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The Ubyssey Jan 5, 1962

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 THS UBYSSEY
FLUNK
LATER
-Vol. XLIV
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1962
No- 36
—Photo by   Bob  Flick
AH Rhodes lead to Ox ford
All DRESSED UP for that dank, clammy climate of England
is  Stuart  Robson, Arts  IV, a native of dank,  clammy Van-
.     couver. Robson was named winner of 1962 Rhodes scholarship, the first major award  he's won.
'Never won before/
says Rhodes scholar
An honors history student who has never won a scholarship has com© up with the most coveted of prizes.
Stuart  Robson,  chairman   of
the World University Service
Committee, has been chosen this
; year's winner of the Rhodes
Scholarship.
He said this is the first
scholarship he has won, although
he has received "money for
marks" prizes and a high school
prize.
"I just haven't fallen into any
of the specialized categories (referring to War veteran, needing
financial assistance clauses
etc.)," he said.
"There just isn't too much to
win in the undergraduate years,"
he said.
Robson has applied to St.
John's College at Oxford and
would like to read for a Bachelor of Philosophy in History
and then possibly for a PhD in
History.   »
He said his field is European
history, Germany in particular.
He is laying the basis for his
future studies in his graduating
essay.      •■> ..-••-.
He said there has been-'a good
Continued on page 3.
See "RHODES SCHOLAR"
Arena only $500,000
Council disappointed
not surprised at drop
Orange-throwing
students  'immoral"?
MONTREAL (GUP) — Five
McGill. University students
. have been fined a total of $20.
for offences against "good
morals and gentlemanly conduct."
The students were, accused
of such offences as throwing
an orange at a cheerleader,
exploding fire-crackers, and
throwing an article (a Dixie
cup) at a member of the Scarlet Key during football games.
"This is the first time any
council has attempted disciplinary action on an organized basis," Robert Carswell,
Students' Society President
said in introducing the five
cases.
AMS eyes
suit over
Bird Galls
The Alma Mater Society is
considering the first legal action
in its history, a spokesman said
Thursday.
Eric Ricker, student vice-president, said a contract drawn up
between AMS and a Victoria
printing firm is the object of
the possible lawsuit. The firm
failed to meet its obligations
when the Bird Calls arrived on
campus "unusually late," Ricker
said.
BOOKS LATE
Ricker said the contract called
for a $100 per day penalty for
each day the student phone
books were late. He estimated
the books were 20 days tardy.
"The printer must certainly
have felt confident of delivery
to sign such a contract," he said.
"But a labor problem forced
him to sublet the contract." .
Student president Alan Cornwall, Ricker and publications
co-ordinator Dean Feltham met
early last December with the
printer and a "go-between" to
discuss settlement proposals concerning the issue. Ricker said
nothing concrete developed from
the meeting.
SALES LOST
"Goodwill enters into the
amount we are asking," Ricker
said, "but we have suffered a
considerable sales loss."
He said the fact councillors
are sure the printer entered
into the contract in good faith
is also reason for not going the
limit.
Ricker said legal action would
be taken if an unsatisfactory
agreement results from further
consultations.
By PAT HORROBIN
Student officials have suspected since last jsummer that the
University was going to use the $100,006 Molson winter-sports
arena grant for part of its own $250,000 pledge. ~
Eric Ricker, council first vice-
president, warned vacationing
president Alan Cornwall then
that the administration was
looking for » way to reduce its
grant.
Quoting a letter from Dr. E.
H. MacPhee, dean of administrative and financial affairs,
Ricker wrote: "... he would
like to reduce the administration's contribution by $100,000
now, and put in the rest 'sometime in the future'—maybe."
GUARANTEE NEEDED
Ricker warned Cornwall that
they must get a guarantee from
administrators as soon. as possible that they would not merely
substitute the Senator's gift for
the equivalent amount of: their
commitment. The Ubyssey confirmed Thursday that this was
in fact the administration's
course.
Commented Ricker wryly:
"Again, we ldse."
He cited a board of governors' promise made in October
that it and student council would
have to agree arena plans were
aesthetically pleasing before
construction started, as the major concession council managed
to get.
Other councillors talked unhappily about the University's
actions.
Cornwall said he would be
very disappointed if the $100,000
were not a straight addition, to
make $600,000. "Especially," he
pointed out, "in light of the
fact they had no inkling (of the
Molson gift) in March."
NO DISCUSSION
Student treasurer Malcolm
Scott admitted the $500,000 was
justified when the fact that there
had been no discussion of the
Molson grant was taken into
account.
Forestry undergrad president
Al S a w b y said he felt the
$100,000 should come from the
administration share but "naturally I would like to see a
$600,000 building."
Alderman Frank Fredrickson,
former hockey great and longtime UBC rhpckey coach, <jja|
pon-committal about the fate of
the gift he spent months negotiating.
He repeatedly declined to involve either himself or Senator
Molson in the mechanics of using
the $100,000.
Roger McAfee, member of the
faculty-student Client's committee, said:
"I think that Senator Molson
gave the money to use for the
construction of a winter sports
arena and not to alleviate the
University's financial problems."
Canadians
not told all
on OAS entry
By  MIKE HORSEY
Canadians have not been given
enough information on the advantages or disadvantages of
joining the Organization of American States, an extension department official said ip a debate.
John Wood, supervisor of pub^
lie programming, said Canadians
must consider three major things
before entering the OAS. They
are:
• Will it mean Canada has
another military obligation?
• Will Canada have to follow
an anti-colonial policy against
the British in Honduras and the
Falkland Islands?
• Are Canadians prepared to
take consequences of our being
associated with the "gringos" of
the United States?
He spoke at a United Nations
Club debate.
Tomas Bartroli, an instructor
in the Department of Romance
Studies, said that the United
States had held Canada out of
the OAS in previous years because of its association with
Britain and its image of colonialism-
NFCUS committee forms travel plan
to assist overseas travellers
Students planning overseas travel next summer
should see NFCUS chairman Dave Anderson for the least
expensive ways and means of getting there.
Anderson said NFCUS can arrange the lowest available fares for university students through charters and
block bookings. He said further aid available to students is
an identity card which gives the student reduced rates
and other benefits.
