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The Ubyssey Mar 27, 1962

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 THS UBYSSEY
Mad
Vol. XLIV
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, MARCH 27,  1962
No. 73
Ex-editor wins
NFCUS award
for lirey'essay
OTTAWA (CUP) — Maurice
Yacowar, former editor of t h e
University of Alberta at Calgary
student newspaper, placed sec-
„ .ond in. the National Federation
of Canadian University Students' literary contest with an
essay entitled "Some notes on
the firing of college editors."
Yacowar was fired last year
"from his position as editor of the
UAC "Gauntlet."
UBC STUDENT PLACES
UBC student Lionel Kearns
won second place in the poetry
division  with   a  poem  entitled
„ "Seasons." R. W. T. MacClean
ot Waterloo University College
placed first with a poem callt d
"1985."
First place in the essay section
"was won by Donald Phillipson
of the University of Alberta. I~i«>
essay was called "Canadian Lit
erary Magazines Today."
RYERSON—2 WINS
<"-• Students from Ryerson won
both first and second places in
the short  story  section:  John
^Clarke took first place with h'
story, "They do no not discriminate";  Brian   Stewart   took   second with "Tale of a young torero."
First place winners receive
$50; second place winners, $25.
The- money is donated by the
Molson Brewing company.
Judge for the short story sec
tion was John Marlyn, an Otta-
'* wal.novelist. Christopher Young,
editor of the Ottawa Citizen
judged the essays, and Douglas
LePhan, professor of English at
^ Queens University, judged the
poetry.
f Expropriation probed
Three members of the Shareholder's Committee for fair expropriation will speak on the
government's expropriation of
•the B.C. Electric Wednesday at
12:30 p.m. in Brock Lounge.
Speakers will be: Jim Clarke,
B. Comm '54; Herbert L. Matthews, a law graduate; and Richard M. Bibbs, Engineering '45.
Bibbs is an employee of the B.C.
Power Corp.
Bruce Fraser, Law 3, will
chair the panel discussion, which
is sponsored by the Law Undergraduate Society and the Debating Union.
— Photo by bashful  Barry Joe
—Umbrella by Hunter
INDOOR SHOWER is latest
AMS service in Brock Hall
and Dianna Smith, Ed 3, takes
advantage of the opportunity to try out her new umbrella. Only drawback was
origin of the liquid—it came
from a broken water closet
in the wen's washroom, and
was warmed on the way
down  by me  riot lightbulb.
Raven  hits  campus
Thursday—maybe
There hasn't been much
crowing so far, but rumor has
it that Raven for 1962 is winging its way campusward.
It may be here Thursday,
officials said. Then, again, it
may be later, they added.
When it comes it will be
on sale in the Bookstore and
at noon in Brock Hall.
Females and "homers"
behind in questionnaire
By SUSANNE CLARKE
Females and students living at
home, as opposed to those on or
near campus, are lagging behind
in returning their SUB questionnaires.
Of the 2500 questionnaires
sent out, 70 per cent went to
males and 30 percent to females,
SUB survey chairman Kyle Mitchell says and the number returned should be in the same
proportion.
Girls, however, are 10 percent
behind their male counterparts,
and people living at home are
15 percent behind those living
in dorms, residences and boarding houses.
Over 1300 survey sheets have
been returned, which Mitchell
describes as "not bad." One
thousand are still out.
Two hundred envelopes have
been returned by the post office
as incorrectly addressed.
Results will be sent to the
Registrar's Office Thursday for
tabulation.
Entrepreneurs
find exams
profitable
By  MIKE  GRENBY
Hawking copies of last year's
final exams is proving very profitable for three engineers.
Almost $200 has been taken
in by entrepreneurs Steve White-
law, Ed Pickard and Wayne McDonald since they began operations two weeks ago.
"And today the exam  copies
are selling as well as they ever
did—abetter if anything," White-
law told The Ubyssey Monday.
BUSINESS BRISK
The three businessmen, all in
first year engineering, started
out by duplicating and selling
copies of the English 100 exams.
Sales were so brisk that the
enterprise quickly expanded.
