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The Ubyssey Jan 18, 1962

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 THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLIV
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,  THURSDAY, JANUARY  18,   1962
No. 41
AUS "fined"
Music to vote
by - by Rolf
Australian singer and accordionist Rolf Harris and the
Chris Gage Trio perform in
War Memorial Gym at noon
today.
Harris, appearing at the
Mardi Gras pep meet, will do
his new "dislocation twist."
Voting for the King and
Queen of Mardi Gras will take
place at the same time.
A Charity Bazaar and a
dress rehearsal will be held at
the Commodore tonight at 9.
Queen candidates are:
Joanne McLean, Liz McLennan, Marge Brooks, Pattie
Kirstiuk, Cathy Bottomly, Annette Lacterman, Sherry Mac-
Donald, Sharon Dragon.
King candidates are: John
Roaf, Fraser Evans, Ray Towers, Kelly Singh, Kyle Mitchell, Robin Fitzgerald, Norman MacKenzie, Terry Culling, Dave Gibbons, Paul
Alexson, Sid Brail.
Rights Bill
not secure,
says MLA
By RICHARD SIMEON
The Canadian Bill of Rights
is a pious declaration of ideals
that has not been followed by
the actions and deeds needed to
make it a living document, CCF-
NDP MLA Gordon Dowding said
Wednesday.
Dowding said the Bill contradicts the Indian Act, Immigration Act and Liquor Act, which
are discriminatory and restrict
individual freedom.
. "Until the government changes
them in accordance with the Bill
of Rights, the bill will remain
a useless document," he said.
Dowding, speaking to a New
Democratic Party meeting, said
the bill is no guarantee of individual freedoms because any future parliament may repeal or
change it.
Court decisions have shown
that it does not supersede or invalidate already existing legislation such as the Immigration Act
which permits deportation without fair trial, he said.
Dowding said he believes in
a Bill of Rights as an ideal and
objective but criticized the present Parliament for not living up
to its own declaration.
"I proposed a Bill of Rights
for B.C. at the last Legislature,
but it was rejected because the
Socred government was too busy
passing laws which violated it,"
he said.
With increasing government
intervention in social and economic affairs an effective Bill of
Rights is needed to draw the line
between the state's rights and
those of the individual, Dowding
said.
The MLA urged students to
imake sure the Federal government lives up to the pretentions
of its Bill of Rights.
BUTTER SURE WOULDN'T.
for
paper
Moobyssey brings
$100 budget cut
By SHARON McKINNON
Ubyssey Council Reporter
The. Agriculture Undergraduate Society has had its budget slashed by $100 and has been prohibited from publishing
an edition of the student newspaper for 15 months as a result
of this year's edition of The Moobysey.
A student council motion pass
ed Monday described The Moobyssey as in "extremely bad
taste."
It also censured the Agriculture Undergraduate Society executive, the editor and staff of
the paper, and said the AUS
must bear the full $237 publishing cost of the edition.
The total AUS grant is $300.
The paper was published Jan.
10. It was edited by Wayne
Wicken, a student carrying only
one university course this year.
Monday's council meeting said:
"Council felt that firm disciplinary action was necessary because of the seriousness of the
situation and the admittedly
poor taste of The Moobyssey.
"Because it is impossible to
establish individual blame the
AUS must: assume full responsibility for the publication."
The Agriculture council apologized publicly in The Ubyssey
Friday for the edition.
The 15-month publications
suspension means there can be
. A  press  release  issued  after no Moobyssey next year.
"Stop flailing cow" — Glenn
—Photo by Don  Hume
... MELT IN HER MOUTH
PASSERS-BY ON WEST MALL Wednesday got frigid come-
hither look from this snowgirl, reportedly carved by erotic
Architecture students. Some society recently criticized campus
architecture as "unimaginative"; buildings as "disjointed
. sweatshops."
Council also passed a motion
proposed by Agriculture president Tom Nisbet establishing
procedure for future undergraduate publications of a campus-
wide nature.
It stated that the editor of
the faculty edition together with
the president of the club or society must consult with the editor-in-chief of The Ubyssey as
to the content of the paper.
In cases of dispute between
the editor of The Ubyssey and
the undergraduate society presi
dent or editor, the matter will be
referred to the Alma Mater- Society president for final decision.
