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The Ubyssey Feb 9, 1962

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 Old deans
never
die
We UBYSSEY
They just-
lose their
faculties
VOL. XLIV
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1962
No.52
Pursue
pleasure
— Swami
The purpose of" life is the
happiness of each individual,
according to Swami Guru Deva-
nand Maharaj.
"It is the legitimate desire of
every man to search for joy,"
the Swami told an audience of
200 Thursday.
But physical happiness is
confined by the imitations of
the senses. While-"not disparaging the satisfactions of the ma*-
.terial world, the Swami said
that the deepest levels of personal happiness come from
within.
The Swami said he believes
;iii the universality of all religions. All scriptures, Christian,
Hjndu,, or Mohammedan, are
perfect Jn their own right; they
await only the subjective interpretation of the reader, he said.
The Swami advocated "deep
meditation" as the means of
transcending all things material
and experiencing the exalted
state of supreme, realty, thus
"unfolding the latent faculties
of the  mind."
By meditation, he said he
meant contemplation rather
than concentration. Static concentration • is aliejn to the naturally dynamic mind, he argued.
The mind should be allowed
to explore Creation's subtlest
wonders, and to finally go beyond the level of thinking.
Only then will the mind comprehend omnipresent God r the
ultimate reality, the Swami said.
"Can the eye see the eye?"
he asked. "No, and in the same
way, the Being within is realized when we are no longer
eonscious Of it."
Swami Maharaj is a discipline
of Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,
leader of the international Spiritual Regeneration Movement,
begun in 1958 in Madras.
Foreign aid
lack is hit
by students
OTTAWA (CUP) — Canada's
record in foreign aid is being
blasted by students at Carleton
University, and a request is
being made that the blast be
made nation wide.
Students and faculty at the
Ottawa university have formed
a committee to challenge students across Canada to join
them in a protest.
In a letter to student councils across the country, the Carleton Challenges Canada Committee, asks that the protest be
taken up, and "let it be known
that we as university students
and Canadian citizens are dissatisfied with the attitude of
our country in the general iield
of foreign aid and in the particular one of education.
"We are disturbed at Canada's shocking record in foreign
aid, especially in the realm of
education," states  the  letter.
Papke wins
position by
acclamation
By DONNA MORRIS
Graduate student Bernard Papke was acclaimed co-ordinator of activities Thursday when no other candidate had been
nominated for the position.
—Photo by Lynne Nixon.
DEEP MEDITATION is the key to unfolding the latent faculties
of the mind, according to Indian mystic Swami Guru Maharaj. But will it get one through final exams???
Toilet seats take
mid-term holiday
Toilet seats were at a premium Wednesday.
Demand shot sky-high, after pranksters made off with 101
toilet seats from washrooms in the Buchanan, Chemistry, and
Physics buildings and the library Tuesday night.
early
Wednesday morning
birds arriving at the Physics
building washroom found only
one toilet intact.
By the middle of the morning student were lined up twenty deep outside the single fully-
equipped  toilet.
Botlv-niale and female water
closets "were hit.
The practical jokers, reportedly dressed as plumbers, moved
in on the buildings shortly after
8 p.m.- Tuesday.
The raid was carried off
smoothly except for one incident, usually reliable sources
told  The Ubyssey.
As two of the pranksters came
out of a Library washroom
clutching several toilet seats,
they were confronted by a
Buildings and Grounds night
foreman.
The pair told the man they
were removing the seats on
orders of Wesbrook officials
who were investigating a "complaint."
Having convinced the foreman, the two slipped the seats
into a canvas bag and left, it
was reported.
Unsmiling   B   &   G   officials
GUIDES NEEDED
Male and female guides are
needed to conduct tours for
High School Conference delegates the morning of Friday.
Feb. 23. Please attend a meeting in Bu 225 at 12:30 p.m.
Monday.
Wednesday warned that unless
the <errant seats find their way
home, the guilty parties will be
presented with a bill for $808.
The threat apparently did not
go unheeded, for by noon Thursday B & G reported that 58 of
the missing seats had been returned anonymously.
The Engineering Undergraduate Society has claimed it can
guarantee the return of the remaining seats.
It was the first acclamation
of this year's AMS elections.
A jubilant and unshaven
Papke said that he hoped to
make his office a place where
every student could come in and
get advice regarding planning
and co-ordinating of all phases
of  their activities..
According to Robin Farquhar,
Papke's seconder, "His varied
experience in studeijt government provides him with an excellent background for Go-or-
dinator,
"He has been assistant AMS
treasurer, Treasurer of the Agriculture US, has chaired two
AMS committees, and has served
on two others."
Up to the 4 p.m. deadline,
second vice-president Pat Glenn
had been nominated for two
positions.
In a candidates' meeting
shortly after deadline, Glenn
chose to run for the position of
first vice-president; declining
his nomination for treasurer.
Glenn, when asked about the
dual nomination, said, "I don't
feel that I have the background
for the position of treasurer.
"Any capabilities that I might
possess would be better put to
use in the office of first vice-
president."
Peter Shepard, Eng. 2, is also
Second slate candidates will
speak at an open meeting in
Bu 104 at noon Monday. They
speak again in Fort and Acadia camps  during  dinner.
contesting   the   office   of   first
vice-president.
Ian Matheson, Comm. 3, and
present treasurer Malcolm Scott,
Comm. 3, are running for the
position of AMS treasurer.
Applications open
for Japanese exchange
UBC    will   again   have   a
seven-week summer exchange
(July and August) with universities   in   Japan.   Six  students .,will  be  selected.  Fare r
plus   spending    money    will "s
come to about $525. At the^i
end  of the  tour  a 12-natioo.
seminar is held.
Applications   and   irdorma-'
tion are available from Miss
Diane Wakter of the Dept. of
Asian    Studies.    Application
deadline is Saturday.
Blood drive
starts Mon.
Students will have to turn out
en masse to fill this term's blood
quota of 5,180 pints.
The semi-annual blood drive
will be held in the Armory Feb.
12-16 and Feb. 19-23. Blood letting hours are from 9:30 to 4:30
each day.
Faculties, residences and
Greek societies will once again
compete for the Globulin Goblet.
The foresters were last year's
winners, filling 290 per cent of
their quota. The Aggies jmd
Engineers lagged with 268 per
cent and. 235 per cent respectively.
Last year the 1,625-pint quota
was over subscribed by 288.
"Reasonable excuses, colds
excluded, will be needed to
escape giving blood this year,"
said Eldon Kerbes, Forestry 3,
co-chairman.
AMS can't afford it
Delegation to model UN vetoed
UCC's delegate to the Model
United Nations at the University of Montreal go the
veto Monday before even getting off campus.
Student council decided it
could not afford $202 to send
a UBC representative.
Student president Alan
Cornwall told councillors that
"in view of the fact that we
have NFCUS under consideration and there seems to be a
delicate balance of funds in
the margin, I don't think we
should send a delegate to this
conference."
"When you compare the
model United Nations with
NFCUS I don't think it stack's
up' at all," he added.
The motion to allocate the
money came to council in the
finance committee minutes.
Treasurer    Malcolm    Scott
ALAN CORNWALL
. . NFCUS supporter
said finance committee was
going to allow the grant on
the basis of past support, relative activity of the UN organization on campus, and the
fact that the university's UN
club is the chief UN group in
Western Canada.