Today copies of last year's
final exams in English 200; Physics 101, Math 120 and Chemistry 101 and 102 are also being
marketed.
The group sets up shop in
side the college library during
the noon hour and sometimes
for a short period in the afternoon.
PROVES PROFITABLE
The exam copies sell for 15
cents apiece.
"Everybody asks us where the
money is  going,", said Pickard.
"When we tell them it's going
to us, a few get angry that the
money isn't for some cause but
most people commend us on our
ingenuity."
Operation   expenses  have  totalled about $15, leaving $55 to
$60 in the pockets of each partner, Pickard revealed.
FORSEES COMPETITION
But the group is pessimistic
about the future. It expects
quite a bit of competition next
year if it decides again to attempt a similar scheme then.
"I have a feeling that a lot
of people are going to try to get
in on this business," Whitelaw
said.
He added that the three will
continue to sell the exam copies
this year for at least another
week "or until sales begin to
drop off."
Five phones
pried from
UBC walls
By TIM PADMORE
Crowbar-wielding thieves have stolen five pay telepkones
from the campus in the past month.
The phones, containing up to $50 in corns, were ripped from
booths in Brock, the library, Wesbrook and Acadia Camp.
The only lead they have is a
small crowbar left behind Saturday when the thieves failed to
free a phone in Brock from the
four heavy bolts holding it to
the wall.
The crowbar had been specially modified to fit into the small
space behind the telephone
boxes.
CROWBAR FOUND
Brock proctor, Ian MacKenzie, said the bar was found: jammed behind the phone, apparently abandoned when the thieves
were surprised at their work.
Brock had already lost two
other phones.
"It was obviously the work of
the  same gang,"  said  MacKen-,
zie, pointing to identical marks
on  the  wooden frames  of  two
booths.
Bookstore manager John Hunter, who is in charge of campus
phones, said that up to six
phones are ordinarily stolen
from the campus during a year.
"But a rash of five in one
month is certainly unusual,' he
added.
WHO DID IT?
Hunter refused to blame students for the thefts. j
"We don't know whether it
was students or one of the same
gang that operates in the city,"
he said.
How could some one walk out
of a building with a phone under his arm without being seen?
"If one was spotted, a person
might think he was only an employee of the phone company,"
suggested Hunter.
The RCMP is wondering the
same thing. "We can't see how
they got away with it," a spokesman said.
Students witnessing possible
thefts should be more suspicious,
he said.
MYSTERIOUS HAND
. . . Pay phones disappear
The~thefts cost the university
nothing but the use of the
phones. They are the property
of the B.C. Telephone Company
which has to absorb all losses.
The phones, costing about
$200 to replace, are usually back
within two or three days.
Grad tickets available
By CHAS  McLEAN
Tickets for the "stupendous"
Grad booze cruise are reported
to be selling well.
Arts types can pick up their
tickets in the alumni office,
Brock 252, any noon this week.
Tickets for the Grad Ball are
also available at the alumni office. The most important feature
of these tickets is that they are
free to grads.
Fear of publicity kills
motion censoring govt
By KRISHNA SAHAY
UBC Socreds Monday introduced a motion condemning the
B.C. government's Bill 85 but withdrew the motion when they
found a Ubyssey reporter was at the meeting.
The motion put forth at the
Social Credit Club's general
meeting called for a note of protest to be sent to Premier W. A.
C. Bennett, Attorney General
Robert Bonner and the B.C.
Socred League.
The bill fixes the price of BCE
assets at 171 million dollars and
bars all protest in the courts.
The motion read:  "The pr'esi-
' dent of the club be asked to draft
a statement on behalf of the club
I condemning  the   action   of   the
B.C. Government in taking a
matter out of the courts whicrr
is presently before the courts."
When it was discovered that
a reporter from The Ubyssey
was present the motion was
tabled and another one was introduced to evict the reporter
from the meeting. It was defeated but the original motion was
left on the table.
The club will hold another
general meeting today in Bu.
