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The Ubyssey Jan 30, 1962

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 THE UBYSSEY
A Democat?
Vol. XLIV
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1962
No. 47
1^.     %-*y„     #«"W'«
FROSH  ENGINEER debate couldn't decide on  whether the
girls in Brock or the girls in the Bus Stop were sexier. Kenneth
. Rae wonders why they didn't consider the Caf as he stands
next tq a typical Caf type female.
Campus sex answer
eludes mere males
Which are sexier? The girls who frequent the Bus Stop
coffee shop or the girls who frequent Brock cafeteria?
Mathematical formulaie,' a vis
iting1 "expert," a letter from. The
, Ubyssey jand a capacity Brock
; Joungfc crowd *— largely nude —
failed to reach a satisfactory
conclusion in Monday's Ffosh-
Engineer debate to the problem
which has bothered, young Igen-
tlemen students almost since the
days of the Great Trek.
The debate concluded in a tie.
Speakers, two Engineers and
two     freshmen,    upheld    their
yiews largely on grounds of personal opinion.
"Bus stop girls are not afraid
to show what they have, whether sitting on stools or at tables,"
stated affirmative speaker Ron
Card, a fourth year Engineer,
who claimed to have spent "the
better part of the last five years
pursuing the subject."
•.- Negative speaker Rick Higgs,
freshman upholding the reputation of BrOck womanhood, countered stating that by a new mathematical formula (B—H—W—
WOW) Brock girls receive a 7
"per- gal" in comparison to their
bus stop cotemporaries who total a miserable three points.
The    "sexless,    ankle-length
Essondale gets
hash president
Frosh president Ed Yewchin
was taken to Essondale Monday.
An engineering spokesman
-said Yewchin was abducted after
a morning history lecture. He
wasdressedintornclothing,
was dressed in torn clothing,
gagged and bound, and then taken out and dumped on the Essondale grounds.
The spokesman said Yewchin
returned to campus about 4:30.
He said Yewchin complained
of spending considerable time
convincing Essondale officials of
his identity.
Yewchin was not available for
comment.
NFCUS levy raise
tabled by Council
National president
criticizes apathy
NFCUS sefs
deadlines
Deadlines for two NFCUS
functions are on Wednesday.
The NFCUS Literary Contest and the Inter-regional Exchange Program both have a
final deadline set for Wednesday.
coats" of the latter group gave
him some difficulty in judging
fairly, he added.
:! FBs Jreshie', associate Maurice
Jordan cited the geographical location of Brock and stated it was
closer to all those places where
ladies congregate; therefore it
followed that there would be
more and therefore sexier women to be found within its confines.
The psychological comforts
of Brock, including its comfortable chesterfields, its relaxed atmosphere and its absence of Red-
shirts, were also praised for
stimulating women.
Second affirmative speaker
Don Buckland, fourth engineering, was roundly hissed after his
description of the English literature program an Engineer takes
during the course of his education.
He ultimately raiesd the point
that a young man can easily pick
up a date during a simple cup of
coffee at the bus stop.
"Brock is far more expensive,"
he continued. "First a young man:
mut rush, then pledge, then buy
the latest Ivy League creation
from Memphis, Tennessee, then
get his pin before he can hope to
get anywhere."
Chairman of the debate Ed La-
valle (Comm. II) declared the
resolution a draw after members
of the audience verbally indicated their preferences.
McLean
blasts local
committee
] The president of the National
Federation of Canadian University Students Monday criticized
the UBC committee for a general
lack of activity.
He praised the committee's
work with native Indians, however, and said more work along
this line should be done.
McLean said UBC was traditionally considered one of the
most active Canadian universities, but now is losing that reputation.
He blasted student council for
being interested only in local
matters. "Nationally and internationally, like it or not, student council has to stand up and
be counted," McLean told the
council sub-committee.
He pointed out that Peter
Meekison, student president in
1959-60, and other past AMS
presidents, had repeatedly
brought national and international problems mto the spotlight and kept them there.
"He'd call me about Hungarian students being-executed and
want to know what we were
going to do about it."
McLean implied that the present student council has taken
little or no interest in this type
of problem.
But, he told local NFCUS
members, it was up to them to.
create interest. "Create interest
and the money will come in. See
the people around here that
count."
By SHARON MacKinnon
Student Council Reporter
Student Council Monday night tabled a motion to give the
National Federation of Canadian University Students an additional ten cents per student.
Walter McLean, national president of NFCUS said a delay in
getting the grant means payment
of a loan would be delayed and
continuing payment of interest
would use up funds which could
be used for national activities.
"At present the increase is
needed for salaries of the national secretariat staff who are grossly underpaid, and for travel expenses of regional and national
presidents so that universities
won't get out of touch with the
national organization as seems to
have happened here," McLean
said.
McLean said 14 of the member universities of NFCUS had
already accepted the voluntary
increase,  and   that  nine more
were expected to do so.
"Two universities have even
considered the possibility of an
additional dollar levy in the light
of the financial position of
their national and international
voice," he said.
Treasurer Malcolm Scott told
council that the Alma Mater Society budget could not stand the
load of the additional grant.
Finance committee had earlier
turned down the NFCUS grant.
President Al Cornwall told
The Ubyssey he was appalled at
the financial picture Scott presented.       :■-'■'■':
Cornwall  states Ms case
Frats  obey
beer rules
Administration has ordered
campus fraternities to get rid of
beer dispensers in their frat
houses, a university spokesman
said Monday.
Fraternity heads contacted on
Friday had declined comment on
the matter.
The spokesman said most fraternities had already complied
with the ruling.
"If indeed our financial position is in jeopardy we should
have known of this months in
advance," he said, "as council
grants supplements to petition-
in g organizations practically
every meeting."
"It has been my policy to leave
specific areas of administration
to specific groups, on the understanding that every consideration is given to the total stature
of the AMS," Cornwall said.
"I find it hard to swallow that
finances seem to be lacking in
this area," he added. "In future
student council -will personally
consider every aspect of finance."
Cornwall said an investment
in NFCUS was an investment in
Canada.
"There is no more beneficial
way in which to demonstrate
our support of the education of
Canadian students than by support of NFCUS," he said.
Cornwall was a member of the
finance committee of NFCUS at
the 1961 national seminar.
Dave Anderson, local president of the NFCUS committee
said he found it "most remarkable that the finance committee
should make a note in the budget that they would have to find
money for the extra NFCUS
grant, and then make no allowance for it in the margin of the
budget or consider it when mak^
ing other expenditures.