"When they go too far you
have to step on them," said
Commerce president Bob Gay-
ton. "Now that we've set up the
mechanism it shouldn't happen
again.
"I'm afraid this procedure
may ruin the spirit of future
papers- But as long as people
are reasonable, the spirit of comedy should continue," he added.
Council sets new procedure
Second vice-president Pat
Glenn said that council should
not have taken action on the
issue.
"The Moobyssey was better
off dead," he said Tuesday.
"Council disciplinary machinery
is inadequate for occasions such
as this and pressing for some
kind of 'punishment' only results in more grief.
"Council should have established and been satisfied with
firm safeguards for the future
and stopped flailing the Aggie
cow to death."
Vice-president Eric Ricker disagreed with Glenn, saying council action was necessary to uphold the student autonomy the
student body enjoys.
"The high point of student
autonomy on this campus is the
right to discipline ourselves," he
said. "We should try to maintain this privilege.
Engineers lose spirit
Guest's  burial  a  grave  situation
By MIKE GRENBY
No engineers came to see
their leader buried Wednesday noon.
The executive of the Arts
Undergrad Society, acting
as pallbearers and led by a
bagpiper, carried a coffin,
reportedly containing EUS
president Terry Guest, from
the Buchanan Building to
the front of the library.
They then solmenly buried the coffin with a splash
in the lily pond.
Engineers were conspicuous by their absence.
"This proves our conten-
-Photo by Ted  Boss
TERRY'S   FERRY
tion that the engineers are
actually dead," said Arts
president Mike Sharzer.
The stunt was reportedly
organized by the Arts executive's "extra-special events
committee," formed for the
purpose of "raising the prestige of the Arts Undergraduate Society."
About 10 minutes after
the ceremony, a handful of
redshirts appeared and began throwing snowballs at
the dispersing crowd.
Their fire was returned
and all traces of sorrow
from the foregoing funeral
rites disappeared. Page 2
THE      U BYSSE Y
Thursday,  January  18,   1962:
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year In
Vancouver by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial
opinions expressed are those of the Editor of The Ubyssey and not
neroSSari]y those of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
;Telephone CA  4-3242. Locals:  Editor—27;  News—25;  Photography—26.
Editor-in-Chief: Roger McAfee
Managing   Editor Denis   Stanley
Associate   Editor        Ann   Pickard
News Editor Fred Fletcher
City Editor Keith Bradbury
CUP  Editor       Maureen Covell
Photography Editor     Don Hume
Senior  Editor             Sharon  Rodney
Sports Editor Mike Hunter
Photography  Manager              Byron  Hender
Critics Editor David Bromige
Editorial Research    .    .    Bob Hendrickson, Ian Cameron
STAFF THIS ISSUE
REPORTERS: Mike Grenby, Mike Horsey, Tim Padmore,
Richard Simeon, Pat Horrobin, George Railton, Ian
Cameron, Sharon McKinnon.
TECHNICAL: Bill Wyness, Pauline Fisher, Ted Ross,
Karen Bainter.
Forward look!
For the first time this year The Ubyssey congratulates
council. At its last Monday sitting, which ran well into Tuesday morning, council "fined" the Agriculture Undergraduate
Society $100. The fine was for their production of the aggie
Moobyssey, and was exacted in the form of a cut in their
AMS budgetary grant. The total AMS grant to the aggies was
$300. Pretty stiff penalty, but well earned.
We feel that the rest of the "sentence" — no Moobyssey
next year.— was unnecessary. We don't feel it is necessary
to- punish next year's undergrad society for the mistakes of
the present one.
Not only did council discipline the AUS, they also took
steps to prevent the recurrence of such an "event." This marks
one of the few times council has adopted "the forward look."
However,- councillors shouldn't be too optimistic. This campus
will not probably see another "Moobyssey" this year but within a few years another will arise.
Under our present system of student autonomy mistakes
are bound to occur. They are inevitable and are the result of
the natural learning process. They are "autonomy in action."
This university and Alma Mater Society have always
adopted the attitude that the teaching of responsibility is
worth the few mistakes which inevitably result.
Letters to the Editor
We  agree.
!
