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The Ubyssey Jan 9, 1962

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 THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLIV   No. 37
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1962
4fl^
PER
.MONTH.
-
Home of The Southam Trophy
\&y#vt*s*^{ \
m
.K
Campus bus
runs hiked
BCE   to   increase   UBC
service 25% next month
B.C. Electric will begin express bus service from two city
points next month in an effort to help solve campus traffic
problems.
Bus service will also be improved between Blanca loop
and the university during rush hours.
—Photo by Don Hume
HERE'S A VIEW of student president Al Cornwall as he will be seen by one councillor at the first
meeting in the new Brock board room Monday night, the new horseshoe table is twice as
big as the old one, to accommodate the seven new councillors added last year, the 23
councillors wilt be spread around the 30-seat table and the furthest will be 30 feet from
the chairman, Y       :
\\\pgal beer   brings   fine;
man,L^i;+;:li:;;;:bJ.p-nd-  acquit+fd
Witnesses  at a   student  trial fSljident council offices but while
Friday told of eventsf^^fchsaw
a student drink half «j brittle of
offices and another1 studenf
found with an unidentified blond
girl in the darkened Mildred
Brock room. .
Maurice Anderson, a first
year education student, was
fined $10 for illegal, possession
of liquor in Brock Hall. And
Neil Beaumont, a first year
pharmacy student, was acquitted on a charge of conduct unbecoming a student. Both were-
charged after events in Brock
Hall the night of Nov. 22.   •
Court Chief Justice Lance
Finch referring to Anderson
said: "Because the convicted,
deliberately drank half a bottle
of beer in the presence of Proctor lieo Kelsey the court sets
the fine at $10 rather than the
usual $5."
The chain of events outlined
by Kelsey was:
He said he found Beaumont
and the girl when he noticed
one door of the Mildred Brock
room open. He said he ordered
them from the room but then
found the lock broken.
Kelsey then said he told Beaumont he could.either be charged
by student court or the RCMP.
Beaumont elected to be
charged by the student court
and the trio set out to find a
student councillor to charge
Beaumont with breaking the
door.
Kelsey said he found education president Stan Yee in the
h% was talking to him Beaumont
rtftd the-girl fled on foot out of
. .      ,. .   ,.-.. .,  Brock Hall. Kelsey said he and
beer   m   the   studentcouncili^   gave  chaSe   Qn foot  and
found the girl near the front of
Brock.
As they brought her in Anderson came down the stairs near
the council offices and seeing
Yee and Kelsey with the girl,
immediately offered to pay for
•any carriage that had been
caused.
The quartet then went to the
student council offices where,
during the conversation a half
bottle of beer dropped on the
floor.
Kelsey said Anderson picked
up the bottle arid after offering
He said when found in the
Mildred Brock room, Beaumont
gave the name Vic Patterson.
Student building
consultant called
Student Council decided Saturday to hire planning consultant Porter Butts to aid in the
planning of the proposed student
union building at UBC.
Butts is presently director of
the student union building at
the University of Wisconsin. He
has been planning consultant
i for more than eighty student
union buildings on this continent and in Europe.
In a letter to the Council he
outlined the elaborate four-
stage plan he follows in his
work.
The stages include preparation and submission of a preliminary report and a building
program' based on analysis of
data developed from student
surveys and other methods.
Butts also prepares a detailed
review! of the architects' preliminary floor plans and of the
working drawings ior the building. He would visit UBC for a
few days to evaluate local needs.
Council, president Al Cornwall
said Butts will work with the
student planning committee.
Moobyssey is here
The Ubyssey was asked Monday to remind students that the
Aggies abortive attempt at literature, the Moobyssey, will be at
Ubyssey distribution points Wednesday.
The plan was announced Monday by BCE planning superintendent D. W. Mills.
"This is not a temporary
change," stressed Mills. "We will
try it for the rest of the term
and will then make any modifications necessary."
UBC buildings and grounds
superintendent Tom Hughes
said he sees the changes as a
"25 percent increase in service."
"Although it is not the complete answer to the problem it
is definitely a step in the right
direction and shows that the
BCE is working on the problem
of transportation for UBC students to and from the campus,"
Hughes said.
Under the new plan:
Two express buses will leave
Broadway and Main and two
will leave Oak and Broadway
and travel along Broadway in
time to reach the campus for
8:30 lectures each morning. The
buses will stop only at transfer
points.
In the afternoon, buses  will
leave campus at 2:30, 3:30, 4:30.
5 anp 5:36;p.rn: and will travielV
to Granville and Br6adwaiyrwi%v
stopirat transfer points.,"> r-V',
F^re '„ for ""thfe. express Jiuses!
will ie twenty cents. ;__
Between Blanca loop and\:fk»i
campus,   buses will  run every
twelve minutes, instead of every
fifteen minutes, before 1 p.m.
After 1 p.m., the shuttle service will operate every 10 minutes, to make connections with
downtown buses.
Formosa   Consul   General   charges
Communists   starving   600   million   Chinese
By MIKE GRENBY
In the last 12 years, the Chinese Communist regime has
brought the 600 million people
of China to the verge of starvation.
The Consul General of the
Republic of China in Vancouver, Mr. Yin-shou Che, made
this claim Monday in a panel
discussion, opening Far East
Week here.
"The Communist regime is,
at this moment, the weakest
and most hated by the Chinese
people since its establishment
12 years ago," he said.
The Chinese Communists in
Peiping are entirely Soviet in
ideology, organization, and
background, the Consul General said.
"In the first five years of
their rule, in order to consolidate their power, the Communists    liquidated    20- . million
people whom they considered
counter - revolutionary," he
said.
"With the institution of the
so-called people's communes,
the Chinese people were reduced to the status of worse
than that of 'animals in a
zoo'."
Mr. Yin-shlu Che told of the
extensive economic reform and
development in Taiwan (Formosa).
"Today on the island, the
farmers, working on the same
land, are producing twice that
they did ten years ago," he
said.
"Today, of the exports of my
country, almost fifty per cent
are manufactured articles. The
per capita income on Taiwan is
douftje what it is on the mainland."
The Consul .General also
mentioned the improvements in
education and public health.
"With our experience on Taiwan, we have come to the conclusion that the Chinese people
can raise their standard of living and at the same time preserve their human freedom,"
he said.
"Today the Chinese government   in Taiwan  is  the true.
See "ORIENT" page 4
faithful custodian of Chinese
cultural heritage and Chinese
best traditions.
"We free Chinese, while enjoying our freedom, naturally
wish to help our people on the
mainland to regain their freedom," he said.
"We cannot write them off.
We will continue to struggle
for the freedom of the entire
Chinese people."