NFCUS  activities
WALTER McLEAN
NFCUS   National   President
. . . blasts inactivity
Mr. McLean told Student
Council Monday night that a student body should belong to
NFCUS not for what it can get
out of it, but for what it can
contribute to student life.
"University students are in a
position to critically evaluate
what is happening in our own
country, our university, and the
world," he said. -
He said that NFCUS was neither a club, interest group nor
service organization but the political organ of Canadian students.
"You have a responsibility to
echo those you represent not
only in local affairs, but on national and international issues,"
he said.
Areas he mentioned in which
NFCUS had taken action representing the views of its thirty-
eight member universities included:
• Obtaining   income tax  exemption for university fees;
• starting a life insurance plan
with lower rates for students;
• requesting changes in immigration policy concerning foreign students.
• Notifying the South African
government of Canadian students' distaste for apartheid and
supporting the SACHED integrated university in South Africa.
• Supporting the teaching of
conversational French and English in elementary schools.
McLean told council tha*
World University Service is "the
service arm of NFCUS."
He said, however, that WUSC
was not a representative nor a
totally student organization,
whereas NFCUS is.
McLean said that the lack of
information and interest in NFCUS at UBC is not general
among other student councils.
Late from  Council
Council approved in principal the motion to pay the ton
cents if finances looked good
in four weeks. Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 30,  1962
THE
Winner ol the Southam Trophy
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department.
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year in
Vancouver by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial
opinions  expressed  are  those of  the  Editor  of  The  Ubyssey  and  not
■ocrenrily    '''OSP    -<**    fir*    itmflT' Mntor    So^i^ty    »r.   thP    TTntV^r^i-tV    «'     HC.
Telephone   CA   4-3242.    Locals:    Editor—25;   News-r^23;   Photography—24
.. "^diiox-in-Cbiet: Roger McAfee
Managing  Editor    .    ; Denis  Stanley
Associate   Editor        Ann   Pickard
News Editor Fred Fletcher
City Editor Keith Bradbury
CUjP Editor  Maureen Covell
Photography Editor Don Hume
Senior Editor       Sharon Rodney
Sports Editor  Mike Hunter
Photographv  Manager              Byron  Hender
Critics Editor • •    David Bromige
' ,     Editorial Research    .    .    Bob Hetadriekson, Ian Cameron
STJKFF THIS ISSSUE
Layout: Donna Morris
Reporters
Ken Warren (desk), Pat Horrobin, George Railton, Ian
Cameron, Krishna Sahay, Susanne Clarke, Tirn Padmore.
Sports
Bill Willson, Donna Morris, Glenn Schultz, Herb Walker.
Technical
Bob Groves, Bert MacKinnon.	
Rmr for cover
Well, council is at it again. Monday night it tabled a motion
which would have given the National Federation of Canadian
University Students another ten cents per UBC student.
When discussion arose, council, as usual, found itself in the
embarrassing position of having; at least three quarters of its
•members totally ignorant of the topic. So instead of sitting
down calmly, and rationally analyzing the problem, some council members voted to table the motion for one month.   -~
It seems to be easier to run and hide than face up to the
problems. This council at times reminds us of squid. A smoke
screen from the heavies and run for the shelter of "the table."
Run for office
[ We do not like to preach apathy BUT with only two days
left until the deadline for. applications on the First Slate there
have been no nominations brought forward.
Positions on the First'Slate are extremely important arid
people who are not eonvmed now or have not even thought
about running are leaving it too late to make a considered decision which is necessary on their part.
': . We hope that people wiho intend to run for these offices
have had enough time to think it over and will now post their
nominations.
Those who have made the decision to run and are holding
out to see if they will be acclaimed at the last minute, should'
post their names now.
If they are afraid of competition for the race then they
are not the best possible people for the post. On the other hand,
if they do post their names and people from other groups find
they are not a suitable choice then the opposing nominations
:,will undoubtedly arise. >
'" With only two days to go before campaigning starts, we
would suggest those who intend to run get on the ball.
The hoi stein hour
There is a news story out of Axmouth, England, which may
lead to some little confusion on Madison Avenue. The report
involves a farmer.wiho has installed television sets in his barn
because he found that his cows gave more milk while watching
television than they did while standing sullenly in barnish
gloom. The complications possible arising from this discovery
become alarmingly evident.
■ If cows give more milk while watching TV, other farmers
will take up the challenge and in turn install sets for their
cows, and television may even become standard dairy equipment. Eventually society may be confronted in some areas with
the rather bewildering possibility of a TV audience 60 per cent
cow and only 40 per cent people.
Not only that. Upon further research it may be established
that cows give more milk while watching "Father Knows Best,"
for instance, than they do watching "The Rifleman." What influence would this have on ratings?
" The industry must face the future of television with stern
resolve, and make what adjustments it can. There might even
come a stage at which cows would have more to say about
program ratings than vice-presidents. If video should become
a factor in serious overproduction of milk the departments of
agriculture might step in. At that point the vice-presidents
might be willing to relinquish their positions.
—Christian Science Monitor.
Letters to the Editor
'Operation Freedom'
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
It was with some trepidation that I read of the iminent
arrival on our campus of the
'radical right,' in the form of
a students' anti-Communist
group. During the past few
months, it has been a matter
of pride among many Canadian students that our campuses
have been relatively free from
the Goldwater neo-facism
which is enjoying such popularity south of the border.
It is particularly disappointing to learn that these extremists have had to fall back on
"The Truth" as declared by
the Chamber of Commerce. A
businessman may have to be
hard-headed in his commercial
affairs but, in the realm of
social political thought, such
an attitude often makes him
more muddle-headed than sensible.
Let us examine "Operation
Freedom"—
(1) It is laudable that our
citizens should learn about
Communism and socialism, but
it is questionable whether the
lectures and discussion organ-
ibed by extremists would engage in an objective study of
these movements.
(2) The group, we are told,
will further 'better understanding of the contrast between
freedom, communism and socialism.' Thus they presuppose
m absolute and all-pervading
contrast between 'freedom' (?)
and any other system of political   and   social   organization.
(3) ". . . work to solve local
problems on which communist
agitation and propaganda
feed . . ."—could it be, perhaps, that some injustice exists
in our 'free' country? I suggest
that it is somewhat unfair to
regard the failings of our system as only 'local problems,'
while assuming that the failings of other systems are due
to an inherent EVIL in that
system.