He said further information on studentt travel service
is available in the office of the local NFCUS committee
in Brock Hall near the College Shop. 'Page 2 ;   r*7~; '
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by the Post'Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
^Published three times weekly throughout the University year in
Vancouver by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial
opinions expressed are those of the Editor of The Ubyssey and not
necessarily   those  of  the Alma  Mater  Society  or the  University  of   b.C
L Editor-in-Chief: Roger McAfee
Managing  Editor Denis  Stanley
Associaie   lidicor        Ann   Pickard
News Editor Fred Fletcher
City Editor Keith Bradbury
CUP Editor     .      Bob  Hendrickson
Photographv Editor Don Hume
Senior  Editor               Sharon  Rodney
Snorts Editor Mike Hunter
'      Photographv  Manager                Byron  Hender
'      Critics Editor David Bromige
STAFF THIS ISSUE
Layout: Sharon Rodney and'Maureen, Covell
BEPORTERS:  Ken Warren (desk),  Krishna  Sahay, Pat
Horrobin, George Railton, Joy Holding, Doug Sheffield,  Judy Richardson.
SPORTS: Bill Willson (desk), Bert MacKinnon, Ron Kydd,
Glenn Schulfz.
TECHNICAL: Fred Jones, Bob Cannon.
Legal drinking
Following is an editorial reprinted from the Dalhousie
Gazette, student newspaper of Dalhousie University, at
Halifax, N.S.
In an unusual and courageous move, the administration of
■Bishop's University at Lennoxville, Que., this year decided to
.permit male students of legal age to drink in their rooms.
A recent, editorial in the Bishop's student newspaper
pointed out that the effect had been a good one. While no
statistics were available, in the opinion of the newspaper the
"behaviour of those students who live in residence had been
better this year than at any time in the past.
The editorial goes on to say that the reason is obvious:
"Most students are adults, but when treated like children
they are quite apt—as often happened in the past—to respond
like children. When treated like adults they are far more
likely to demonstrate an adult sense of responsibility . . . also
nothing so removes the glamor from breaking a petty rule on
the sly and getting away with it as removing the rule itself."
The Gazette congratulates the principal of Bishop's for his
liberalism, his courage, and his faith in his student body. All
too often these days the men responsible for student discipline
and control are afraid to do anything which is even slightly
out of the ordinary. Instead, they hide fearfully behind the
heavy cloak of conservatism which has covered Canadian universities for so many years.
It takes eourage to stand up to the straight laced moralists
of our time and to tell thefn that their ideas are antiquated.
In this particular case it would seem that the stern moralists
who had gloomily predicted universal inebriation and unrestrained hooliganism have been proved wrong, while those
who argued for the benefits of greater freedom coupled with
greater respbnsibility have been proved right.
However, it would seem to Us that the most beneficial
aspect of such a decision lies in the immense faith and respect
which the Bishop's administration must have for its student
body. Such actions which show a true understanding for the
'student's position and which indicate a willingness oh the part
of the administration to train him fully for his future life are
rare indeed.
We can only hope that by the actions of such men as the
principal of Bishop's, more University administrators will
learn the value of bending a little to student requests in such
matters.
Made it again
Once again the university has "made" the downtown press.
!Phis time in both papers. The Province, the morning edition of
Pacific Press, devoted 25 inches, complete with typos and mis-
mformation, to telling their reading "public that "UBC students
are up in arhls about the activities of Buster's tow trucks on their
campus."
The Sun, the Pacific Press afternoon edition, takes a slightly
different angle and writes that a committee, whose findings "were
made public today," (Jan. 4), says the B.C. Electric should provide free bus service for students attending UBC.
The Province's rendition of the story was true—about two
or three months ago. The findings of the committee which The
Suh said were released Jan. 4 were, in fact, released late last
November and rah in The Ubyssey Dec. 1. Of course it's entirely
possible The Sun didn't hear about it until Thursday. Furthermore, the student report did not say B.C. Electric should provide
free bus service to students attending UBC. It said that since the
utility was now a government organization a request for free
transit for physically handicapped and old age pensioners, as well
as university students, could be initiated at UBC.
Journalism of this type is giving the entire profession a bad
name, and it is indeed unfortunate that the two Vancouver dailies
practise it in such a manner.
THE      U%YSSEY
Friday, January 5, 196'
Money da
hidden in
By JACK SCHRElNER
FROM THE FSNANCIAL POST
There's a hidden danger in the friendliest of
car pools, and you should know about it.
It's possible your insurance agent didn't even
think of it when he wrote your car insurance
policy.
The danger is this: if there's an accident and
the passengers sue the driver, the insurance
company rnay n6t pay any damages the court
awards.
A friendly arrangement between neighbors
could mean years of debt for the driver if he
is sued.
Normally, passengers ride in private cars at
their own risk in all provinces but Quebec.
But the driver is generally responsible for
passengers when he's being paid to carry them,
and is in the business of passenber transportation.
• •    •
And the way courts are interpreting the law,
some car pools may be business arrangements,
particularly if passengers pay a fixed fee for
the ride to work.
"A man is a fool," says one insurance lawyer,
"if he takes money or some reciprocal advantage from the passenger and doesn't have liability coverage."
The fact is that many car pool drivers haven't
the extra insurance coverage, companies say.
The standard insurance policy states clearly
that the policy does not cover anyone making
a business of carrying people "for compensation or hire."
There's a condition added to the policy and
an extra rate for drivers who get paid for carrying passengers in private cars.
:     •    •    •
The rate is higher because the risk is greater
that the insurance company may be faced with
claims from passengers who under most circumstances would not fee entitled to damages.
The law does not make it clear Whether Or
not the driver taking his neighbor to work is
making a business Of it.
So the advice of insurance companies to car
pools is this:
If you have a standard policy, get your insurance company's permission to run a pool
and pay the extra premium — $5 to $15 extra.
There are four situations Where the driver
might find himself responsible for passenger
safety — and expose himself to being sued.
• •   •
• A true oar pool: a group of neighbors alternate cars. Insurance companies feel there is
least risk here that the court would decide the
driver was Using his car for compensation.
• A passenger pool: orte driver charges a fee
to take others to and from work regularly.
