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The Ubyssey Jan 11, 1962

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 FACULTY CAR FINES
DISMISSED ON SIDE'
-fH«
UBYSSEY
Vol. XLIV
VANCOUVER,  B.C., THURSDAY,  JANUARY  11,   1962
No. 38
Alliances
are needed
says Green
By KRISHNA SAHAY |
Canada   should    not   become |
neutral,  Canadian External Affairs   Minister   Howard   Green,
said Tuesday.
Green, speaking in Brock
Lounge, said "Canada is in many
alliances, and it needs these
alliances for its own protection."
Canada will, as long as possible, retain all its foreign alliances, he said. The Commonwealth is "the most precious
connection that Canada has".
It has helped Canada to un-,
derstand the problems of mem-|
ber countries, Green said. ,
COMMON MARKET |
Asked what objections Can-!
ada had to Britain joining the,
Common Market, Green said:     j
"The reason is largely poli-j
tical. Traditionally Britain has
been the head of the Commonwealth and if it joins the ECM,
an organization whose aim is to
bring out a common foreign
policy for Europe, it cannot remain independent."
Also, he said, Canada has an
annual trade of more than $900
million with Britain.
"However," he said, "this is
not a simple question and we
cannot decide at once. We are
trying to work out a solution,
beneficial to both."
Green reiterated his government's stand on tRed China, saying that if Red China insists on
Formosa becoming Communist,
Canada will never give in. But
if it modifies its demands, Canada might consider supporting
Red China's bid for a seat in the
United Nations.
HAMMARSKJOLD
Speaking about the death of
UN Secretary-General Dag Ham-
marskjold, Green said "His
death was a disaster to the
whole world and Very very bad
for the UN".
"S u p p o r t of the UN has
always been a cornerstone in
our policy, and it will remain
so", he said.
The UN is, however, greatly
obstructed in its work by the
communist bloc, he said. The
communists will never ■ miss an
opportunity to inflame the nationalistic feelings of countries
of the Afro-Asian bloc, Green
said.
Appeals bypass
traffic court
By PAT HORROBIN  -
Some faculty members have settled their campus traffic
fines "on the side," The Ubyssey learned Wednesday.
| Buildings and Grounds superintendent Tom Hughes has
l been granting appeals before the faculty members involved
came to the traffic conviction appeal commission.
A November appeal docket showed five appeals "allowed
by Mr. T. Hughes."
Not all of the appeals granted by Hughes were faculty
members. However, none were students.
Law   Undergraduate   Society   President   Chas   MacLean
charged at a student council meeting Monday that the campus
traffic conviction appeal system has completely broken down.
The   situation   has   grown   so   = ' —
Photo by Don Hume
WOE JS ME POSE is struck by Martin Petter Arts II, seen sitting
in abject despondency on the Administration Building steps.
Cause of his sorrows — the Saturday deadline for second
term fees.
acute on the facultystudent appeal court that the faculty association has put a lawyer on
their parking committee. The
Ubyssey later learned the lawyer is David S. Huberman, of
UBC's law faculty.
BREAKDOWN CHARGES
MacLean, student member of
the board, backed up his charge
of total breakdown with these
points:
• iaculty appeals have not
been going through t h e tribunal.
• seventy or more cases have
been called in at one sitting and
no ruling given until all had
been heard.
• the student member of the
board has not been notified of
sittings of the board.
• faculty members object to
a student being on the board on
the grounds of possible discipline problems.
• the student member's request for a statement of policy
in the face of the former developments was "quietly ignored."
• MacLean told council students had to "cool their heels"
in the corridor for as much as
three hours while waiting for
their cases to be heard.
MacLean pondered the impli
cations of the administration's
listing of council treasurer Malcolm Scott, who sat in with the
law president at two sittings of
the appeal board, to the newly-
formed president's committee
on traffic control.
In October MacLean was ap-
appointed by council to sit on
the appeals board. He has been
a member of the commission
since.
KICKED OFF?
However his name was not on
a list of board members released
this week.
"I don't know if I've been
kicked off or not," said Mac-
Lean. He also said that other
board members are reluctant to
let him know of sittings.