(4) "Counteract the 'Party
Line' with 'THE TRUTH.' Does
the Canadian Chamber of
Commerce have  some sort of
monopoly  on  the dispensation
of TRUTH?
(5) "Keep an active, informed interest in world affairs . . ."
—This probably means thsit all
members must swear to read
only TIME magazine.
(6) "Challenge misleading
and uhtrithful statements as
they appeair" in the press, or on
radio or television. Wbat is a
'misleading statement,' and
who is to judge orthodoxy in
these matters? On what basis
do these extremists set themselves up as the guardians of
truth in our society?
I suggest that it is the right
and the duty of every student
on this campus to support the
OBJECTIVE study of socia.l
arid political problems, end
not to be swayed by the sophistry of extremists, either
on the right or oh the left.
John Hutchinson,
I Graduate Studies.
Restriction?
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
With reference to the debate
- currently going on as to whether or not the activities of
communists in Canada should
be restricted, may I suggest
that those who proclaim themselves against such restrictions
on the grounds of their invalidating democratic principles,
examine more closely the forces that are at work in the communist camp. The history of
communism shows that their
pattern of operation has always
been the same: neutralize the
country, isolate it from all alli-
ences or substitute, pro-communist alliances and then "take
over." Let us not be deluded
into the belief that the mere
upholding of our principles is
a guarantee of immunity from
»communist infiltration. If totalitarian tactics are used to
undermine democratic governments, what alternative remains there for us but to fight
back with the same measures?
I think all this screaming
about Birchism is highly childish. It should be evident that
such movement are not advocated by citizens who merely
wish to apply sane measures
against communist infiltration.
Nevertheless, I would think a
routine check on those attending the Toronto conference
would be quite appropriate and
not at all in violation with our
!"principles." In closing may I
inform the reader that I am not
identifying myself with any
group whatsoever which advocates anti-communist measures
but merely write this from my
own point of view.
Dietrich   Luth,
Arts III.
Represent the voice?
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
Lately the Ubyssey has printed marry letters that claim to
represent the voice of all democratic freedoms which, they
ruminate, are threatened by an
enthusiastic right-wing element. Of particular interest is
last Thursday's letter by Charlie Boylan, president oi the Student Commonwealth Club.
These gentlemen of the left
anxiously reveal to us that our
freedom of speech is menaced
by the distribution of a few
and too far between letters.
These letters are allegedly distributed by Fascists, Birchists,
McCarthyists and various advocators of a police state.
When I read these brilliant
compositions of innate knowledge, my first reaction is obviously a positive one. I burn
with anger. I feel that I should
rouse myself to action to protect my freedom of speech and
stamp out these letter distributors.
I look around the campus. I
see no swastika banners, no
straight-arm salutes, no speakers that represent the John
Birch Society. Instead I see an
active Communist club represented regularly by speakers, a
nuclear disarmament club, the
NDP and a constant volley of
leftist propaganda. I observe
that these leftists are attempting to destroy freedom of
thought, for the right has hardly had an opportunity to express their freedom of speech.
The strong leftist tendencies
of this campus will lead to a
political  reawakening.
Yours  truly,
Helmut Skujins,
Arts II.
I'm sorry, sonny, this lot is Faculty Only Tuesday, January 30, 1962
THE WBY.SSEY
Page  3
By   BOB   HENDRICKSON
So you think UBC has tT,HKio
with pilferers, Then pity the
University of Washington students who are plagued by room
snatchers.
A room is missing from the
student union building. "I didn't
even know it was missing," the
program staff speryisor said.
It was concluded the only logical solution is that some fast-
talking, slippery-fingered student has borrowed the room for
his own private use.
Though there isn't any rule
about removing rooms, it was
thought the student who stole
it was very impolite.
Now that your weeping over
the JEate of room-snatch victims,
let rhe break your heart with a
tale about victims of a university snatch.
The Student Mirror reports
that hundreds of students, who
had registered for courses in an
institution went to school in the
fall only to find that the "college" organizers had decam-
pused, taking several thousands
of rupee in tuition fees.
By the way, who's keeping an
eye  on  administration?
* *    *
Definition which is now in
style: Symposium, n. (Gr. from
'syn\ with 'posts' a drinking) A
feast where there is drinking; a
convivial meeting; etc.
If yotavdoiVt believe it, look
it up in Webster's. Better *tiB
keep, your eye on the Aeadernic
SyrBposimn delegates.
* *    *
Turn aboutr was thought W be
fair play during co-ed week at
Mount Allison, Sackville,   r^.B;
Male students were compelled;
to sign in and out of dorojs in
the evening and also to observe
a curfew.
In order to enforce the regulations, two freshettes Were,
posted at the receptionist desk;
by lite Women's Council.
The meii, naturally, did something; about this mortifying situation, a "Vigilante" gang was
formed, white hoods and all, and
kidnapped the two co-eds.
Mysterious phone, calls were
sent to the Women's Council and
the student council vice-president (who else?) protesting restrictions on both male and female students.
The incident closed with the
return of the two girls to the
dorms after midnight. Nothing
was mentioned about the rules
being relaxed.
* *     *
Researching a broad field here
are some choice tripe items for:
The Social Workers: A deaf
husband and a blind wife are
always a happy couple. (Danish
proverb)
The Commerce-men: There are
two times in a man's life when
he should not speculate: when he
can't afford it, and when he can
... (Mark Twain)
Thought for the Week: McGill
Daily ^— Confucius says ^people
who live in glass houses should
dress in the basement.
Decision near
on eligibility
Student court will hand down
a decision Friday on whether
student council has the power to
set eligibility rules for participation in student activities.
The court heard testimony on
both sides of the question Monday but decided to give the matter further study before making
a ruling.
"We want td take a close look
at the Societies.Act," said Chief
Justice Lance Finch.
Frank Iabobucci, Law 3, presented argument in favor of recognizing student council's power to legislate on eligibility. Student treasurer Malcolm Scott
and Law Undergraduate Society
president Chas. McLean spoke
on thhe other side.
Student .council referred the
question to the court last week.
U, of JM debaters
cop AAcGoun Cup
By BOB; MCDONALD
The University of Manitoba won the*Mc Goun Cup- Friday
night scoring seven out of a possible eight .points.
The  cup has  been  awarded - annually  since  1923  to  the
best debating team from the four western universities. -
UBC   and  the   University   of
ARTSMEN retaliated Saturday
by chaining Engineers to the
pillars under Engineering
building to rnake another first
for the active Arts Society.
