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The Ubyssey Mar 15, 1962

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 Genera I meeting today
vUBYSSEY
Vol. XLIV
VANCOUVER,  B.C., THURSDAY, MARCH   15,   1962
No. 68
Council decision:
AMS still not liable
Student Council Monday reaffirmed an earlier decision
not to accept responsibility
for damages caused in student
pranks and riots.
Councillors defeated a motion proposed by student president Alan Cornwall, "That
$200 be paid as the student
contribution towards the cost
ef the riot which took place
Feb.   14".
On Feb. 19 Council received
a request from buildings and
grounds superintendent, Tom
Hughes, that the AMS pay a
total of $647.50 for the damages caused by student pranks
and by the Feb, 14 riot.
Council decided not to pay
the costs in the  light of By
law 4 of the AMS constitution
which states.
(1) The Society shall not be
responsible for the actions and
behaviour of any student unless: (a) the acts are performed
during and in connection with
a past or future AMS event.
(2) The Society shall only
assume financial liability for
those acts which fall within
sub-sections (a) and (b) of section (1) above, and for damage
inflicted on the campus by
a student if that student can
be determined.
Cornwall, proposing the new
motion to contribute the $200.
said council was morally responsible to make a token payment.
"Our obligation here is to
the people of the province who
are supplying the majority of
the money for student education; they are not supplying
money for willful damage of
university facilities", he said.
"If Council does not make
a token payment we are being
irresponsible", he added.
President-elect Doug Stewart said council was not legally or constitutionally bound to
contribute.
"But morally and responsibly, I think we are", he added.
"We wouldn't be setting a
precedent by making this payment", he said" as we'll always have a legal out in our
constitution, bylaw 4".
—Photo by Ted Ross
REHEARSING FOR tonight's Educational Formal in the Commodore Cabaret are Chorus line members Barbara Gardiner,
(left) and Pat Elliot, both in Education 2. Theme of the show
is "Rhythm and Blue."
80 equals 100? Only at
Arts US annual meeting
By MIKE HORSEY
When do 80 people become a 100-man quorum?
At the annual Arts Undergraduate Society meeting.
' Shortly after the 80-man
meeting started Tuesday, Ken
Leitch, a member of next year's
Arts executive, asked chairman
Mike Sharzer if there were 100
members present.
Sharzer called for a vote and
the 80 assembled artsmen decided that they, indeed, numbered 100.
The meeting then proceeded
with more mathematics, with the
80 come 100 members voting to
accept a constitutional change
that sees the 50-man Arts coun-
• cirreduced to 30.
The meeting ended with a
bang — provided by several
sciencemen who exploded an
unidentified object at the back
of the room.
The meeting adjourned and
the 80 or rather 100 members
left with their 50, or rather 30
executives.
All groups and clubs which
will need posters and banners
during opening week of the
1962-63 session must place
their orders with Mamooks
before Friday.
1881  needed in Armory
By KEN WARREN
Student council goes to the
student body for approval of
several resolutions at the
spring general meeting in the
Armory at noon today.
If others years can be taken
as a criterion barely a quorum will turn out to exercise
its controlling right. A quor-_
urn of 15 per cent or 1881
members of the student body
is required.
A majority of two-thirds of
the quorum is needed to approve the proposed rules and
incorporate them into the
AMS bylaws.
Included in the general
meeting as council recommendations are: a) tightening
student eligibility in running
for AMS office, bl a change
in the method of selection of
The Ubyssey editor-in-chief,
c) putting the coordinator of
publications back on student
council, and d) granting National Federation of Canadian
University Students an additional  $1200.
Besides  tightening   eligibil
ity rules for holding AMS offices the proposal requires
that students be allowed to
hold one A office and no
others, a B office and two
C offices or up to four C offices.
Council proposes that
henceforth The Ubyssey editor-in-chief be selected by
council. However, The Ubyssey editorial board will be
allowed to express its preference in a vote supervised by
SUB survey
starts Friday
A student union building
questionnaire will be sent by
mail to 2,500 students. Results
of the survey will aid the building committee in its planning.
The questionnaire was urged by
AMS building consultant Porter
Butts.
Survey chairman Kyle Mitchell
has urged all students to complete and return the forms as
soon as possible.
the  returning  officer   of  the
AMS.
The NFCUS grant—equivalent of a lO^eent per student
levy—is needed to offset
NFCUS national office deficits.
Other, proposed amendments and recommendations
include:
• Lowering the quorum of
an AMS general meeting from
15 per cent of the active members to 10 per cent.
• Lowering the required
number of signatures to call
a special general meeting
from the present five percent
to 500.
• Requiring the treasurer
to present a financial state;
ment each Feb.  1.
• Lowering contributions
per member of the AMS to
the Accidental . Benefit fund
from 40 cents to 20 cents.
• Including the president of
the Rehabilitation Medicine
Undergraduate Society on
student council.
• Changes in the honorarium structure.
Say Legion Cup debate winners
Women  better  nude  than  wearing  slacks
Women should wear nothing
at all rather than wear slacks,
the Legion Cup debating winners said Wednesday.
Tom D'Aquino and Chris
Thomson retained the cup for-
Psi Upsilon debating negatively "Resolved that women
should wear slacks."
D'Aquino and Thomson said
if women wore trousers they
would lose their most powerful asset—sex appeal.
Defending t r o u sers for
women John Paynter and
Mike D'Arcy of Zeta Psi said
women should no longer attempt to usurp man's author-
TOM  D'AQUINO
, . . even sacks
ty if they wore the symbol of
quality — trousers.
They said scientific statistics prove women who wear
slacks get fewer colds, are better prepared for H-bomb attacks, and have a superior defense against indecent assault.
"Trousers cover a multitude
of sins," said pro-slacker Mike
DArcy. "Nothing is more un-
feminine than a woman in a
short skirt with knobby
knees."
The affirmative produced
- a 23-inch waist, 35-inch hipped
tightly-slacked model, as live
evidence of the aesthetic qualities of slacks.
CHRIS THOMSON
.  rather than slacks
Opponent D'Aquino said it
was scientifically demonstrated that women who wear
slacks have abnormal amounts
of male sex hormones.
"Men have adored the softness, grace ^nd beauty ef
women since Adam discovered Eve different from himself,"
he said.
The winning team was challenged to debate for the Bull
Trophy, emblematic of student-faculty debating supremacy, by cup judge, Prof. C.