• Mileage payments: a driver, receiving mileage payments from his employer, carries other
employees as passengers. An example would
be a team of salesmen.
• The solicited ride: a driver agrees to convey
a passenger from one point to another for a fee.
• •    •
Except in the case of a true car pool, there
have been court decisions in Ontario ruling that
drivers in the other three situations were receiving compensation. This made them liable
for the safety of their passengers.
• In one case, the driver arranged to take an
employee to and from work for a fixed fee. On
the first trip, an accident occurred and the injured passenger sued.
The court ruled that the fee had no relation
to the expenses incurred by the driver. Therefore, a passenger was being carried for compensation. The driver had to pay damages.
nger lies
car pools
¥ Another case, SKhmiarized in Roderick Phe
lan's Highway Traffic Law, tells of two persons who paid a driver a fixed fee for a ride
from Toronto to Montreal. They were injured
in an accident and successfully sued, the driver,
Phelan observes: "A motor car can, in some
circumstances, be operated in the business oi
carrying passengers for compensation even it
it is so operated for only one day or on a single
occasion."
* The • car owner can be equally responsible
with the driver.
•    •    •
One owner allowed his son, a high school
student, to drive other students to school daily
for a fixed rate per week. There was an accident and the other parents sued for medical
expenses.
The court held the car was used for compensation and the owner was liable for passenger safety.
Whether or not the car pool driver makes
a profit is unimportant.
'The legislature has defined the business,
namely a carrying of passengers for compensation," Phelan writes, noting there is no mention of profit or loss in the act.
If these court decisions seem to define compensation clearly, put against them a 1957 decision.
An Ontario judge ruled that a man is (quoting the Highway Traffic Act) "in the business
of carrying passengers for compensation" only
where compensation is the primary reason for
a man to operate his car.
• •    •
Which leaves the suggestion that you're not
running your car for compensation if the car's
chief purpose is to get you to work and if the
passenger fees are voluntary or nominal.
The laws in the other common law provinces
give the judges plenty of room for interpretations either way on car pools.
It's a suituation the insurance companies
don't like. A good deal of bad feeling results
when drivers find their insurance policies do
not cover suits arising from the neighborhood
ear pool.
The trend to car pools began with wartime
gasoline rationing and has been magnified by
suburban living. Standard insurance policies
were drafted before car pools presented a clear
insurance problem.
• •    •
There are now discussions within the insurance industry aimed at coming up with a policy
that will give automatic protection to drivers
in car pools.
Until a measure like this appears, insurance
companies advise car pool drivers to get permission from their insurance companies.
Says one lawyer:
"Pleading in court that it was a friendly arrangement will not be much protection."
THE McGILL DAILY
"Why is The McGiU Daily?"
Asked the pessimist sourly.
"Thank God." said the optimist
gaily.
"That it isn't hourly!"
A. J. M. SMITH
THE LAYMAN TURNED CRITIC
Seeing cm elephant, he cried
with bliss:
"What a wonderful nightingale
this is!"
And of a mosquito he observed
with a laugh:
What a curious thing is this
giraffe."
LOUIS DUDEK
i. Friday, January 5,  1962
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
WORDS
By MIKE GRENBY
"HOW'D YOU MAKE OUT
QN YOUR EXAMS?"
"Well, except for English,
math, French and physics, I
did  very well."
"I was rather disappointed,
actually. Aside from a 97 in
history all my marks were in
the low eighties."
"Well, since I didn't write
them . . ."
"Oh, I did just fine, just fine
—how about yourself? I heard
a rumour you failed all of
yours but that's not true, is ii?
.-. . Oh."
"I ran into trouble. You
know this guy in fourth year
that I paid to be me during
exams? It turned out his father
is on the Senate. I'm just here
to pick up my books."
"I only had one to write.
How were your nine?"
"I can't quite decide how to
tell my parents."
"I had a whole week to study
for my last exam and it's the
only one I failed."
, "At any rate I'll be getting
a degree before you do. I got
word this morning that I qualified fully for a BAC and can
expect the official announcement early next week."
"Don't talk to me about
exams, you dog! Taking me out
on thai all-night party just be-
. fore my last exam and telling
me I'd still have plenty of time
to study!"
"Once again I've proved that
it pays to be kind to professors.
The bottles of cognac were the
biggest single expense but . . ."
"Even if I add all my marks
together I still don't get 50 per
'cent."
"Considering that I didn't
study for them I guess I can't
really complain. I got four
firsts and two seconds."
"What exams?"
"Remember those questions
I got hold of before exams
started, the ones I figured
would be on the exams? They
weren't."
"I got 50 per cent in Fine
Arts."
"Looks like I can't do three
months' work in three hours
after all."
"They gave me two marks
for getting my name and registration number right."
"English — 49 per cent,
psych — 49 per cent, German
—49 per cent. Tell me, which
is higher — Lions Gate Bridge
or the new Second Narrows?"
"If I'd had my books with
me I'd have had no trouble at
all. As it is . . ."
"I knew I wouldn't make it
so now I don't feel at all badly.
Amazing how one can be so
completely unperturbed at a
time like this, isn't it? Here,
have another drink."
• • •
On reaching the printers
late last night on my homeward way and immediately
thereupon being reprimanded
for a two-inch hole that appeared below my column as the
result of my not having written enough, and being very
tired and therefore in an unimaginative mood, I wrote this.
UBC professor to direct
survey of nursing education
A UBC sociology professor has been appointed to direct
a nationwide survey of nursing education.
Dr. K. D. Naegele will be granted a one year leave of
absence to conduct the survey for the Canadian Nurses' Association.
The object of the survey is to ascertain a certain community's health needs and how nurses should be educated to
meet the needs.
Dr. Naegele received his B.A. from McGill, his M.A.
from Columbia and his Ph.D. from Harvard.
The survey, arises from a previous study that showed
84 percent of the schools surveyed failed to meet the standards which are considered desirable.
From Page 1
Rhodes scholar
number of UBC students at St.
John's and so there exists an
informal relationship.
"I can now see the responsibility of such a scholarship.
You just have to step back and
take a second look.
"My future plans are probably
in the academic world, but the
terms of the scholarship are flexible enough to allow me to enter
any field."
He said most of the Rhodes
scholars have entered public or
academic fields.