The Arts Undergrad Society has finally come to life—at
the expense of the engineering president—if we are to believe
what we read in the first edition of their Artisan. Arts students
parried the engineer's coffin to the edge of the lily pond and
gave the defunct ■Engineering Undergraduate Society a "splashing" blow. Unchallenged yet!!
Hey, you guys, what gives?
Our faith in the Engineers is shattered. How now can one
feel safe? Once upon a time we, the members of this campus,
were secure. No oppression, no tyranny. Our freedom from the
rule of despotic "kings" was assured by those staunch defenders of the faitih—The Engineers.
Now what?
Our omnipotent overlords, our saving lights, our protectors, the Engineers, are dead.
How could it have happened? A bunch of upstart Arts-
men. Artsmen? Overthrow the engineers? Hard to believe,
isn't it?
Looks like the Artsmen have finally come alive. They're
putting out decent papers and throwing redshirts, in effect,
anyway, in the pool.
Congratulations!
b.m.
Mac cleaned?
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I write to express to you my
appreciation of Charles Mc-
Lain's excursion into Mythology printed (with less mutilation than usual) in The Ubyssey
of Jan. 16. Mr. McLane and I
have much in common: both
the epigraphist and the lawyer
deal with evidence, although
the epigraphist, unlike the
lawyer, as I judge from Mr.
McLean's essay, is inhibited by
the evidence. Because The
Ubyssey is a serious newspaper, I shall not comment in
public on the humorous sections of Mr. Mclayne's delightful fairy-tale, that is, those
dealing with his subconscious
adventures as a member of an
imaginary "Appeal Tribunal."
I do hope, however, that Mr.
mcLein will give me the pleasure of discussing these with
him in private.
I must confess to one major
disappointment. I do not expect The Ubyssey to spell my
name correctly in two consecutive issues. I do expect Mr.
M'Layn to do so, especially
when I think of the many long
and fighting partnerships that
we have shared in the past
(long may they continue!).
Some are sensitive about the
spelling of proper names, others are not. I am; Mr. McClain,
I assume, is not.
Very truly yours,
MALCOLM F. McGREGOR
Christians alert1
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
It is a pity to see Dr. Remnant and others try to whittle
God down for human inspection and judgment. In Mr. Orn-
stein's article of Jan. 12 we
are told that "if God would
change his mind" (Cf. Jas. 1:17,
Rom. 9:20), the moral law
would collapse and be rendered useless; on the other hand,
if a standard exists apart from
God, He would be open to
charges of "immorality."
I ask, who is being immoral
—God who has issued (and
never rescinded) the fourth
commandment, say, or he who
breaks the Sabbath on the plea
that God told him? And just
what is the "highest human
morality" offered as an alternative? Surely not pagan ethics!- If so, one censures God by
something never intended for
that purpose.
Christians should alert themselves to these dangerous insinuations which go under the
guise of inquiry.
Yours   truly,
JOHN PRINS,
Arts III.
Disgusted
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Pleasure should be private.
I would like to express my
disgust at an action which
should.have been but was not
private. A young, "innocent
stomached," status seeking student thought that tensions
should be released whenever
they arose. The tensions (i.e.
beer from a pubbing trip) arose
(nausea) in a bus Friday night
and the release of the said tensions caused the "clot" much
pleasure. As I was a passenger
on self same bus I would like
to point out to the unpractised
''swiller"  that  a crowded  bus
is not a place to rid one's
stomach of slightly digested
pepperone sausages and sour
beer.
Yours   truly,
MIKKEL SCHAN,
Arts & Sciences.
Oh wretch!
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
This   is   a  copy   of  a   letter
which I thrust under the wiper
of a pale, seasickly green and
yellow car last" Saturday.
DRIVER:
Oh wretch, why did you
leave your A-lot to torment me
in my C? Did you make yourself so odious to your bogmates
that they cast you forth? Easily believed!
Driver, on returning to my
little Metropolitan I found that
you had parked your car with
the angular side of that fin-
fui monster a mere five inches
from my door—while leaving
five feet of space between
yourself and your other more
fortunate neighbor.
Sir, Mrs., or Miss, chivalry
should have commanded you to
be far more courteous to a
vehicle so much smaller than
your own.