The UN club is self-supported and receives no budget
from the Alma Mater Society.
Scott said, "NFCUS has had
a sizeable grant, while the UN
Club has received nothing. Finance committee considered
this project worthy of support."
Agriculture president Tom
Nisbet said that as NFCUS is
in as dire financial straits as
the UN club, the allocation for
Model UN should not be made.
"We have to draw the line
on these grants from the margin somewhere," he said. Page 2 . •: ,
THE UBYSSEY
Winner of the Southam Trophy
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department.
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEMBER   CANADIAN  UNIVERSITY   PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year in
Vancouver by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial
opinions expressed are those of the Editor of The Ubyssey and not
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
Telephone   CA   4-3242.   Locals:   Editor—'25;   News—23;  Photography—24.
Ediior-in-chief: Roger McAfee
Managing   Editor Denis   Stanley
Associate Editor    -- Ann Pickard
News Editor    ---- Fred Fletcher
'City Editor - Keith Bradbury
CUP  Editor    -    -    -    - Maureen  Covell
Photography Editor Don Hume
Senior Editor Sharon Rodney
Sports    Editor    ---------    Mike    Hunter
Photography   Manager Byron   Hender
Critics Editor    -   -   -   - David Bromige
Editorial  Research    -    Bob  Hendrickson,  Ian  Cameron
STAFF THCS ISSUE
REPORTERS: Mike Grenby (desk), Harry Swain, Krishna
■        Sahay, Ken Warren, Donna Morris, Nicky Phillips, Catri-
ona   McAskie,  Marje  Gow,   Doug  Sheffield,  Bob   Mac-
Donald, Ron Slater, George Rail ton. ,
' SPORTS: Glenn Shultz, Herb Walker, George Railton,
Bill Wlllson, Linda Gooch, Peaches Barkowitz, Penny
Stamp, Stanley and Davis Cup.
TECHNICAL:   Gail   Kendall,   Beatrice   Wong,   Heather
Virtue.
Respect-still needed
Student president Alan Cornwall has come under considerable fire lately because he approached Faculty Council
to institute eligibility rules to govern the second slate of the
AMS elections, in the face of council opposition.
Nine of the sixteen councillors present voted not to ask
Faculty Council to set the rules. Two abstained.
Since Cornwall's approach to Faculty Council, various
reasons have been advanced against his action.
One of our illustrious councillors said his action of going
to the administration might well be the very cornerstone of
our system of student autonomy.
The Ubyssey disagrees. Approaching the administration
to get help in a problem we cannot handle ourselves is the
logical thing to do.
The ruling of Faculty Council was only temporary and was
to be in effect only until the AMS brought forth its own set of
eligibility rules. Members of Faculty Council insisted that the
"only" clause go in.
Other council members brought forth the idea that approaching the faculty for help this issue was more dangerous
to the society's autonomy than having no eligibility rules at all.
»
Again we disagree. Arty group is treated as responsible
only if it shows it is responsible. As it acts, so it is treated.
The Alma Mater Society, is not, in our opinion, acting in a
responsible manner when it allows a slate of its elections to be
run without rules governing candidate eligibility. Council, or
at least those who voted against the proposal, has to accept
this responsibility.
The good name of the AMS depends on its reputation. So
far students of this institution have been able to impress the
administratidn with the quality and calbre of their students
officers. Since much of our autonomy depends on the good
will and respect of the administration, we should be very
hesitant of taking, or not taking, any action which will tend to
destroy or dimmish this respect.
Allowing candidates who cannot maintain the mmimuni
academic standards of this institution to run for office can do
nothing but lessen this respect.
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 9,  1962
Letters to the Editor
Sinister atmosphere
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
I must bring to your attention the fact that the atmosphere on this campus is
becoming more and more sinister.
At one time I thought, the
general mood here was no better nor worse than the Vancouver mood itself—a mood of
glazed somnambulism wherein
one walks about with one's
mind in neutral. Lately, however, we have been witnessing
the beginnings of an outmoded
political activity.
We are presented With two
political doctrines which are
alike in that they would complete the lobotomy process and
fit the student for his sarcophagus. In short we are witnessing a revival of both Communism and Facism. We have
the familiar "Vote Communist"
literature which would cause
any European to yawn violently, accompanied by the counter-
rhetoric of Mr. Benko which
again causes acute boredom in
anyone familiar with the writings of Benito Mussolini.
The average student, three-,
quarters dead already, is asked
to choose between two totalitarian policies.
As if they were not boring
enough we have the beginnings
of an Orweilian anti-sex
league. The young stoats of the
Brock Lounge and the other
secret and public places have
come under heavy criticism in
your pages. I believe the
"league" has even gone to the
lengths of preparing a cage for
one of these amorous couples.
Sir, on the principle that in
our day—the day of the IBM
card, the Klein vTest, the mass
media, the split level bungalow
— life of any other kind is
better than non-lifeK let us
leave these young couples
alone. I would far rather have
to fight my way to the Buchanan Building stepping over re-
cumbant bodies, bottles of Gordon's Gin, used contraceptives,
mounds of benzedrine tablets,
than through the litter of conformist pamphlets with which
this campus is becoming
swamped.
Personally, it does not matter to me — my own heyday
was in the late forties and early
fifties of this century. Neither,
as a happily married man, do
I have the special interest of
the voyeur. It merely seems
to me that in a society which
is three-quarters dead, and
which many wish to see wholly dead, sex as a manifestation of life, is the last thing we
should condemn.
Yours truly,
JOHN MILLS,
Ed. II.
'Extreme discourtesy'
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
I was annoyed to read in our
local papers that our campus
was mentioned in connection
with the smear 6n Dr. Alcock
and the CPRI.
Mr. Geza Benko and the Canadian Society for Human
Rights, by carrying out this act
of extreme discourtesy, have
identified themselves with the
current wave of bad manners
around the campus.
I am referring to incidents
where    guest   speakers    have
been jeered, insulted, and pelted with garbage, also the attacks on the editors of The
Ubyssey and the accusation
that The Ubyssey is pro-Communist.
This display of ignorance
has, in my opinion, and I'm
sure, in the opinions of other
students, embarrassed and discredited the university. I would
like to suggest that the Canadian Society for Human Rights,
and especially Mr. Benko,
make a public apology to Dr.
Alcock and the students of
UBC and also give them a
guarantee that these disgusting
actions will not occur again.
Your truly,
R. SKELLY,
Arts & Science II.
Warped warblings?
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
Another "Hungarian Freedom Fighter" has come to lead
us along the path of democracy
a la Geza Benko. This gentleman, graduate of Sopron, has
returned to the campus in response to the bleatings of
Adolf Bucholtz, Arts I, and his
colleagues.
Benko (who, incidentally, is
no longer a student, but makes
free use of campus facilities)
and his henchmen have formed
the so-called Committee for the
Protection of Human Rights—
the rights to abuse and slander
every organization and individual that does not follow their
demented line of thought.