W. J. Eliot. Thompson, in accepting the challenge said:
"We'll see who wears the pants
in this university." Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
Winner of the Southam Trophy
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEMBER   CANADIAN  UNIVERSITY   PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year in
Vancouver by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial
opinions expressed are those of the Editor of The Ubyssey and not
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
Telephone' CA  4-3242.   Locals:  Kditor—25;  News—23;  Photography—24.
Editor-in-chief: Roger McAfee
.'     Managing   Editor    -    -    -    Denis   Stanley
Associate Editor    -    -    -    - Ann Pickard
j        News Editor    -    -    - Fred Fletcher
City Editor -    -    -    - Keith Bradbury
CUP Editor    ---------    Maureen Covell
Photography Editor Don Hume
Senior Editor Sharon Rodney
Sports    Editor     Mike    Hunter
Photography   Manager Byron   Hender
Critics Editor    ---------    David Bromige
Editorial  Research    -    Bob Hendrickson,   Ian  Cameron
Staff  This  Issue:
Layout this issue: Bob McDonald.
REPORTERS: Krishna Sahay, Mike Horsey, Mike Gren-
by, Tim Padmore, Nicky Phillips, Sharon Mackin-
non, Richard Simeon, Ken Warren.
PHOTOGRAPHY: Les Pal, Barry Joe.
TECHNICAL: Pauline Fisher, Ian Cameron. Don Hume,
Ted Ross, Gail Kendall.
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 15, 1962
Letters to the Editor
%i$enior citizens'
We had the pleasure of watching on TV the other night some
of Canada's "senioi* citizens" play hockey against the Swedish
National hockey team. Needless to say the "seniors" lost the game,
which was their third in the current world hockey championships
at Colorado Springs.
For years1 now, Canada has been sending a group of washed
up pros and washed up amateurs to the world championships.
There have been few exceptions.
From the performance of the Gait Terriers, Canada's representatives this ear, a viewer tuning in late would have mistaken
them for the Vancouver Canucks. They were simply outlasted.
In the old days the Canadian teams could have spotted the
international opposition two men and still walked off the ice at
the long end of a six-goal margin. It wasn't that we were so good,
it was just that everyone else was so bad.
Well, fellows, the old days are gone forever and it's about
time Canadian hockey circles realized it. The downfall started
' about 10 years ago when we sent what amounted to a good junior
team to Europe and got pasted by the Russians. There was a great
roar about building up our amateur strength. So we started sending
over Allan Cup winners, seniors, amateurs. This turned out not
badly. We've broken a little better than even with them.
Now, however, this calibre has taken a further downswing
with the bulk of the remaining eastern teams forming the Eastern
Professional Hockey League. This leaves few Canadian hockey
teams with the amateur standing required by international competition rules.
Each year we lose, the Canadan public is deluged with mahy
excuses for this additional blow to our pride in our national sport.
"The refereeing was lousy."
"The ice was poor."
"Those international rules are ridiculous."
r Well, fellows, if we're going to play in the international
hockey arena we have to play under the rules that exist there. If
we don't like it we should get out.
Each time we lose we hear rumbling from the hockey moguls
that they're going to do something about it. Everyone is still waiting. Or perhaps the donation of a &w over-the-hill national league
players constitutes "doing something abdut it."
The Canadian government has announced the establishment
of a $5 million national "fitness fund." Why can't some of this
money be channelled into producing some top calibre amateur all-
stars who can brihg some respect back to this country?
Correction on CAPRI
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Having staked my hopes of
life on "motley crews of corner cringers", I should like to
correct Mr. Pechenick's opinions of CAPRI. First may I inform him that he is already
aboard the "vomit comit". He
has joined the retching mob
ready to spew forth uninformed comment on CAPRI.
CAPRI does not stand for
better Red than dead. CAPRI
is not a political group. It is
a research institute designed to
seek the means, if any, to prevent our species, and all other
life as we know it, from being
erased from the face of the
earth. (Yes, even the vomit
comit crew). CAPRI intends to
"investigate all forms and combinations of forms of government, even democratic, that the
world may exist peacefully
under.
I hope you don't have too
many people laughing at you
at CAPRI Mr. Pechenicfc, or
maybe you will be emptying
your insides again — of radiation sickness.
Yours truly,
DAVID TAYLOR,
Arts I.
Srill wondering
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I am Still wondering What
was the object of Dr. Giovanni
Costigan when he made a trip
from Seattle to Vancouver in
order to talk to us about the
rightists in the U.S.A. But it
is obvious from his speech that
the purpose was not to bring us
the correct picture of those peo-
. pie. On the contrary his entire
attitude showed the hatred of
the rightists and a tendency to
distort facts.
I am not a rightist, because
I believe in Socialism, but I also believe in fair play and the
truthful  presentation  of facts.
Dr. Costigan claims that the
rightists are frustrated because
the U.S. is unable to defeat
Russia. This statement implies
that the U.S. was and is still
trying to defeat Russia. This is
an obvious fallacy. U.S. has
never tried that. The rightists
are frustrated, and for good
reason, because of the inability
of the West to stop the advance
of Communism which is threatening our very existence.
Dr. Costigan imputes to the
rightists the hatred of the Jews.
However, if one reads the Blue
Book by Robert Welch, the
most right of all the rightists,
he could NOT find there one
word that would indicate anti-
Semitism. And how could a
man like Dr. Fred Schwarz be
anti-Jewish when he is himself
a christened Jew.
Dr. Costigan stated that on
the "Council of Twelve" in the
John Birch Society there are
four ex-presidents of the American Association of Manufacturers. Does that mean that the ex-
presidents of such organizations
have no right to participate in
the political affairs Of their
country?
Finally, Dr. Costigan concluded his speech with a statement
that gives little credit to his intellectual standards. He stated
that reading anti^communist lit
erature was "like living in the
gutter." In reply to this I
would suggest to every one
who is interested in this problem to read Dr. Schwarz's book
"You can Trust the Communists". After reading that book,
I am sure, he will have different opinions about Dr. Schartz
and 1000 rightist groups, but,
maybe also, about Dr. Costigan.
Yours truly,
JIM   SMITH,
Arts II
'Indefensible7
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I am sure I am speaking for
a majority of students when 1
say that your recognition of
the Players Club play, the Af-
rikaaner, was indefensible. If
the government and the people
of South Africa can be so slandered without any check by
responsible people on this campus, then this country is heading toward a gloomy future.