One sitting of which MacLean
learned 15 minutes before it
was to start, was cancelled by
the time he arrived at the scehe
of the session, he said.
He gave this and the fact that
neither he nor Scott have ever
got a reply to their request for
a clarification of present appeal-
board policy as good examples
of the confused state of campus
parking administration.
All agree students shouldn't judge profs
Students «an vow register
complaints about AMS. cards.
Constructive . criticism and
helpful suggestions are being
sought by Student Council.
Students interested contact
Bernie Papke at AMS office.
By PAT HORROBIN
Nobody — faculty, students or
administration — wants to see
a student help decide if a professor did or didn't err in the
eyes of the law.
■ The fictilty, student council
was told Monday night, doesn't
feel happy about having students sitting on any body that
can pass judgment on a professor's behavior.
Some councillors agree. Said
Law Undergrad Society president Chas MacLean Wednesday:
"Personally, I appreciate the
faculty point of* view. What we
want is a1 statement of policy so
council can consider it."
•    •    •
Buildings and Grounds superintendent Tom Hughes told the
Ubyssey, when contacted on his
status . with the appeal board
and the President's committee
on parking controls, that he felt
it wasn't up to a student to vote
on faculty appeals.
Hughes however said that he
had never been to the appeal
board and only went to the parking committee when invited.
"It gives me a big laugh," he
chortled, "when theytalk about
me being responsible lor everything to do with  parking.  Not
the ease."
.  ..*-:■,*   <£-.....--
The story both student hteni'
hers told of the B & G super^
intendent's role in appeal proceedings was quite different.
"The dockets (lists of those
appealing and outcome of their
hearing) showed members of
faculty who violated traffic regulations have in practice settled
the matter with the superintendent of bulldings and
grounds," MacLean remembered.
The docket is destroyed after
each hearing.
Hughes said the President's
committee deals with faculty in*
fractions.    He    interpreted   re
marks made by Chas. MacLean
to council that if faculty tickets
were settled out of court by himself: "What he (MacLean) really
meant was: faculty parking appeals don't go through at the
same time as student appeals.
The President's commsfetee deals
with them"
:   *    *    *
Scott shrugged, when told of
the B &;G superintendent's remarks. The faculty, he said,
should have to appear before a
proper board—-which he stated
was not being done.
Mr. Hughes may say what he
likes, but no committee is dealing with this. Mr. Hughes is,"
Scott said.
Only one faculty member has
insisted on being tried by the
faculty-student appeal board —
Prof. J. A. McDonald of the
Spanish department.
McDonald didn't want to
make any statements on his own
personal views of the involved
campus parking question.
He suggested philosophy's professor Dr. Peter Remnant, who
in turn suggested Dr. James
Foulks, head of the department
of pharmacology, as the best
man to talk about faculty feelings on parking. "
Foulks, whom Remn an t
termed as head of a faculty committee in charge of parking
problems (chiefly impounding),
had earlier played down the
committee's scope-
•    •    •
Another member of the executive, vice-president Charles B.
Bourne, a professor of law, had
affirmed the rumor that David
S. Huberman of the law faculty
had joined  Foulks'   committee.
Foulks had admitted Huberman was needed: "The fact he
is a lawyer may enable him to
give assistance not otherwise
available from other members." Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 11, 1962
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEMiBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year in
Vancouver by the Alma, Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial
opinions expressed are those of the Editor of The Ubyssey and not
necessarily  those  of  the Alma  Mater  Society  or the  University  of   B.C.
Editor-in-Chief: Roger McAfee
Managing Editor    .    .
Associate   Editor    .    .
News Editor      .    .    .
City Editor      .    .    .    .
CUP Editor . . .
Photography Editor .
Senior Editor . . .
Sports Editor . . .
Photographv Manager
Critics Editor . . .
Editorial Research    .    .