Robson said he felt a bit uneasy stepping into the group of
such men as Dean Rusk and
Davie Fulton.
HELLO    BOYS
I   hope  you've   had   a  good
Yule. See us for your Brynner!
Sincerely,
Peter. Van  Dyke.
No. 153,
Brock Extension.
Campus NDP hosts
education seminar
A seminar on education arranged by  the  campus New
Democratic Party is scheduled for Saturday afternoon.
Four   faculty    members   will
CUP annual conference
accepts three new members
Canadian University Press accepted three new members
at the Annual Conference.
The Coryphaeus, University of
Waterloo,    Waterloo,    Ontario;
UAC    Gauntlet,    University   of
Alberta,   Calgary,   Alberta;  and!
The   Campus,   Bishop's  Univer- j
sity, Lennoxville, Quebec, were j
admitted. :
Each editor submitted a brief j
outlining the history and work j I
of his paper. ;
The Manifesto, Lakehead Col-1
lege of Arts Science and Technology,  Port Arthur,   Ont.,  lost!
its  membership   rights  because j
it • has  ceased  publication.
give lectures and answer questions on various aspects of education.
Dr. James Foulks, head of the
Dept. of Pharmacology, will
speak on "Primary and Secondary Education in the Soviet Union". Dr. Foulks recently spent
two years in Russia and his two
children attended Russian
schools.
Dr. Cohn of the Dept. of Sociology will discuss "Some Aspects of Progressive Education."
Noise in library?
Warning bells will sound in
the library at 9:30 p.m. weekdays and 4:30 p.m. Saturday to
allow students time to select and
sign out books.
The bell will sound again at
9:50 p.m. weekdays and 4:50
p.m. Saturdays to signal library
closing time.
UBC   STUDENTS
15% Discount
Imported   Car   Parts   and
Accessories
^Overseas Auto Parts]
112th  and Alma BE 1-7686
Dr. Cohn is among the four
UBC professors who are starting
their own primary school.
Dr. Walker, Dept. of Applied
Science, will discuss "Some
Dangers of a University Education".
Dean Neville Scarfe, head of
the Faculty of Education, will
answer questions from the audience.
The seminar will be held in
the Mildred Brock room, from
1 to 5 p.m. Coffee will be served.
FROSH!
STUDYING TOO HARD?
KEEP ASPIRIN WITH YOU
AT ALL TIMES
ASPIRINS!
UNIVERSITY     PHARMACY     LTD.
5754 University Boulevard CA. 4-3202
We!
By
you ve
got the sad new?.  My '-oriilolenees
to   those   who   need   them.
Do not despair, all is not lost.
Somewhere in tins bleak, bleak
world the sun still shines (even,
when it rains.) Yes the sun is
always  shining  at   PIZZARAMA.
This weekend we are featuring
a terrific entertainment treat. On
Saturday night PIZZARAMA
proudly presents one of the
world's foremost Banjo Players—
Dust;.' Corbett, direct from Los
Angeles,
the    very    best
team    in   Van-
in     the     West,
a  ball   and   a
You will hea
banjo and piano
couver—posalibly
"We promise you
half. So come on in and. enjo:y
yourselves (and while y6ur enjoying \~ourselv<;\s sink your teeth
into one of our famous Italian
Pizzas)  they are better than ever.
As usual there will be no cover
charge or minimum at the PIZZARAMA. All we ask you to
bring (along with money) is your
appetite, because w ewill feed you
like you ain't never been fed
. before.
Tonite we ire featuring one of
Vancouvers finest ragr-tirh.e and
honky-tonk   piano   players^ARB.
Both nights promise to, be. lots
of fun,   so plan  to be with us.
2676   W.   Broadway       BE   3-9918
1962 and 1963 ENGINEERING or
HONOR CHEMISTRY CLASSES
THE PROCTOR & GAMBLE COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED
HAMILTON, ONTARIO POINTE CLAIRE, QUEBEC
has openings for permanent employment for graduating men
and _    u;
openings for summer employment for those in Class of '63
in
PRODUCT RESEARCH PROJECT ENGINEERING
PROCESS DEVELOPMENT MAINTENANCE ENGINEERING
PRODUCTION SUPERVISION PACKAGING DEVELOPMENT
QUALITY CONTROL INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
Company   representatives   will   be   present   for   campus
INTERVIEWS: January 9,10,11,12
Personal interviews may be arranged through your Placement Office Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 5, 1962
Indian art given
to campus museum
Three collections of Northwest
coast Indian artifacts have been
added to the permanent collection of the anthropology museum at the University.
The collections were purchased with funds provided by
Dr. H. R. MacMillan, who has
made a number of grants to the
UBC museum for the enlargement of its permanent collection.
Former UNB dean
will lecture here
Dr. J. Miles Gibson, former
dean of the facultv of forestry
at the University of New Brunswick, has been appointed a special lecturer at UBC.
Dr. Gibson, who retired earlier
in 1961, will lecture on forest
policy and administration in
UBC's faculty of forestry during
the second term, which opens
January 3.
Before joining the University
of New Brunswick as a professor of. forestry in 1929. Dr.
Gibson was a member of the
B.C. forest service. He was
named dean of forestry at UNB
in 1948.
Dr. Gibson prepared several
reports on forest problems in
B.C. for the Vancouver Foundation in 1955.
The first collection consists of
whaling materials purchased
from families of Nootka Indians ]
on the west coast of Vancouver
Island  and  includes a whaling
harpoon in use up to 1850 and [
rattles,   charms  and  dishes for |
the whale feast. j
The second collection consists
of carvings in argillite, a black,
shale-like substance found only
in the Queen Charlotte Islands
where it was mined by the Haida
Indians and carved into elaborate figures and plates and bowls.
Included in the current collection is a carving of a medicine
man dressed in ceremonial robes
and a carved dish which museum
officials say is prdbably the most
elaborate example of its kind in
their collection.
The third collection was acquired in London from Mr,.
David G. Young, whose father
and other relatives were at one
time surveyors and timber dealers in B.C. The collection was
made in B.C. before the turn of
the last century and has been
in London for more than 60
years.