The door upon which you
inflicted your undesired proximity happens to be the only
one on my car that c a n be
opened- from the outside, when
locked. Hence entering through
it, with five inches of freedom,
was an exceedingly lengthy,
awkward and difficult feat of
athletics. Beyond my loss of
time and the irreparable affront to my dignity, this.series
of contortions involved the
near ruination of a favorite
pair of stockings.
I protest!
- Driver, mend your ways;
and I hope in any case that this
revelation of your criminal
negligence will shake to the
core both your fame and your
conscience, as you so richly deserve.
Yours truly,
BONNIE ERICKSON,
Arts III.
Sensational?
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
It was with a great deal of
regret that I read your headline article in the Jan. 16 issue. A university paper that
prints the idiotic rantings and
ravings of a fascist .extremist
is indeed in bad need of material; but then again, Roger McAfee is very well known for
his love of sensationalism.
Phrases such as Communist
conspiracy have been passe in
educated Canadian circles since
the passing away of the late
unlamented McCarthy, and
we have heard enough about
overthrow of our government
to make us violently ill. I really regrat this epidemic of extremists who would deny everybody their right to voicing
their opinions on this, a once-
free university.
Up to now I have really appreciated the amount of free
thought allowed on this campus, but in recent days I have
been appalled by the rash of
CUCND equals Communism
signs appearing on campus. I
myself am by no means a Communist, in fact I'm a member
of Varsity Christian Fellowship, but I do appreciate the
freedom to talk on various
subjects  that  we have  had.  I
know that because kids listen
to the communist propaganda
on campus, they feel it is also
their duty to consider other
points of view, such as that of
the Gospel of Jesus Christ. This
is the way a university should
operate; we students should be
willing to listen to the opinion
of others and anybody who attempts to deny us our right
should be run off campus.
I   do  hope   that   Mr.   T.   M.
Barker may learn to appreciate
the value of true freedom.
Yours truly,
ROGER SCHIFFER,
Science  I.
Apparently Mr. Schiffer did
not lake the time to- read our
editorial in the same edition,
which clearly outlined The
Ubyssey's policy or perhaps he
just can't.—Ed.
Premeditated?
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I was very happy to see in
the Jan. 12 issue of The Ubyssey that the Agriculture Undergraduate Society assumes
the responsibility and apologizes for the poor taste exhibited
by The Moobyssey which was
published last week.
May I say, however, that 1
was very much disturbed by
the two photographs which appeared in the same issue, showing chickens being removed
from the experimental pen?
and displayed in the library
and in Brock Hall. It is very
unfortunate indeed that the
culprits were not apprehended.
The fact that a Ubyssey photographer was on hand to take
photographs' would indicate,
however, that the whole matter
was premeditated and The
Ubyssey staff apprised of it.
I therefore consider The Ubyssey guilty by association and
cannot understand why your
staff would condone such a
thing.
Might I point out that the
birds in question are used in
experimental work. As a result
of the escapade six or seven
hundred birds will have to be
caught, their identification
numbers recorded and checked,
and much painstaking labor
performed, in order to determine exactly how many birds
were removed from the pens.
Otherwise our experiments
will be meaningless since rate
of production, feed consumption, etc, are based on the
number of birds used in the
experiments.
I wonder if those who were
involved in taking the birds
are men enough to follow the
example of the Agriculture Undergraduate Society and apologize to the Department of
Poultry Science.
Yours very truly,
J.  BIELY,
Professor and chairman,
Dept. of Poultry Science
Competent
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Please extend my most hearty    congratulations    to    Gerry
Dirks  and staff for "our"  entertaining, new Artisan. A few
more  such  issues and  I  will
feel   completely   competent   to
use lavatories marked "Men."
Yours   truly,
KEN WARREN,
Arts III. Thursday, January 18, 1962
T HE      UBYSSEY
Page  3
Leadership weekend
too social' — Guest
Engineering president Terry Guest charged Monday that
Leadership Conference is primarily a social weekend and suggested that the Alma Mater Society grant to the conference
  -    I jje naive(j
Leadership
Conference
criticized
^The chairman of Leadership
Conference is unhappy with
the results of last fall's confer-
snce.
'II have heard too many cri-
;icisms of it," Bryan Gates told
councillors   Monday   night.
In a written report he suggested, that in future:
• a weekend other than
Thanksgiving be considered for
he conference. Gates suggested
amily commitments prevented
ittendance of many delegates
nd faculty members.