Mr. Yin-shou Che urged the
Free World to help the Nationalist Chinese or at least to
"refrain from giving aid or
comfort to the Chinese Communists to strengthen their iron
hands of oppression against the
Chinese people."
Deputy Japanese Consul in
Vancouver, Mr. Muneo Tanabe,
said Japan's primary aspiration
is for world peace arid free
trade.
He urged that the U.N. be
strengthened toward these
ends.
'He expressed his appreciation for the Far East Week
project as vital in promoting
Canadian-Asiatic relations.
Dr. ^Policronio de Venecia,
consul for the Philippines,
spoke on the general improvements of his country's national
economy.
He said that the economic
growth depended on the question of giving more rights and
privileges to individual capitalists. Page 2
■*TrH E      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 9,   1962
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year in
Vancouver bv the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial
opinion* expressed are those of the Editor of The Ubyssey and not
necessarily   those   of   the Alma   Mater  Society  or   the   University   of   B.C.
Editor-in-Chief: ^8-oger McAfee
Managing  Editor Denis   Stanley
Associate   Editor     .       Ann   Pickard
News Editor Fred Fletcher
City Editor Keith Bradbury
CUP Editor       Bob  Hendrickson
Don Hume
Sharon  Rodney
.    Mike Hunter
Byron  Hender
David Bromige
Photography Editor	
Senior Editor	
Sports Editor	
Photographv   Manager      	
Critics Editor	
STAFF THIS  ISSUE
Layout:  Donna Morris
REPORTERS: Desk, Ken Warren; Krishna Sahay, Mike
Grenby, Joy Holding, George Railton, Ian Cameron.
SPORTS: Desk, Chris Fahrni; Glenn Schultz, Bert MacKinnon.
TECHNICAL: Brenda Van Snellenberg, Nancy Roberts,
Maybe
If you got skates for Christmas in eager anticipation of
using them on the ice of UBC's proposed winter sports arena
you'd better sell them. Unless you're in first year.
The thing is scheduled to get under way "pretty soon" but
the way it's going now we'll be lucky to have ice in 1963. This
may mean nothing to anybody, except those interested in
skating, hockey and curling. But it should.
A quarter of a million student dollars are being spent on
this ice palace and as yet few students have had much to say
on the issue. It's not for the lack of opportunity. Perhaps the
students don't want a winter sports arena. Maybe we'd rather
have a new cafeteria. Maybe we'd rather have the five bucks
per year this; thing is going to cost. Maybe.
On the other hand maybe everyone is happy with the
progress the project is making. Maybe everyone on the campus
wants to skate, play hockey or curl. Maybe.
. Maybe nobody knows for sure what he wants. Maybe nobody knows what's going on. Maybe.
Maybe no one cares what's going on. Well, man, he should.
• It's about time we started to hear something from someone
about this project. Drop us a line sometime.
Not proven
In Canada, most people believe a man is innocent until
proven guilty.
Broadly speaking, this is the philosophy followed by the
student court. Because of this, in at least two cases this year
and in several more last year, students accused of misdemeanors have been let off, not because judges thought them innocent, but because the prosecutors failed to prove them
guilty.
The judges take the position that they cannot convict without proof. They feel it is necessary that guilt be proven by the
prosecution.
The prosecutors, lamentably, have failed to do this:
There are several possible reasons for this failure:
-•   law students who fill these positions may be incompetent;
• witnesses may be afraid to come forward to testify
against fellow, studentts;
• Jhe absence of a student police force may mean that
investigation is not sufficiently thorough;
• the discipline committee may be charging students
without sufficient reason.
It is likely that all these possibilities are contributing factors. And it is highly important that something be done about
this situation.
Students cannot be allowed to deface university property, to do damage to student property, or to break the laws
of the land.
Acquittal isn't always justice. The guilty should be punished by their peers.
Failure to do this results in: encouragement to others to
commit similar offences; a lack of respect for the student discipline system; the possibility that students will lose the right
to discipline themselves.
Possible solutions are many. Prosecutors must prepare
their «ases more thoroughly. Investigations must cover all possible angles. Students must be prepared to testify for their own
protection.
A student police force should be instituted. The discipline
committee should make sure it can prove charges before making them.
If all these problems are not dealt with, five guilty men
■will continue to go unpunished for every one fined.
letters to the Editor
Skeptical
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
An interesting notification
on the stress of adequate insurance has arisen. In effect,
your January 5 article maintains that car-pool drivers
should pay $5-$ 15 coverage for
commercial third party insurance.
Mr. Schreiner states several
cases in which the driver was
sued for not haying additional
coverage.
My experience with insurance companies has afforded
me a skeptical viewpoint of insurance. For example, if you
pick up a hitch-hiker, you are
liable to be sued by-him if you
are in an accident. But if you,
the driver, can prove beyond
reasonable doubt that you were
driving competently and legally, your ease it at rest. However, how many of you can
: prove this in a court of law?
The. only statement the hitchhiker has to make is that the
driver was controlling the car
incompetently. The whole cage
rests persuasively in his favour.
■As fa*- as insurance companies are concerned, you are not
driving with complete competence, therefore your insurance
coverage is void. As far as this
goes you still get sued.
For commercial coverage the
situation is exactly the same,
you have to prove you were
driving sanely; the evidence is
totally against the driver.
In all of the insurance
offices everywhere there are
stacks of files cf dissatisfied
clients who could not prove
'that they were driving competently. In the insurance company with which I was employed there were five or six
large bureaus especially devoted to these tragic derelicts.
I shall not doubt the integrity and possible "goodwill" of
Mr. Schreiner's statements in
The Financial Post; however, I
do-object violently, to the subtle infiltration of insurance
propaganda into a mass media.
The article appeals to our high
sense of security. No doubt it
will achieve this in some of
you.
I will present one more over-
simplification: why is the additional premium ($5-$15) so low
for a liability which is shown
to be so magnificent?
The insurance companies
will, no doubt, see fields of
greenery.
Yours truly,
HOWARD RAFFERTY
Education I
Anonymous borrower
Editor,
The -Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
I would like to extend my
wishes to the anonymous person who stole; my car-coat from
the Armory on December 16,
during Physics 101 examination.
To the anonymous borrower
of my car-coat: May the devil
take you—and the sooner he
would do it the better—-to the
proper place where you belong
best—in HELL not at UBC!
K. CHAND
1st Year Arts and Science
Neglect
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
I was extremely interested
in the article written by Joe
Much of the Salem Capital-
Journal which was reprinted in
The Ubyssey on January 4.