Representing such, they attempted to, and partially succeeded in, disrupting a meeting
of 2600 Vancouver citizens attending a CPRI rally Tuesday
evening in the armouries. By
use of brown shirt tactics they
pulled apart the connection to
a microphone and blasted forth
with the warped warblings of
the Canadian Intelligence Service (John Birch in nature and
affiliation) with a tape recorder
apparently there for recording
purposes.
When several people advanced to restore order, Benko,
turning pale, made a whimpering plea for the RCMP to be
called for his protection.
In conclusion, this group
has exposed themselves for
what they are. I and every
other Canadian who feels an
inherent right to democracy,
shudder at the ultimate objectives of this group.
Yours truly,
STEVE RANKIN.
'Freedom'
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
The modern mind is (most
appropriately, with the growth
of the nuclear threat) concerned with the various aspects of
the problem word freedom.'
In any democracy, the citizens
(particularly at the student
level) subscribe to a great gamut of attitude towards this
ideal.
In recent editions, The Ubyssey has carried a variety of
Opinions questioning the logical
existence of Communism in the
democratic order.
In protest, the Communists
have declared their democratic right to speak freely. Mr.
Smith has'already written a
most admirable condemnation
of the pretentious terminology
employed in the issue, so I will
say nothing of that. However,
another peculiar characteristic
shared by the majority of the
arguments is that they offer
only condemnation or beliger-
ent rebuttal; few pause long
enough to consider the matter
constructively.
In his so-called "extreme
center" letter, Mr. Armstrong
says, "We should not have anything to fear from letting the
various extremist groups say
what they believe . . ."—and
offers a public interest in politics as a solution. I will not
pretend to be neutral: Communism is to me the most diabolical force alive in the modern world. However, I do not
deny the right of the Communist voice in the democratic society. Yet anyone who says
that democracy will not suffer
because of that voice (provided
democracy is actually "the best
way of life") is being impractical and unrealistic.
Since (as I believe) true democracy by its very nature
tends towards self destruction
(by consenting to the growth
of such odious cancers as Communism, which will eventually
kill the main body, left untend-
ed), the solution must be to
utilize the Communist method
in combatting the Communist
lie; to meet the Communist
propaganda wave with a greater flood of truth. By 'truth' I
do not mean a campaign for
Capitalism; neither do I infer a
program of idealistic freedom
raving.
Rather, I think it must be
the duty of every democratic
government to acquaint the
people with the visage of Communism as it really exists,
showing both the good and the
bad effects. Radio, TV, the
newspaper and the lecture hall
make it possible for the nation's leaders to transmit such
vital information to every part
of the world, as well as to
their own people.
Thus informed, it becomes
the privilege and the responsibility of every citizen as an
individual and as a member of
the democratic community, to
consider the matter rationally;
and when eventually the serpent Communism presents him
with its gilded poison, he may
thrust it aside with conviction,
knowing the golden fruit to be
rotton at the core.
Or if, on the other hand, his
reason should lead him more
strongly towards the Communist state, he will at least have
arrived at a satisfying conclusion on the strength of knowledge; and whatever disappointing consequence may arise
from his decision, he may be
certain that he was not seduced
in false propaganda; that in all
events, his freedom to make
his own choice has been maintained.
To my understanding, freedom is based on truth and
knowledge. Since the majority
of the letters recently written
on the subject have been based
neither on truth nor knowledge, they can scarcely be considered arguments for freedom. Therefore, both leftists
and rightists (and I use both
terms loosely) if you would protect your right to think, and
consequently, to vote, I ask
you to acquaint yourselves
with the facts before you derive the solution.
Yours   truly,
LORNE DICKSON,
Arts II. Friday, February 9, 1962
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Drift
WORDS
By MIKE GRENBY
It's a pity we can't always
tell the truth.
"But my dear, it's simply
not done! We can't hurt their
feelings by telling them the
real reason we don't want to
go is that we can't stand their
company. We mustn't tell the
truth, it would never dp."
No, it wouldn't do, it just
wouldn't.
But why not tell them the
real reason, the truth? No need
to be rude about it:
"Thank you for asking but
we don't want to come. We
don't enjoy your company."
How crude! How tactless!
How absolutely "just not
done"!
No, people prefer to lie.
White lies, of course, but nevertheless lies.
"It's so sweet of you to ask
us over. We'd really love to
come but Herman is a little
under the weather this evening
so perhaps ..."
•   •    *
"Who was that, dear?" Herman asks.
"The O'Tweedys asked us
over but I told them you
weren't feeling too well. I just
can't stand listening to Ger-
irude  talk about her  babies!"
"I'm glad you got us out of
it," Herman adds. "Charlie's
tall tales are enough to driye
me up a wall,''
How disgusting! How hypocritical! How absolutely "the
accepted thing"!
Actually, we do say what
we really feel—to ourselves.
"What an adorable baby!"
(thinks: "Sure is an ugly-looking brat; slinks, too.")
"What a clever idea for a
hat, and it suits you so well!"
(thinks: "Good grief, what
ghastly nightmare provoked
that!")
"Oh, George, you look simply too handsome for words!"
(thinks: "When will he grow
upl Red and green tie, blue-
checked shirt, yellow socks—
and he's forgotten to tie his
shoelaces.")
"This meal is really excellent. You must have spent
hours in the kitchen over it."
(thinks: "How could anything
taste so utterly foul! It must
have taken hours in the kitchen
to do this to an ordinary, harmless   potato.")
• •    •
I get a sadistic pleasure out
of imagining what would happen if people voiced their
thpughts (like those above) instead of only mouthing them
inwardly.
Think of the shocked looks,
the icy silence, the fumbling
attempts to start conversation
going again.   -
I'd be highly amused.
Ha-ha!
I'm quite frank and honest
if anyone ever asks my opinion
on something or invites me to
go somewhere.
Come to think of it, it's been
a long time since such an occasion last occurred, but, if . . .
• *    *
In case you might wonder,
typographical (and other)
errors are intentionally put
into The Ubyssey in order not
to disappoint; those' who like
to find fault.
.Thought: Madness comes in
small- desesi Enjoy it-while it
l8?ts.
REV. EARL PALMER of Seattle
speaks on "The Christian Gospel" in the Brock Lounge,
noon today. He also speaks at
6:30 p.m. in the Common
Block  on  "Doubt and   Faith,"
Intra-mural debaters
tackle ambition query
Next week is intra-mural debating week on campus.
Psi Upsilon Fraternity will
defend its championship when
it competes with the New Democratic Party, Union College, the
Fraternities, Sororities and
other campus organizations for
the Canadian Legion Trophy.
Kappa Alpha Theta affirms
"that the grass is greener on
the other side" against Delta
Upsilon Monday, Feb. 12, in
Bu. 106.
Wednesday, Feb. 14, in Arts
100 the New Democratic Party
on the affirmative and Alpha
Delta Pi on the negative debate
"that   security   kills   ambition."
Beta Theta Pi and Alpha
Omicron Pi will debate "that a
nuclear bomb shelter be built
in every Canadian home" on
Friday, Feb. 16, in Bu. 100.
The debates are sponsored by
the University Debating Union.
SKI
TIPS
Ben Hill-Tout deadline
for entry is Saturday
SKI REPORTS
Local: No new snow (but no
rain either) this week has resulted in a 4-5 inch hard-packed
base. On Grouse the T-bar is the
best hill. The road up Seymour
is clear. Skiing is generally fair,
and chances are good that the
weather wili be favorable this
weekend.