• time for discussion groups
s increased.
• the registration fee be in-
reased-
• general trends of, discussion
e put to the delegates before
he summary session.
• an executive member of
Jreek letter societies be invited.
"The main criticism of this
ear's conference seems to be
lat there was a lack of prep-
ration among the speakers,"
aid Gates.
He said he felt too many of
le delegates were not exeeu-
ves of the clubs they repre-
mted, and that many were on-
r first-year members.
Commerce president Bob Gay-
>n said that possibly the era-
hasis has been placed on the
rong things. He said many
udents go for the social activi-
es, not to talk about student
'fairs.
Gates said he did not know
dw the problem could be over-
>me.
Council treasurer Malcolm
:ott disagreed with Gayton,
ying delegates were more in-
rested in participating in dis-
ission groups than in "sociaU
ing."
He added that students inter-
ted   in   having   a   good   time
ouid stay in Vancouver where
is more comfortable.
twirsm®
The     f
firet Comedy
From
Poland..
Witty.
Brilliant
And
Daring.
Also direct from the
Museum of Modern Art,
New York
LAND OF THE LONG DAY'
color
I.F.B. YARSHY'Starting
CA 4-3730
Tuesday
Campus Barber
ShoD
\ohday - Friday 8:30 - 5:00
Saturday   8:30   -   12:00
LOCATED IN
BROCK EXTENSION
Speaking at Monday's student
council meeting Guest charged
delegates at last fall's conference
showed a complete lack of preparation and the weekend served
only to inform people as to what
was going on.
Guest said that instead of establishing a trend of thought, all
delegates did was talk around
the topics.
He said discussion group leaders were ill-prepared and only
eight and a half hours were
spent in discussion compared to
ten hours of socializing.
"The summation session was
the final spike in the coffin," he
added. "As I walked about the
delegates I saw nine-tenths of
them doodling."
"The resolutions were, in the
words of Eric Mitterndorfer,
'pablum.' It is no wonder that
council will ignore most of
them," Guest said.
Guest commended the committee on its work in organizing the conference and added
that the food was good and the
conference "quaint."
Guest suggested that in future
years the grant from the AMS
be halved.
He also suggested:
• discussion groups be formed
immediately after the opening
address Friday night;
• an after dinner speaker and
a discussion group be held Saturday night;
• the Summary should be
dropped and a resolutions committee formed to present resolutions for discussion;
• an information session be
held on campus a week prior
to the conference so that delegates can prepare for discussion.
Good job opportunity
awaits grad student
Rental Service
TUXEDOS
Black Suits, Formals,
Costumes, Make-up
Special Student Rates
New York
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Near UBC Gates
Campus employment officials
expect little trouble for graduates seeking permanent employment at the end of this
term.
Student employment counsellor K. H. Speed said Tuesday
that more than 108 companies
held interviews last year and, if
the pattern repeats itself, over
2,000 students will be interviewed this spring.
"That these companies are interested in graduates is shown
by the fact that some of them,
arranged interview dates for this
spring as far back as last June,"
said Speed.
"Our main problem now is getting the grads to come in for interviews. We send out bulletins
to all the faculties, and these are
posted on the bulletin boards in
the faculty buildings.
"For those students who have
not  seen  these notices as  they
appeared, we have duplicates of
nil of them  here in  the place-
1 merit office."
One of the biggest problems
the department has, Speed said,
are students who come in and
say "Who's interviewing this
week?"
"These grads should find out
from the boards which companies in their field are interviewing and have some idea of who
they want to see," he said.
"There are positions available
for all faculties, but the greatest
demand seems to be for the specialized professions."
Japanese organized
TOKYO, Japan (CUP) — A
new national federation of university students organizations
has been inaugurated here.
The first meeting of the council was attended by more than
100 delegates representing student associations at over 30 universities in Japan. Its initial
campaign program stresses increased interchange with students of foreign countries.
-Photo by  Hender
GUESTS AT MARDI GRAS this
weekend will get a kick out of
these girls, members of the
Mardi Gras chorus line. Chorus is part of the floor show
at dances Friday and Saturday night.