 Denis  Stanley
.    .    .    .    .    .       Ann   Pickard
 Fred Fletcher
 Keith Bradbury
 Maureen Covell
 Don Hume
.    .    .    .   ..      Sharon  Rodney
 Mike Hunter
        Byron  Hender
 David Bromige
Bob Hendrickson, Ian Cameron
STAFF THIS ISSUE
Layout: Bob McDonald
REPORTERS: Pat Horrobin, Chris Fahrni, Tim Padmore,
Richard Simeon, Mike Horsey, George Railton, Eric
Wilson, Krishna Sahay.
TECHNICAL: Pauline Fisher, Ted Ross, Don Hume.
At
confusion
The reason for the schmozzle in the realm of campus
parking has become a little clearer. The system is bad. Not
the system used in towing violators to the compound, or the
system for collecting fines. These work fine. Cars are towed
and fines are collected. True, often the wrong cars are towed
and the compound fills up with visitors' cars. The traffic
office then fills up with visitors trying to get the cars. Sure
they get them back with nothing more than a little inconvenience — and a lot of hard feelings.
And Busters patrols the campus, shepherded by little men
in a little car who point out the violaters. Busters isn't to
blame. They do the job they are hired to do and do it quite
efficiently.
It's fine for university officials to say that Busters is made
necessary by students who will not follow the rules. We have
always agreed with that statement. But lately we have been
having second thoughts.
More and more cars are towed each year. The fine scale
continues to rise. And now we. are told a five dollar parking
fee will be levied on all student cars at the start of the next
academic year. (No official word of this has yet been received
by student council.) These developments point to one thing—
an inability by those who form this university parking policy,
to cope with the problem.
The story on page one is a good indication of what we
mean. This university has set up an appeal tribunal to hear
anyone dissatisfied with the judgment of the patrolman who
had the car impounded. The students were led to believe
this system would be fair, with everyone being given a chance
to state his case. After hearing each case, the judges ruled on
it. Now, however, the judges "process" the entire docket,
perhaps 70 cases, before rendering a decision. Then each case
is voted on. It must be difficult to remember Case 1 after
finishing with Case 70!
Of course, not all cases get as far as the appeal board. In
the interest of what he would probably call efficiency, the
Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds Tom Hughes has
allowed certain appeals on his own. Now we are not questioning Jolly Tommy's ability to decide on the merits of an appeal
all by himself. We are-asking, as Chas MacLean-and Malcolm
Scott have asked, for a statement of university policy on parking appeals.
' It seems like neither the parking appeal board, which
meets on an ad hoc basis with whatever number of faculty
members of the parking committee it can entice from the bar
of the-faculty club sitting as fudges, as well as two students
when they are told of the sittings, nor the parking committee,
which is a sub-committee of the Campus Planning and Development committee, know what, exactly, they are doing.
Confusing, eh?
Right, but with such confusion in the top echelon of our
parking system it's no wonder that UBC parking is getting
worse instead of better.
We didn't do it
Aw come on, people, quit phoning and don't bother to
even think about writing letters. We had nothing to do with
the copy in The Moobyssey. The thing was published by the
Agricultural Undergraduate Society headed by aggie Tom
Nesbit. Any 4»eefs or compliments should go to him and The
Moobyssey editor.
NEWS ITEM: Faculty settle traffic violation on the side.
^^n^-x-*v  ^ v>-- i%™.~*m*
Letters fo> the Editor
Misrepresentation ?
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
Permit me to reply to the
letter on automobile insurance
in your issue of Jan. 9.
Mr. Rafferty's letter not only
reflects unkindly on insurance
companies and on the intelligence of those of us who, year
after year, are spending around
$100 for insurance premiums,
but it also, grossly misrepresents the present state of the
law in British Columbia.
And inasmuch as Mr. Rafferty's remarks may persuade
some- people not to carry any
insurance, these misrepresentations should not go unchallenged.
•In this, province, a non-paying, passenger v who wishes to
collect damages from his; driver
must: prove that •. the accident
in which he was injured was
the result of the driver's gross
negligence, i.e: wanton or very
great carelessness.
In other words, the chanees
that an insurance company
will be called upon to pay under its policy are greater when
the passenger is a paying one.