Baker: A hard-packed base
with fair skiing.
3ft        3ft        3ft
It was rather unfortunate that
the one day of good weather
and the one day of fairly good
skiing didn't coincide last weekend. But with luck a more coordinated effort will be forthcoming this weekend for the two
big group trips that are planned.
*&        *J» rp
VOC is sponsoring, a ski-touring trip to Skypilot near Britannia. The group will leave late
Friday afternoon and will attempt to be back in time for lectures Monday morning. Since
trie touring isn't too rough, this
trip is custom-mage for those
who have had. little or no experience in ski-touring but
would like to get in a little practice.
The other expedition is a day's
outing to Mt. Baker which is
sponsored by Fort Camp. Breakfast will be served in the Fort
Camp dining hall at 5:30 and a
bus will leave from there at
6:00. Free ski lessons are offered
as a lure, and tobogganing and
hiking are promised for non-
skiers.
Saturday is the deadline for
entry in the Ben Hill-Tout Memorial Photographic Salon.
Students, faculty and staff are
eligible.
There will be special categories for faculty and staff as well
as for students in both the black
No advertising:
No Com. Ledger
There will be no commerce
yearbook this year, the assistant
co-ordinator of publications said
recently.
Robin Far.quhar said lack of
advertising forced the move.
"All faculty publications this
year are on a paying basis," he
said, "and it did not seem logical
to allow the Ledger to take the
loss."
and white and color divisions of
this competition.
Certificates and merchandise
prizes will be awarded to the
winners.
Entries should be handed in
to the Slavonic Studies Office,
Bu. 469.
Entries will be evaluated on
the basis of composition, artistic quality, and technical competence.
Further information is available in Bu. 469.
f£Hr|P|£QM..
Safecracking, says Bobbin
Whaley, "is a real challenge."
And he should know. He con>
mitted 43 burglaries while on
the force. In this week's Post,
ijiis "burglar with a badge"
tells why he turned to crime.
How he phonied up police reports to cover his tracks. Used
official cars for his getaways.
And why he feels his superiors
are the real culprits.
The Saturday Evening
irwn
SOME
places offer lunch
specials, others offer breakfast
specials, still others offer
BRUNCH specials, but the special
of specials is offered at the PIZZA RAMA. At the PALACE OF
PERFECT PIZZAS, we proudly
offer the DINNER SPECIAL,.
Yes, the dinner special at the
PIZZARMAMA is meal of the
year:   Get   this—!
Our special Italian
green salad
Your choice of ANY  one of
our 12  different types
of   small   pizzas
Your   choice   of   any   one
of our small   soft   drinks,
or coffee,  tea or milk
An   Italian  desert,  Spumoni
ice cream
THAT'S   IT,  a   complete   meal—
for  the  mere  sum   of   150  pennies
(no   stamps).
This offer is good ANY day between 5 p.m. and S p.m., so treat
yourself  TODAY.
And say, if PIZZA; isn't your
ilish, vou can get other treats -at.
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We also carry sheet music,
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RE 8-8610
BASK6TBALL
Alberta (Calgary) Friday and Saturday at 8:30
at the War Memorial  Gymnasium.
RUGGER
Thunderbirds   play   University  of   Oregon  at
the UBC stadium on Saturday at 2:30.
SWIMMING
UBC  swim  team  takes on  the  University of
Washington frosh team on Saturday night at
7:30 at the Crystal Pool.
th. MILDEST BEST-TASTING cigamtt. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 9, V
Jean   Cocteau's
brought to mind a verse from
a Louis Macniece poem.
"John    MacDonald    found    a
corpse, put it under the sofa,
Waited till it came to life and
hit it with a poker.
Sold its eyes for souvenirs, sold
its blood for whisky,
Kept its bones for dumb-bells
to use when he was fifty."
RECAPITULATION
Cocteau is now seventy (not
. fifty), but he has certainly taken the corpse of his ideas from
BLOOD OF A POET and
ORPHEE and sold "its eyes for
souvenirs". LE TESTAMENT
D'ORPHEE is nothing more
than a recapitulation of his
pre-occupation with the Artists' conscious and unconscious
mind, with the esoteric quality
of Art and with the necessity
for the Artist to 'die' before
he can really begin to live. The
result is that his last film is
more apres-garde than avant-
garde.
His earlier films had validity
because their ideas could be
properly related to all art; in
this film, as he puts it himself:
"I shall perform a strip-tease
of my soul" with the result
that the film becomes a
"Siudged up collection of paradoxes and aphorisms culled
from his mind over a period of
fifty years. There is no form
of structure to the film, which
whisks us about the labrynths
of Cocteau's subconscious like
the garbled account of a psychiatric examination. The poetry of the dialogue has many
levels of meaning, but what
relevance has this meaning
other than a quixotic interest
in soul-stripping? "This flower
embodies the paralysis of your
destiny." Very lovely words—
but what do they mean?   And
KINEO
By PETER MORRIS
•   LE TESTAMENT D'ORPHEE   •
UBC Auditorium — Thursday, February 8,
latest   film     what   about   a   paradox   like:
"Only the unreal is real".
Cocteau has also reproduced
the Pygmalion legend in which
an artist's created characters
come to life, and has added to
it by having these characters
turn round and question the
artists as to his purpose.
I wish, too, I could praise
the acting for the film contains
so many celebrities that I lost
count. But I cannot. Cocteau,
playing himself (or Orpheus?),
wanders around like a sonam-
bulist, and none of the others
seem to have very much faith
in, or understanding of, their
roles. What a contrast this is
to ORPHEE!
* I prefer also to forget* the
obvious-trickery in some of the
photography: people appearing
and disappearing with a rapidity that dazes one; sequences
reversed in time (as when Ce-
geste appears from the sea, or
when Cocteau re-assembles the
Flower of Irrationality).
On the other hand, I shall
long remember the sheer evocative beauty of the imagery:
the gypsy encampment; Minerva framed by two centaurs;
Cocteau being carried to his
bier by the centaurs and the
beautiful choice of location.
Sequences like these set the
mind of an imaginative tack
away from the phantasmogria.
I shall remember also the grace
and poetry of the movements,
and the subtle quality of light
and share.
WIT AND SATIRE
I shall remember, too, the
dry wit of some of the dialogue.
Cocteau remarking "Drole
chien!" at a couple of men imitating a dog. Cocteau dubbing two lovers who write
poetry whilst they love: "Intellectual lovers". Cocteau's remark .about people in the
Eighteenth   Century   thinking
. -*   ,.- **"    '4
1962
smoking "a very strange idea."
Or the self-satire as he dons his
D.Litt (Oxon) gown to reassemble a Flower.
If these are the things Cocteau would like me to have as
"souvenirs" then I am pleased.
The rest — the pretentiously
loaded intellectual collection of
Cocteau-isms—I prefer to forget.
SUMMATION
Since I began with poetry I
will let Walter de la Mare
speak my final summation of
the film:
"A foolish, fond old man, his
bedtime nigh,
Who  still at  western window
stays to win
A transient respite from   the
latening sky,
And scarcely can bear it when
the Sun goes in."