317 to discuss Bill 85. Page 2	
^THE^JBYSSEY
Winner of the Southam Trophy
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEMBER   CANADIAN  UNIVERSITY   PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year in
Vahcbuver bv the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial
opinions expressed are those of the Editor of The Ubyssey and not
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
Telephone  CA 4-3242.  Locals:  Editor—25;  News—23;  Photography—24.
Editor-in-chief: Roger McAfee
Managing   Editor    --------    Denis   Stanley
Associate Editor -    -    -    Ann Pickard
News Editor    -    - Fred Fletcher
City Editor .-    Keith Bradbury
CUP  Editor    -    -    - Maureen Covell
Photography Editor Don Hume
Senior Editor    ---------    Sharon Rodney
Sports    Editor Mike    Hunter
Photography   Manager Byron   Hender
Critics Editor    ---------    David Bromige
Editorial   Research    -    Bob  Hendrickson,  Ian  Cameron
STAFF THIS ISSUE
Layout:   Donna   Morris
NEWS: Krishna Sahay, Tim Padmore, Suzanne Clarke,
Sharon McKinnon.
TECHNICAL: Brenda Van Snellenberg, Pauline Fisher.
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 27,  1962
m
Letters to the Editor
A dispute with Jack
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
In reference to Jack Ornstein's
column of Mar. 23, 1962, I dispute certain of his statements
about the problem of iin mortality.
If I understand rightly the
development of his thought, he
seems to advocate a conclusion
that contradicts his b-a s i c
assumption.   His   claim   is   that
subsequent to that period of time
can ever change the fact that,
for that period, he underwent
some physical discomfiture due
to his refraining from smoking.
He has suffered the irremedial
loss of pleasure, obtained by
smoking, for that period of
time.
Now, in no way has the act
of "sacrifice," as' described
above, included the act of "being smart." The act of "being
smart"  enters when you realize
naturally   conclusive   evidence  |hat  y°u  wil1  Possibly  get  to
heaven more easily if you carry
out   the   act   of   sacrifice,   and
Fire!
On our way to the printers Minday night we saw a fire
truck and police car stopped at the corner of University Boulevard and Acadia Road. Sensing a possible story, we stopped and
asked the cause of the excitement.
Seems like someone was sick and the only vehicle available
to carry the itthalator equipment is the university fire truck.
The university's first line firefighting equipment was tied up
because someone was sick!
A few years back a student, mixing a few chemicals in the
back of feis car in the area where the swimming pool is now,
put two incompatible substances together. The resulting explosion blew the trunk lid of the car off its hinges and blasted the
student's hand off just above the wrist. He suffered other serious
lacerations and burns.
He had to grovel in the parking lot mud for more than 20
minutes before an ambulance finally arrived.
Why did it take so long? Because it had to come from somewhere in Vancouver.
It does seem strange to us that a campus the size of UBC
does not have an ambulance. We don't know many towns with
a population of 15,000 that do not have such a vehicle.
With a growing resident student population and the continued construction on the campus, the need for such a safety
vehicle can only continue to grow.
The AMS accident benefit fund has in excess of $10 thousand in surplus. Why doesn't the council offer to put up part
of the cost of an ambulance out of that? Perhaps the administration could be shamed into putting up the rest.
* We're not saying the Alma Mater Society should be respon-
ble for ambulance service on the campus. That should be the
b of the" administration. However, since they seem reluctant
to move on the matter, the student body should perhaps, give
them a little encouragement.
We can anticipate the next hurdle. Where is it going to be
kept and who is going to man it? The fire department is on
3uty around the clock. Why shouldn't it be placed at their disposal, to be used at the direction of the RCMP or university
lealth service
In our discussions on this point with some university officials we have been assured that there is not enough demand for
such a vehicle. To us, an ambulance is like insurance; it's not
leeded very often, but when it is needed it's needed badly and
n one hell of a hurry!
*        g #
While on the top of safety vehicles have you ever noticed the
ype of firefighting euipment we have on this campus? It used
o be modern and up to date, about 15 years ago. We wonder
f any one of the hand ladders on this trucks are long enough
o reach top of the Memorial gym? How about Wesbrook? The
■oof of the new power plant? Seems ridiculous to be spending
hillions -of dollars on new, modern buildings, and then protect
hem with fire equipment almost a fifth of a century old?
re immortality is impossible, i.e.
like you don't know until you
die." If he believes this, what
is his authority for stating that
"this life is the only one?"