Therefore, if you are going to
use your car to carry paying
passengers, the company will
want to know about it and
charge you an extra premium.
' If you fail to disclose this
fact to them (and they ask you
about it specifically) and you
are not paying the extra premium, you are not insured
against this extra risk and the
company will refuse to pay.
It is as simple as that, there
is nothing underhanded or
subtle about it.
It is simply not correct to
say, as Mr. Rafferty does, that
the onus is on the driver to
prove beyond a reasonable
doubt that he was driving competently. On the contrary, the
burden of proving negligence
rests on the passenger.
It is also quite wrong to
state that your policy is void
if you are not, as Mr. Rafferty
puts it, "driving with, complete
competence," or not "driving
sanely". Most accidents are the
result of carelessness or incompetence, and are yet covered
by insurance.
Indeed, if Mr. Rafferty would
care to read his policy he will
find that the only occasion on
whiehs 'the manner of his driving would effect his insurance
is when he: is "under the influence". And the burden of
proving* that happy state rests
on' the company.
Yours truly,
'H: WEDDIGEN,
Law III
Closed Early
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
What's with the Brock cafe?
Today at 4t50 p\m., I went up
tobuy a ten-cent chocolate icecream econe, but. the cashier
said'• 'the'-place was. closed. I
thought i 'it • ■didn't close until
five* o'clock. I'm disgusted.
^- Yours truly,
OVER WEIGHT'BUT
HUNGRY.
"Ho Udfcility"
Editor,
The-Ubyssey.
Dear-Sir:
In-reference to the January
9 letter > entitled "Skeptical",
Mr: Rafferty has stated that "if
you pick up a hitch hiker you
are liable to be sued by him if
you are in an a«cident. He
states that "the evidence is
totally against the driver" and
that "the whole case rests persuasively in the hitch hiker's
favor." These statements reflect ' the common misconception of an automobile driver's
liability to a gratuitous passenger. The proof is gross negligence as stated in Sec. 81 of
the Motor Vehicle Act.
There is therefore no liability to the driver who injures
a passenger who rides free of
charge unless a high degree
of negligence is established.
The occurrence of such a high
degree of negligence is not
found in every accident. Most
accidents do not involve high
degrees of negligence, hence
there is no liability to drivers.
At the conclusion of Mr. Rafferty's letter the question is
asked — Why is the additional
premium so low? The answer
is, that the risk of incuring liability to a gratuitous passenger
which needs a high degree of
negligence proved, is low —
hence the premium is low.
Excess coverage is an aspect
of auto insurance open to all
drivers and often the ordinary
policy contains a clause for ex
cess insurance at no extra cost.
The article criticized stated
that when the passenger is not
gratuitous, but a paying passenger, then excess coverage is
recommended. This reason has
been pronounced because when
the driver carries a paying
passenger then a lower degree
of negligence is all that is
needed to establish liability.
In such cases excess coverage
is recommended.
The article itself was excellent and should serve as «;
warning to persons having paying passengers.
The criticism was bad because it missed the ooint of the
article due to a fabrication of
false legal principles in the
mind of the critic.
S. J. MACFARLANE,
Law II.
Reply "Maybe'
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
In reply to your editorial entitled "Maybe", of January 9, I
must challenge your statement
that "we'll be lucky" if the
Winter Sports Centre is completed in 1963.
Revised plans are now being
prepared for presentation to
the Board of Governors and
the Alma Mater Society early
in February. Drawing of detailed working plans will follow, with construction to begin
as soon as these are completed
and finally approved.
Floods and tornadoes aside,
this should mean completion of
the Winter Sports Centre by at
least the early summer of 1963,
not, as you suggest, in dim and
distant '64.
With reference to farther
statements in this editorial to
the effect that students possibly
do not want a Winter Sports
Centre, I call to vour attention
the fact that over 80 per cent
of students voted in favor of
this proposal when it was put
to referendum.
Surely this is ample evidence
that the students of UBC both
know what they want and are
willing to continue to contribute to the development of
this university in order to
achieve it.