The Mattress Is Comm
UNIVERSITY     LIAISON
PROGRAMME   1961-62
ROYAL   CANADIAN
NAVY
Officers
will be here
to interview and counsel students
interested  in a sponsored education and a career as an officer in
the RCN
on February 19 - 21,1962
at the University Placement Office
on the West Mall
Make an appointment for an interview
through your University Placement
Officer
COCTEAU, THE CENTAURS, MINERVA: A still from TESTAMENT
D'ORPHEE, reviewed in Kineo.
Tickets   now on   sale
Hudson's Bay Co.
10   a.m.-5   p.m.   MU   1-3351
$4.00 - 3.25 - 2.50 - 1.75
inc. tax
Presented by CKWX and
FAMOUS ARTISTS LTD.
—Notes—
THE HAPPY TIME plays tonight and Saturday at The
York Theatre, Commercial at
Georgia. Production by Vancouver Little Theatre.
THE WINTER'S TALE review yields place to Festival
news. A copy will be attached
to the Green Room notice-
board by black-suited lackeys
with slug-colored lips.
textui
American composer, ELIOT
CARTER-Brock Hall, Tuesday,
February 6, 1962.
Noted American composer I
day noon on the Festival of Com
same time UBC hosted its first n
the performance of Mr. Carter's
and Harpsichord.
As well as the performance
on the form which he employs i
"If one accepts the frame
a lively frame," he said.
• •
To achieve this lively frarr
in his works on the texture "o
activity rather than thematic m
He uses the "rather mechE
a sound which contrasts with the
ing oboe flute and cello.
The first movement of the w
of drama" in which a stealthy p:
employed effectively.
The second movement was
chord and the other instruments.
The third movement was a
dances all joined together in qui
• •
The work was performed by
Stannard (oboe), James Hunter ((
sichord).
Mr. Carter's "sound" idea is
used to themes and melodic line
However, it is a field of aln
we shall and probably will hear
Mr. Carter was introduced !
ordinator, UBC extension depar
the
Unfortunate Is the lot of a
shepherd who is fairy down to
his waist but whose legs are
mortal. This is not getting the
best of both worlds. Unfortunate also is the lot of the
maid who loves him, when she
is pursued by almost every
peer in the House of Lords and
her guardian, the Lord High
Chancellor, as well. Such are
only a few of the illogicalities
which make Gilbert and Sulli-~
van's Iolanlhe one of the most
delightfully silly of their many
operettas.
WEAK SATIRICALLY
Iolanthe as presented last
week by the Greater Vancouver Operatic Society lost little
of its inane humor but its
satiric elements were weakened by a tendency either to
understate them or to play for
laughs more than meaning.
In the crucial role of the old
Lord High Chancellor, Harry
McCulloch seemed afflicted by
this latter tendency. While his
vocal performance was not
bad, except for a rather dull,
slow delivery of the Nightmare
Song (he would do well to hear
Martyn Green's  rendition), he
U
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it THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
e
^cture
t Carter was featured Tues-
Dorary Arts program. At the
r telecast, with CBC filming
lata for Flute, Oboe, Cello,
is work Mr. Carter lectured
s music.
concert one must make it
.r. Carter has concentrated
ihds  rhythms and musical
ial and melodic lines.
1 and soft harpsichord" as
•e liquid and smooth-sound-
vas "a very interesting type
ory harpsichord sound was
alogue between the harpsi-
unation of "many kinds of
iccession."
•ad Crocker (flute), Warren
and Hugh MacLean (harp-
sual to the listener who is
mitless possibilities which
of in the near future.
1 Docherty, Fine Arts Co-
—bob mcdonald.
-placebo-
>'^R
K   V'-\'
-'J "if m
B \*t- •«*-*
•       -4
MERCE CUNNINGHAM, whose dance company can be seen
in the auditorium at noon, Friday, February 16.
eer and
e pen
ess to satirize the legalist
to   play    a    rejuvinated
it conscience  ridden)   old
Needless to say, his song
iance trio with Earl Tol-
(Richard Loney) and the
of  Mountarrarat (Robert
y) "He who shies at such
ze",    was   so    amusingly
squed    as    to   be   worth
ig to see alone.
&NTHE by Greater Vati-
uver Operatic Society—
leen     Elizabeth     Audi-
rium, February 1.
!se latter two gentlemen
l g h t quite satisfactory
to their roles even
h their acting, like that
st of the principals, did
:flect much appreciation
2- subtleties in Gilbert's
ue.
VI WITHOUT PEER
-tally the most enthusias-
;or in . the cast occupied
• right end of the chorus
>les. What gusto! Here
character identification
vengeance. He was (I
as well say it) a ham
t peer.
The male chorus generally
sang rather badly, showing
especial strain in the upper
registers. Similarly, little spiritual quality appeared in the"
singing of the chorus of fairies
although the sheer number of
these delightful, ridiculously
garbed, wand-bearing ladies
provided a full, balanced
sound. Their Queen, Lenore
Gibbs, projected her voice
rather blatantly and was outshone by a mere mortal -—
Phylis, ward in chancery and
beloved of Strephon, sung by
Nora Harriman. Her pleasing
soprano blended well with the
tenor of Kirk Macbeth, whose
diction in the role of Strephon,
made up for what his voice
lacked.
LESS ADMIRABLE
One of the less admirable
features of the whole production, which as a production
rates quite well, lay in the
orchestra, pit. While conductor
Beverly Fyfe strove commend-
ably to co-ordinate his forces,
the pit ensemble was simply
too small to do justice to Sullivan's orchestration.
Doreen Bell's stage direction
adhered to rather traditional,
unimaginative lines. But routine chorus blocking posed a
Jess serious flaw than the lack
of individual characterization
by the principals. G & S direction and acting are traditionally
stylized but this should not
preclude individuality. If more
members of the cast had felt
the enthusiasm and identification with their roles demonstrated by that earlier mentioned peer in the chorus, the
performance as a whole would
probably have projected more
of the wit and satire which
make Gilbert and Sullivan
operettas the most eduring in
the English language.
—william littler
Winram Insurance
Ltd.
SPECIALIZING   IN
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1678  W. Broadway, Vancouver  9
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Presents
THE SONGS OF
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and
THE CHAD MITCHELL TRIO
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X
WHATYOU
SHOULD KNOW ABOUT
FALLOUT
Eight years ago, scientists began to investigate the effects
of world-wide fallout from nuclear tests. "The results," says
physicist Edward Teller, "were
reassuring." In this week's Saturday Evening Post, he tells how
much radiation the body can
absorb. And why we should stop
worrying about fallout.
The Saturday Evening
n
February i« issue now on saiI  *
by george bowering
FERLINGHETTI   -
THE    NICEST   THING
about the reaffirmation of
poetry as a vocal art, is that
the poets are being heard all
over the place as they range
beyond not only the pages of
the Partisan Review, but far
past the boundaries of their
own coteries, universities, and
literary societies. Long range
reading tours are one pleasant
phenomenon, and the recent
interest in recorded poetry is
another.