A second point which is unclear to me is your writer's view
on the nature of sacrifice. He
holds that a sincere Christian is
unable to make a real sacrifice
because his faith promises advantages in heaven for whatever
he relinquishes on earth. I
wonder if a pure, uncompensated sacrifice is possible even for
the unbeliever? Bertrand Russell does not go to prison on a
therefore you carry it out. Therefore there does not seem to be
any contradiction between offering a "real sacrifice" and "being smart" in the sense discussed by Mr. Ornstein and me.
Hence, there is no reason to believe that "genuine sacrifice
seems impossible to the sincere
believer."
Finally, I have no objection
tc Mr. Ornstein expressing his
opinion. As he points out, his is
merely "another view." I do object to him taking a topic such
motiveless impulse. His reward as this and confusing it by his
is the hope of victory for his apparent inability to distinguish
ideas, just as the Christian's re-   between different acts.
ward is the hope of salvation.
The atheist receives a less personal gain, but that is the fault
of his own choice.
To close, I thank you for your
consideration.
Yours truly,
EWARD KERRON,
Arts 4.
'Being smart'
Yours truly,
DAVID A. PINK,
Grad Physics.
Can't ignore Jack
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
As a Christian, I can't really
ignore Jack Ornstein's liberal
abuse of basic Christian doctrines regarding immortality and
related subjects, which he displayed in his article the The
Ubyssey on Friday, Mar. 23.
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
In a recent article Mr. Ornstein suggests the knowledge of item 1: Sacrifice
a possible ultimate reward of
eternal happiness after death
leaves the notion of sacrifice
"out in the cold." He states that
if you give up an immediate
good in order to obtain a future
good, that is, eternal happiness,
you are not really sacrificing
but are just being smart. However, it is obvious that Mr. Orn-
He began by crucifying the
Christian notion of sacrifice.
Our actions, if they are in response to the love of Christ, must
involve sacrifice from us. Since
we don't know empirically any
more than anyone else if there
is an after life, sacrifice on our
part must come from faith alone.
And acceptance of the sacrificial
stem  has   confused,  and  indeed   loye of chrlst (T e   ^j    ig toQ
equated,    the    acts    of    "being   humiIiati       to  be  smart
Smalu    T,    .'faCrifJ!cing-'.'; Tak"  "em 2: Christian Obedience (an-
mg the definition of sacr.fice to  other tautology).
be an "irremedial loss," as Mr
Ornstein takes it to be, there is
no  reason  to  believe  that  the
Obedience to God means loving  Eim  and tnen  living  as  if
acts   of   "sacrifice"   and   "being  you  meant  [t  From  tnere  y°u
smart" cannot be carried out at
the same time.
At least about 55  percent of
can only use your head and try
to act as it seems best in each
situation.   And   we  must  accept
the Christians in the world today  our  brother's interpretations of
believe that it is proper to offer
a sacrifice to God either, as they
what   he   thinks  he   must   do.
Every  theologian   in  some   way
put it, in reparation for offences  sPeaks for God-
Item 3: God the Cynic and His
committed by the human race
against God, or as an act of homage and love. These deeds are
quite analogous to those of human society where a person will
give some gift to a friend to illustrate the regard that he has
for   the   person.   Similarly,   one
Sense of Humor.
Did you ever stop to consider
how much greater God's compassion (Latin: com plus patior
equals I suffer with) for sufferers is than the suffering itself?
Besides, the natural order has a
may humiliate oneself to apolo- remarkably high rate of success
gize to someone for offences percentage-wise, it seems to me.
committed against that person. Also, look at the mess most
Thus,   these   Christians   believe  beautiful and/or intelligent peo-
that it is proper to give up what
they  believe to be  some  imme-
ple   are   making  of   their   lives.
It helps one to understand the
diate good and offer the act of   infinitive  love  of  God  that  He
giving up this good as a sacrifice to God.