It includes a Nootka "soul
boat" carved from whalebone
and used by medicine men in
treating illness, a series of
painted Haida canoe paddles,
and a beautifully carved Haida
food dish.
Career Opportunities In Forestry
DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY - VARIOUS CENTRES
Approx.  $5000 to $7140
* Excellent Research Facilities — * Challenging Professional Careers
* Attractive   Fringe  Benefits
* ISilverculture
* Mensuration
* Silvics ana Ecology
* Forest   Fire  Research
* Forest Inventories
* Forest Economics
* Hog and Tree   Grading
* Watershed   Management
* Wood   Utilization
If you expect to obtain a Bachelor's or post-graduate degree,
in Forestry, by 1962, you are invited to visit the Federal
Government's Selection Team which will be at your university January 9-12, 1962. Interview arrangements should
be made through the Office of the Dean.
SPEC I AL jTUDENT^RATES
COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE
Glasses Fitted
Contact Lenses
24-Hour Service OPTICAL Repairs
VANCOUVER BLOCK
MU 5-0928 — MTJ 3-2948
Main Floor
734 GRANVILLE ST.
Immediate Appointment
NEW WESTMINSTER - 675 COLUMBIA STREET
LA 6-8665
PHYSICS    PROFESSOR   F-    A.
Kaem.pffer will speak on
"Symmetry" at an open meeting of the Humanities Association Tuesday, at 8 p.m. in
the upper lounge at International House.
Win ram Insurance
Ltd.
SPECIALIZING   IN
AUTO INSURANCE
1678   W. Broadway,  Vancouver  9
RE   1-5328
LARGE, Serai-furnished main
floor ideal for gang of four. T.V.
complete kitchen $100.00 CA 4-
4108. After o:00 p.m. Three blocks
from  Gate.
Matz & Wozny
548 Howe St.        MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and  Hoods
Uniforms
We   specialize
in
Ivy League
Clothes
Special Student Rates
Australian scholarships
available in March 1961
OTTAWA (CUP) — Opportunities to study in Australia
have been announced by the
Canadian Universities Foundation.
Awards to Canadian scholars
are being made through the
Commonwealth Scholarship and
Fellowship Plan.
Under the CSFP, the Australian government is offering two-
year scholarships to men and
women students from other parts
of the Commonwealth. These
scholarships are mainly for post-
I graduate study, although a smal
' number of undergraduate award
| are also available, restricted t>
; fields of study which are no
j available at this level in the aj
' plicant's country.
! The scholarships are availabL
for institutions of higher learn
ing in Australia from the begin
i ning of the academic year ii
| March 1963.
j Applications for the scholar
ships must be received by thi
Canadian Commonwealth Schol
arship and Fellowship Commit
tee by no later than January 15
iowj
Dow Chemical Of Canada, limited
Offers  Career  Opportunities
for
ENGINEERING AND CHEMISTRY GRADUATES
Company Representatives will be on, campus
January  9,   10,   11
Please make an appointment for interview with your
Placement  Service
£3&«sj£vmk&rtjb£«eE
HAS FLYING, ENGINEERING AND
EXECUTIVE CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
FOR UNIVERSITY GRADUATES
...AW RCAF PERSONNEL OFFICER
WILL VISIT YOUR CAMPUS TO...
INTER VIM
ALJ. FINAL YEAR UNDERGRADUATES
INTERESTED IN PERMANENT
EMPLOYMENT IN THE AIR FORCE
7 February '62
IN THE ARMOURIES
APPOINTMENTS MAY BE MADE THROUGH
YOUR UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE Friday, January 5, 1962
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Extension lectures begin
Specialists to teach courses
PHONE BOOTH-CRAMMING is regaining popularity at UBC
this year, but it's not just for fun's sake. The three typical
hungry students above find a Brock phone booth the only
available place to eat lunch. Students have complained about
inadequate food facilities in questionnaire circulated by Food
Services Committee.
Commuting students hit
cafeteria hours, capacity
Members of the Vancouver
consular corps will take part in
a six-week lecture series beginning Tuesday, on the European
common market, one of 45 new
night courses offered by the university extension department in
January.
A second lecture series on
creativity in relation to literature, music and painting will
feature lectures by UBC poet
Earle Birney and music school
head G. W. Marquis.
Faculty members of UBC's
school of physical education will
give a theoretical and practical
course in how to stay fit from
youth to old age beginning January 15.
T"        V T*
A 10-week illustrated evening
lecture series oft the Renaissance
in Italy and northern Europe
begins Friday, Jan. 12, at the
Vancouver Art Gallery.
Also featured on the program
will be a pottery course for beginners,    instructed   by  John
Reeve, extension department
ceramacist, beginning Friday,
Jan. 19.
Speed reading for professional
and business people has-been designed to improve reading efficiency with emphasis on comprehension. The 16-week program will be held Saturday
mornings and Wednesday evenings on the campus beginning
Feb. 3.    "
The popular course on "How
to invest your money in stocks
and bonds" will be repeated in
the new year. Classes will take
place on 10 Wednesday evenings starting this Wednesday in
the Wesbrook building.
v    v    v
A variety of famous Chinese
Mandarin dishes will be introduced when a special 10-week
course on Chinese cooking begins Tuesday. Classes, held at
the school of home economics on
Tuesday evenings at 8 p.m. are
limited to 25.
Seven music courses are offered. The development of instrumental music from Beethoven on will be covered in a 10-
week course on the history of
instrumental music in the 19th
and 20th centuries. Classes will
be held on Thursday evenings
in the Vancouver Ballet Society
Workshop Theatre at 1255 West
Pender street.
&msm
Also direct from the
Museum of Modern Arl,
New York
LAND OF THE LONG DAY'
color
n.f.b. UAPCITY^iaTiing
CA 4-3730
Tuesday
Students are dissatisfied with
the hours of service and the
capacity offered by the present
Food, Services facilities.
However, they are satisfied
with the cafeteria-style service,
the price and quality of food
and the food selection offered.
Seventy-two per cent are opposed or indifferent to paying
more for better quality food.
This information was revealed
this week by Ronald Beaulieu,
a fourth "year Commerce student. Beaulieu, under the authority of AMS Food Services, pre
pared a questionnaire submitted during November to 400
commuting students.