The play in question should
be examined very closely because it is no coincidence that
the polemic it puts across is
exactly parallel to the rantings
of the Communist party both in
South Africa and outside that
nation.
Those who laugh at the
claims that the Reds are infil-_
tratirig this university would do
well to have a good look at the
other so-called cultural groups
at UBC.
Sincerely,
HELMUT FRANZ,
Give a cheer!
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
RE: Mr. McKinnon.
Approximately three weeks
ago you wrote a somewhat
nonsensical article criticizing
the cheerleaders for their supposed lack of enthusiasm. It is
my pleasure at this time to extend to you an invitation to
try out for one of the two positions of male cheerleaders that
will be available next term.
The tryout practices will be
held all this week and next at
12:30 sharp in the College of
Education gym. I would advise
you to bring gym shorts and
running shoes, as the exercise
can be quite vigorous. All your
friends, and even your enemies, both male and female are
also welcome to attend.
Yours truly,
SID BRAIL,
Campus athletic
publicity.
A stroke of luck
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Three sets of examinations
have now passed for first-year
students with, no doubt, startling successes and failures.
With the duscussion of the
results in all courses there
wouid seem to be a great vari-
atlbn in the average mark of
each of the sections — which
are made up of students picked
at random. Explanations for
these variations—such as poor
professors, severity of some
exams, br severity of certain
markers—have been given not
as excuses for poor work, but
purely out of individual concern for the variations in these
averages. Because the marks
obtained on exams already
completed count towards the
final grading, some people will
be entering the final exams
with more marks behind them
than they merit, while the converse or loss of marks will be
true for some others. This accumulation of marks or loss of
marks will be carried through
to the final grade on which depends failure or success, a first
or a second class, a scholarship
or a lack of funds.
The clearing up of this question is of great importance and
many first-year students would
like to know if the university
administration  has  any  mechanism  to  offset  the   "axe  of
fate" or "stroke of luck."
Yours truly,
C. N. BULL,
Kootenay House.
Sunday school picnic
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
First of all I would like to
apologize to Mrs. Margaret
Carson-Kubbard, through the
special events committee for
the manner in which she was
accosted after the meeting last
.Friday by a member of t h e
audience. I personally, feel this
display of distasteful manners
was uncalled for, and I completely disassociate myself
from this type of behaviour.
On the other hand, two
points were raised by the
speaker which should not go
unanswered.
First, she mentioned that
many tribal groups do not wish
African rule because they are
afraid of the hazards which
might result after the pink
man has departed. This,* I admit', is true, as exemplified in
the Congo, but I contend it is
the direct consequence of dividing a continent into blocks
without first taking into consideration the differences in
customs, outlook, and social order existing among the tribal
groups.
Another point which many
speakers, including Mrs. Carson-Hubbard, seem to put
forth all the tiine is atrocities
committed by Mau-Mau; in
fact, more Africans were killed
by the secret society for refusing to join them than were
pink settlers.
However, I think it is only
fair to point out that thousands
of Africans served in World
War 2, they saw millions
slaughtered in a senseless war,
saw pink soldiers raping pink
women, and also read and
heard of the blood-curdling
atrocities committed against
the Jewish people by that superior Nordic race, the Germans. They, of course, would
quite rightly what two thousand years of "civilization"
have done for the pink man.
Many have heard of the horrible atrocities of Mau-Mau.
However, many, including myself, have also read of atrocities against the Jewish people
which would make the Mau-
Mau look like a Sunday school
picnic in comparison. Thanking you.
Yours truly,
V. SEYMOUR WILSON
Forestry 4. Thursday, March   15,  1962
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
BUT REMEMBER EVERYBODY HAS  THE DEMOCRATIC  RIGHT TO AGREE WITH  US.
WORLD'S FAIR
TICKETS
Although all tickets in Vancouver were sold but yesterday,
we have been able to purchase from Seattle 600 more adult
Bonus Books, 40 children's (12 and under) Bonus Books,
and 1Q0 single admission tickets. These are on sale today,
Friday, and perhaps the beginning of next week. We believe these to be the only tickets available in Vancouver.
Since over 300 were sold on Tuesday alone, we suggest
you hurry to get yours at the A.M.S. office or the booths
on campus. Prices are the same - THE LOWEST IN CANADA!
This is a project of the CIRCLE K, an international
service club for college men.
Letters to the Editor
The 'good squad1
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
The recent pattern of student
behaviour in campus elections
has been somewhat disappointing. Apart from the smattering
of individual cheating at the
polls, the practice of certain
fraternal organizations has
been particularly appalling.
These upright and august
bodies have deemed it necessary to "good squad" the polls
in an effort to ensure that un-
guided students pledge their
support to the "proper candidates. This practice reflects
poorly on these oft criticized
organizations and must be embarrassing to the fraternal
brothers not involved.
Personally, I am rather concerned about the type; of student that would be influenced
by such external pressures. Responsible- government is not a
right in our society, it is a privilege; a privilege'that requires
members to take the time to
investigate and evaluate the
abilities of the candidates. That
students of this U n i v e rsity
should abuse or ignore this
privilege leaves the writer
wondering what values these
people are to a university.
Yours truly,
KEN LEITCH,
Arts.
Shaded pills
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
So the doctors had their say
again on the subject of socialized medicine; and all the patients who attended the lecture
by Dr. McCoy and Dr. Jabuson
swallowed the shaded and coloured pills dispenced. The patients are doing most satisfactorily for the tranquilizers have
proved most effective in lulling
everyone beyond reason to the
benefit of the B.C. medical profession. Another triumph in
the science of medicine.
The largest of the coloured
pills was administered in the
statement by Dr. McCoy; "A
government monopoly of all
medical services means that
politics will take over the medical profession to the detriment
of medical care". Can the public not see that according to Dr.
McCoy, large medical schools,
more medical students, more
women doctors to care for
women, larger treatments and
drugs—which only the government could provide—is a detriment to medical care?
The second pill (a coloured
one indeed) was administered
by Dr. Jobuson, who said that
"a wave of socializing is sweeping the country and that people
feel that it is their right to be
taken care of."
Is it not baffling to you and
to me, that according to Dr.
Jobuson the people of a democratic society can't see that they
have the right to feel that they
should  be  taken  care   of  and
that they have no right to work
together to establish a medical
care plan that would be less
expensive and better for all
people concerned? Is it not
strange also, that a democratic
society can't see that they must
not have a government to represent their wants because
that would be communism?