NEW DIRECTIONS HAS
picked up on the gambit of the
Iowa poets, distributing Fer-
linghetti's new book with a
small LP disc tucked inside
the back cover. One can speculate without tongue in cheek,
STARTING FROM SAN
FRANCISCO; new poems
by Lawrence Ferlinghetti;
New   Directions;   79    pp;
hardpaper and 33Vz RPM
—$2.95.
that the time will come when
the record or the tape or whatever science has in store, will
be sent put with little or no
printed addenda.
IN FERLINGHETTI'S CASE,
the advent of the book-record
idea is fortunate indeed, because he is more impressive to
the listener than to the reader,
far more impressive.
Ferlinghetti is the A. E.
Hbusman of the Beat Generation. Next to of course Ginsberg, he is the best selling American poet of the postwar era.
A fearful influence, he can be
heard gooking through the
imitative poems droned out in
coffee houses all over America.
BUT, AS THESE NEW
poems show, he has been more
valuable as a publisher and
vender (City Lights Books)
than as a poet — more valu
able, that is, to students and
devotees of the poetic art. Certainly he reaches an audience
unexpected in this age. Unkind
critics will say: So has Edgar
Guest. Let us not be unkind.
BUT INSTEAD LOOK AT
the best poem in the new compilation. "The Great Chinese
Dragon" is more lucid, more
subtle, and less inclined to
sprawl than any other poem
Ferlinghetti has written of late.
In it he refrains from his usual
inorganic jokes, corny repetitions, and blandly stolen lines.
He writes quite inspired description of the SF New Year's
scene, and from that locale
right out to an undiverted
satirical blast at the war-
making fringe of all America
and the whole world. Most important-—he works with a propelling sound that drives his
long lines through the poem
as it drives his long dragon
through the - Chinatown America streets.
BUT OTHER POEMS, LIKE
"Hidden Door" show the poet
at his worst, the poet with a
lot of blank paper and a lot
of unconnected j a r g o n i s tic
jokes and bang-on lines. Here
is where the reader (ie—me)
sees Ferlinghetti as the pop-_
ular standup beatnik comedian,
the troubador of the. top; forty.'
Here he sounds like a hanger-
on imitator of'Ginsberg, who
has looked tpo long at his own
photograph in the old Life
Magazine article.
BUT AS I SAY, TO HEAR
him is to forgive. To hear him
is a pleasure, and when you
get down to it, that's what
you're supposed to get from a
poem. The current festival was
clever to get Ferlinghetti to
read at UBC this afternoon —
somebody was not so clever in
booking him for such a tiny
room.
ST. TIMOTHY LUTHERAN CHURCH
ON CAMPUS WORSHIP
HUT L4 -I EAST MALL
11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Everyone Welcome •
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
presents
SPECIAL  EVENTS  WEEK
FEBRUARY   12-16
theme:
The Moral Climate of the 20th Century
Speakers and Topics are:
MONDAY,   FEBRUARY   12—12:30   p.m.   BUCHANAN   104.
"MASS   COMMUNICATIONS"
Mr.   Allan   Booth.   Director   of   Programming,   School   of   Communications,   Extension   Dept.
TUESDAY',   FRBRUARY   13—12:30   p.m.   BUCHANAN   10S
"POLITICS   AND    INTERNATIONA!.    AFFAIRS"
Mr. Arthur  Laing,  former M.L.A. and M.P.- and past provincial
leader  of  Liberal  Party  of  British   Columbia.
WEDNESDAY,   FRBRUARY   14—12:30  p.m.   BUCHANAN   104
"MEDICINE"     •
Dr.   David   Williams.   Head   of   the   Department   of   Continuing
Medical  Education.
THURSDAY,  FEBRUARY  15—12:30  p.m.  BUCHANAN  104
"HUMANITIES"
Dr.    Malcolm    McGregor.    Head    of   Department    of    Classicial
Studies and  Assistant to  the Dean  of Arts  and Science.
FRIDAY',   FP.BRUARY   16—12:30  p.m.   BUCHANAN   10B
"REFLECTIONS   OF   A   SOCIAX   SCIENTIST"
Dr.   Leonard   Marsh,   Director  of   Research,   School  of   Social
Work.
BROTHERHOOD   SABBATH:   DINNER   AND   SERVICES
Friday,   Feruary   16th,   6:30   p.m.
Schara   Tzedeck   Synagogue   — Oak  Street   at  19th  Avenue
GUEST   SPEAKER:
Dr.   D.   P.   Pandia  —  Distinguished   Vancouver   Lawyer   from
India.
TICKETS   $1.50   PER   PERSON
(Reservation at  Hillel House  behind Brock) Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  February 9,  1962
Second slate  seconders'  statements
FIRST
VICE-PRES.
Pat Glenn
Pat Glenn is the most eminently qualified student on the
campus for the position of
First Vice-President. His experience includes:
—AMS Second Vice-
President
—AMS Finance
—Winter Sports Centre
Committee
—Frosh Orientation
Committee
—Alumni. Board of
Management.
He has represented this university on speaking tours
throughout this province and
at the NFCUS Seminar in 1961.
A scholarship student and former memher of the UBC Thunderbird soccer team, Pat will
be  an  invaluable member   of
next year's council.
FRANK IACCOBUCCI,
Law 3.
Peter Shepcird
We are fortunate to have a
person with the experience and
capabilities of Peter Shepard
running for this position. Peter
has proven he is equal to any
task which confronts him.
As president of his freshman
class Peter organized his council into an effective group.
Peter has been active in student activities including Homecoming Treasurer, Chairman
of Open House Traffic Control, Frosh Retreat Chairman,
First Engineering President,
Vice-Chairman of Publications
Commission and Brock Management.
He deserves your support.
DON ROBERTSON
McGiU students vote
on eligibility rules
MONTREAL (CUP) — The
next meeting of the Students'
Society will vote on a motion
requiring s^ud^nts who take
office with a 65 pe^r cent mini-
inum academic requirement to
maintain that, average "during
4iie tenure of their office.
Exception will, be   made for
Borne officers since their terms
of   office   expire  on  or before
- Jan. .1   of  the following   year,
and they will have over three
months to prepare for examinations without the pressure of
extra-curricular activities.
WANTED — I or 2 girls to share
large furnished suite with 2
others in modern apartment block.
$30.00 a month. South Granville
Area. Available Feb. 15i If interested contact laobel at RE 1-8367
evening's.  6-7 p.m.
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FEELING
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you fell in love with living!
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—Jfce»a»l(t'*Best-le«(rsj»rBriigWi* "rH
V
TREASURER
Ian Matheson
The position of Treasurer of
the Alma Mater Society requires command of the academic skills involved in keeping the books of a large operation. It also requires a mature
and responsible attitude in the
discharge of administrative
functions. It is my opinion that
the personal qualities demanded in this high office are
more important than experience.
For these reasons, it is my
pleasure   to  second   as   candi
date for the office of treasurer,
Ian Matheson, of third year
accounting.
LANCE FINCH,
Law 3.
Malcolm Scott
The AMS Treasurer must
have not only a firm grasp of
financial and business principles but also practical experience. Malcolm Scott has shown
he possesses these.
As Treasurer of Film Society
and Vice-President of Parliament Council, he showed his
interest and organizational
ability, and'was elected Treas
urer   of   the   Alma  Mater   Society  in  the following year.