The form contained 19 questions.
Most students were concerned
with the inability of the Food
Services to accommodate them
during the dinner hour.
About 900 of the 10,000 commuting students stay on campus
after 5:30 p.m. But combined
capacity of the Bus Stop, and
cafeteria during the dinner hour
is only 500. The remaining 400
students must eat whenever they
get a ehance.
Pan American Petroleum Corporation
;   CALGARY/ALBERTA
Offers Careers In
EXPLORATION   GEOPHYSICS:   For   students   majoring   in   Geological
Engineering, Honors Geology, Physics, and Mathematics.
GEOLOGY: For students majoring in Geology or Geological Engineering
Company representatives will  visit  the  campus to interview graduating,
post-graduate and undergraduate students on Monday and Tuesday,
January 8 and 9, 1962
Interested persons, are asked to inquire at the University Placement
Office for further particulars.
Clearance
Men's
Topcoats
New Short Styles
$39.50
Regular $59-$69.50
Small   sizes  available
Continental
Raincoats
Regular $29.50
UNITED
TAILORS
BRITISH WOOLLENS
549 Granville
PROCTER  & GAMBLE
OFFERS  THE  GRADUATE:
1. HIGHLY DEVELOPED TRAINING
2. A CHANCE TO GROW IN DIRECT RELATION TO HIS ABILITY
3. THE SOLID BACKING OF AN EXPANDNG COMPANY RECOGNIZED
AS A LEADER IN INDUSTRY
Products such as Tide, Crest, Ivory, Camay, Crisco and Duncan Mines, are known
and used in every household. The successful development and marketing of these
brands is directed by university trained men whose abilities are constantly challenged by new responsibilities.
Graduation may be many months away, but we urge you to give serious consideration to your future now. The Placement Office has copies of booklets which have
been designed to give you detailed information.
Comoanv representatives will visit The University of British Columbia to discuss
wi+h prr-riuptinn studpnts of all faculties mnnrytement careers in ADVERTISING,
F'NANCE. PURCHASING, SALES AND TRAFFIC
I    N    T    E    R    V    I    F    W    S
JANUARY, 15/ 16 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 5, 1962
—Photo by Les Pal
NEW HOCKEY COACH Father David Bauer surveys St. Michael Majors, the team he guided
to  the Canadian   junior  championship last year. Father Bauer hopes to have equal success
with the Thunderbirds   by   concentrating   on   the fundamental points of hockey. Father Bauer
took  control  of  the  Birds,  replacing  former  coach Al Stuart.
Back to fundamentals
with Bauer in charge
By  BERT  MacKINNON
UBC Thunderbirds will
wear a new look when Father
David Bauer takes over the
reins as coach of the usually
hapless icemen.
Father Bauer learned his
hockey from the players he
grew up with. He thinks that
a team which knows its fundamentals could beat the prairie
colleges.
"I'm going to stress fundamentals and try to build a
strong defence for a base to
work with," he said.
Talking with Father Bauer,
one gets the impression that
he guides all his actions by
fundamentals. He will tell you
that "fundamentals are everything."
Father Bauer said he learned
two fundamentals from his
older brother Bob, a vital link
in the famed "Kraut Line" of
the NHL's Boston Bruins. He
attempts to impart these ideas
in all his players.
The two all-important concepts are "never give the puck
away," and "never take your
eyes off the eyes of your opponent."
Talking ideals, Bauer says
that a combination of a Toronto defence under Hap Day
and an offence under Toe
Blake would be the best team
hockey has ever seen.
•    •    •
Both as a player and a coach
Father Bauer looks up to Joe
Primeau, who, he says, is the
greatest "psychological" coach
in any sport.
Father Bauer plans to close
up the style of hockey played
by the Birds in an effort to
beat the prairie teams at their
own game.
"We're going to stop stick
checking   and   throw   a few
trotters TICKETS
PLAY HARD-TOGET
A limited number of student tickets for the Jan. 19-20
Harlem Globetrotter series
go on sale at the' Memorial
Gym office today.
Tickets are $1, but only 500
are available for  each night.
Accompanying the Trotters
this time are Cab Calloway
and his orchestra, and the
Honolulu Surfriders basketball team.
UBC plays Surfriders in a
preliminary game Jan. 19, and
meets the Trotters Jan. 20 in
the feature.
more artistic body checks. We
won't be vicious; we'll just impede our opponents' forward
progress with the odd shoulder."
The future looks bright for
UBC hockey in Father Bauer's
opinion.
"With all the players coming up from the new junior
teams in the province and
with the good nucleus that we
already have to build around,
we could be giving the prairie
boys a good run for their
money in the very near future," he says.
The new ice arena, due to be
completed next Christmas,
also plays a big part in Father
Bauer's plans.
"As it stands now, my players only practice three times
a week in the middle of the
night."
•    •    •
"We just have to have more
working time if we're to improve to the calibre necessary
to bring home some honors."
Under the guidance of
Father Bauer and his "fundamentals" hockey at last could
become of importance at UBC
and the team may surprise
some of its perpetual critics.
Falcons hold
height edge
Battle of birds goes
in Seattle Saturday
By RON KYDD
UBC Thunderbirds will have their work cut out for them
this weekend when they move into Seattle to meet Seattle
Pacific College Falcons. i
Falcons, sporting a 5-2 won-
lost record, will have height as
well as experience going for
them when they meet the 'Birds.
So far this season the 'Birds
have won one and lost three.
SCORING LEADERS
UBC will be depending on
two of last year's stars to provide both points and rebounds
in the tussles Friday and Saturday night. Dave Way and Wayne
Osborne with 42 and 39 points
respectively are the team leaders after the first four games.
Way is also leading the team
in rebounds with 38.
Wayne King and John Cook,
two newcomers to the 'Birds
lineup this year, are tied for
third spot in the scoring race
with 25 points each.
For Seattle Pacific College,
the big threat is their centre,
John Wortman. He is averaging
a scorching 22.8 points per
game, and also leads the team
in rebounds. His field-goal percentage is 45.4.
Next Tuesday Thunderbirds
travel to Bellingham to play
Western Washington College.
Western Washington won UBC's
Totem Tournament just before
Christmas.