Yours truly,
PATRICK GLENN,
Winter Sports Centre
Client's Committee. ">**
Thursday, January 11, 1962
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
IDEAS
at large
 BUTTONS	
By  PAT HORROBIN
Ubyssey Staff Wriler
What this world needs is a
"that wasn't the real me you
saw" button, and the sooner
the better.
A button with a message like
this would save endless Monday morning explaining over
Saturday night behavior. When
someone armed with a smirking "hey" starts to remind you
how you maintained you were
out to break Harpo Marx's old
record for standing on your
head, all you do is flash your
button.
That was not the real me,
gents, you saw Saturday night.
• •    •
No more of this weak business of stuffing the blame off:
"He was easily the strongest
personality in the place. I
mean ... I mean . . . gosh,
what was I supposed to do?
Slug him? I didn't want my
blood all over your mother's
carpet." A clear-eyed, dignified flash of the button would
do it.
Never more would anyone
with a dime to invest have to
bluster out another pink-faced
pardon-me. "Some people fold
up and go to sleep. Heck, all
I do is get slap-happy when I
get really tired. That's the way
it is. I don't really know what
I'm doing and don't really seem
to care. Oh. Well, take it that
way if you want to. See if I
care."
The real me, boys? Out to
tea.
• ■• ■•
With a button like this, no-
one would ever have to totter
beaten puppy-like between the
nervously flinching: "I wouldn't
recognize London if someone
gave me it, sir. Heh, heh," and
the wild-eyed: "I just don't
know. I sometimes wonder how
you profs don't turn to homicide when you see things like
this," as something more like
a tabulated dartboard than
Ancient Europe, flawlessly reconstructed, is handed back by
a troubled instructor.
Academy award character
reforestation portrayals would
stay near the Freddy Wood
theatre, where they draw a bigger gate and kinder critics.
"D'you think it would. interest you to know I began
studying for the August supp.
last night?" would become
passe. Serenely, you could set
him straight.
What you have there, sir, is
not the real me.
• •    •
Button, button, who wants a
button? All those in favor, rise
and chant,* "that'was not the
real me you sa"v^."- ■
In unison, ready now, all
together . . .
Special   Prices  for  UBC
Cornette Beauty
Salon
"Individual   Attention"   by
Merle and Female Stylists.
OPEN   FRI   TILL   NINE
4532 W. TO CA 4-7440
Council ok s belated
clubs  board  budget
Council Monday night passed
an amended budget of the University Clubs Committee.
The budget had first been
presented to council in November and was referred back to
UCC for further investigation
and review.
The amended budget included
a $200 decrease in the Folk Song
Society's grant and a $500 allotment for administrative expenses.
UCC spokesman John Oades
told council the budget was presented late because the UCC
treasurer had resigned around
budget time and the UCC president has been ill. He also blamed
a lack of liaison between council and the UCC executive for
the delay.
He said the UCC executive
had    not   received  any  serious
Attention aesthetes!
Rumours that The Ubyssey,
having used the Critics' Page
to win the Southam Trophy,
has now callously discarded
that particular diadem; rumours that popular playboy
editor Bromige is sitting this
term out in an Acapulco jail;
rumours that his brilliant
staff, heads stuffed with well-
merited praise, have struck
for higher pay and more free
ducats; all these rumours —
however appealing to the
speculative mind — all these
must be quashed.
Ready yourselves, aesthetes
all; tomorrow we astound
again!
complaints or requests for a
general meeting from the member clubs regarding the budget.
UCC is holding a general
meeting this month.
Council treasurer Malcolm
Scott said he could see no reason why the budget could not
be passed.
Grad  class
to elect exec
This year's graduating class
executive will be elected at a
meeting of two representatives
from each faculty during the
week of January 22, student
council deeided Monday.
The executive, consisting of a
president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer and social
chairman will appoint the his-
tori an, valedictorian, poet,
prophet, and writer of the last
will and testament.
Council earlier defeated a motion to have the grad class
executive elected at a general
meeting of the grad class.
UPPER
TENTH
BARBERS
4574 W. 10th AVE.
One Block Past the Gates
Featuring European Trained
Barbers
FROSH!