Much's main point, about the
Vancouver papers neglecting
to give adequate coverage to
UBC sports, is true. Expanding
this we could say that the coverage of all amateur team
games jn Vancouver is generally poor. Notice I say "team
games" because individual
swimmers, golfers, etc. are reported very well when they
win events or break records.
Only when teams or leagues
reach provincial finals or inter-
provincial playoffs is there
good reporting.
Joe Much wrote his story
trying to show how "bush"
Canadian sport is, but he made
one comment which -weakened
his argument considerably.
He said, "Nor did the university itself regard this (football game between UBC and
Willamette) as anything merit-
v \^.,J^i,,iJiJXijV,
ing exclusivity. In fact, on the
same several acres in the middle of an extensive campus,
four other contests were competing vigorously and simultaneously for attention."
He must mean that it was
wrong to have four other
games going on at the same
time as the football contest.
I believe the idea is to promote participation before and
above spectatorism. Certainly it
is fine to watch, but it is better to play.
Yours truly,
LEN CORBEN
Education II
Trophy?
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
The recent acquisition of the
Southam Trophy by The Ubyssey leads me to the natural
question: If UBC's illustrious
newspaper is the best university paper in Canada, what
must the others be like?
Sentences of 12 words and
words of five letters seem to be
the limit. As for structure, the
stories are like German sentences — one has to get to the
end to find out what they are
all about'.
And such ghastly drivel as
"Drift Words" and "Jack Orn-
stein" doesn't even rate comment. The Editorial Page is another masterpiece—of childish,
pointless composition.
The Southam Trophy —- big
deal!
Yours truly,
DISGUSTED
(Ed. Note: Alright, Disgusted,
come down and make it a better paper.)
More signs
Editor,
Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
Let's have a few more stop
signs at the corner of West
Mall and University Boulevard.
BS
Arts II Tuesday, January 9, 1962
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
By BOB HENDRICKSON
Soulfully I gazed deeply into
her eyes and caressed her ears
with the five most important
words I knew: "We won the
Southam Trophy!"
She reacted instantly with
words I couldn't believe. "Is
that the trophy for the winners
of the pubsters' national boat-
racing contest?"
Forthwith I began my combination lecture and indoctrination course.
The Southam Trophy was
presented to CUP in 1948 by H.
S. Southam, publisher of the
Ottawa Citizen.  •
It is given annually to the
English - lariguage university
newspaper achieving the highest standard of general excellence among papers publishing
twice weekly or more.
"Oh, now I understand." she
said. "They fill it with beer for
the victory drink."
Undeterred I continued.
There are now 11 papers
competing for, the trophy. Usually there are three judges who
are top-rated professionals in
the field of journalism.
This year there were two
judges, B. T. Richardson of the
Toronto Telegram and Andrew
Snaddon of the-Calgary Herald
They gave credit on a point
system.
"They don't put beer in it?"
my girl friend wondered.
"What do you do, pawn it to
finance pubster voyages to
Georgia?"
Ignoring this I mused on how
this was the first year The
Ubyssey had procured the
trophy. The University of Western Ontario Gazette had won it
eight out of the 13 years of the
trophy's existence. In 1956 the
University of Alberta Gateway
brought the prize West for the
first time.
Of course this doesn't include
last year when the Southam
Trophy took a rather circuitous
route from the Toronto Varsity
to The Gazette. The trophy
took the grand tour from Newfoundland to UBC "just so the
boys could see it once in their
lives."
"No beer in it huh?" my girl
asked.
No.
"You don't convert it into
ready cash?"
Not even under the duress of
our present budget.
"What's  it good  for  then?"
My head began to whirl and
the room tilted over at a very
peculiar angle. Faraway I heard
a voice.
"And I heard so much about
these pubsters' parties and all
he can do is discuss some
trophy or another. Remind me
never to go out with a Ubyssey
man again."
Thought for the Week: From
a Village Voice cartoon. One
Indian to another, "Well, I for
one would rather be red than
dead."
Bird Calls' lateness
costs printers $500
Colonist Printers of Victoria, printers of 1961 Bird
Calls, has suffered a $500 late
delivery penalty because of
their failure to meet the contracted delivery date.
The directory was 20 days
overdue because of a union
strike at the print shop.
The penalty price was arrived at by consideration of
sales and advertising revenue
lost because of late delivery.
Public ation co-ordinator
Dean Feltham said Monday
his office has not yet totalled
revenue for this year's directory. More than 4,400 copies
were sold, he said.
operated super university
Literary  contest
deadline is Feb. 1
Aspiring literators take heed!
Mary-Lee Magee, NFCUS secretary, announced Monday the
deadline for the federation's annual literary contest is Feb. 1.
Miss Magee said $450 is being
offered as prize money this year
in three categories: poetry, essay
and short story.
Prose should not exceed 5,000
words in length or verse 300
lines.
Miss Magee said further particulars may be obtained at the
local NFCUS office in the Brock
extension by the College Shop.
The North Atlantic Treaty
Organization may set up a "super university" to help advance
scientific development of member countries, NDP-CCF MP
Harold Winch told a meeting
Friday.
Winch said tiie plan for the
university is unique and only
graduates of other universities
in the sciences interested in doing research would be admitted.
He said students of the university would be paid.
The university plan is part of
the social and scientific program
of NATO which Winch said impressed him more than the organization's military aspect.
Winch attended the NATO
conference last December.
He spoke in favor of Canada's continued membership in
NATO to students in Brock
Lounge.
Winch said a decision to withdraw from NATO would isolate
Canada from the European situation.
He said he sees NATO as a
counterbalance to the Warsaw
Pact of the communist countries.
Winch said he fails to see the
logic of permitting the Warsaw
Pact to live on and to abolish
NATO.
"Although NATO is chiefly a i over 1,000   scholarships for re-
military alliance, I was surprised   search work in science for bril-
to find that of five days spent
on the NATO conference only
one was devoted to the discussion of the organization's mili-
iiant students.
He said nuclear weapons at
present are merely deterrents
and should be used as such.
"No one will deliberately
start a nuclear conflict," he
said.
"However, if too many countries had nuclear weapons then
the danger of someone starting
a nuclear war, accidentally,
would be correspondingly greater."
HAROLD  WINCH
.  .   .   super university?
tary aspect," the veteran MP
said.
The remaining days were
spent in the discussion of social
and scientific subjects, he, said.
Winch said NATO has set up
Professor appointed
Douglas W. Fowler, of the
UBC school of social work, has
been appointed supervisor of the
training division of the provincial social  welfare department.
Mr. Fowler is president of the
B.C. Association of Professional
Social Workers as well as serving on the faculty of UBC.
FROSH!
STUDYING TOO HARD?