This act of sacrifice most certainly includes an irremedial
loss because if,,say, a person who
likes to smoke gives up smoking
for some period of time and of-
doesn't take revenge on the millions of fortunate humans who
never give Him thanks for what
they have been given. It's a question of would God want to spend
eternity with droves of "people"
with   a   sense   of   humor   like
fers the discomfiture that he un-  THAT?
dergoes to God, he has certainly
suffered an irremedial loss. No
amount    of    cigarettes    smoked
Mr. O. was right when he said
this is the only life we've got—
the only chance we have to re
spond to the challenge of God's
love.
The celebration of Christ's
(and our!) immortality, commonly called Easter, is coming up
on Apr. 22. Here is an excellent
opportunity for all of us to refresh our minds on the Christian's belief in eternal life. The
basis of our belief lies in the
revelation of God's love as seen
in the ressurection of Kis Son,
Jesus Christ, our Lord.
Yours truly.
JOAN RIPLEY,
Arts 3.
Mr. 'X' roams again
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Sick, Sick, Sick! — the only
description of some vile creature
roaming the campus who is not
content with "borrowing by mistake," or "picking up by mistake" that which does not belong to him; but who has stopped
to outright theft. This is the
only word for the action this
person has commited.
Sudents beware! Mr. X, while
passing through the chemistry
building on Wednesday afternoon saw fit to increase his
wardrobe with the topcoats of
not one, not two, nor three, but
four students which were on the
coat rack outside  C.  220.
Surely no one needs four overcoats, some of which probably
don't fit anyway.
If Mr. X reads this a n d is
broke, OK, keep the $5 that was
in the pocket of my coat, keep
the coat too if you must, it only
cost me $15; but at least have
the decency to toss the wallet
and keys where they will be
found. However, if your conscience begins to bother you,
the lost and found is located behind the book store.
Moral: To all 3,000 student,
(less one)—don't place any trust
in the basic honesty of your
fellow men—it's not worth it;
and watch out, as Mr. X may
strike again.
Yours truly,
J. G. WOOD,
Ed. 4.
Thief is 'caught'
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I'm laughing!
Someone took my first year
notes. Only they weren't my
notes. They were a set of notes
from two years ago. The course
has changed. The notes were
not complete anyway.
Someone is studying the wrong
notes.
I'm laughing  .  .  . the  "thief"
will probably fail with  me.
Yours trulv.
HA, HA, HA.
Arts 1.
The Ubyssey prints letters to
the editor on any topic of interest lo students. We ask thai
they be as short as possible and
within  150  words  if  possible.
Letters should be turned in
lo Ihe Ubyssey office, north
Brock basement, or mailed lo
the Editor, The Ubyssey. Brock
Hall, University of British Columbia.
We, of course, reserve the
right lo edit. Juesday, March 27, 1962
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 3
Rowing birds
stroke way
to  victory
The Thunderbird crew stroked
their way to victory in their
first meet of the season, beating
Oregon State University by five
lengths on Coal Harbor Saturday
morning.
UBC won the 2,000-metre race
in 6:07 while the Oregon crew
finished in 6:23.
Birds' heavier crew (190 lbs.
average) handled the shell easier in the chop created by the 15-
mph tailwind.
The lighter Oregon crew had
trouble starting and were unable
to gain on the faster Thunderbirds.
Members of the Thunderbird
crew were, cox, Frank Chow;
stroke, Darryl Sturdy; Marc Le-
mieux, Max Wiecorek, Keith
Donald, Herb Chandler, Don De-
war, Peter Brown, Trevor Wilson.
Earlier the UBC Jayvees beat
the second string Jayvees, Oregon and a mixed UBC-Oregon
crew. Oregon and the mixed
team tied for third.
Birds next meet is with the
University of Washington in Seattle May 12.
A WS honors athletes
UBC's women athletes will
be honored Thursday at the
annual Associated Women's
Students-Women's Athletic Association awards banquet.
The banquet will be held at
12:30 in Brock Lounge. All
campus women are invited to
attend. Tickets are available
at the AMS office for 35 cents.
FULLBACK ROY BIANCO wii
lead UBC's rugger Thunderbirds against California in
third game of World Cup series Thursday at 12:30 in
Stadium. Birds trail 25-12 in
four-game   total-point  series.