Applications open
Applications for the 1962 Academic Symposium to be held at
Parksville, Feb. 9, 10 and 11 will
be available Jan. 19 at International House, the Graduate
Student Centre and the AMS
office.
lUBC STUDENTS
15% Discount
Imported   Car  Farts   ana
Accessories
Overseas Auto Parts J
DIAMONDS
— 4 0% below retail store prices
on "fine white" and "VVS"
quality stone*.
— 3 years insurance on r. s.
price — i.e. nearly twice your
ring-'s cost to you.
WATCHES
TO BRANDS, MUCH BELOW BS
Top Brands— Much below R.S-JP.
— Excellent references — 1 day
delivery.
Phone ALEX, 4th year Arts,
REg-ent   1-5123,   6-9  p.m.
PRE-MEDS!
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FREE  HOT &  FAST  PIZZA
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Help Wanted - Women
Young lady for summer staff commencing about May 15th
to after Labor Day. Knowledge of typing and of Greater
Vancouver area is necessary.
Please reply by letter only to Mr. J. V. Hughes, Greater
Vancouver Tourist Association, 596 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver 2, giving full particulars as to experience, references, and any other information deemed advisable. Prefer
first year student who would be in a position to return for
summer employment in succeeding years.
STUDENTS   -   FACULTY   -   ALUMNI
When you require an Auto Towing Service
Call   KEN'S - Radio   Dispatched
FA 1-6422
As a feature to the University enrollment
KEN'S  AUTO  TOWING
FA 1-6422
OFFERS THIS SERVICE:
Anywhere Inside the city limits including the
University Area.
TOWING CHARGE $5.00
or on the producement of your
Alma Mater cards . $4.00
We are pleased  to offer you this  service with  immediate
attention  to  every  call   off and  on  campus.
Call   KEN'S  AUTO  TOWING
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FULLY INSURED      -      CITY WIDE      -      PROVINCE WIDE Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January  18,   1962~
Iween classes
Berlin Wall film shown
GERMAN CLUB
"The Inhuman Wall", a film
on the inhumanity and tragedy
caused by the wall in Berlin.
Plus "Between Us the Barbed
Wire", a film on the Iron Curtain between East and West
Germany Fri. noon, Bu. 102.
V    V    •*•
PLAYERS CLUB
Spring auditions today, 12:30-
5 p.m. in Frederic Wood Theatre. All students welcome.
URC
Universal Week of Prayer for
Unity. Lecture by Pastor Fox
"Biblical Prayer", noon Bu.
2244.
SCIENCE US
Meeting of the Science Graduating Class. Fri. noon Wes. 100.
12130 Employment Opportunities, Grad Class Elections.
•1*     •£     TE*
AMATEUR RADIO
Advanced code and theory
classes today at noon in Bu. 317.
■T*     *t*     *t*
CIRCLE K CLUB
Dr. E. M. Griffiths, UBC Physics Dept. "Space Around Us,"
Fri. 12:30, Bu. 2218. All members   welcome.
3p  v  v
EAST ASIA SOC
Held over. Japanese award
winning film, "Seven Samurai."
Today noon, Bu. 104. Adm. 50c.
v  v  v
ITALIAN STUDENTS
All former and present Italian students are invited to the
Italian Dinner on Thurs., Feb. 1.
Tickets available in Bu. 256.
V    *fr     *T*
JR. CHEM CLUB
Dr. Farmer speaking on
"Frigid Radicals". Chem. 250,
Fri. noon.
*l*   3r*   ft*
CHINESE VARSITY
CVC presents Tri-City Mixer
Sat., Brock Hall, featuring Jack
Reynold's Quintet with special
guest star, Peter Rolston. Tickets
at the door.
Special   Prices  for  UBC
Cornette Beauty
Solon
"Individual   Attention"   by
Male and Female Stylists.
OPEN  Ffel   TILL  NINE
4532 W. 10 CA 4-7440
Scotland, English Lakes, Shakespeare Country, Devon, London,
Holland, Germany, Switzerland,
Liechtenstein, Austrian Tyrol,
Vienna, Yugoslavia's Alpine and
Adriatic resorts, Trieste, Venice,
Florence, Hill Towns, Rome,
Sorrento, Capri, Rivieras, French
Alps, Paris.
Sail June 15, Empress of England .
67 doys $1,392
contact your local travel agent or write
UNIVERSITY TRAVEL CLUB LTD.