NDP leader started [34
with Farm-Labour party
Federal New Democratic Party leader The  Hon.  T.
Douglas will speak in the Armory Tuesday at' noon;:
The recently-elected NDP leader will meet student leaders and
faculty before his speech at a reception in Administration building.
Douglas has had experience in
both federal and provincial politics.
. In the early '30's he was a minister in- Weyburn> Sask., in the
heart of the depressed drought
area.
His experiences made him
enter politics in the 1934 general
election when;he was,drafted.as
a candidate for the now defunct
Fatm-Labour Group.
After being elected to the
House of Commons in 1935 and
again in 1940, Douglas resigned
his seat to lead the CGF party
C.
in  the Saskatchewan .election.
v.The CCF was' successful and
Douglas became prime minister
of the first socialist government
in Canada. He led his party to
re-election in 1948, I§52 and
1956.,and remained premier until 1961 when he wasi elected
national leader of the newly-
fprmed New Democratic Party..
During his tenure in office,
Douglas introduced many reforms, including, socialized, medicine.
The, NDP leader will be introduced at UJ3C. by Tom per-
ger, president of the B.C. New
Democratic Party. Prior to the
speech, entertainment will be
provided by local folk-singer
Spencer Mohart.
Alberta tied for second with four
points, Saskatchewan das last
with a single point.
In competition here, the UBC
team of Peter Hebb, Law I, and
Felix Raymond, Arts II, scored
a 3-1 victory over law student
Ed Weninger and theologue
George Rodgers of the U of S.
Hebb and Raymond defended
the affirmative side of the resolution: "Resolved that world
government is the ultimate solution for the problem of world
peace."
The speakers were allowed
twenty minutes each for their
main speeches and five minutes'
for rebuttal's.
UBC's debaters in Edmonton,
Dave Anderson, Law III, and
Rick Brown, Forestry IV, lost
a 3-1 decision to U of A debaters.
The UBC debaters' proposal
was that a framework for world
government could be formed
upon, and facilitated by, the formation of such organizations as
a world court of justice, a world
revenue authority, a world education authority and a world
peace authority.
The affirmative con tinued
that, with . these instruments,-
with the decline of nationalism,
and with the gradual forming of
more and more associations in
the world as a whole, world government would inevitaby come."
Weninger, of the U of S in
speaking for '.'the negative, called*
the aifirmatiyes parable '^a
beautiful story." jj
He went onto nominate Mt.
Bayniond of^^FBCfor the "Lea-
lock award for Canadian fiction*
and humour," saying,that Mr.i
•Raymond's approach was unrealistic.
'Hie speakers for the. negative*
called the solution of world gov-^
eminent impractical. They said
world government neglected to
realistically assess present world
conditions and the basic human
factors involved in the question.
The rebuttals which brought
applause and laughter from the
audience ended with the affirmatives stressing their point that
historical trends, and present
world problems, would lead to
world  government.
The negatives summed up
their attack by saying that, they
were "not pessimistic, but realistic" and that now was not the
time to be testing time honoured
dreams.
X
6ET HIP
to this! This week
end, ami the next 6, we're featuring a live radio show. Yep —
it's the PIZZARAMA PIZZA PARTY, broadcast fr.om our stage
every Friday & Saturday nite
from 10 p.m. till 2 a.m. on CKLG
—730.
Tune in this weekend for the
best in dance and listening music.
Paul Heskith will feature everything from The , Limejiters to
Dave Brubeck. It'll be the swills;-
ingest ; show on radio, we'll --even;
be featuring live music from <tut<
house musicians too. We TaosrtfvE-1
ly guarantee there'll be JtfQ rb6k-
'n roll.
"Why not .plan, to.,join.us eitljei
in person, or on your raSki YorifB,
enioy it!
.. Tl*a.t*s. only .ONE. oifiihe.cAAKajBs-'
we hope. to have, around the plaice
— the other 6iie ffhtef iftG oifc)
is a big;secret, so fre eah*t breath
a word labovti ' it yet.*'Bttt""ft!»p
an eye oiVt Tor it whenever vouh"e
around. -Wfiieh ft dome's, Yotfll
flip!
Tn the meawtipe, c'm«n ©v<er
atftd try xme of our temosis pizzAs,
**of one oT oWr:NEW kostopr jftyle
corjied beef on rye sandwiches.
"Gitaraarteed to 'be- -the ut s t jn
totrn.      :
PIZZARAIilA
2£76. W. Broadway '12'Ot Bavie St.
RE JMSl'S . JHU. 3-6815
The Honourable
T.C DOUGLAS
muAmc
NEW
DEMOCRATIC
PARTY
speak Tuesday, Jan. 30th
at 12:30 p.m. in the Armouries
Inserted by  the  UBC New Democratic Club
■I I   '" Page 4
NFCUS
REVENUE
Per Capita Levy __,.     $39,388.50
Associated
Membership Fees 100.00
Insurance Commission      1,950.00
EXPENDITURE
National
Travel   _____:     $ 6,000.00
General expenses _ 1,500.00
7,500.00
Projects
Regional         $     200.00
Library  175.00
Inter-regional   •
Scholarship plan __ 600.00
Scholarship Plan 600.00
General expenses 300.00
Travel Dept.
Info Service  2,000.00
$  1,700.00
Only a portion of National
Federation of Canadian University Students comes from student sources.
The actual amount paid by students is about one-third the actual working budget of $100,000.
The total amount students pay
for NFCUS is $39,388.50 which
is collected from students' councils in proportion to the number of students paying fees to
them.
THE UBYSSEY
budget for 1962
Administration
Salaries      $11,682.00
Rent  900.00
Telephone
and Telegraph __ 600.00
Interest and exchange 390.00
Postage     425.00
$41,438.50    Express charges  50.00
Stationary,  printing
and Advt  1,350.00
Audit fees  300.00
Sundry expenses __ 200.00
Office expense  300.00
Cleaning and
Maintenance  325.00
Depreciation      625.00
$17,197.00
Executives
Salaries
President  $ 3,800.00
Exec. Secretary  6,142.50
Travel  1,600.00
General     1,000.00
$12,542.50
$42,214.50
Expenditure in excess
of Revenue .     $     776.00
Tuesday, January 30,  1962
DUMON DS
quality stones.
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WATCHES
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Top Brands— Much below S.S.F.
  Excellent references — 1 day
delivery. .   .
phone ALEX, 4th year  Arts,
REg-ent   1-5123,  6-9  p.m.