The third pill slanted in form
was swallowed with no adverse
effects was the statement by
Dr. McCoy that "socialized
medicine didn't work in England." Do the people of B.C.
not know that there is no socialized medicine in England today?
Doctors are leaving England,
he says. Yes a few are; for what
well paid doctor of £6,000, per
year would not look to the
green pastures of our free America where doctors make from
$50,000 to $100,000 per year
and some even more?
Furthermore in what country but free America can you
find accrediated hospitals established for the free practical
training of interns and doctors?
Do not the administrators of
such think it not strange when
you refuse to sign admitting
papers which specify that one's
wife is to be freely examined
observed or delivered by the
medical staffs of interns and
doctors?
Does not our way of life
provide a sufficient crop of unwed mothers to train the male
medical students—the rate being one out of .every sixteen
births in Vancouver?
And are not the doctors free
enough to push the husbands;
out of the care rooms so that
interns can take their place in;
labor rooms and delivery —;
regardless of the wife's protests? Must not the young fellow learn regardless of consequences to husband or wife?
And must I not tremble at the
doctor's orders to say nothing
lest I should break the public's
faith in their medical profession and agree with Dr. Whitman who told me when I enquired about certain practices
on my wife, in the General
Hospital, that "we (Medical
Profession) can lead the people
into   anything."
"Anything" he replied.
So let us swallow our pills,
coloured, slanted and shaped
so long as the doctors say so.
And let us fight for our .free
way of life making it secure
—for the few.
Yours truly,
ROLARD MORDERSON
Heat of learning
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I visited the Sahara Desert
yesterday.
I didn't even have to leave
the campus to do so.
In fact I walked into the
stacks in the Library and was-
immediately enveloped in tropical heat waves. I wonder
whether the Librarians ever
spend any time in the stacks?
If they do so without coming
out "dripping," I wish they
would add the secret of how
to their Information booklet on
the Library.
Yours truly,
TIRED AND DISCOURAGED LIBRARY USER.
"THE REEF
II
Point Roberts, Washington, U.S.A.
DINING & DANCING
Featuring "the Fabulous Ian Smith Trio"
FRI., SAT. & SUN.
OPEN YEAR ROUND
10 Miles South of Deas Island Tunnel-
Large Parties by Reservation Only: Dial 945-2233-945-2579
No minors allowed on premises
Proof of age must be available
THE ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT OF THE
ALMA MATER SOCIETY HAS THE
FOLLOWING POSITIONS OPEN  FOR  1962-63:
• ADVERTISING MANAGER—TOTEM
• ADVERTISING   MANAGER-BIRD   CALLS
• ADVERTISING  SALESMAN—UBYSSEY
Applicants should apply in writing
stating experience, to R. L. FRISBY,
Advertising Manager, Alma Mater Society
DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21
BEGINNING
WEDNESDAY
MARCH 14
THE BOOKSTORE
WILL HOLD ITS
ANNUAL SALE
OF
DISCONTINUED TEXTS
AND
ART PRINTS Page  4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 15, 1962
Bookstore
boycotted
HALIFAX (CUP) — A number
oi Dalhou.ie students set up a
boycott ol the university bookstore early this month in order
to draw attention to the need
for a "decent well-run bookstore" to   r.eet student needs.
The boycott came as a result
oi an editorial in the last issue
or The Gazette calling for student   action  in  this  field.
The Daihousie Student Council also t'.ave the boycott its
backing daring a meeting.
Students with placards paraded in front of the bookstore,
but despite this a number of
students continued to use its
taciiities.
Student reaction to the protest
action was varied. A number
v.ekomed the move, while others
declared the action was discrimination against the bookstore
proprietor
3 new entries
join WUDL
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.'ictoria
Alberta
la Colic:
the W-
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p next \
"In futsi
a semi-t
toria Coli,
v.-ill meet
other we.si
Peter Hebt
the league.
The new
tccl durin:;
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UBC's c
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III. presidi
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College, University
at Calgary, and Re-
X> have been admitted
stern University De-
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inal race against Vic-
•ge and the winner
the winners of the
ern provinces" said
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members were admit-
; the League confer-
igary last weekend,
delegate to the con-
s Bruce Fraserj Law
nt of the UBC Debat-
EdUS election results
T.'>e following is the executive
nl the Education Undergraduate
Society: President, Jolyon Hal-
vice-president, Kathy Hob-
ecretary, Susan Sheppard;
rer, George Boechler; PRO
Brovm; executive member,
Jor.,>; Walion; B. C. Teacher's
Feneration Liason, Tom Hall;
social convenor, Rochelle de Vor-
kin: USC representative, Allan
Ov.cn, boj's sports,. Lloyd Mac-
D o a aid. girl's sports, Jane
Brown.
JOWS
son:
Ireas
Dave
THE MAD  BOMBER
. . . sectually satisfied
UBC profs aid
in Douk-land
By   MIKHAIL   SONOBOVITCH
Ubyssey Private Ear
KRESTOVA (Staff) — Latest
word here in the terror-ridden
Kootenays is that five top professors have been brought in to
help cope with the explosive
situation.
"We are short on explosives,"
Mayor Tom Dropkoff told reporters. "We have brought in
two chemistry professors to help
cope with the situation."
RELOCATION
He added that two psychology
professors and an education ex-1
pert are working on relocating
the   troublesome  Sons  of  Freedom  Doukhobors.
They said they are considering
| a plan to move the sect to a location on Point Grey where they
can be studied at leisure by faculty and students.
"With sufficient study and experimentation, we are sure we
can find a solution," a spokesr
man said. "So what if they blow
up a few of the temporary buildings. They're insured, aren't
they?"
EUS ABOUT SAME
"And besides," he adde.d
"they're not much worse than
the Engineers."
Another professor said bringing the primitive sect to the
campus would give social science
students a chance to conduct
live experiments.-
"The scientists can do it, why
shouldn't we?" he said pouting.
Board of governors
to levy student,
staff parking fee
The university board of governors has confirmed its intention of charging a parking fee
lor students and staff.
The students fee of $5 becomes
effective Sept. 1, 1962, and is
paid when parking stickers are
issued.