]
KEEP A5P1RIN WITH YOU
AT ALL TIMES
UNIVERSITY     PHARMACY     LTD.
5754 University Boulevard CA. 4-3202
YOU
wanna know something?
It's not easy writing" ads for this
rag every week. What with running a busy restaurant, being an
ad writer isn't the softest part
time job there is. Sometimes I
have a helluva job trying- to think
of something to write to keep you
interested in this column. Sometimes I witsh I could have been
born with the talents of some of
the columnists you are familiar
with. Then I wouldn't have to sit
in front of a typewriter for hours
trying to put words on paper.
They would flow out quickly, and
then I would be able to concentrate' on my profession — MAKING THE BEST FOOD SERVED
IN VANCOUVER.
, Did you know that NOBODY
makes pizza like PIZZARAMA.
(Who wants to???)
By God—With all the griping I
did, I managed to fill up a whole
column, and also keep you interested. And you didn't get
bothered by a lot of junk about
how our decor is so quaint, and
how our live entertainment is
the swingingest, and how everybody has a ball here. We didn't
get a chance to say anvthing
about that at all.
Too  Bad.
PIZZARAMA—-TWO LOCATIONS
2S76 W. Broadwav 1208 Davie St.
RE  3-!)916 MU  3-6015
PROCTER  &  GAMBLE
OFFERS  THE  GRADUATE:
1. HIGHLY DEVELOPED TRAINING
2. A CHANCE TO GROW IN DIRECT RELATION TO HIS ABILITY
3. THE SOLID BACKING OF AN EXPANDING COMPANY RECOGNIZED
AS A LEADER IN INDUSTRY
Products such as Tide, Crest, Ivory, Camay, Crisco and Duncan Hines, are known
and used in every household. The successful development and marketing of these
brands is directed by university trained men whose abilities are constantly challenged by new responsibilities.
Graduation may be many months away, but we urge you to give serious consideration to your future now. The Placement Office has copies of booklets which have
been designed to give you detailed information.
Company representatives will visit The'University of British Columbia to discuss
with graduating students of all faculties, management careers in ADVERTISING,
FINANCE, PURCHASING, SALES AND TRAFFIC
INTERVIEWS
JANUARY, 15, 16 Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 9,   1962
Orient featured in
Far East Week
The   mysterious   Orient   is   on   display   on campus  this
week.
The occasion is Far East Week,
this year being sponsored by the
Chinese Varsity Club, the Nisei
Varsity Club and the East Asia
Society. Patrons are President
MacKenzie, Dean G. C. Andrew,
and the consuls from Japan,
China, and the Philippines.
Opening the week's activities
was a panel discussion Monday
chaired by Prof. William Holland, head of Asian Studies.
(Story on Page 1.)
The program is as follows:
Today, Bu. 106, 12:30 p.m.—
Dr. Ping-ti Ho, Confucius: His
Influence on Chinese Society and
Education.
Wednesday, Bu. 102, 12:30
p.m. — Prof. A. C. Erickson,
slides and commentary: The
Architecture of Southeast Asia.
Thursday, Bu. 100, 12:30 p.m.
—Award-winning Japanese film,
"Seven Samurai''. Admission, 50
cents.
Friday, Bu. 102, 12:30 p.m.—
Prof. John Howes: Buddhism in
Japan today: living or dead?
The week culminates in a colorful evening of entertainment
at International House, 4:30-11
p.m„ Jan. 12. Displays of flower
arranging, Chinese and Japanese
painting, folk dances of Japan,
China and the Philippines and
traditional Japanese swordfight-
ing are among the attractions.
Admission is 50 cents for students, $1 for others, with proceeds going to a scholarship
fund to promote interest in the
field of Asian Studies at UBC.
Fink or Phynque?
Fink has been spelled wrong
in the Ubyssey for forty-three
years.
The Ubyssey learned today
that Fink is spelled "Phynque."
Informed sources from the editorial boards of the "Red Rag"
and the "Moobyssey" registered
their formal complaint Monday.
0)«^BOOKS
HAVE NOW OPENED
A STORE
AT
4560 WEST TOth AVENUE
HOURS: 11 a.m. - 9 p.m.
SATURDAYS: 9 a.m. -6 p.m.
CLOSED MONDAYS
TELEPHONE: CAstle 4-7012
FRATERNITY
SPRING
RUSHING
REGISTER  NOW!
A. M. S   OFFICE
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tories beat Liberals by 61 votes
in Model Parliament elections
FORMER BCE PRESIDENT Harry Purdy is again teaching
economics at the university.
Dr. Purdy taught economics
for several years before joining the B.C. Eleciric. This picture was taken as he was
giving an Economics 200 lecture.
LUBC  STTJDEWTS
15% Discount
Imported   Car   Farts   and
Accessories
* Overseas Auto Parts]
LONDON (CUP) — The Progressive Conservatives defeated the Liberals in the University of Western Ontario
Model Parliament elections.
The P.C.'s had a margin of
only 61 votes, despite the fact
that they won in four of the
university's colleges.
The Conservatives won 42
seats, the Liberals took 39,
and the New Democratic party
took nine. Independents won
six seats.
Harry  Sterling,   University
Students' Council Internal Affairs Commissioner and Chairman of the Inter - Political
Council, revealed that this
year's vote was up by 20 per
cent from last year. The medical school — which went Liberal — was up 30 per cent
and Huron—which went Conservative — was up 40 per
cent.
At the February sessions of
Model Parliament, Conservative Leader, Tom Fox, will
take over the office of Prime
Minister.
|12th  and Alma
BE 1-7686'
Matz & Wozny
548 Howe St. MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
We  specialize
in
Ivy League
Clothes
Special Student Rates
ATTENTION
GRADUATING STUDENTS
In today's Ubyssey and following
editions in January, you will notice
several advertisements by companies
which will: be conducting employment interviews during January and
February. Please keep a watch for
future advertisements and notices
in the Ubyssey regarding employment interviews.
(See page eight of today's paper for interview dates)
(Inserted  by   the  Advertising  Department   as
a PubTn; Service to the Personnel Dept.)
Employment   Opportunities
with
obi I   Oil   of*   Canada, Lf
On
January 10, 11 and 12
COMPANY REPRESENTATIVES Wilt INTERVIEW
GRADUATE, SENIOR AND JUNIOR YEAR STUDENTS
INTERESTED  IN CAREERS IN
Geology
^eophysical Engineerings
Petroleum and Production Engineering,
IWe are openings for regular employment in all
categories and for summer employment in
Geological and Geophysical Engineering.