RENT A GOWN
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Fur   Stoles,
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Dinner  Jackets
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Designers and Dressmakers
Expert Alterations
Evenings  by Appointment
4683 Kiagsway   HE 1-1160
25%
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For
UBC
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Gowns and Hoods
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We  specialize
in
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School District No. 57 (Prince George)
Secondary Teachers
PRINCE GEORGE SCHOOL DISTRICT OFFERS YOU
* Opportunities in the fastest growing community
* Resident University of B.C. Professor
* Courses you want to teach!
* Large-City conveniences in a friendly city
atmosphere.
* An active B.C.T.F. local Association
* Administrative experience
* Wide choice of cultural and social activities
* Summer School allowance without previous
experience in School District No. 57
INTERVIEWS MAY BE ARRANGED
February 1, 2, 3 - Hotel Georgia, 1  p.m.-9 p.m.
February 3rd-Hotel Atangard, Abbotsford
1 p.m.-5 p.m.
Phone or call at the above hotels and ask for
"Prince George School District"
Consider tibe time you invest getting
your degree as a percentage- of your
working life. It would be about 11%. To
get the most out of the remaining 89% your
work should provide the opportunity and
the scope to use your professional knowledge
and natural ability to best advantage.
Cominco is one of the world's largest
mining, metallurgical and chemical enter
prises. It is growing and diversifying. Its
range of activities provide interesting and
challenging opportunities for graduates in
engineering, geology, physics, chemistry,
commerce and many other professions. We
suggest you make it a point to see our personnel representatives when they visit your
campus. Cominco has much to offer you.
THE  CONSOLIDATED  MINING AND-SMELTING  COMPANY OF CANADA LIMITED
Trail, British Columbia .    _ _ *>i„,,+„»„i   ,-....,.„_
A Great Canadian Enterprise Montreal, Quebec Tuesday, January 30, 1962
THE UBYSSEY
Page 5
CUSO asks UBC
for volunteers
OTTAWA (CUP)—The recruiting program for Canadian University Service Overseas (CUSO)
has moved into high gear.
Local committees, a 1 r ea d y
formed on most campuses, this
week will receive detailed information brochures and directives
for screening applicants. Also be
ing sent out this week are requests for university graduates
to serve in specific countries at
, specific tasks. Most jobs are for
teachers.
^      UBC is looking for a total of
20 graduates for postings.
The   local   committees   have
both student and faculty  mem-.
' bers. Their jobs are to screen ap-
.'■ plicants, and to submit a report
on    an    applicant's   suitability.
These pepole do not hire or re-
' ject candidates.
The actual hiring is left up
5- to the country seeking the per-
ioanel.:Oni receiving the nominations from local committees, CUSO in Ottawa submits the names
to overseas governments and
agencies :#ho require personnel
"The final selction of all candidates will rest with overseas agencies and not with CUSO," emphasized Lewis Perin-
bam, acting executive-secretary.
"In making . an application,"
explained Perinbani, "students
should fill out a "personal information; sheet" r in duplicate and
:. flaail :«ne : copy> to the national
office here i»*6ttawa, an<| the
other; to the" local committee."
He said that the document was
not ah, applicationjfprm, but "a
.means* of -indicating to overseas
governments the availability of
certain individuals with particular qualifications and experience
which may be required in other
countries."
First day of frosh week
is dampened by Engineers
Engineers stole the thunder
from Frosh at noon Thursday
when they dunked AMS members.
Immediately following the
lily-pond dunking of four Arts-
men by a horde of engineers,
Frosh came rolling in with an
unanswered challenge to t h e
redshirts.
Frosh president Ed Yewchin,
driving up to the lily-pond in
a microphone-equipped car bellowed, "C'mon you guys, drive
the redshirts back to where
they came from."
•j.       sf»       sfi
The unfortunate Artsmen,
Mike Sharzar, Eric Ricker, Pat
Glenn and Kyle Mitchell had
been lowered into the pond by
an intricate system of ropes
and pulleys.
The Frosh had just completed a roller skate race from the
Bayshore frih.       '
Earlier, on their  way,  they
had   also   experienced  trouble
with   the   Engineers    but   had
managed to talk their way out
of it.
Betty Irwin, attractive fresh-
ette, in charge of the skaters,
was confronted with three carloads of Engineers at  the University gates.
FROSH skating champ gets
"pie in ;eye" during presentation of silver skate.
All political parties
the same' — Harnetty
Dr. Peter Harrtetty said Monday that there is "no real difference" between political parties in Canada.
Dr. Harnetty, speaking on "The
Growth of the British Labor Party," said;' "The only difference
between Liberals and Conservatives is that one party is in and
the other out."
He explained, "Once a reform
party accomplishes whatever so
cial reforms it set out to make
it will decline." He then classed
Canada's three major parties as
"basically conservative."
Harnetty, UBC history professor, dismissed the Social Credit
party as a "lunatic fringe,"     : .
Speaking on his own preferences he said, "I voted for Diefenbaker because he was a lively
man; I intend to vote for Mr.
Douglas for the same reason."
HAS FLYING, ENGINEERING AND
EXECUTIVE CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
FOR UNIVERSITY GRADUATES
... AM RCAF PERSONNEL OFFICER
WILL VISIT YOUR CAMPUS TO...
INTERVIEW
ALL FINAL YEAR UNDERGRADUATES
INTERESTED IN PERMANENT
EMPLOYMENT IN THE AIR FORCE
7 February '62
IN THE ARMOURIES
APPOiNTHiNra ma m •*»■ r mover
VOHI UMIVHf If V PLACIMIHT OPPICI
■ w—vit* '        ,-.,.., - -......,
"I looked at them, threw up
my hands and told them that
the little Frosh had been planning the little stunt for a long
time."   ,
"I guess it took a woman to
reason with them," she said.
T* V V
Amidst a shower of snowballs from gathered Artsmen,
Frosh Dick Hooper presented
a silver skate to Captain Kerry
Egdell of the winning Frosh
Al^Stars.
The All-Stars defeated another team labelled the Finks.
As Egdell took the skate he
received a pie in the face from
an unidentified thrower.
The Frosh roller-skating stunt
was to publicize the forthcoming Erosh dance at the Bay-
shore Inn.
Times changed
far IB testing
A correction has come to
The Ubyssey office regarding
UBC Health Service's T.B.
clinic.
The clinic will be conducted
today and: Wednesday in Wes-
brook between 2 and 4 p.m.