Hardest hit will be car pools
where two or more cars are used
by several students on alternate weeks. Every car in the pool
must pay, even if only one space
is being occupied, said Tom
Hughes, supervisor of Buildings
and Grounds.
Fees for faculty and staff will
be $10 and will be effective May
1.
(Fees for regular visitors will
be the same as for faculty and
staff).
Revenue from fees will
amount to about $30,000, half
of which will come from students, Hughes said.
"This will pay for most of the
costs of maintenance, and construction of lots and for parking
patrols," he said, "But there will
still be almost as much again
in overhead and indirect costs
to take care of."
Students may also look forward to one-way streets next
year,  said Hughes.
"Also the parking brochure
has been revised and expanded,"
he said, "so ignorance will be
no excuse."
No charges to be laid
m February 14 riots
No student court action will
result from the Feb. 14 riots at
the Engineers building, Vice-
president Eric Ricker told student council Monday.
"We just don't have the evidence to prosecute with",
Richer said. "No witnesses
have come forward, and we
have had a minimum of co-operation  from   the   students'.
LAST DAY
FOR
WORLD'S   FAiR   TICKETS
at A.M.S. Office
MARCH   20
SEE
GREAT
EXPECTATIONS
3:30,   6:00,   8:30
AUDITORIUM
@  Holland
£ Germany
£ Scotland
©  Italy
COLLEGE CAMPING IN
EUROPE
Departing - JUNE  18, 1962
46  Days . . . $1395.00
£   England
Q  Denmark
£   Switzerland
%  France
9   Belgium
For Full Information Contact
WRIGHT'S TRAVEL SERVICE LTD.
VANCOUVER:
PENTTCTON:
KELOWNA:
VERNON:
818 Howe Stereet MU 4-5185
68 Nanaimo Ave. W. HY 2-6040
255   Bernard   Avenue PO 2-4745
2911   Barnard   Avenue LI 2-5940
or SANDY D'AQUINO at CA 4-5237
APPLICATIONS FOR POSITIONS
ON FROSH ORIENTATION
AND RETREAT COMMITTEES
DUE FRIDAY, MARCH 16, 4 p.m.
State Preferences and Experience
A  LIST  OF  POSITIONS   IS   ON
THE   AMS.   BULLETIN   BOARD
4th Annual Spring Ski Sale
Artbery 'a
VALUES   UP   TO   %%   OFF
METAL   SKIS
ALLAIS 60 $135.00 Now $99.99
KASTLE reg. $119.50 Now $85.00
STOKLIE reg. $112.50 Now $79.50
WOODS
KASTLE         reg. $87.50 Now $57.50
ROSSYNAL ALLAIS reg. $85.00 Now $47.50
ROSSYNAL COMBI reg. $79.50 Now $52.00
ROSSYNAL SOUPLE
    reg.   $65.00 Now $47.50
DYNAMIC COMBI reg. $79.50 Now $55.00
DYNAMIC MONITEUR
    reg.   $65.00 Now $45.00
GRESVIG reg. $99.50 Now $75.00 j ARLBERG GOLD MEDALLIST
!          reg.   $72.50 Now $45.00
MANY MORE TERRIFIC VALUES IN SKI SLACKS
HAUSER OF PARIS reg. $42.50 Now $33.50 i SPORT TEX reg. $29.95 Now $23.95
SAILER TEX _    .__ reg. $49.95 Now $35.00 | WALLA TEX reg. $1 9.95 Now $14.95
BROKEN LINES OF SKI SLACKS UP TO 50% OFF
ALL MEN'S SLACKS 20% OFF
AFTER BOOTS
KASTINGER	
KANONE  __.
AROSA 	
reg.  $49.95 Now $37.50
reg. $39.95 Now $30.00
ALTA  __.
VALDOR
reg.  $34.95 Now $26.50
reg. $31.50 Now $23.95
ADDITIONAL VALUES
LADIES'
Reversible Wool Tapestry and Poplin
Jackets. Value to $42.50 Now $25.00
Quilted  Nylon  Jackets.  Full  Zipper.
Up to $24.95 Now $17.50
Quilted  Nylon Jackets.   Plains  and
Reversibles. Values to $35.00 Now $22.50
Ladies'   Racing   Jacket.   Full    length
zipper. Full price $34.95   Now $25.00
MEN'S
Quilted. "White Stag" Men's Parkas. . Furopean Quilted  Parkas.
Up to $29.95 Now $20.00 ! Regular $42.95 Now $30.00
European Quiited Racing Jackets.
Regular $41.50   Now $25.00
ARLBERG (SKI HUT) SPORTING GOODS
608 Robson — Ample Parking on Seymour MU 5-9411 Thursday, March  15,  1962
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Modern  labs,  good  salaries
UBC has ace up sleeve
By MIKE GREKBY
UBC is involved in an unusual and highly competitive
game these days.
The stakes are topflight researchers.
And the hands the university plays are modern, fully-
equipped laboratories and attractive salaries.
For this is the "game" of
bringing top-notch men and
women to UBC to carry on research and thereby expand
areas of graduate work.
"In recent years the university has been endeavoring to
build up its field of research
and graduate studies and to
expand into new fields—as far
as funds have been available,"
UBC information office told
The Ubyssey.
"Research specialists and
students go where they can
find facilities in their areas of
study."
MacKenzie report
In his 1959-60 report President Norman MacKenzie said:
"Great graduate centres . . .
* are not built without very substantial sums of money, nor is
it possible to attract scholars
unless they can be assured that
the conditions under which
they will work are as good or
better than those they can find
elsewhere.
"The distinguished professor
is a most mobile of persons for
he can teach and investigate
wherever he wishes.
And wherever he goes, he
will in turn draw students to
him from every corner of the
world."
New men
Referring to the recent appointment to UBC's department of chemistry oi Dr. Anthony I. Scott and three other
researchers presently teaching
■ at the University of Glasgow,
a university spokesman said:
"With our new graduate studies chemistry wing we can offer the research team better facilities and probably better
salaries than they are enjoying
at present.
"They will have more opportunity here to work in their
field of bio-chemistry, which
will be unique in Canada."
Researchers who come to
UBC are normally appointed as
assistant, associate or full professors, with a salary scale of
$7,000 and up, $9,000 and up
and $12,000 and up, respectively.
"But matters of salary are
confidential between (he board
of governors and the protestors."
The competition for experts
is becoming fiercer, he went
on, and it is to some extent
a spiralling affair.