Russ. UN view
to be aired
Amasasp Aroutunian, Russian
ambassador to Canada, will
speak on "Soviet Foreign Policy and the United Nations" April 10 at 12:30 in the auditorium.
Aroutunian's talk is the second in a two-part series on the
super powers and the UN sponsored by the campus UN club.
Livingston Merchant, U.S
ambassador to Canada, gave the
American point of view last
week.
Rabbi Abraham Feinberg Speaks on
THE WAR FOR PEACE
A Message from London, Berlin & Moscow
BU   102   - MARCH  29th  -NOON
Sponsored    by    Nuclear    Disarmament    Club
Actresses needed
to fill Fey er'cast
The Players Club is looking
for actresses who would be
ready, willing and able to tour
B.C. during May.
Two openings in the cast of
"Hay Fever," which played on
campus earlier this month, must
be filled for the tour. Parts open
are Judith and Clara.
Those interested should con
tact Colin Godfrey, local 696 or
108, old Arts building. Rehearsals will be held after exams.
SPORTS   SHORTS
This also happened on the
UBC sports scene over the weekend:
){t       %.       if.
IN GRASSHOCKEY — UBC's
varsity women's grass hockey
team has won the right to play
in the Vancouver city league finals next Sautrday.
Varsity Saturday defeated ex-
King Edward 1-0 and will now
meet ex-Britannia for the championship. Liz Philpott scored the
game's only goal.
•T* H* T-
IN SOCCER — UBC Thunderbirds defeated North Shore "B"
1-0 Saturday in Mainland league
play.
In other games, UBC Jayvees
were whomped 8-0 by Firefighters while the UBC Chiefs whipped Shamrocks 5-1.
V *V V
IN TRACK — UBC whipped
Room and Board
May—September
$70 Month
on Campus — Kappa SiRina House
2380 Wesbrook Cresc.
Phone  Fete  Biidfell   CA   4-4912
STUDENTS!
STUDYING TOO HARD?
I
KEEP ASPIRIN WITH YOU
AT ALL TIMES
UNIVERSITY     PHARMACY     LTD.
5754 University Boulevard CA. 4-3202
Vancouver Olympic Club 86-24
in a dual meet at UBC stadium.
UBC's Geoff Eales was the
meet's only double winner, running the mile in 4:15 and the
two-mile in 9:28.
Dave McKay of UBC won the
880 in 1:56.8 and Craig Gaston
won the 440 in 50.5.
IN CYCLING — UBC cyclers
placed first, second, and fifth in
a 35-mile handicap race Sunday.
Bill Best and Rob Way of
UBC placed first and second,
ahead of Vancouver Bike Club's
Jack Ferguson. Lome Nicholson
Of UBC was fifth.
PIZZARAMA
TODAY
tii.
Yes TODAY is the day of the
LAST JAZZ CONCERT OF THE
YEAR. Pizzarama is proudly presenting- its house oiar.ist, the
fabulous MIKE TAYLOR in concert at UBC.
■You'll hear the famous record-
ins Ki-oup, THE CANADIAN JAZZ
TRIO, of which Mi-ke is Hie leader.
This promises to be one of the
best, jazz scenes heard this j ear
at I'RC, and  it's  FREE.
■We've gotten together with Jaz-
zsoc and arranged for the use of
Brock. .So at l^::i0 the bis show
commences.
Tonite xMike will be playing- at
the PIZZARAMA, as he does every
Tuesday thru Saturday nite. Why
not drop by and meet him, and
listen to bis great music? ? You'll
ALWAYS hear the best in music
at   the   PIZZARMAMA.
You'll also eat the very best in
food, featuring- PIZZA, Italian
Sandwiches and other specialties.
PIZZARAMA
2676   W.   Broadway        RE   3-9916
PORTRAITS
for. . .
,    FINE ART PHOTOG'Y
J&n,   TTUCUIiAisA.