(Not just Tuesday between 2
and 4:30 as earlier reported.,
It is lo lest students who
were not tested in the fall
clinic, or who have never had
the test.
People of the
Northern Lights
Meet the most honest people
in Canada, the Eskimos.
Many of them, says February
Reader's Digest, are of Scottish or English descent...
others have ancestors from
the Fiji Islands! They spend
their life in hardship, and enjoy it! Get your February
Reader's- Digest today — 40
articles of lasting interest.
A Reminder to Students
IBM
WEEK OF FEBRUARY 5th
Interview times should be scheduled through
The PerswntfQttic*
in the W^^
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES COMPANY LIMITED
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NEW WESTMINSTER - 675 COLUMBIA STREET
LA 6-8665 Page 6
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 30,  1962
Beats coming
■ T;...A - ;s'   •'•■:>■'■>
U of S zone chills Birds
By-HERB WALKER
UBC Thunderbirds took on
the look of champions Friday,
thoroughly trouncing University of Saskatchewan Huskies
79-45 at War Memorial gym.
T3ut Saturday Birds almost
took on the look of chumps,
saving face only by eking out
a narrow : '55-51 last-minute
victory.
Friday, the Birds could do
no wrong. Racing off to a 26-7
first-quarter lead, they were
able to coast to an easy victory. -
Leading the onslaught was
flashy newcomer Laurie Pre-
dinchuk. Predinchuk, time and
again harrying the listless Saskatchewan team into errors,
took advantage of their many
miscues to chalk up 25 big
points. His brilliant ball-hawk
ing display brought back memories of all-star Ken Winslade.
To pick any star of Friday's
game would be an impossibility. All the Birds, from Predinchuk to newcomer Steve Spen-'
cer played extremely well.
Big Dave Way played his
usual good game, both on the
boards and in the point-producing column, adding 11 to
thhe total. John Cook, although having trouble of late
finding the range, connected
for 11 more.
•i*       v       ^f*
If t h e Birds could do no
wrong Friday, Saturday they
could do no right. Facing a
strong zone defence, the Birds'
offence sputtered miserably.
To say that the Birds ran out
of gas would be a falsehood:
they simply forgot to refuel
after Friday night's effort.
Dave Way led the attack
with 13 points, and Court
Brousson, playing another excellent  game, added  13  also.
John Cook, having trouble
from the field, found no problems at the foul line as he hit
on  seven  free throws.
The Birds will have to surpass Saturday's effort if they
hope to give University of
Alaska Polar Bears a run for
their money this Thursday
noon hour. Polar Bears warm-
up for the encounter by
trouncing Birds' favorite American opponents, St. Martin's,
91-55.
Jayvees on the weekend
dropped a pair to the powerful Alberni Athletics, 93-68,
and 74-70. Earl Farenholz
once again led the scoring parade with 19 and 22 points respectively.
Viki
capita lists give
rugby  lesson
—Photo by Barry J<
UBC's BARB BENGOUGH (light uniform) vies for ball wife
KeJowna's Marg Fielder during Saturday's Thunderette tourney game."K#tewrrdV trefte M&Lift'tS^|tf Doris Fowlfs
look on.
JLn^A
:miWSBSfrrm*zz*v
by m-Thiwdmstfe
i^^RBIfr
iaxie Seacfe led Kefowna«.TtottdaN
Former Thunderette. star
Bears to victory ia/IiM^i^kaigf^ Thunderette Basl|et<
: ball Tournament Saturday at the Women's gym.
She scored two last-miilute
foul shots and a breakaway lay-
up to give Kelowna a 39-35 yic-
SCOREBOARD
«aa*a***M»
BASKETBAI.&
Western mterooHefftate
Thunderbirds    79,    Saskatchewan    45
Thunderbirds    55,    Saskatchewan    51
Jayvees    67,   Alberni   93
Jayvcoo   74>, -Alberni   <4
junior Hew* Seacjie
Braves «>, YMCASS
WBBSTliHO   ' '    ■
Western   "Washington   18,   tlBC   IS;
. UBC  20.  Westi
GRASS
^gjjiia^toB ?
Vancouver   AJl-gS>s  «,  Victorta.
First Jtonna.   "
Thunderettes   44,   Sunset   29
Kelowna   86,   Grandview   11
Richmond   85,   Trail   17
Portland  50,   Victoria  33
Second   Round
Grandview" .49;   Sunset   31
Victoria   57,   Trail   44
Kelowna S5. UBC 40
Richmohd 79, Portland  33
Cotkattlation ~#lnad-    ,
Victoria   6t,    Grandview   37
CHAKFrONSHrF   FINAI
Kelowna  3»,  Richmana 85
When  a  victory
isn't  a  victory
UBC wrestlers won the battles but lost the war against
Western Washington College
Saturday.
UBC was forced to give Western 10 points when they were
unable to put entries in the M0
and 137-pound' events. Western
won the-meet tff-I*.    '
UBC wins were scored rby
Klaus Zoellmer, Ron Effa and
Ted Conover.
tory oyer ^defending champion
«fenlorM^ierdiahts. - •   ?   '[
FIRST SR. A
The Bears, playing their first
year in Senior "A" basketball,
put forth an inspired effort tp
-defeat the" seasoned Merchants,
presently rated the. number one
Daskefbatt "team in 'Cfeaoa.
'REt was just Jremefldous jtb
be;haefe;at feBC and after losing
the championship to the Met-
chahts last year," said Mi$s
3|£acfe'*|t's Just aboutthe besj
thing;iurt ever happened to me?'
■Diaae spaced the Kelowna
team with 17 points, while Shirley Tppley netted 19 for Richmond.
Earlier in the day, Diane led
the Bears to a 55-40 win over
her former teammates, the UBC
Thunderettes.
At half-time the Bears led
UBC 29-20 and never looked
back. Taking advantage of every
opportunity, they chalked up
their second straight win of the
tournament.
17 POINTS
In this encounter, Miss Beach
scored 17 points, while Gail
Leitner totalled 12 for Thunderettes.
Victoria Naval Vets won the
consolation final Saturday, scoring a fctf-37 Victory over Grand-
view;
Sriday night; Thunderettes de-
feated Sunset 44-29 behind Barb
BeagougbV itV- point performance.
UBC's rugby 15 returned from
Bellingham Saturday with a 20-
9 win over Western Washington
tucked under their belts.
In the first series of games
with U.S. college teams, Birds
showed Western how to csfpital-
ize on the scoring opportunities.