Top men needed
"Still, our enrolment is increasing and we must have
a corresponding increase in
highly-trained personnel," the
spokesman said.
"A competent and effective
graduate study progi-am must
be  a  part  of  t h e  long-range
view of edueal ion when we are
considering Canada's growth
and development."
Expanding research and graduate study facilities and staff
has a snowball effect.
"More experts are attracted
by the prospects, more facilities are created—this is how
graduate schools are built up,"
he said.
In the field of Asian studies,
UBC has increased its resources over a period of time and
now has the most comprehensive Asian studies department
in Canada, said the spokesman.
"Top people in this area of
studies are drawn to UBC to
continue their work aud thus
complement   the  department."
Survey first
Before considering appointments the university first
makes a survey of the areas in
which it is weak, at the same
time taking into account the
money available for enticing
new staff, he explained.
"We must take all of the
budget into consideration and
can't sacrifice one field for another," he said.
In the case of Dr. Scott,
chemistry department; head Dr.
C. A. McDowell wrote to universities and scientific circles
the world over asking for information concerning persons in
the desired fields.
Those selected were approached indi \ idually.
The final choices were recommended to President MacKenzie, were approved by the
board of governors and then
were announced.
"Of course universities are
disappointed to ' lose their top
people but they are all in the
same game and have much the
same opportunities of. attracting other experts," The Ubyssey was told.
First class personnel are
also attracted to UBC through
the possibility of developing
and expanding departments.
UBC holds own
"On the whole UBC stacks
up quite well against comparable universities in its 'possession' and acquisition of expert j
researchers," the spokesman |
said. j
The   program   of   acquiring i
high-price staff  got  into  high
gear at UBC with the establish-.
ment of the faculty of graduate |
studies in 1949. !
Many  top   researchers  have I
since come to the university.   !
Doctors   Frederick   Kaempf-
fer and Keinz Koppe left West i
Germany   in   1949   to   experi- ,
ment here in pure science and '
teach physics. j
Appointed to UBC's depart- ;
ment of social sciences were
Double Breasted Suits
Converted to
Single Breasted
United Tailors
BRITISH WOOLLENS
549 Granville St.
Slacks  Narrowed
Dr. J. S. Clark, who left Cornell University in 1956, and Dr.
John A. Jacobs, who came
from Toronto in 1957.
Dr. Robert L. Noble was appointed director of the cancer
research institute at UBC in
1959. He came from the University cf Western Ontario.
New librarian
Dr. Norman J. Willimovsky
left Alaska in lifsu to join
UBC's institute of fisheries.
Other appointments have included Neil R. Harlow who
came from the University of
California in 1951 to take the
position of head librarian at
UBC. (He has since left to become director of the librarian-
ship school at Rutgers University, New Jersey.)
Formerly at the University
of Sydney, Australia, Dr. David
M. Myers was appointed dean
of the applied science faculty
in 1959.
Raiding charged
In 1956 UBC was charged
with "raiding" the staff of the
University of Manitoba after
UBC hired the the entire education faculty away from the
prairie university.
Present faculty education
head, Dean Neville V. Scarfe.
was one of those "raided."
UBC has also attracted many
other top-flight scholars to
head its departments.
Dr.   Malcolm   S.   McGregor
came  from   the   University  of
Cincinnati in 3 954 to take up
the post of chairman  of thej
department    of   classical   stu- j
dies. j
A former Yale professor, Dr. |
H. Young was appointed head
of the department of economics
and political science in 1960.
—I'holo by Ttil  Ross
ONE OF MANY researchers attracted to UBC by the improved research facilities is Dr. Robert L. Nobel working
here with U3C's modern liquid scintillation spectrometer.
Three researchers from the University of Glasgow will arrive
ai UBC next fali to work with the new facilities offered by
the graduate studies chemistry wing.
COMING,  TUESDAY, MARCH 20
Great Expectations
3:30,   6:00,   8:30     -     AUDITORIUM
TONIGHT,   FRIDAY,   SATURDAY
8:30 - UBC Auditorium
UBC PLAYER'S
PRESENT
By NOEL COWARD
Directed by Dorothy Somerset
Tickets on sale at Auditorium Box Office
11:30 to 3:00 p.m. daily
and at door
Students 50c Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 15,  1962
Canadian school in
Africa needs books
The Chassa Secondary School
in Northern Rhodesia has sent
out an urgent appeal for books
to build up their library. It now
has less than 200 books, most
of which are in poor condition
The school of 120 pupils is
staffed by the Canadian Marisl
Brothers of the Schools and now
gives instruction at the grade
nine and 10 level, with grade
11 to be added by 1963.
Books of all kinds are needed, as well as subscriptions to
periodicals.
Material may be sent parcel
post to: Chassa Secondary
School, P.O. Box 77, Sinda,
Northern Rhodesia, B.C. Africa.
No customs declaration is necessary if "books—not for resale" is put on the package.
Posts filled
Appointments made at the
second joint-council meeting
were as follows:
Editor of Raven, Mike Sinclair, Arts 3; co-ordinntaor ' of
publications, Bill McDonald,
Arts 3; chairman Leadership
Conference committee, Mike
Davies, Law 1; chairman Special Events committee, George
Peter, Arts 4; chairman, World
University Services committee,
John Curtis, Arts 3; chairman
High School Conference committee, Gordon Galbraith, Arts
2; chairman, Academic Symposium committee, Peter Mc-
Nair, Arts 3; Chief Justice Student Court, Tom English, Law
2; Alternate Justice Student
Court, John Swan; Law 2; Student Court Judges, Eric Ricker,
Law 1, Ron Parker, Eng. 3,
Fred Fletcher, Arts 4; alternate
judges, Wendy Moir, Law 1, and
John Dick, Forestry 4.
DR. DONALD BROWN
. . . timely topic
Time talk tells
timely tale
Time is a valuable commodity
said Dr. Donald Brown in a
timely lecture at noontime
Tuesday.
Time is especially valuable
at exam time, he said, because
there is so little time for study
time.
People are always wasting
time, spending time, making
time and buying on time. It is
just like money. "I am tempted
to suggest that time is the basic
unit of value," he said.
Time is exchangeable and can
be bought and sold, as when
you spend eight hours of time
in return for a wage.
It is a possession which everybody owns all the time and like
any other commodity can be
utilized and tiimely satisfaction
derived from it, he said.
"In fact, we would have a
terrible time if we had no
time," Dr.  Brown said.