STUDYING TOO HARD?
KEEP ASPIRIN WITH YOU
AT AH TIMES
ASPIRINS!
UNIVERSITY     PHARMACY     LTD.
5754 University Boulevard CA. 4-3202
JUMPING APPLE deadline is
June Bugg, Arts 1, who said
she couldn't wait to buy an
Aggie apple for the Crippled
Children's fund. Apple Day
is today.
Music room to
common room
Student council decided Monday that the Brock Stage Room
will be re-established as a Common Room, containing a television set and other furnishings
from the old Common Room.
The former Common Room
will be used as a Council Chamber. A new enlarged council
table has been installed in the
old Common Room as the Board
Room is no longer big enough
to seat the expanded Student
Council.
U
n
THE SNACKERY
3 LOCATIONS
3075 Granville - RE 3-5813
4423 W. 10th Ave. CA 4-0833
5075  Kingsway — KE  1-8818
FREE  HOT  &  FAST  PIZZA
DELIVERY
Clearance Sale
(CONT'D.)
at the
COLLEGE SHOP
6 only POPUN JACKETS, snow-proofed       ©EJ QC
great for golfing. Reg. $7.95. Now '..._...:     VfJ««MJ
6 only UBC JACKETS
Were $15.95. Now 	
$11.50
3 only VOC T-shirts
Were $1.98. Now    $1.50
3 only UBC T-shirts
Were $1.00. Now      80c
3 only AGGIE T-shirts
Were $1.98. Now    $1.50
1 only PHYS.-ED. T-shirt
Was $1.79. Now     $1.30
Brock Extension
11:30 - 2.30
Mon. - Fri.
SAVE 20% to 50%
OFF REGULAR PRICES
AMERADA PETROLEUM
CORPORATION
WILL   INTERVIEW
Geologists and Geological Engineers
FOR PERMANENT EMPLOYMENT
with Bachelors and Advanced Degrees
-JANUARY 15-16, 1962
Inquire at the office of
PERSONNEL SERVICES
University of  British  Columbia
FOR
THAT
SMART
LOOK
IN
GLASSES
LOOK
TO
Plesclibtim Optical
GP®
We use genuine CORECTAL lenses
— clear from edge to edge —
"Ask Your Doctor"
Contact Lenses — Zenith Hearing Aids
Special Discounts to Students Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 11,  19cfl?
Tween dosses
Quintet comes Friday
JAZZSOC
Dave Quarin Quintet featuring former Stan Kenton sideman
Ray Sikora, Friday, 12:30 in
Auditorium. Members free, non-
members 25c.
* *   *
GERMAN CLUB
"The Big Spa", an excellent
documentary film and the latest
newsreel. Both films in English,
Fri. noon, Bu 204.
* *   *
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
John Edwards film "Lonesome
Lake", the Northern wilderness,
12:30, today in Bu 104. Come all.
* *   *
CIRCLE  K  CLUB
Fri. 12:30 Cedric Cox, MLA,
"Inside Russia" — slides and
commentary. Bu 2218.
* *   *
PHILOSOPHY CLUB
Dr. B. Savery will speak on
Art and Truth, Monday noon,
Bu 212.
* *   *
WRITERS' WORKSHOP
Meeting tonight at Dr. Bir-
ney's home,  1938 Comox. MSS
in Bu 170.
* *   *
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Still a few spaces available
for foreign students for Powell
River trip Jan. 26 to 28. Apply
I.H. office.
RAMBLERS CLUB
Annual Awards dance Sat.,
Jan. 13, 8-12 in Brock Dance
Lounge. Gen. meeting today
noon, Bu 204.
* *   *
UBC SAILING CLUB
General meeting 12:30 today
in Bu 203. Films shown.
* *   *
WEIGHTLIFTING TEAM
Team picture taken today 1
p.m.,     weight-training    room.
Strip.
* *   *
AGRICULTURE UNDERGRAD
SOC
Meeting of all fun-loving
types, a party, 'the Farmers'
Frolic. Meeting begins sharp at
9   p.m.  Friday  in the  Armory.