ROAD TRIP
Next weekend UBC will make
their first long road trip of the
season, as they travel to Calgary for two games.
They return home for a game
with the Honolulu Surfriders
January 19, and the following
weekend Saskatchewan moves
into town to open the league
season.
UBC Jayvees play St. Regis,
a Senior B team, on Friday
night at 7 p.m. in the War
Memorial Gymnasium. Saturday
night they join the 'Birds in
Seattle for a game with Seattle
Pacific's Jayvees.
CENTRE DAVE WAY leads
Thunderbird basketball team
with 10.5 average per game
and 38 rebounds. I
SPORT^^ENU
SATURDAY
Basketball
Jayvees at Seattle Pacific College.
Skiing
College   Meet in  Rossland.
TUESDAY
Basketball
6:00 — Jayvees vs.  Western
Washington, Belligham.
Students!
For a new dining pleasure
try our daily special.
DEANS
4544 W. 10th
Open 'till 11:30
FOR
THAT
SMART
LOOK
IN
GLASSES
LOOK
TO
Ptesclibtion Optical
We use genuine CORECTAL lenses
— clear from edge to edge —
"Ask Your Doctor"
Contact Lenses — Zenith  Hearing Aids
Special Discounts to Students Friday, January 5, 1962
THE      U B YS'SEY
Page 7
By The Gateway
SPORTS IN SHORT
£ftWtli$kt
University of Alberta
Almost $60,000 will be spent in the 1961-62 term to provide
University of Alberta teams for Western Canada Intercollegiate
Athletic Union competitions.
It will cost $530 to put one Golden Bear hockey player on
the ice for the season; one Bear basketball player will cost $505;
and one Bear football player costs $300 per season.
The hockey budget is $9,550. There are 18 players on the
team. Hence the $530 per player. The total for basketball is
$6,075 for 12 players. The football team chalks up another
$9,750. The average for all teams that participate in inter-
varsity athletics is $200 per team member. Three hundred
people are involved in inter-varsity competitions.
The issue is obvious. Is the expenditure of $60,000 justified
for the benefits this university receives from athletics?
One contention is that athletics are a facet of extra-curricular activities. Both the participants and the spectators enjoy
the sport as a combination Of entertainment and school spirit.
Further, it is argued, there are scholarships for the intellectually gifted. Therefore, why should not the athletically gifted
be given the privilege of what amounts to a subsidy? Both belong to the same university.
Students need some means of identification with a university. Athletics are the most convenient means of providing a
sense of belonging. Academic standards alone cannot provide
a satisfactory basis for pride in a large institution.
It can be argued that a "rah-rah" type of spirit is not desirable for a mature, self-confident institution. Too often students
attend a game with a mickey tucked conveniently in a pocket.
The thrill of violating the liquor act takes precedence over
watching the teams in action.
ff.rf.Sf.
The primary function of a university is academic. Therefore, contact between universities should be maintained on an
intellectual level—the exchange of ideas on vital topics, rather
than the exchange of blows on a football field. We should develop our thinkers, not our sweat-sock crowd. We should make
ourselves aware of the varying philosophies that are generated
by residence in diverse regions with their different problems,
and not of the quality of the hockey players a region can
produce.
While each student pays approximately seven dollars for
athletics on this campus, he pays only 45 cents for NFCUS. Yet
through NFCUS a more general, more continuous and more
effective contact can be maintained. Is this true of athletics?
Most important in the activities of the UAB should be a
well organized intramural program. With ten times more students involved than in inter-varsity athletics, it seems ludicrous
intramurals are only apportioned one-tenth of UAB's total
budget.
Sf.Sf.Sf.
Soon it is to be expected the old drawing card of fine facilities and brilliant professors will yield to the attraction of attending the University of Alberta—where sport is king and
athletic scholarships are provided for all.
Should we spend $60,000 a year on inter-collegiate sports?
Attractive Careers
in
Atmospheric Sciences
for
1962 Graduates in Arts or Science
A Federal Government Recruiting Team will be here
JANUARY 8, 9 and 10
To interview and select graduates for careers as
Meteorologists and as Meteorological Officers.
The starting salary for Meteorologists is $5160,
for Meteorological Officers, $4740.
For consideration as Meteorologists, candidates
must have an Honours Degree in Physics, Mathematics and Physics or Engineering Physics while a
pass degree in Arts or Science is sufficient for
those competing for Meteorological Officer, provided they have several credits in Physics and
Mathematics beyond the senior matriculation level.
Training in Meteorology
Provided
Numerous Opportunities
for Advancement
TO  ARRANGE  INTERVIEWS,   CONTACT
UNIVERSITY  PLACEMENT OFFICE
preferably before above dates
The   University   Placement   Office   has descriptive
folders,   posters and  application  forms.
UBC girls start on curling trail
This also happened on the
campus sport scene:
IN CURLING — Last year's
WCIAU Championship curling
team enters the -B.C. Ladies'
Curling Playdowns Saturday.
UBC is faced with tough
competition from the Pacific
Ladies Club, Pacific Business
Girls, Capilano Ladies, and
the North Shore Club.
The winner of the round-
robin playoff is eligible to enter the district playdowns and
finally the B.C. finals.
Team  members   are:    skip,
Diane    MacNaughton;    third,
Lorn a    McCready;   second
Genevieve   Walsh;   and   lead,
Pat Chataway.
IN GRASS HOCKEY — All
women interested in playing
for the UBC team are asked to
put their names and telephone
numbers on the bulletin board
at the east entrance to the
Women's Gym.
IN RUGGER — Birds face
North Shore Saturday in an
exhibition match at the stadium. The Birds will be playing
their first game since early
in December.
•   •   •
IN SKIING   —   UBC's ski
team leaves today for a team
meet in Rossland.
Career Opportunities for Graduates
in Agriculture
PRODUCTION AND  MARKETING  BRANCH
DEPARTMENT  OF  AGRICULTURE
Various   Centres
Starting Salaries - $4740 or $4920
• Livestock and Poultry Officers
• Plant Protection Officers
• Inspectors, Plant Products
• Production  and  Marketing   Trainees
A descriptive folder and Information Circular 62-24, describing in detail these position are available at your
University Placement Office or from the Civil Service
Commission, Ottawa.