Interviews are being scheduled through the Personnel Office, West Mall
Mobil Tuesday, January 9, 1962
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
'Education a bore
says Prof Walker
An engineering professor told
a seminar on education Saturday
that contemporary Canadian education   is  merely   a   condition- j
ing process and is in danger of !
boring  students  to  death. J
Dr. G. B. Walker said there
should be more communication
between the student and teacher, instead of the students simply listening to the teacher for
the sole purpose of memorizing
material for exams.
He described the system as
"basically wrong."
Dr. Werner Cohn, assistant
professor of sociology called for
a more radical approach to education.
He said educators should:
» constantly question their aims
and never take things for granted;
• ask about actions and relate
them to aims;
• ask about consequences of
actions;
• ask who should be educated;
4 question principles of adjustment.
Dean Neville Scarfe, of the
education of faculty, said present teaching methods prepare
teachers to be responsive to progressive teaching methods.
He said children must be placed in a position where they are
forced, and want, to think. He
said direction and-contrdl stifle
thinking.
Dr. James Foulks, head of the
department- of   pharmacology,
WUSC seeks
applicants for
German trip
The World University Service
Committee is looking for applicants for two German scholarships.
WUSC Chairman Stuart Robson said the scholarships give
tuition, travel allowance, room
and board, and some pocket
money.
He said one scholarship is
good for one academic year at
the University of Hamburg and
the other good for one year at
any German university.
He said the scholars must return for another year at UBC.
Applicants are being interviewed Saturday, Jan. 27.
TIMB:,2T weeks 1.97;  1  year 3.87
2 years  $7.00
LIFE:  21 weeks,,1.91;  1 year 4.00
2  years  7.00
.i   MaeLeans,   1   year  1.50
Saturday Night, 1 year 2.00
Write: Student periodical Agency,
P.O.   Box   717,  Adelaide  P.O.,
Toronto   1,  Ontario
Cornette Beouty
Salon
Special Prices for UBC
"Individual Attention"  by
Male and Female Stylists
Up to the minute
hair styling
.     OPEN FRI. TILL 9
4532 W. 10th   CA 4-7440
said that during a recent trip to
Russia he found the education
system completely centralized
with a common goal and direction at all levels.
Dr. Foulks said about 20 percent  of  eligible  students go to
Possible Malayan
exchange sought
The World University Service Committee is negotiating a
possible exchange scholarship
between UBC and the University of Malaya.
WUSC vice-chairman
Wendy Moir said the exchange
can be a straight exchange
(we send them a scholar and
they send us one); or some
type of one-way scholarship
with transportation payment
differences.
AMS to produce
17 new TV shows
The Alma Mater Society is producing seventeen 15-minute
television shows for CHAN-TV.
The  series,   called   UBC  Re
ports, has a dual purpose: to
show something of the institution and its activities; and to
examine outstanding students.
The series started on Jan. 6
with members of the Far East
Week committee taking part.
The second show will feature
Rick Brown and Ray Noel, delegates to the Laval Conference,
discussing the problems of the
separatist movement in Quebec.
Barry McDell, the moderator,
said he welcomes any student
groups who have some ideas for
a show featuring their group.
He can be contacted through the
AMS public relations office.
McDell said the shows are
planned three weeks in advance
so work must begin about a
month before the show would be
run.
UBC Reports is run every
Saturday at 6:45 p.m. on Channel 8.
DEAN NEVILLE SCARFE
.   .   .   make 'em think
university, and that it takes
about two years for a high
school graduate to get into a
university.
Humanities are largely extracurricular activities, he said,
but more humanities are taught
in Russian science courses than
in western counterparts.
. He said students are subsidized according to need.
<8JP0jB) Employment Interviews
CANADA
A representative of our Company will be conducting employment interviews  on  the campus  January   17th,   18th and   19th   and  will   be pleased  to
discuss with interested students the 1962 requirements for regular and summer
employment.
REGULAR EMPLOYMENT
We have a number of attractive openings in process, development, design and maintenance, sales and technical service, finance and control for male
graduating and post-graduate students in Chemical and Mechanical Engineering;
Honours Chemistry; and Commerce (and class min. various options.)
NOTE: Co-application forms to be mailed well in advance of interviews
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
Openings will be available during the summer of 1962 as assistants to
process, development and design engineers, and for vacation relief in production
accounting, and the chemical laboratories. Applications for employment are
invited from male students one or two years from graduation in the courses listed
below (with II class min.)
Mechanical Engineering; Chemical Engineering; Honours Chemistry; Commerce.
NOTE: Application form to be left at Per. office well in advance of interview dates
Application forms; details of actual openings; ana' interview appointments; can be obtained from University Personnel Office"oh The West Mall/ H.M.7
DUPONT  OF   CANADA   LIMITED
PERSONNEL DIVISION     P.O. Box 660   MONTREAL, P.O.
r   i   .1     ,
*    I
A
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THIS MAN
WE CAN
TALK
T0f
He's different but not way-out, imaginative but not odd.
He'd like the idea of a fresh, unusual career with a top-notch
company—but he'd expect the financial rewards that go with it.
If you think there's fun and prosperity in the finance
field, you're right!.. .Start thinking of Traders right away.
We can promise lots of good things for you—a great future,
room for growth, plus the indisputable satisfaction of a
good income. It's a pleasant combination of the things
you're probably looking for, and you'll be working for
Canada's most highly respected finance organization!
Contact your career counselor or your local Traders office
right away.
TRADERS FINANCE CORPORATION LIMITED
A TRADERS FINANCE OFFICER WILL BE CONDUCTING
INTERVIEWS ON FRIDAY, JANUARY 12 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 9,   1962
Lions chase
Beck, Turpin
By BERT MacKINNON
B.C. Lions are surveying the UBC campus in an effort to
bolster their team with Canadian talent.
Three UBC standouts, George Turpin, Jim Beck and Roy
Shatzko have been getting the once over from the local pro
team.
—Photo  by  George Fielder
MUD, MUD,  (IN) GLORIOUS MUD!!
ALL MUDDLED UP, two intramural soccer players, Lawrie Elliot, Ed. II (left), and John Klas-
sen. Science IV, struggle on Memorial Gym playing field. Fields, hopelessly overused by intramural, extramural and PE teams, are now a sea of mud after heavy rains during holidays. No relief is in sight until new Woolfson fields open next September-
Falcons give Birds
a lesson in losing
UBC 70, 57; Seattle 12. 69.
UBC's young Thunderbird basketball team is gaining experience but losing games. Last weekend in Seattle they lost-—
or gained, if you're Jack Pomfret—against the Seattle Pacific
Falcons.
Coach Pomfret's Birds, loaded
with rookies, lost two games to
the Falcons, by a close 72-70
decision Friday night, and by a
much more convincing 69-57
count Saturday.