With the Birds' backs moving
well, Western was kept in their
own half of the field for most
of the game. '-..:•■
Neal Henderson was once
again the standout,. scoring 14
of the Birds' 20 points. He boot-
-ed:t*treeT»enaity goals and a convert and also scored one try.
Other scorers were: Gordie Olal-
try
son and Bill Dubois with a
each. ;
Top scorer for Western Washington was Garry Burton with
a try and a penalty kick.
Next weekend, the Birds play,
Vancouver Reps  in  the  first,
game of the McKechnie Gup series.   The   defending   champion
Birds will be known as the Varsity Reps during Cup play.
If they win Saturday they
will play the Victoria Reps for
the cup this Saturday's game,
will be played at Brockton Oval.
The McKechnie Cup is emblematic of the B.C. Rugby Union
championship.
UBC's 1961 Rhodes scholar,
John Madden, may row for
'Oxford in famed Oxford-
Cambridge boat race April
17.
T
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INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES OOMPAtW LIMITED
•44 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C. MU. 3-3331
Branch Mawtger—J. L. YtUowhu
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IBML Tuesday, January 30, 1962
THE UBYSSEY'
Page 7
FOR THE BIRDS
By  MIKE HUNTER
Our statisticians went to work on the delegates to the
Canadian University Press conference in Toronto last Christmas,'and came up with some figures not unlike a friend of
mine's sisters—mixed up, but they say a lot.
.'•' We asked delegates from the student newspapers of some
20'universities and colleges across Canada questions about the
athletic setups at their schools. Some of the answers weren't
th6 most qualified, but most were interesting, especially when
compared with UBC's situation.
'■-■-. For instance, at 59% of the schools, the administration
controlled the athletic program. At about 30% of the schools,
the program was run by a joint faculty-student board. At three
/pj^ of five schools, the students financed the program on their
;bwir. Most other programs were paid for by both administration
and students.
More facts:
• All schools questioned had women's programs and an
intramural setup of some kind.
• At three out of five schools, student don't pay to get into
the games admission to all sports is included in their athletic
fee.
• Only 20% received outside coaching or financial aid from
"professional teams.
• Only 55% had a compulsory P.E. program, and most who
did had it only for freshmen.
• 70% of the schools said the students actively supported
the athletic programs at their universities.
• Only two in five schools had teaims in local city leagues—
most competed only in intercollegiate competition.
• Three-quarters said travelling costs were a big financial
problem.
• N6 schools had residence facilities on campus for housing
visiting teams—most used off-campus hotels.
OP 70% ef the schools said they favored nationail intercollegiate playoffs. Many didn't know, while a few others were
opposed.
" 'OT About half the schools said some students on their
caiiipus played for Mbn-university teams. The other half reported
no such problems.
• 59% of"the schools had their own stadium; 53% had their
own arena; 72% had playing field areas on campus; and 78%
had their own gym.
Athletic fees ranged widely from campus to campus—
from around $3 per student to $20 at Ontario Agricultural College to $70 at the University of Toronto. UBC students pay in
the neighbourhood of $5.50 each (in their AMS fee).
Crowds were also bigger in the east, with as many as
10,000 turning up for footbaill games at McG.ill, and more'than
5,000 at many games in London, Kingston and Toronto.
At McGill, the • administration runs the iwhole show, and
athletics are financed by students' tuition fees and Senator
Molson. Facilities there include two swimming pools, squash
and handbatll courts, as well as a stadium, gym and arena.
At the new Memorial University in Newfoundland, it was
estimated that more than 80% of-the students participated in
athletics of some kind. All first year students were required to
take a swimming course.
At Queen's, the student fee for athletics (presently $20),
is set by regular plebiscite.
The two Toronto schools, U of T and Ryerson both ^aid
they opposed national intercollegiate playoffs similar to the
Churchill Cup in football, which this year failed to materialize.
Queen's said it supported the idea "depending on the financial situation," while Western said said it was "noncommittal."
Ryerson said it opposed the plan because of its smaller enrollment.
Meanwhile, good old Toronto said they opposed national
playoffs because there was no money and "because of the' disparity in ability between east and west."
My friend's sisters? They're from Toronto. They still think
a sfniddle guard is a corset.
FOR
THAT
SMART
: LOOK
IN
GLASSES
rLOOK
TO
*5>
Ptesctibticn Obtical
IDISPENSINGI
PPTiCIAKSJ
We use genuine CORECTAL lenses
— clear from edge to edge —
"Ask Your Doctor"
Contact Lenses — Zenith Hearing Aids
Special Discounts to Students
EARL FARENHOLTZ scored 19
points Saturday and 22 Sunday, but UBC Jayvees lost
93-68 and 74-70 to Senior A
Alberni Athletics on Island.
Don no wins curling
The Donna Geddes foursome
defeated the Lorna McCready
rink 8-5 in curling action Saturday.
Students!
For a new dining pleasure
try our daily special.
DEANS
4544 W. 10th
Open 'till 12:3©
UBCs Wolsak makesMd
for B. €. aM- star spot
Joel Wolsak, a UBC forestry student, started whittling
out a berth on the B.C. field hockey all-star team Sunday.
Wolsak scored two goals in
leading Vancouver to a 4-3
triumph over Victoria Reps in
the first of a series of test matches to choose B.C.'s all-star team.
Frank Nakashima reached the
semi-finals of the Vancouver
Judo tournament over the weekend but was eliminated by Shuji
Taabata of the Kamloops Club.
In   the   preliminary   rounds,
Nakashima scored wins in five
and 10 seconds, respectively.
*     *     *
UBC's swim team suffered
their first defeat of the season,
splitting a dual meet in Alberta
last weekend-
Saturday they bowed to the
University of-Alberta at. Edmonton 58-37 after they defeated a
combined UAC-Calgary Y team
at  Calgary  Friday.
Saturday, Alberta won six of
the 11 events. Friday UBC took
seven of the meet's 11 events.
Bill Campbel land Dave Smith,
once again, were UBC's top
swimmers. At Calgary, Camppell
broke two pool records and
Smith one.
STUDENTS!
STUDYING TOO HARD?
KEEP ASPIRIN WITH YOU
AT ALL TIMES
ASPIRINS!
UNIVERSITY     PHARMACY     LTD.
5754 University Boulevard CA. 4-3202
du MAURI ER Page 8
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 30,  1962
'Tween classes
Douglas speaks in Armory
NEW DEMOCRATS
Hon. T. C. Douglas, Federal
leader of the New Democrat
Party speaks at noon today, in
the Armory.