U
rr
THE SNACKERY
3 LOCATIONS
3075 Granville - RE 3-5813
4423 W. 10th Ave. CA 4-0833
5075  Kingsway - HE  1-8818
FREE  HOT  &  FAST  PIZZA
DELIVERY
l?£
There is
food for thought
in this book
It is about IBM, the company, its philosophy, its products and the dynamic industry in which IBM is an
unquestioned leader.
But mostly the book is about the positions available at
IBM for graduates in Engineering, Commerce or
Business and Arts. It explains how the work at IBM is
tailored to a graduate's degree and describes the positions of Applied Scientist, Sales Representative, Programmer, Instructor and Systems Representative. It
indicates, too, how stimulating and satisfying tnese
jobs can be.
We believe this book will show you why a position at
IBM can be one of the most rewarding ever offered. If*
you would like to have a copy, write or telephone.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES COMPANY. LIMITED
944 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C. MU. 3-3331
Branch, Manager—J. L. Yellowlees
IBM
•rratfe Mark
~J Page 8
'TWEEN CLASSES
THE      UBYSSEY
Newman dub to host open dance
NEWMAN CLUB
Dance Saturday in Sherry
Hall, 4th and MacDonald at 9
p.m. 75c single, $1.25 per couple.
Everyone welcome.
* *   *
VCF
Miss Marjorie Long speaks
noon today in Bu 106. Miss Long
is a member of VCF at U of A.
* *   *
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Special Sweethearts' Ball
meeting Wed. noon in Bu. 327.
* *   *
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Film "Village in the Dust" to
foe shown noon today in Bu. 205.
PHBAtERES
All-phi   Friday   noon in Bu.
iTIME: 2.7. weeks 1.97; 1 year 3.ST
2 years $7.00
'UJ&'i: weeks, 1.91: 1 year 4.00
2  years  ?.0fr
MacLeans,  1   year 1.50
Saturday Night, 1 year 2.00
Write: Student I~erlodical Agency,
P.O.  Box  717,  Adelaide  P.O.,
Toronto   1.   Ontario
wus
Important first meeting of
term today, Conference room, at
noon.
* *   *
UN IH CLUB
Current affairs discussion
group. Every Monday noon in
Board Room at IH.
* *   *
Films followed by dance tonight at IH.
* *   *
UKRAINIAN VARSITY
Important meeting of the
Alpha Omega Soc. Monday noon
in Bu. 225. All out.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Fine Arts students and ski enthusiasts come see films on
Douanier Rousseau and skiing.
Bu. 202 noon. Members free,
others 10c.
The Ideal Place To
Meet Your Friends
Look For Our Daily Special!
Full Course  Meals  Within
Your Income
DO-NUT DINER
4556 West 10th Ave.
Fish & Chips, Donuts to GO!
AGRICULTURAL &  BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH  OPPORTUNITIES
in
ZOOLOGY -MICROBIOLOGY-CHEMISTRY- FOOD SCIENCE
ANIMAL, PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCE
Salaries up to $7860 per annum
Research Branch
Department of Agriculture at Various Centres
Information Circular 62-1350 with full details of
departmental operations and specific requirements
available at your University Placement Office or
from the Civil Service Commission, Ottawa-
Northern Ekctric
offers
KM
ELVIRA'S
Pa I ma de Mallorca
4479 W. 10th Ave. CA 4-0848
Original Imports from Spain
Vancouver's Most Unique
Gift Shop
■ Doable  Breasted   Suits
Converted  to
Single Breasted
Slacks Narrowed"
BRITISH WOOLENS
549 Granville St.
Friday, January 5, 1962
1962 Graduates and Post-Graduates
Excellent  Career. Opportunities
in Science and Scientific Research
with the Civil Service of Canada
If you  are  obtaining  a   post-graduate  or  honours  degree
in any of the following:
Chemistry
Chemical  Engineering
Physics
Geophysics
Engineering Physics
Biochemistry & Pharmacology
Geology (all fields)
Metallurgical*'Engineering
Mathematics
Electronics
Geochemistry
Astronomy
OBTAIN      — Your   copy  of  Information  Circular   62-1500
from the University Placement Office;
CONSIDER — The opportunities of interest to you
— The  advantages of employment with  the
Civil Service: of • Canada.
AftftANGE — Through your Placement Officer for your
interview with the Scientific Selection Team
which will visit the University in January 1962
for GRADUATES in -
• ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
.• fNGlN£ERIN6 PHYSICS
• HONOURS MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS
Northern Electric, as a major manufacturer of
Communications Equipment and Wire and
Cable, offers opportunities in the fields of;
MANUFACTURING - PLANT ENGINEERING
DESIGN - COMMUNICATIONS
SYSTEMS ENGINEERING
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
• Most assignments are in the Montreal area,
although openings are available in Ottawa,
Belleville and London, Ontario, transportation allowance is paid.
• Excellent salary schedules and a formal evaluation program providing ample opportunity
for individual advancement are combined with
generous employee benefits and good working
conditions to make employment with the
Northern Electric Company worthy of your
investigation.
• fii
! IHTERV0EW8
Week of January 8th
Fuffuribtrktformattonandintervitwappoiia-
meat, please contact your Placement Officer.
Northern Electric
COMPANY     LIMITED
l|aVott#l^*{t dionipnnn
Georgia at Granville
INCORPORATED   219   MAY   1670.
Shop daily 9-5:30, Fridays 9-9
PHONE MU  1-6211
It thrives on action . . .
GREAT NEW ALL-WOOL
STRIPED CARDIGAN
BY ITALIAN ART—Styled by this famous Canadian sportswear specialist
for guys-on-the-go! Soft and evenly knit of aU-wool, these liip-length sweaters
take to fun and adventure, wash easily by hand. Continental style touches
in the deep V-nickline and vertical stripes, accented with brass military
buttons. Sturdy ribbed edge and cuffs keep their shapes. Multi-colours of
green and grey; brown and gold; rust and blue. 4 A AF
S,M, L,XL. EACH J.«F*tPt)
REMEMBER, YOU  CAN SHOP 'TIL 9 FRIDAY NIGHT and use
your PBA card in The Bay Career and Campus Shop. 2nd Floor

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