skull in Wes-
brook Bldg. by medical student. Needed urgently for
studying. Reward offered,
even if damaged. Phone HE
4-9877 after 6:30.
NANCY WALSH: Or anyone
knowing her whereabouts,
please call Sue at RE 1-5593.
QUICK SALE — leaving province, '52 Hillman Sedan.
Good condition, call YUkon
5-4951.
Special   Prices  for  UBC
Cornette Beauty
Solon
"Individual   Attention"   by
Male and  Female Stylists.
OPEN   FRI  TILL  NINE
4532 W. 10 CA 4-7440
LOST: Lady's gold watch at Mar-
di Gras Friday night. Phone
AM 1-3990.
"THE REEF
ff
Point Roberts, Washington, U.S.A.
DINING & DANCING
Featuring "the Fabulous Ian Smith Trio"
FRI., SAT. & SUN.
OPEN YEAR ROUND
TO Miles South of Deas Island Tunnel
Large Parties by Reservation Only: Dial 945-2233—945-2579
No minors allowed on premises
Proof of age must be available
HELP WANTED
Research Assistants for Communications Research. Behavioural
science, research methods and
statistics helpful. Hours flexible.
Pay dependent upon ability. Call
Local   538   for   appointment.
for
RENT A GOWN
25%
OFF
For
UBC
MARIE BRUCKER SALON
Designers and Dressmakers
Expert Alterations
Evenings   by Appointment
4683 Kingsway   HE 1-1160
Lovely
selection
Brides,
Attendants,
Formal Wear
Fur   Stoles,
"White Fox,
Tuxedoes,
Dinner  Jackets
Saturday Night points its pen
fearlessly. And the Establishment is
always fair game. Arnold Edinborough,
Saturday Night's
intrepid editor, sees
to it. That's why it's
stimulating to read. It's
on your newsstands
now. Get one. Or
better yet, subscribed
Send a postcard to 55 York
Street, Toronto 1.   Pay later.
CIatubpay
om
IGHT

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