YOUTH MOVEMENT
Pomfret gave most of his
younger players a good workout
against the highly-regarded Fal-
-cons, and was pleased with their
performance.
Tonight, the Birds venture to
Bellingham to play the Western
Washington Vikings, the team
which won this year's Totem
Tournament last December.
Vikings so far have a 7-2 record; Birds are now 1-5. In a
tournament last month in California, the Vikings lost only one
game, that to California Polytechnic, one of the top small
schools in the State.
Both the Seattle-Birds games
were watched by more than
3,000 fans in Seattle Pacific's
new field house. Friday, Birds
almost pulled off a victory,
paced by 6'5", 245-lb. Wayne
Osborne's best performance since
he joined the Birds three years
ago.
26 FOR OZZIE
Osborne scored 26 points,
eight of them in the final minutes. He stole the ball and
scored with 20-seconds left to
pull UBC within two points of
the Falcons, but a last-second
tip-in attempt failed.
Saturday,   Osborne scored 11
points in the first half, but he
also picked up four fouls. He
didn't play much in the second
half, as Pomfret gave most of
the younger players a chance.
Birds also lost the services of
first-string guard Wayne King
during the Saturday game. King,
Birds' third .leading scorer,
sprained his ankle and could be
sidelined for a week or ten days.
TWO VETS *.OST
Birds also lost two more veterans before last weekend's
games. Dune McCallum and Ed
Terris, both fifth-year education
students with Senior A experience, quit the team.
The freshman team, the
Braves, also received a personnel setback. Scholarship winner
Carl Anderson, a 6'5" centre
from White Rock, didn't do too
well in his Christmas exams and
is not expected to be back with
the team this year.
The Jayvees, however, got a
boost when flashy guard Earl
Farenholtz rejoined them for the
first time this year.
Farenholtz scored 23 points in
two games on the weekend as
Jayvees split with St. Regis and
the Seattle Pacific Jayvees. UBC
beat St. Regis 57-53 Friday behind Farenholtz's 13 points. Ken
McDonald added 11.
LAURIE SCORES
Saturday, Laurie Predinchuk
scored 13 and Farenholtz 10, but
the Americans, well-stocked with
veterans of the strong Seattle
high school league, won easily,
76-43.
Bird skiers slide to
4th at Rossland
UBC's ski team swabbed
their skis with this year's first
coat of competition wax,
caught the train tc Rossland,
and shcussed through the fog
to fourth place in the annual
intercollegiate ski meet, last
weekend.
First place in the four-way
meet went to the University
of Washington which picked
up 375.4 points compared to
s e c o n d-place Idaho's 355.7.
Third place was taken by Montana State College with 326.8
points, and then UBC with
309.2.
The meet was hosted by the
Red Mountain Ski Club and
UBC.
Birds edge
AM Blacks
UBC'c Rugby Thunderbirds
drove from behind to post their
sixth straight win Saturday, defeating the North Shore All
Blacks 12-8.
Behind 8-3 at half-time, the
Bird forwards moved the ball
constantly. The wet, muddy field
hampered the play of both teams.
The bad weather resulted in the
cancellation of the other UBC
teams' games.
The team was paced by Neal
Henderson who scored a try
and two penalty kicks. The last
clinching try was earned by the
forwards when they pushed the
All Black scrum across the goal
line and John Grange fell on
the ball.
In the remaining two games in
| the Miller Cup series, the Birds
play CYO and  Kats.  Kats  are
still undefeated at the top of the
league.
Lion coach Dave Skrien said
Lions are definitely interested
in these players as future prospects.
However, he stressed,- "We
have not reached the stage of
making a concrete offer, but are
just trying to find out what
their interests are."
Shatzko Still has a year left
at UBC. Both Beck and Turpin
graduate this year, but Beck is
expected to return for a graduate education course next year.
Interest has also been shown
in Turpin by the New York
Giants of the National Football
League, the team which previously grabbed Bill Crawford
from beneath the Lions' noses.
Beck has been holding down
the guard slot for the Birds.
Voted "most valuable lineman"
last year, Beck is feared most
for his great down-field blocking. The Birds elected Beck captain this year.
Both Beck and Shatzko were
picked for the Western collegiate all-star team. Beck was
elected to the offensive unit
while Shatzko anchored the defensive team.
Skrien said Lions were exploring  the possibilities of  getting
these players without actually
making a concrete offer.
"We're just trying to clear the
way so that we can bring matters to a head if they reach the
signing  stage,"   Skrien said.
Skrien also said Lions are trying to get all three players to go
to the team's Canadian camp
this year.
Soccer slips
to close win
UBC Thunderbirds took advantage of a slippery field to
slide past St. Andrews Athletic
Club 1-0 in the Mainland soccer
action over the weekend.
Hard-checking by UBC fullbacks and halfbacks kept the
league-leading St, Andrews
squad off the scoreboard, while
outside left Ron Cross scored
the game's only goal to give
Birds  the  victory.
The muddy field slowed down
play but a united effort by UBC
gave them the necessary edge in
play.
UBC goalie George Hrenni-
koff recorded his third shutout
of the season with a superb performance in the nets.
"THE REEF
a
Point Roberts, Washington, U.S.A.
DINING & DANCING
Featuring "the Fabulous Ian Smith Trio"
FRI., SAT. & SUN.
OPEN YEAR ROUND
10 Miles South of Deas Island Tunnel
Large Parties by Reservation Only: Dial 945-2233—945-7579
No  minors allowed on premises
Proof of age must be available
SPECIAL jTUDENT^ATES
COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE
Glasses Fitted
Contact Lenses
24-Hour Service OPTICAL Repairs
VANCOUVER BLOCK
MU 5-0928 — MU 3-2948
Main Floor
734 GRANVILLE ST.
Immediate Appointment
NEW WESTMINSTER - 675 COLUMBIA STREET
LA 6-8665 Tuesday/January 9, 1962
THE      UBYSSEY
Paae 7
FOR THE BIRDS
By  MIKE  HUNTER
Back in the news again is our long-lost winter sports
arena. This time the controversy concerns finances. Last
spring it concerned facilities. Next week, the controversy
will probably concern both.
Last year, athletic types were haggling about squash
courts and indoor swimming pools as part of the arena and
curling complex. Gradually these factions died out and the
matter was absorbed by one of those obscure, secretive arms
of government, the committee. So, too was the matter of
finances. The students only got infrequent, hazy accounts
of what was going on. Many vagrant opinions were expressed, and a couple of reports were issued. Meanwhile,
Joe Student paid his $5 and carried on.