As Treasurer he has efficiently supervised the expenditure of $500,000 of our money,
earning the respect of Student
Council and the University
Administration through his devotion to duty, able financing
and sound administrative decisions.
I urge you to re-elect Malcolm Scott, Treasurer.
DEAN  FELTHAM
Acadia Camp!
STUDYING TOO HARD?
!
KEEP ASPIRIN WITH YOU
AT All TIMES
ASPIRINS!
UNIVERSITY     PHARMACY      LTD.
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AFTERMATH OF A
PLANE
On October 29, 1960, sixteen
college athletes met death in
a chartered plane. The night
was foggy — the flight non-
scheduled. In this week's Post,
you'll read how the survivors
have tried to mend their broken-
lives. And why some of them
blame the football coach, the
Board of Regents —and even
the college president.
The Saturday Evening
i FEBRUARY 10 ISSUE NOW ON S/U.S
du MAURIER
product  of  Peter-Jackson Tobacco   Limited  —   makers of fin« crgaraHti Friday, February 9, 1962
THE      UBYSSEY
Page T
FOR THE BIRDS
By  MIKE  HUNTER
Well! A letter to the sports editor. Things are looking up.
It concerns Tuesday's For The Birds in which your agent expressed disappointment at the fact that an exhibition game
between the best college basketball team in B.C. (the UBC
Thunderbirds) and the best senior amateur team (the UBC-
cum-New Westminster Bakers) will not come about.
3ft 3ft 3f>
Sports Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
It is a matter of concern to those of us whose responsibility
it is to administer the policies and activities of the Men's Athletic Committee that, for the second time this session, you have
chosen to editorialize on a matter which, in most of its aspects,
is an unfortunate one. Our primary objective in calling attention in this way to your column in the Feb. 6 issue of The
Ubyssey is to assist those of your readers who may wish to
form opinions to do so on a broader basis of information than
that which you have provided.
It is the broarl policy of MAC to provide a program of extramural sports which will both furnish an outlet for student athletes of more than average ability and, at the same time, assist
them to develop their skills in a high level of competition.
When and where we do so, it is our hope and expectation that
our athletes will co-operate and assist in the development of
this program.
We believe it is the feeling of the great majority of the
student body, at least insofar as we can interpret it through
their representatives on the MAC, that those who are members
of the AMS and who have special skills and talents to contribute should have a sense of pride and also some feeling of obligation in giving university teams and clubs such time as they
can devote to extra-curricular activities.
We believe, further, that the general feeling is that rigid
regulation of this matter would toe undesirable and that efforts
should be directed toward making representing his university
a desirable end for the student.
This year, as you have pointed out, a small group of students who in previous years had established their ability to
compete on university teams, have chosen to compete on an outside team in a basketball league in which the university is not
represented.'
^ Because we believe them to have been misguided in their
reasoning, MAC has considered it to be a fortunate circumstance,
primarily from the point of view Of their own best interests,
that it will not become necessary for them to compete directly
against their fellow students.
For reasons such as these, we must record our disagreement with the stand taken by your column that a game between
Bakers and UBC would be a desirable thing.
To advocate it mainly on the basis that it would provide a
./'big gate" and for the reasons you appear to associate with gate
receipts, does not make the proposition more attractive in our
view. May we suggest to you that when gate receipts become
so important that principles go out the window, no doubt other
equally possible ways of attracting crowds can be found.
We would not for a moment suggest that any policy that
MAC adopts is likely to meet with 100 percent acceptance by
all those who are affected by it, or that those who disagree are
not entitled to their own views.
* Our final comment is that at any time policies which
MAC lays down, in what it believes to be the best interests of
the whole, cease to toe in conformity with general student opinion it then lies within the power of the AMS to advise a change.
A. W. MATTHEWS,
President, MAC
R. J. PHILLIPS.
Athletic Director
Peruvians, Birds
split hoop series
UBC Thunderbirds finally ran out of gas Thursday, dropping a 78-62 decision to the Peruvian national basketball team
before their largest crowd of the year in War Memorial Gym.
SPORT SHORTS
This is also happening on the
UBC athletic scene this weekend.
IN SWIMMING — The UBC
swim team is pinning its hopes
on Bill Campbell and Dave
Smith in an exhibition meet
against U. of Washington Freshmen Saturday.
Meet time is 7:30 at the Crystal Pool.
IN HOCKEY — Thunderbird
Hockey team travels to Chilli-
wack "Saturday night to meet
the Chilliwack Steelhedds, in an
■xhibition game.
Birds have a 4-0 record in
league play and one win in exhibition play.
JOHN PHILLIPS
.   .   .  back Saturday
Rugger" Birds
host Oregon
at stadium
Saturday the Birds rugby
team will clash with Oregon
State in an exhibition match at
UBC stadium.
Back in the line-up for the
Birds will be Peter Merratt and
captain John Phillips to help
bolster the team. Game time is
2:30.
In other games, Braves, the
Birds' main competition on campus, will meet CYO. One of the
most thrilling games this weekend will be the Frosh I - Phys.
Ed. game played on the gym
field   at   1:30.
Other games have Tomahawks
playing Blue Bombers and Frosh
II playing Burnaby. The latter
two games start at 1:30 also.
*    *    *
BERKELEY (UPS) — University of California's 1962 rugby
battalion have moved into high
gear as coach Miles "Doc" Hudson works on the 77-man turnout
which has volunteered for duty.
In addition to the three-game,
home - and - home World Cup
match with the University of
British Columbia this spring, the
Bears will add another impressive opponent to their list of
adversaries when they host the
powerful University of New Zealand at Memorial Stadium,
March 10.
Last year, California had an
11-3-1 record. The Bears lost the
World Cup to UBC.
[UBC STUDENTS
15% Discount
Imported  Oar Farts an*
Accessories
'Overseas Auto Pa its j
112th and Alma
The loss came as quite a surprise, especially considering the
Thunderbirds' easy 73-51 victory over the same team the
night before.
Wednesday, Birds capitalized
on a last-half letdown by the
travel-weary Peruvians for their
victory. Down only 31-29 at half-
time, the Peru team couldn't
cope with the second half zone
thrown up  by the  Birds.
They had trouble coping with
big Dave Way also, who ended
up with 26 points, his best of
the season.
The Peru club was playing
its seventh game in nine days,
however, and its Spartan-like
pace had to slacken sooner or
later.
All signs of. weariness disappeared Thursday, as the Peruvians chalked up the easiest victory of their Canadian tour.
Behind the flawless performance of huge centre Ricardo
Duarte, Peru jumped into a 40-
26 first-half lead. Duarte, who
is wonderfully agile for his 6-
foot-8 frame, scored 18 points in
the first half and added three
more in the second before fouling out with 16 minutes left in
the game.
Peru completely outfoxed
Thunderbirds in Thursday's
game, pressuring Birds into
making countless mistakes, the
same tactics UBC applied in
Wednesday's encounter. The
cat-quick Peruvians simply ran
Birds out of the gym.
•   •   •
The Thunderbirds will polish
off a hectic basketball week with
two games against the University of Alberta at Calgary here
tonight and Saturday.
Game time tonight for the
Thunderbirds is 7:30, while the
Jayvees meet Alberni at 9:00.
Saturday night, Birds will meet
Alberta at 9:15 while the Jayvees meet Alberni again in the
preliminary.