* *       *
PRE-MED SOC
A film, "Who Cares for Carol
Ann?", on how socialized medicine works, introduced by Dr.
A- Johnston, Wes. 100, noon,
Wed.
* *       *
NEWMAN CENTRE
Newman Centre is sponsoring
annual semi-formal this Friday
at Capilamo Gardens. Cocktails
at 7:30, dinner at 8. Bar. Tickets
at  the   AMS   office   or   at   St.
Marks.
* *       *
PSYCH CLUB
Trip to Essondale-Crease Clinic Thurs., 1 p.m-6 p.m. Members
75c, non-members $1.25. Sign at
Lounge, HM3.
* *       *
BAPTIST   STUDENTS
Bible study in Romans, noon
today, Bu 2202. All welcome.
* *       *
COMMONWEALTH   CLUB
Dr. Will on Canada and Latin
America.  Wed., noon, Bu 2238.
* *       *
CIC
Dr. Reid speaks, Wed., noon,
Rm. 250.
MS* asks new grant setup
.HALIFAX (CUP) — Four
Halifax colleges sent a joint
telegram to the prime minister this week asking for a
change in the present system
of awarding grants to universities.
Boosts in federal , grants
were announced in the throne
speech at the opening of parliament; this week the prime
minister asserted that grants,
would be raised from $1.50
per student to $2.00.
Signing the telegram were
the .presidents of councils at
D al h ousi e University, St.
.; IjJarjy's University, the University y of Kings-; Colle^- and
^o^lSSaint ^heent College.
The special wire asked that
n future federal grahts. :m provinces be .based on sta^it tpop--
ulationwithin, the provinces.
The grants are now awarded
on the basis of total provincial
population.
A spokesman for the Halifax students said Nova Scotia
universities suffered under the
present system because, although the province has a
small population, it has a
higher per capita population
of university students than
any other province.
A brief, backing up the telegram, will be sent later, the
spokesman said.
Copies of the message were
also sent to revenue minister
George Nawlan—Nova Scotia's representative in the federal cabinet—and the 11 other
Nova Scotia members of parliament, as well ias Nova Scotia premier Robert L. Stan- i
field.
FROSH UNDERGRADS
Free Wed.  in Brock Lounge,
a   fashion   show   presented   by
Jermaine's,  featuring the latest
fin campus Wear.
* *       *
UBC LIBERALS
Miss Judy La Marsh, MP.,
speaks in Bu 102, Wed. noon ...
* *       *
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
All members are requested to
come to a general meeting. New
program. 12:30 today.
* *       *
RUPERT  HEUNION
Prince Rupert reunion. Rupert
night, Friday, Feb. 2, Sherry
Hall, near 4th and McDonald.
* -  *       *
ROD AND GUN CLUB
General meeting Thurs., Feb.
1, Bu 212 at 12:30. Films will
be shown.
•*• V *p
NOON HOUR CONCERTS
*2:3«, Bu 106, Ernst Wid Ma
rie Friedlander on cello arid
piano.
* *      *
NATIVE CANADIAN
FELLOWSHIP
A lecture on good study habits
and techniques will be gives by
a UBC psychologist, 12:30 in Bu
214, Wed. Members and interested people are Urged to attend.
Special  Price* for UBC
Cornette Beauty
Salon
"Individual Attention" by
Male and Female Stylists.
OPEN" FRI  TILL NINE
4532 W. 10
C A 4-7440
Ford Motor Company of Canada Ltd.
Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited invites graduating seniors in ARTS, BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION,
ENGINEERING to investigate its UKIVERSITY GRADUATE RECRUITMENT PROGRAM.
Opportunities are available in SALES, FINANCE, PURCHASING, MANUFACTURING, Etc. Candidates are
selected on the basis of academic performance, participation in extra-curricular activities etc.
Training and development durinjg the two year program
emphasizes learning by doing. MEN ARE HIRED FOR
PRODUCTIVE JOB ASSIGNMENTS. Graduate trainees
generally spend approximtaely 6 months on each of four
assignments in different areas.
A COMPANY REPRESENTATIVE WILL BE CONDUCTING INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS ON FEBRUARY 5th
AND 6th, 1962.
ARRANGEMENTS FOR INTERVIEWS CAN NOW BE
MADE AND FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE
PROGRAM OBTAINED AT THE PERSONNEL OFFICE,
H.M. 7.
"THE SNACKERY"
3 LOCATIONS
3075 Granville - RE 3-5813
4423 W. 10th Ave. CA 4-0833
5075 Kingsway - HE 1-8818
FREE  HOT &  FAST  PIZZA
DELIVERY
* BAR OPENS AT 9 P.M.
* DANCING UNTIL 2 A.M.
* COCKTAILS SERVED AT 7:30
* DINNER STARTS AT 8 P.M.
EVERYONE WELCOME
On Friday, Feb. 2, the Newman Centre will host its annual
forma P, the Crystal Ball. This year the dance will - be held
in the beautifully appointed Copper and Crystal rooms of
the Capilano Gardens. Cocktails will be served at 7:30, and
dinner (baked-salmon entree) commences at 8:00. The bar
will open and dancing begin at 9:00 and continue to 1:00.
Tickets are $7.50 per couple and can be obtained at the
A.M.S. Office or from any executive of the Newman Centre
at St. Mark's College. Everyone Welcome.
TICKETS  AT  A.M.S.   OFFICE
end ST. MARKS COLLEGE
TAKE A
GIANT
STRIDE
•.. from Graduate^
to Executive u)ith the
HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY!
Through our diversified Training Program,
you'll have the opportunity of achieving management status within 3 to 5 years of joining
the company. You'll train in one of 'the Bay's'
mx large stares m Winnipeg, Vancouver. Calgary, Edmonton, Victoria, ox Saskatoon, tor
responsible positions in such fields as Buying,
Department Administration, Accounting and
Control, Display, and Personnel Management.
If you are a male graduate in Commerce,
Business Administration or Arts, you are eligible for our Training Program consisting of:
• 4-month induction period covering all major
store functions.
• 7-year lecture course in merchandising.
• Training under an experienced Department
Manager in Sales Management, Suying, and
Department Administration.
The Hudson's Bay Company wants young
men of outstanding ability who desire challenge, rapid advancement, and attractive executive salaries.
Make an appointment now through your Placement Officer to see our Representative for full
details.
Interviews will be conducted on
THIS THURSDAY AND FRIDAY
•acMpoiurao an hay icto.

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