• •    •
The arena and the curling sheets would be completed
by Christmas of 1963, was the word.
Unfortunately, the arena won't be completed by next
Christmas. Construction won't even begin for three or four
months yet.
"We'll be lucky if we're skating by this time next year,"
says Building and Grounds superintendent Tom. Hughes.
"Construction probably won't begin for a few months, but
that's very unofficial," he said.
What is also disappointing is the administration's decision to regard the $100,000 Molson grant as part of their own
grant to the building. A spokesman says the administration
had "no inkling" of the Senator's gift when the University
began plans a year ago.
• •    •
The administration's bargain has always been that they
would pay half of a $500,000 arena. It seems then, that they
have always felt they would have to put up $250,000. If
they had "no inkling" of the Molson grant when they made
this agreement, it seems that they are now ducking out of
two-fifths of their bargain and covering for it with the
Molson grant.
Now so far, the finance committee and the planning
committee have not get together. In other words, the planning committee doesn't yet know if they can afford what
they consider to be necessary specifications. The two committees will get together sometime this month, after rough
plans have been submitted to the architects.
All this is going to take more time—and, granted, vwe
shouldn't rush into the matter. But the fact that the arena
now won't be completed until perhaps the summer of 1963
will come as a great disappointment to many people.
Foremost of these are probably the members and the
coach of the hockey team. These are the chaps who practise
at 11:30 at night, and who venture against the Prairie powerhouses with only two or three hours of practice a week
under their belts. When their coach, Father David Bauer,
a man whom UBC was extremely fortunate to obtain in
the first place, agreed to handle the team, I believe one of
the agreements was that he would coach the team providing the arena was built on campus by next year.
*   *   *
Father Bauer naturally * believes most of his .; players
would improve greatly with more practice time both before
and during the hockey season. He has tried hard to obtain
more practice time both at the Forum and at .Kerrisdale.
More will be known next week, after the committees have
gotten together. Let's hope they arrive at a decision.
1962 Graduates and Post-Graduates
Excellent   Career   Opportunities
in Science and Scientific Research
with the Civil Service of Canada
If you are obtaining a  post-graduate or honours degree
in any of the following:
Chemistry
Chemical Engineering
Physics
Geophysics
Engineering Physics
Biochemistry & Pharmacology
Geology (all fields)
Metallurgical 'Engineering
Mathematics
Electronics
Geochemistry
Astronomy
OBTAIN       — Your   copy  of  Information   Circular   62-1500
from the University Placement Office.
CONSIDER — The opportunities of interest fo you
— The  advantages  of  employment  with  the
Civil Service of Canada.
ARRANGE — Through your Placement Officer for your
interview with the Scientific Selection Team
which will visit the University in January 1962
SPORTS IN SHORT:
UBC rocks skid astray
In curling action over the
weekend, Diane McNaughicn's
UBC rink was defeated 12-7
by Mrs. Margaret Cooke of
Pacific Ladies' Club in Brier
playoffs.
Previously in the zone playoffs, the McNaughton rink had
lost the first game 11-8 to the
Capilano rink. They came
back in the second game, out-
curling the North Shore rink,
17-7.
In Big Ten League  action,
Jack Arnet's   UBC   rink lost
8-4 to Frank Avery.
*   *   * -
UBC's "B" badminton team
dropped its first match of the
season Sunday to the Vancouver Racquets  Club, 7-5.
However, UBC managed to
win three out of four mixed
doubles games. Of the men,
only Keith Tolman and Bruce
Rollick were able to pick up a
doubles win. Gill Semadeni
and Lynne McDougall won
one ladies' doubles match.
UBC is now in a first place
tie with the Racquets Club.
Meeting of football ieam regarding the banquet, today at
12:30 in Room 214 at the Gym.
*   *   *
Weightlifiing ieam pictures
will be taken Thursday at 1
p.m. in the weight training
room. Members must wear
strip.
Students!
For a new dining pleasure
try our daily special.
DEANS
4544 W. 10th
Open 'till 11:30
Special   Prices   for   UBC
Cornefte Beauty
Salon
"Individual ,-Attention"   by
Male and  Female Stylists.
OPEN   FRI TILL  NINE
4532 W. 10 CA 4-7440
APPLICATIONS
ARE   NOW   BEING  ACCEPTED
FOR THE POSITION OF
Financial   Assistant
TO THE
Co-Ordinator  of   Publications
• Applicants  should   have  background  in  publication
and/or student government
Applications must be handed into
Mrs. Dore, Room 201, Brock Hall by January 12, 1962
10-5 p.m. Weekdays
U
THE SNACKERY
rr
3 LOCATIONS
3075 Granville - RE 3-5813
4423 W. 10th Ave. CA 4-0833
5075  Kingsway - HE  1-8818
FREE  HOT &  FAST  PIZZA
DELIVERY
mLl be on campus to interview students for
EXPLORATION
PRODUCTION
(OILFIELD ENGINEERING)
REPINING'
MARKETING
ACCOUNTING & FINANCE
JANUARY 22-25, 1962
For specific information please check
with your campus placement office
SHELL OIL COMPANY OF CANADA LIMITED Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 9,  1962
TWEEN CUSSES
Howard Green speaks today
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Howard Green. Minister of
External Affairs, speaks in Brock
Lounge noon today.
* *   *
INDIA'S STUDENT ASSN.
Elmore Philpott speaks on
'"Liberation of Goa by India" on
Thursday at noon in Bu. 102.
Everyone welcome.
* *   *
NOON HOUR CONCERTS
Wed. noon in Bu. 106 Sonata
by Benjamin Lees, and "Billy
the Kid" by Aaron Copland,
played by Irene Rosenberg and
Trances Adaskin.
* *   *
PRE-MED SOC
"First a Physician", a film on
radiology. Non-members 25c. W.
100 noon Wednesday.
* *   *
NEWMAN CENTRE
Ski trip to Mount Baker this
Sunday. Buses leave St. Mark's
at 7:30 a.m. Mass at 6:30. Everyone welcome.
•k    "k    -k
UN CLUB
Two films on Contemporary
Asia, noon today in Bu. 102. All
welcome.
liberal Federation
to meet in Ottawa
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canadian University Liberal Federation will hold its annual convention in Ottawa Jan. 27 and
28.
. Simon Venne, president of
CULF, said that delegates from
university or college clubs in
every province are expected to
attend.
The gathering will deal with
trie problems of organization,
discussions on Confederation,
arid will he addressed by the
key leaders of the Liberal
Party.
JAZZ SOC
The Dave Quarin Quintet featuring Ray Sikora. Friday at
noon in the Aud. Members free,
others 25c.