57 Bloor St. West, Toronto
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOV'T.
Retreat this weekend at Hat-
zic Lake. Leaving Sat. afternoon, back Sunday. Further information, Paul, LA 4-3210-
HIGH SCHOOL CONF.
All committee members report to the office, Fri. noon, for
second mailing.
V ■**    V
VCF
"The Dead Sea Scrolls." Prof.
Parke-Taylor from ATC will
give an illustrated lecture Fri.,
12:30 in Bu. 106.
V •*•    •!*
NEW DEMOCRATIC  CLUB
Arthur Turner, MLA, showing slides and commentary on
Israel, today noon, Bu. 106.
AQUA SOC
Important General Meeting
for all members in Bio. Sci.
2000 at 12:30.
9f,    2ft    Sft
IHC AND UN CLUB
Two films produced by the
present Cuban government followed by a short talk and discussion, 8 p.m. Sunday at IH.
Varsity Fabrics
4437 W. 10th Ave CA 4-0842
Yard Goods, McCall Patterns
Sewing Supplies
Open Friday 'til 9
Deadline extended on
NFCUS scholarships
The deadline for applications for National Federation
of Canadian University Students inter-regional scholarships has been extended to
Jan. 30, local chairman Dave
Anderson announced Monday.
"Not enougn time was given
students to get their applications in," Anderson gave as
reason for the change.
The scholarship offers students an opportunity to study
at other Canadian universities, and to improve their
knowledge of Canada. Tuition
fees are waived by the university the student chooses to
attend.
Driven to teors
MANDALAY, Burma (CUP)
Seven hundred rioting students of Mandalay University
had to be dispersed by tear gas
bombs of the Burmese police.
The students, led by the Mandalay University Students' Union,
had staged a three-day token
strike in protest against a new
examination system.
POINT GREY
JEWELLERS
25% REDUCTION
On all Merchandise For
UBC Students
(SSiow Student Card)
4435 W.lOthAve. CA 8-8718
"THE REEF
rr
Point Roberts, Washington, U.S.A.
DINING & DANCING
Featuring "the Fabulous Ian Smith Trio"
FRI., SAT. & SUN.
OPEN YEAR ROUND
10 Miles South of Deas Island Tunnel
Large Parties by Reservation Only: Dial 945-2233-945-2579
No  minors allowed on premises
Proof of age must be available
Hudson's Bay Oil and Gas
Company Limited
CALGARY
HAS
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
FOR
POST-GRADUATES
AND
GRADUATES
IN
PRODUCTION ENGINEERING
GEOLOGY
GEOPHYSICS
ACCOUNTING
ARRANGEMENTS FOR INTERVIEW APPOINTMENTS
SHOULD   BE   MADE   THROUGH   THE   STUDENTS
PLACEMENT   OFFICE
First slate elections
to be held February 7
First slate elections for president, second vice-president and
secretary of the Alma Mater
Society will be held Feb. 7.
Second state elections for
treasurer, first vice-president
and co-ordinator of student
activities will take place a week
later, on St. Valentine's Day.
Nominations for first slate
candidates will open next Wednesday, Jan. 24, and will close
Thursday, Feb. 1. All nominations must be addressed to the
secretary of the AMS.
Second slate nominations will
open one week later and close
on Feb. 8.
All nominations must have
signatures of at least ten active
members of the society "in good
standing.1*
All nominations will be posted
on the student council bulletin
board as they are received.
I
sign nomination papers for more
than one candidate for each
office.
Talk on Chaucer noon
Professor John Lawlor, head
of the Department of English at*
the University of North Staffordshire, Englind, will lecture on
"Pathos and Irony in Chaucer's
Franklin's Tale" in Buchanan
100 at 12:30 today.
UPPER
TENTH
BARBERS
4574 W. 10th AVE.
One Block Past the Gates
Featuring European Trained
p__i.—
F^TS^
<**p™;
f*
*
«*
*   »*
w*>:
s>
DON'T FORGET
THIS DATE
February 7th,
in the Armouries
AN RCAF PERSONNEL
OFFICER WILL VISIT
YOUR CAMPUS TO
INTERVIEW
ALL FINAL YEAR
UNDERGRADUATES
INTERESTED IN
PERMANENT
EMPLOYMENT

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