4331   West   10th   Ave.
PEOPLE
GRADUATION
INDIVIDUALISTS
PORTRAITS
APPLICATIONS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
FINE  PRINTS
PEOPLE
ALSO STUDENTS
CA 4-5340
SENORITAS ... just arrived at . . .
fclviAa'A,
(EXCLUSIVE DEALER  FOR THE  UNIVERSITY AREA)
"Fjorlane" Sweaters
• 100% Virgin Wool
• Genuine   Mohair
• Made  in  Italy
• LOVELY SPRING  COLOURS
CARDIGANS — 29.95 PULL-OVER 24.95
CABALLEROS ... just arrived at . . .
fcfoim'A.
BEAUTIFUL WINE SKINS (Botas) FROM SPAIN
• Numerous  shapes  and  sizes.
• Guaranteed   to  keep  wine   in   good   condition
PRICED FROM $4.50 AND  UP
£IviAa'A,
4479 WEST  I0TH AVENUE
CAstle 4-0848
CLEARANCE SALE
COLLEGE SHOP
CLOSING  MARCH   30
Faculty  Sweaters
Aggie
8
Arts
6
Education
18
Forestry
2
Ramblers
2
regular 15.95   NOW 14.88
Umbrellas
Regular 3.39 (3.95)
Automatic 4.99 (5.95)
Hooded Sweatshirts
regular 4.50       NOW 3.99
Sweater Crest
regular 1.55        NOW 1.30
Nylons, broken sizes
regular 1.09 NOW 89c
Faculty   Pins
regular 1.45        NOW 1.30
UBC Pennants
regular 45c NOW 35c
regular 1.20        NOW 1.05
1 Only Men's Blazer
41 regular        NOW $34.00
Jewellery
—
regular   1.50
NOW
1.29
UBC Charms
UBC Key Chains
UBC Pins
UBC Charm Bracelets
regular 4.25
NOW 3.79
Cuff Links
2.79
Pin & Guard
3.69
Gold or Silver Charms
with stone
regular 6.50
NOW 5.19
Brock Extension
11:30-2:30
Mon.-Fri. Page  4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 27, 1962
Iween classes
Birney to discuss Lowry
GRAD ENGLISH ASSN.
Dr. E. Birney will discuss the
life and work of the poet Malcolm Lowry in Grad Centre.
Wed. at 8:15 p.m. All graduates
and guests are welcome.
* * *
UN CLUB
Dr. Mack Eastman, former
head of History dept. will speak
on "The Algerian Tragedy" Bu.
102 noon today.
* *  *
PARLIAMENTARY COUNCIL
Elections of next year's executive in Bu. 102 at noon, Wed.
All parties should be represented.
King  George  High  School
Reunion May 26,  1962
AH Ix-Groas  Welcome
lively
selection  for
Brides.
A.tten«ants,
TVmnaJWear
RENT A GOWN
25%
OFF
For
UBC
MARIE BRUCKER SALON
Designers and Dressmakers
Expert Alterations
Evenings  by Appointment
4683 Kingsway   HE 1-1160
Fur  Stoles
Wl
..'hite Fox,
Drtiner Jackets
Sargent
Sales   &   Service
1205 Seymour
MU 4-3933 MU 4-7730
European and Small Car
SPECIALISTS
Qualified Mechanics
Guaranteed Satisfaction
"Vancouver's Leading
Citroen Dealer"
Students!
For a new dining pleasure
try our daily special.
DEANS
4544 W 10th
Open 'till 11:30
Matz & Wozny
548 Howe St.      MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen.
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
We specialize
in
Ivy League
Clothes
Special Student Rates
Teaching Positions
School District No. 43
(Coquitlam)
Interviews at Personnel Office
March 27 and 28; 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m.
BIOLOGY   CLUB
Brief meeting for election of
programming chairman Wed. at
noon in Bu. 232.
5ft    2ft    Jf.
ROD AND GUN
Important general meeting on
Thurs. at noon in Bu. 217. Elections.
^r   t*   <•
NDC
Rabbi Feinberg speaks on
"The War for Peace," a message
from London,  Berlin • and Mos-
LVBC  STUDENTS
15% Discount
XmporUd  Car  Parti  »».«
AccasioEiaa
'Overseas Auto PartsJ
12th and Alma 111.
cow, Bu. 102 at noon Thurs.