* *   *
BOOSTER CLUB PEP BAND
Rehearsal in Armory at noon
Thurs. All campus musicians
welcome.
* *   *
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
Noon hour meetings every
Monday in Hut L-2. Everyone
welcome.
* *   *
CHINESE VARSITY
Special meeting Wed. noon in
Bu. 205.
* *   *
BRIDGE-CHESS CLUB
Meeting on Wed. at 7:30 in
Card room.
* *   *
UBC SAILING CLUB
General meeting noon Thurs.
in Bu. 203.
* *   *
HIGH SCHOOL CONF.
Important meeting Wed. noon
in Bu. 2233, all attend.
* *   *
BAPTIST STUDENTS
Baptist Bible study at noon in
Bu. 2202. All welcome.
* *   *
FRENCH LECTURE
Prof. Pierre Melese, University of Paris will lecture in
French on Monday at noon in
Bu. 106 on "La vie du Theatre
au Temps de Moliere".
UBC CLASSIFIED
LOST: One black pencil case RIDE WANTED: From vicinity
containing green Schaeffers | of 70th and Oak for 8:30 Mon.
pen, during Xmas exams. I to Sat. Phone FA 7-3781.
Finder please call AM 1-2001. i     Dave.
POINT GREY
JEWELLERS
25% REDUCTION
On all Merchandise For
UBC Students
(S"how Student Card)
4435 WAOthAve. CA 8-8718
The California Standard Company
■  M
CALGARY. ALBERTA
offering careers in
Petroleum Exploration in Canada
will conduct campus interviews on
January   15,   16  and   17
for Post Graduates, Graduates and
Undergraduates in:
Geological Engineering
(Options 1, 2 and 3)
Honours Geology
Physics and Geology
Mining Engineering
Chemical Engineering   -
Permanent and Summer
Permanent and Summer
Permanent and Summer
Permanent Only
Permanent Only      .
ARRANGEMENTS FOR PERSONAL INTERVIEWS MAY BE
MADE THROUGH THE UNIVERSITY EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
NURSING
First year students interested
in entering First Year Nursing
are asked to attend a meeting
concerning the program in W.
201, Monday, Jan. 22, at 7 p.m.
* *   *      '
VOC
John Edward's film "Lonesome
Lake", the Northern Wilderness,
noon Thurs. in Bu. 104. Come all.
* *   *
AMATEUR RADIO
Code and theory classes noon
today in Bu. 317.
LOST: Arevold's Anthology of
18th Century Poetry and
Prose. Please phone AM 6-
8804.
WANTED: Drivers from Central
West Vancouver area to join
carpool. Anyone interested
please call WA 2-7267.
WANTED: Physics 200 text.
Contact Paul, RE 6-9420.
Accounting office
says too few fees
Too few students are paying their fees, the Accounting
Office complained Monday.
But the Accounting Office
holds the upper-hand.
Second term fees are due
and payable by Jan. 13. The
University calendar states students failing to pay fees by
this date will be excluded
from classes and their registration cancelled.
Once the registration is cancelled a $10 penalty fee must
be paid to be re-instated. A
student cannot attend lectures
until he has been re-instated.
Second term fees are outlined in the calendar on. pages
82 and 83.
WANTED: Math 101 tutor. Contact Fred Waters, CA 8-8818.
RIDE AVAILABLE: Do you
need transportation? I leave
six days a week along 49th
from Vict. Drive; can go along
Marine Dr. 8:30-6:30 except
Sat. Contact Rick. FA 7-7554.
Reliable.
RIDE WANTED: From vie. of
Imperial and Kingsway for
8.30's Mon.-Sat. Phone HE 4-
1462.
RIDE WANTED: For us two,
too, 8:30 a.m. Mcn.-Fri., from
vicinity of 36th and Crown.
Please call AM 6-4345.
RIDERS WANTED: Anywhere
from 25th and Cambie or
along route to UBC. Also
new tube for Austin '52. Sell
cheap. Phone TR 4-3679. Ask
for Barbara.
RIDE WANTED: From 26th St.
and Upper Levels Hwy., West
Vancouver, for 8:30 lectures.
Have 6:30 labs on Monday and
Friday. Phone Mike at WA 2-
0496.
GRADUATE   EMPLOYMENT
The following is a list Of the companies which will be
conducting interviews at the Personnel and Placement office
on the West Mall during this week. Graduate Students who
have not yet signed up for interviews with these companies
and wish to do so, are asked to do so as soon as possible.
A list,of next week's companies will be published in Friday's
Ubyssey. (space allowing.)
Canadian Industries Limited—January 8, 9, 10
Dow Chemical of  Canada Ltd.—January  9,  10,  11; Grads;
Chem Engr and Chem. also 2nd & 3rd yr students in
these courses.
Mobil Oil of Canada Limited—January  10,  11,  12; Grads;
Geol. or Geol. Engr., Physics, Engr. Phys, GeoPhys.,
Elec. Engr., Mining, Civil Mech., & Chem. Engr.
Northern Electric Company Ltd January 3, 9, 10, 11, 12.
Proctor & Gamble Co. Limited—January 9, 10, 11, 12; Engr.
Chem. all faculties for Advert. Finance, Purch., Sales,
Traffic.
Traders Finance Corp. Limited—January 12; Grads; Comm
& Arts etc.
Hydro Electric Power of Ontario—January 11, 12, 13; Elec.
Engr. Grads.
"%
s
HI'
CHEMICALS?
fob opportunities in Alcan Chemical Operations ar»
diversified. Alcan *s extensive chemical operation processes
several million tons per year of bauxite to produce refined
alumina and also processes electrolyte materials for use in
making aluminum metal. Chemical products include caustic
soda, chlorine, aluminum sulphate, refined fluorspar, and
pure alumina trihydrate as well as calcined alumina.
A graduate chemical engineer joining Alcan could be
faced with almost every unit operation common to chemical industries whether he works as a process engineer, a
development engineer or a design engineer. An Alcan
chemical engineer will deal with fluid flow, heat transfer,
crushing and grinding, evaporation, mixing and separation,
crystallization, calcination and related processes.
Alcan's major chemical operations are located ati
Arvida Works—Arvida, Quebec
Wakefield, Quebec
If you are interested in becoming part of the Alcan team,
write to:
ALUMINUM COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED
STAFF PERSONNEL DIVISION, P.O. BOX 6090, MONTREAL 3, P.O.
The following booklets and information sheets are available on request:
Presenting Alcan to the University Graduate. / The Role of the
Chemist in Alcan and its Associated Companies. / The Role of the
Chemical Engineer and Extractive Metallurgist in Alcan.

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