\\
ft
THE SNACKERY
3 LOCATIONS
3075 Granville - RE 3-5813
4423 W. 10th Ave. CA 4-0833
5075 Kingsway - HE 1-8818
FREE  HOT  &  FAST  PIZZA
DELIVERY
<<h JtnMatitbh
is extended to members of
the 1962 graduating class in
ARTS, COMMERCE or ENGINEERING
to investigate  a  career  in
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANCY
by   contacting
Mcintosh, McVicar, Dinsley & Co.
1075 Melville  Street
To arrange an appointment,  please telephone
Mrs. Teal at MUtual  4-8221
Dalhousie
Christmas
drops
exams
HALIFAX (CUP)—Dalhousie University
away with Christmas examinations.
Dr. Henry Hieks, dean of Arts
and Science and vice-president
of the university, said last week
that exams at Christmas would
"be abolished on a trial basis,"
but added that one-hour tests
during the term would be given
to students.
"Professors would be expected to submit a student's standing to the registrar on the basis
of these tests," he said.
Professors of freshmen classes
may decide to set more formal
examinations, if they feel the
need.
Dr. Hicks admitted that some
faculty members "had reservations."
"They felt that freshmen
might experience some difficulty,   especially   when   the   new
has  decided to do
SIiOCAK   FIiOBIST   LTB.
2523 Xing-sway
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MARIE BRUCKER SALON
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Expert Alterations
Evenings   by Appointment
4683 Kingsway   HE 1-1160
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selection   for
Brides,
Attendants,
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Fur  Stoles,
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; ule that freshmen must pass two
of the final examinations to remain in the university is put
into effect next year."
Up to now, freshmen have
been able to return to Dalhousie
for their second year without
passing any of the final examinations. The new rule will apply to freshmen entering next
fall.
Students!
For a new dining pleasure
try our daily special.
DEANS
4544 W. 10th
Open 'till 11:30
LAST DAY
FOR
WORLD'S  FAIR  TICKETS
at A.M.S. Office
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Open 7 Days a Week — 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. - 4577 W. 10th
th. MILDEST BEST-TASTING cigaritti Thursday, March   15,  1962
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
—Photo by Les Pal
' WORKING OUT seduction plan for unsuspecting Lisa
Mclarren, in Players' Club's production of "Hay Fever" is
Mflte" FullertSn". The play goes nightly in the auditorium
until Saturday.
Mich, trot bars blacks^
may be disciplined
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN (CUP)—The Sigma Nu social fraternity of the University of Michigan is facing possible disciplinary
action over a clause in its constitution.
The committee on membership in student organizations
submitted a recommendation to
student government council last
week concerning the compliance
of the frat with the university
regulation on membership selection. Council president Richard
Nohl, in making the announcement, did not reveal details of
the recommendation.
F'lRST CASE
This is t h e first case to be
brought before the council by
the membership committee.
Stewart Loud, president of
the local chapter, said the group
has voted to apply immediately
to the national for a waiver of
ts membership clause.
Rental Service
TUXEDOS
,        Black Suits, Formals,
Costumes, Make-up
Special Student Rates
New York
Costume Salon
4397 W.   10th       CA 4-0034
Near UBC Gates
The Sigma Nu national constitution states: "Membership
Qualifications: Members must be
Men, free born and of free en-
cestry, and without Negro blood.
(Article II Section 4).
The university regulation on
membership in student organizations provides: "All recognized
student organizations shall select members on the basis of personal merit and not race, color,
religion, creed, national origin,
or ancestry."
LAST DAY
FOR
WORLD'S  FAIR  TICKETS
at A.M.S. Office
Varsity Fabrics
4437 W. 10th Ave CA 4-0842
Yard Goods, McCall Patterns
Sewing Supplies
Open Friday 'til 9
LAWMEN!
STUDYING TOO HARD?
I
KEEP ASPIRIN WITH YOU
AT ALL TIMES
ASPIRINS!
UNIViRSITY     PHARMACY      LTD.
5754 University Boulevard CA. 4-3202
Offers  financial  careers
Ottawa runs big business
OTTAWA (CUP) — Students
now in economics, business administration or commerce and
finance who are interested in a
business career might consider
Bay Street or St. James Street
to be the height of achievement
in the financial world, but they
often forget the biggest business in Canada — the federal
government, and its financial
heart. >
*   *   *
A career in the Department of
Finance does not mean a job as
a bookkeeper or tax collector.
Activities cover a wide area
ranging from government expenditures, taxation policy and
regional development, to foreign
trade, commercial policy and
economic fluctuations. The finance officer must be of executive quality, he must have an
appraising eye, he must be able
to think and talk on his feet
for he is often required to hold
his own against experts in other
fields.
"Jobs in business may pay a
bit more," one officer said recently, "but they aren't as much
fun, and there isn't as much
breadth and depth. We have an:
opportunity here to present
views to people who can do
something about them."
The various divisions within
the department include: economic and international affairs,
treasury board, and taxation.
The first concerns itself with Canada's trade and tariff policies-,
international as well as purely
Canadian economic and financial
arrangements and governmental
plans for assistance to developing countries through such devices as the Colombo Plan.
As the watchdog of the nation's pocketbook the Treasury
Board is the final authority for
expenditure policies of all departments and government agencies. The Taxation Division does
not collect taxes — the Department of National Revenue does
—• but it does advise the minister
of finance on taxation policy
and fiscal measures and what
these imply from an economic
and social stand-point. The staff
must also deal with thousands
of people who "know" what is
wrong with their taxes.
*     *     *
The finance officer is "right
in the heart of things," so the
department needs able people
rather than just economists. It
is, of course, an advantage to
the recruit to have handled economics, but the department
might take a philosoher in preference to an economist if it
thought the former could "do the
job. But usually recruits are honours graduates in economics, political science, commerce and finance or business administration.
No mattter which division the
graduate may prefer he will find
his job entails constant contact
with the government, in addition
to regular consultation with men
in  business and  industry.