3£  V  H*
COMMUNIST  CLUB
Mr. Nigel Morgan, provincial,
leader of the Communist Party,
speaks Friday noon in Bu. 100
on "A New Power Policy for
B.C. All welcome.
ROOM AND BOARD
at Fraternity House
Available   from   May   1st  to
September  1st
Comfortable    surroundings
and   use  of  House   Facilities.
Call    Bob   Evans
During evenings at
PSI   UPSILON   FRATERNITY
HOUSE
2260 Wesbrook Cses.
CA 4-90S2    >
Saturday Night abhors muddled thinking.
Arnold Edinborough,
Saturday Night's
incisive editor, sees to
it. That's why it's
stimulating to read. It's
on your newsstands
now. Get one. Or better,
yet, subscribe.
Send a postcard to SS York St.
Toronto   1.  ray  later
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IHS
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ST  il
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IGHT
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THE SNACKERY
3 LOCATIONS
3075 Granville - RE 3-5813
4423 W. 10th Ave. CA 4-0833
5075 Kingsway - HE 1-8818
FREE  HOT  &  FAST  PIZZA
DELIVERY
rr
Employment   Opportunities
available through
The   National   Employment   Service
GRADUATES
1 ARCHITECT, Male-B Arch. Position in B.C. Salary $400.
Order No. 962-39.
10 AGRONOMISTS, Male or Female, BSA, positions in Ontario. $395.00. Order No. 512-72.
8  ELECTRIC ENGINEERS,   BSC (Elect.)  Positions  in Alberta.
$425."Order No. 811-107.
10  FORESTERS, BSF, Positions in Ontario. Order No. 512-73.
$415.
4 JR.   EXEC.   TRAINEES,   BA,   postions   in   Ontario.   $325.
Order No. 510-G17.
19 JR. EXECUTIVE, B. Sc. (Mech. Elec.) Positions in Ontario.
$430. Order No. 510-G58.
8 MECHANICAL   ENGINEERS,   B.   Sc.   (Mech.)   Positions   in
Quebec. $500. Order No. 432-2878.
2 CASE WORKERS, Female,  BSW,  positions in Vancouver.
$383. Order No. 908-4.
1 JR.  EXECUTIVE, Female, B. Com. or any grad.  Position
in Vancouver. Salary to be arranged. Order No. 908-15
2 INSURANCE UNDERWRITERS, University Degree. Positions
in Vancouver. $350-$500. Order No. 908-243.
UNDERGRADUATES
10 PETROLEUM ENGINEERS, 2nd/3rd year. Positions in Alberta.   $340.  Order   No.   811-80.
8,,tSEOLOGISTS   ASSISTANTS,   3rd/4th   year   Geol.   Engr. '
8 GEOLOGIST   ASSISTANTS,   3rd/4th   year.    Geol.    Engr.
1 ARCHITECT, Male, 2nd year Arch. Positions in B.C. $225
Order No. 962-40. N .*•
12 SIGHTSEEING GUIDES, Male or Female, 2nd yr. any
faculty. Positions in Vancouver. $1.50 per hr. Order No.
908-238.
60 LABOURERS, Jobs in Vancouver. $1.60 per hr. Order No.
908-253.
2 PROSPECTORS,   2nd/3rd  year.   Mining/Geol.   Eng.   Positions in B.C. $15.00 per day. Order No. 908-238.
1   ASST.   MECH.    DRAUGHTSMAN,    2nd/3rd   year   Mech.
Eng. Position in B.C. $250-$300. Order No. 908-241.
1 ASST. MINING ENGINEER, 2nd/3rd year Geology, Geophysics. Position in B.C. $450-$500. Order No. 908-239.
10 GEOLOGISTS, lst/2nd/3rd yr. students. Positions in
Manitoba. $2.04-$2.17 per hr. Transportation paid both
ways for students remaining all summer. Order No
686-136.
For full information about these positions
and other employment opportunities, see Mr.
Roberts, Room 203, Armoury, CA 4-4305,
9:30a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

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