Earlier this season, UBC took
two games from Calgary on
their home court, but they had
to go into overtime to win the
second contest.
Alberta is a small team, but
they have speed to burn. They
use a zone defence, switching
into a full-court press often
enough to keep their opponents
off balance.
FOB SALE — Three-quarter size
billiard table (4'x8') Brand new
still In paclring- case. —$450.00.
Phone Terry at CA 4-4646 after 7
any evening-.
EXPERIENCED   TTTPIST
Will   type   notes,   essays,   drafts,
thesis,   etc  at   reasonatole  rates-.
Done to your specifications. Neatness   and   accuracy   guaranteed.
Phone BE 8-4301.
IT COSTS NO MORE TO HAVE YOUR
WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHED BY
QcwadaA kadinq
Wedding Photographers
See samples  in  your home.
29 Albums to choose from . . . priced from $37.50 to
$219.00 complete (add $10.00 for Sundays and legal
holidays).   60  to  100   pictures   to  choose   from   .   .   .
posed  and  candid   ...
HOME      •       CHURCH       •       RECEPTION
free M.C. Services if Desired.
PHONE TODAY!
RE 8.6707
JuliuJ   £/iefe
WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHERS
* MORE BRIDES CHOOSE JULIUS SHORE WEDDING
PHOTOGRAPHERS THAN ANY OTHER STUDIO.
Students!
For a new dining pleasure
try our daily special.
DEANS
4544W. 10th
.. Open 'till 11:30
I
COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE
Glasses Fitted
Contact Lenses
24-Hour Service OPTICAL Repairs
VANCOUVER BLOCK
MU 5-0928 — MU 3-2948
Main Floor
734 GRANVILLE ST.
Immediate Appointment
NEW WESTMINSTER - 675 COLUMBIA STREET
LA 6-8665 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  February 9,  1962
Iween classes
Engineering to organize
ENGINEERING
General meeting   to   organize
- engineers    today.    Let's    have
everybody out.
rft      3ft     3ft   .
lif £ UN
Current     affairs      discussion
'•  group with reference to Acade-
jnic Symposium.  Mom noon at
IH Board Room.
*V       "X"       V
JAZZ SOC
Contemporary jazz in concert.
Today in Auditorium. The Mike
Taylor Trio. Members free, non-
members 25 cents.
3ft       3ft       3ft
MECH. ENG.
Dr. G. V. Parkinson, special
lecturer in aeronautics, speaks
on "Recent Developments in the
Aero-Space Sciences". Eng. 201
. at neon Mon. All interested are
invited to attend.
'.-■•   * *  *
h»c "
Dr.  James Tyhurst, head  of
the*Dept.ef*^y«*iatjry, speaks
on "Tjhe /PS^ckblegy  of-Fear:*?
; ':B«/2l7,'no^n-|j^:':" -^^ ■'■-'"':''
1 ALLIANCE FRANCAIS
;■ ■;■ ;lRims: ;:^,A;^:';f^;iv:':|2j3^
camps in the^Alps) and,"Mont-
martre et ses Peintres" <life in
Montmartre). Members free;
others 10 cents.
•3p      3ft     3p     ;
scm
"The Mind and the-Maker"
series. Dr. W. Stevenson speaks
on Blake, Mon. at 12:30 in Arts
100.
•ji        2ft        Sft
UBC CHORAI,  SOC
Sixth Annual Concert of varied choral works on Sat. at
8:30 in UBC; Auditorium. Actaits
$1, Students 50 cents.
Religion shouldn't be a
political issue, says
Richard Nixon — unless  	
a candidate las mreligiw*
belief." In this week's Post,
?
sftftoife; %*Mlfotee of K*
sent," he claims that agnostic*
can be more moral than chwsft-
goers. And points out that
some of our greatest patriots
didn't believe in God.
The Saturday Evening
«onaust«><us#tui]tfeHUM •
Double Breasted Suits
Converted to
Single Breasted
United Tailors
BRITISH: WOOIiZ.£irS
.  549 GranviHe St.
Slacks Narrowed
Special  Prices for  UBC
Cornette Beauty
Solon
"Individual Attention"  by
Male and Female Stylists.
OPEN   FRI  TILL NINE
4532 W. 10 CA 4-7440
JR. AGRIC. INST.
Dr. L. Rubin, director of Canada Packers, will speak as a
member of "Beef Cattle Production and Marketing". Panel.
Mon., Feb. 12, Ag. 100 at 8 p.m.
Everyone welcome.
3ft        3ft        3ft
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Two films "The Loon's Necklace" and "Legend of the
Raven". Noon today in Bu. 2238.
V •** •**
AFRICAN   NIGHT
African dancing and folk singing. Film and speaker. Fri. 8:30
p.m., International House.
JR. CHEM. CLUB
Dr. Pincock speaking on "Organic reactions". Chem. 250,
•12:30 today.
rf» *** T*
GUIDES NEEDED
Male and female guides to
conduct high school delegates on
campus tours, Fri., Feb. 23, from
8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Please
come to meeting Mon. in Bu.
225 in  12:30.
•J* ■**        "T*
EAST ASIAN SOC
Important pre-election meeting in Bu. 203, noon Fri.
l>tft£utt#T^t <t
ninpntti!
INCORPORATED  Zv<>   MAY   I67Q.
Georgia at Granville
OPEN DAILY 9-5:30; FRIDAYS 9-9; PHONE MU 1-6211
UNITED AIR LINES
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR
STEWARDESSES
For Spring and Summer Training Classes
Qualificationsu Single, age" 20 through 26; height, 5'2" to
5r8", weight in proportion. Must be personable, attractive,
capable of dealing with the public. Some public contact
work experience beneficial.
IHTERVIEWER    ACCEPTING)    APPLICATIONS    AT
GEORGIA  HOTEL, MEZZAHTKE.  FEBRUARY  14,
ll:0O »J». to 7:00 p.m.  . FEBRUARY 15, 10:00 to 2 pjn.
•m
Pox further information please
.write to united Air Klaea Person.
' nel  Department, Seatle-Tacoma
Airport, Seattle 88, Wasbintrton.
Valentines Day
February   14
e Co
hos for your sweetheart
Valentine Cards
.25
UBC Charms
1.50
Lighters
1.25
Faculty Rings
6.50
Bracelets
4.25
Faculty Pins
1.45
Blazer Crests
6.50
Musical Mugs
6.95
COME IN AND BROWSE AROUND!
Brock Extension, 11:30 ■ 2:30, Mon. - Fri.
Guys  go  for  this  back  tab . . .
hangs   your   shirt   wrinkle-free!
New BLUE Tab Shirt
only  $7  each*—  Use your PBA
Step out of the locker room fresh and neat as when
you went in — hang this shirt by its convenient
back tab to prevent wrinkling. This shirt, in blue oxford cloth, features the tapered fit you've been wanting. Has snap tab collar, action pleat in back, and
convertible cuffs. Sizes I4V2 to I6V2, 32-35 sleeves.
The   Bay  Career   and   Campus   Shop,  second floor.
REMEMBER, YOU CAN SHOP 'TIL 9 TONIGHT . .  .
AND THERE'S EASY PARKING IN THE BAY PARKADE

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