ST. PATRICK'S DANCE
In  the beautiful  British Columbia  Room  at the central
YMCA
PRIZES
The Dick Tripp Quartet—9:00 p.m. to 12 p.m.
every Saturday. Membership open to both men
and   women
995 BURRARD STREET MU. 1-0221
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New.. .Philips Battery Tape Recorder
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alive. It records and plays back anywhere, anytime because its all-transistor
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Push a button and you're in record1 orj
playback position ... in the car, at the
ski lodge, in the concert hall or the jazz
loft. See and hear the Continental '100.
now at your Philips
flashlight batteries,    dlld it's Ollly $144.95    tape recorder dealer. Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 15, 1962
7ween classes
Arise Oh Men of Science
sus
Sciencemen! As soon as you
read this notice go to the steps
of the Physics Bldg. General
assembly march to the Armory
for the General Meeting. Let's
show the campus who science-
men are.
*     *     *
I H
Nominations for best Foreign
Student close today. Nominations for exec, close tomorrow.
Cambridge  man
to  talk  Friday
A. G. Woodhead, a noted British classical scholar, will visit
the University Friday to give
a public lecture and hold seminars with advanced students.
Woodhead, a fellow of Corpus
Christi College and lecturer in
classics at Cambridge University, will speak in room 100 of
the Buchanan building at 12:30
p.m. on "Whom the Gods love . . .
(A children's epitaph in ancient Greece and modern England)."
Mr. Woodhead is well known
as an historian of ancient Greece
and is Great Britain's leading
epigraphist — an interpreter of
partial.inscriptions found in ancient ruins.
JR.  CHEM  CLUB
Dr. Harvey speaks on "Low
Temperature Spectros copy"
Chem. 250 Friday at noon.
* *     *      .
SPECIAL EVENTS
75 cent tickets available for
Rise Stevens and Brian Sullivan — AMS office.
* *     *
AQUA SOC
General meeting for election
of next year's exec, in Bio. Sci.
2000 noon today.
* *     *
COMMONWEALTH CLUB
Annual general meeting at
noon Friday.
* *     *
UNITARIAN CLUB
General meeting Wed. in Bu.
102 at noon.
Cornette Beauty
Solon
Special  Prke«  for UBC
"Individual  Attention"  by
Mote and Female Stylists.
OPEN  FRI TILL NINE
4532 W. 10 CA 4-7440
Campus Barber
Shoo
Monday - Friday 8:30 - 5:00
Saturday  8:30  -   12:00
LOCATED IN
BROCK EXTENSION
NEWMAN CLUB
Grand Finale Talent night Friday at 8:00 p.m. in St. Mark's
Lounge.
* ' *     *
AMATEUR RADIO
Computer meeting as usual this
week in Bu. 219.
* *     *
CINEMATOGRAPHY GROUP
Meeting noon today in Film
Soc offices. Elections, discussion
of  Constitution.
* *     *
V.C.F.
Rev. Kimmitt will speak on
"The Resurrection, The World
and You," Fri. noon, Bu. 106.
* *     *
WRITERS' WORKSHOP
Meeting cancelled tonight.
Next meeting Mar. 22 at 3591
W.   11.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE CONCERT
•'!?KE THE  PHILIPPINE  BAMBOO  DANCE"
U.B.C. Auditorium, Friday,  March 23, 8:15 P.m.
Tiikets: Famous Artists—Hudson's Bay, International House, and door
Timetables  coming
This year's final exam timetables will be posted sometime
next week, the Registrar's office announced Wednesday.
"We hope to have them up
on Monday but that's only a
hope," a spokesman said.
TUXEDO
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• Shirts   &
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• 10% UBC Discount
E. A. Lee Ltd.
One   Store  Only!
623 Howe St.     MIJ 3-2457
SpecialQeh t& Cwwttee
AppiicaticwA
Applications are now being accepted for positions
on the Special Events Committee of the A.M..S
Applicants should write Special Events, Box 110,
Brock Hall, by 5 p.m. Thursday, March 16, stating
year, faculty, previous committee experience if
any, etc. Interviews will be held Friday, March
17 in the Special Events Office B.'E. 255.
WITH
CANADIAN CHEMICAL
COMPANY, LIMITED
This advertisement will be of most interest to graduates in chemistry,
chemical, mechanical and electrical engineering and engineering physics.
Let's Do It!
Birds and bees do it,
and, as a special tribute
to Spring, the UBC
Players are doing it now . . .
NOEL COWARD'S
hay fever
directed by Dorothy Somerset
Tickets NOW at the.
Auditorium Ticket Office
March 14, 15, 16, 17 - 8:30 pm
Auditorium
Students: only SOc
What interests you most about a career? Opportunity
should. Opportunity not only for advancement, but
opportunity for professional growth through varied
and interesting experience. We firmly believein diversified experience and, luckily, we can offer it in our fully
integrated operation. We find it's best for you (makes
life more interesting aad provides greater opportunity)
and best for us, (we end up with senior people who are
fully experienced in bur. business). Now, let's have a
crack at answering some of your questions.
What do we do? Canadian Chemical Company produces
basic organic chemicals, cellulose acetate flake and
acetate yarns, fibres and staple.
Where do we do it? At Edmonton. We have three plants
on a 430 acre site. The first produces chemicals-
alcohol, ester and ketone solvents, acetic acid, glycols,
pentaerythritol, formaldehyde and other organics. The
second produces cellulose acetate flake. The third, acetate and Arnel yarns and fibres.
Sales offices are located in Montreal, Toronto and
Vancouver.
What is our future? Very bright. (It just happens to be
true.) We think of ourselves as a young, progressive,
fast-growing Canadian firm with world-wide affiliations. The record bears this out. So does the operation
of our Edmonton plant. And the fact that our engineering department is one of the largest and most diversified
in Canada.
Our raw materials are basic Canadian natural resources:
petroleum by-products from Alberta and cellulose from
the forests of British Columbia. Our markets are worldwide, and through our affiliates we have a strong alliance with companies in the textile, chemical and
plastics industries;
What would you do? As a qualified chemist or engineer
you could be working onproduct development, research,
process engineering, plant design, construction or some
aspect of production. This is exciting work in many
completely new fields. As a chemist or chemical engineer
you could choose also a career in sales or technical service.
What else should you know about us? Lots more. You
can get more information and literature by writing to
Department "A" at 1600 Dorchester Blvd. West,
Montreal 25, Quebec. Or to the Personnel Department,
Canadian Chemical Company, Limited, P.O. Box 99,
Edmonton, Alberta.
CANADIAN CHEMICAL COMPANY, LIMITED
MONTREAL • TORONTO  •   EDMONTON   •  VANCOUVER
G*i
yiemtc/if ®
PETROCHEMICALS

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