* *   *
AMATEUR RADIO CLUB
Advanced code and theory
classes today noon in Bu 317.
* *   *
INDIAN STUDENTS ASS'N
Elmore Philpott speaks on
"Liberation of Goa" today at
noon, Bu 102.
! UBC  STUDENTS
15% Discount
Imported  Car  Parts  and
Accessories
'Overseas Auto PartsJ
kl2ta and Alma
BE 1-7686'
"THE REEF
ff
Point Roberts, Washington, U.S.A.
DINING & DANCING
Featuring "the Fabulous,Ian Smith Trio"
FRI., SAT. & SUN.
OPEN YEAR ROUND
10 Miies South of Deas Island Tunnel
Large Parties by Reservation Only. Dial 945-2233-945-7579
No minors allowed on premises
Proof of age must be available
The California Standard Company
CALGARY. ALBERTA
offering careers in
Petroleum Exploration in Canada
will* cortductcampus interviews on
January 15,  16 and  17
for Post Graduates, Graduates and
Undergraduates in:
Geological Engineering
(Options 1, 2 and 3)
Honours Geology
Physics and Geology
Minjng Engineering
..Chemical Engineering
Permanent and Summer
Permanent and Summer
Permanent and Summer
Permanent Only
Permanent-Only
ARRANGEMENTS FOR PERSONAL INTERVIEWS MAY BE
MADE THROUGH THE UNIVERSITY EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
Varsity Fabrics
4437 W. 10th Ave CA 4-0842
Yard Goods, McCall Patterns
Sewing Supplies
Open Friday 'til 9
Campus Barber
Shop
Monday - Friday 8:30 - 5:00
Saturday   8:30   -   12:00
LOCATED IN
BROCK EXTENSION
POINT GREY
JEWELLERS
25% REDUCTION
On all Merchandise For
UBC Students
(Show Student Card)
4435 W.lOthAve. CA 8-8718
Complaints About
A.M.S.  Cards?
Constructive criticism  and helpful suggestions are being
sought by Students' Council.
CONTACT THE CHAIRMAN!
BERNIEPAPKE
• SEE HIM! Any noon hour in the A.M.S. office
• WRITE HIM! A brief at Box 131, Brock
• PHONE HIM! And leave a message at CA 4-3242
Rental Service
TUXEDOS
Black Suits, Formals,
Costumes, Make-up
Special Student Rates
New York
Costume Salon
4397 W.  10th      CA 4-0034
Near UBC Gates
APPLICATIONS
ARE   NOW   BEING  ACCEPTED
FOR THE POSITION OF
Financial   Assistant
TO THE
Co-Ordinator  of  Publications
• Applicants should have background in publication
and/or student government
Applications must be handed into
Mrs. Dore, Room 201, Brock Hall by January 12, 1962
10-5 p.m. Weekdays
***
Scotland, English Lakes, Shakespeare Country, Devon, London,
Holland, Germany, Switzerland,
Liechtenstein, Austrian Tyrol,
Vienna, Yugoslavia's Alpine and
Adriatic resorts, Trieste, Venice,
Florence, Hill Towns, Rome,
Sorrento, Capri, Rivieras, French
Alps, Paris.
Sail June 1 5, Empress of England
67 days $1,392
contact your focal travel agent or write
UNIVERSITY TRAVEL CLUB LTD.
57 Bloor St. West, Toronto
3
iMXJM^
WANTED-men of this calibre
This is Harry Knight, a graduate in Electrical Engineering from the University of Toronto. As an IBM
consultant, he is putting his university education to
exciting practical use.
Harry works with some of Canada's largest companies
©n computer applications and he continues to broaden   ,
his knowledge in his chosen field with each aew IBM
assignment. His work is creative, inspiring and satisfying and Harry is confident about his future with IBM..
Students who wish to know
about a position at IBM like
Harry's are invited to
write for this book.
K&.-X
HfTERNATrONAL BUSINESS MACHINES COMPAKY UMOTED
944 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C.MU, 3-3331
Branch Manager—J. L. Ytllowlen
•Trade Mart

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