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The Ubyssey Feb 7, 1939

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 ^^^^^s^.^Ta'*' "'■
MEDICAL FILMS
Ap. So. 100
WEDNESDAY
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
DR. STRONG
TODAY
ARTS 100, NOON
Vol. XXI.
HHIIMMIMIHHtMIIIIHillHIIIMIHMMIMHIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIHMMtJ
HERE
AND
THERE
 MMIIIMI HIIMIIIIIII lllllllMII-mill]
Edited by J. D. MACFARLANE
In theae days of nation-wide
scholarship campaigns the following story direct front the McOlll
Dally should be of Interest to B.C.
students.
Augmentation of ^ its present services and an inorease in the total
number of services of the National
Federation of Oanadlan University
Students waa announosd by John
H. MoDonald, Federation President,
recently.
The chief features of the revitalised program announoed by the
, president are the inorease in tha
Federation's Scholarship, travel, and
Information services. Additional services in the form of an Employment
Bureau, a Dramatlo Club clearing
house, a student Radio Hour and
the formation of an advisory oounoil
were announoed. The next Executive
Conference of the Federation would
be held in Ottawa on December 27,
1089, McDonald said.
"On of the moat Important things
undertaken   by   the   Federation,"
stated MoDonald, "was the backing   of   the   Canadian   University
Press. This has worked out so suo-
ocsslully that tt ts now a vital factor   ln   the   life   of   every   college
In tho Dominion. But
backing the Canadian University Press the Federation has
heen  quietly  at work  in  a lone
range and broad program which It
now feels should be announoed to
Its members."
The National Federation ot Canadian University Students ls an organisation  formed by the  various  Students' Councils  of Canada  In  order
that    a    certain    mass    bargaining
power of student  opinion might be
utilised  for the benefit of Canadian
Students, he explained. Some of the
most successful ventures of the Federation have been in the development
of the Canadian University Press, In
the   obtaining   of   reduced    railway
fares    for    students    travelling    at
Christmas   time   and   the   establishment  of  Exohange  Scholarships—85
of whioh are now  open to  application by Canadian Students.
The Federation is governed by a
Counoil in whioh each member Student Society has one vote. This council meets once every two years and
lays doWn a polloy which is then
carried out by the exeoutive eleoted
by that Counoil. The last meeting of
the Counoil was held In Winnipeg in
1987 and the next meeting it waa
announoed would be held in Ottawa
in 1989.
• •      •
For the further Information of
scholarship conscious students we
publish the following excerpts from
the new column "Canadian Campus,"
by John H. MacDonald, last year's
editor of the MoOill Dally, and founder of Canadian University Press,
as printed tn the MoOill Daily.
• •      •
At the present moment the Federation la offering more than twenty-
live scholarships to the Students of
Canada tenable next session at Universities throughout Canada. Thla la
not the place to elaborate on the
scheme. Suffice it to say that this
plan, which has been in operation
for over ten years has enabled more
than one hundred and twenty-five
students to take their work at a
university in a different part of
Canada and thus to gain experience
and a knowledge of the country. If
any of you are interested in this
matter you should discuss lt with the
president of your Students' Council
or with the Registrar of your University.
Expand Present Plans
This scholarship plan of the Federation has been so successful that
the executive has been encouraged
and is seeking to increase lt. Already
much valuable work has been done
In this direction and It Is hoped that
within the next few months we will
be able to announce that we have
expanded this plan to include Gradu-
(Continued on Page Two)
See HERE AND THERE
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1939
No. 30
Money Granted For
Memorial Building
PRESIDENT L. S. KLINCK, chairman of the Board of Oovernora,
whloh has granted 839,000 to the Alma Mater Sooiety for the Brock Memorial Union Building. Of this amount 4-8,000 will be given In ten Instalments of $3,800 eaoh, and the remainder to be used for connecting heating
and light servloos In tho building.
Weir Officially Opens .
University Health Week;
Health Director Speaks
Venereal Diseases and Resulting Conditions First Topic
in Lecture Series; Social and Economic Factors
Aiding Infection Spread
"Our purpose is to break down public prejudice and public
habits in order to bring a message of good health and a scientific
outline, so that young people can avoid the pitfalls thnt beset tho
older adults," said the Hon. Dr. Weir when he officially declared
the University Health Week open. The first of the series of lectures took place in the auditorium Monday noon and are sponsored
by the Monro Pre-Med Club and the Health Service.
MENTAL, INSTITUTIONS I
"Ten per cent of the cases in our
mental hospital is due to venereal
disease and It is steadily increasing,"
continued the Minister of Health.
"We would rather have the inorease
In attendance at thia mental institution, the University, rather than at
Essondale."
Dr. Weir introduced the speaker,
Dr. Donald H. Williams, provincial
director of publio health, who la a
graduate of the University of Manitoba and did research work in venereal diseases with the Mayo Broth-
era.
The spread of venereal diseases
constitutes the most Important
public health problem was the expression of Dr. Williams.
University students should understand the facts concerning such problems. Among the men, venereal disease ia acquired between the ages of
30 to 80 years with 32 as the peak.
Co-eds will be the future homemak-
ers and may be Innocent victims If
they do not understand the problems
of venereal diseases.
LONGER LIFE
The average man of today lives
longer than the average man of fifty
years ago. This is the result of many
lives being saved during the flrat
period of life by public health measures.
Little Is done In the aecond half
whloh Is ravaged by cancer, heart
diseases and venereal disease.
Comparing and contrasting the
two main venereal diseases, gonorrhea and syphlis, Dr. Williams
explained that gonorrhea produoes
sterility in both men and women frequently and is the cause of so many
childless marriages.
GONORRHOEA
This type of disease is localised to
the site of origin, is chronic and haa
shown symptoms of inflammation.
It is not transferable from mother to
child before birth, the treatment is
short and easy but is infectious until
the patient is completely cured.
In Syphlis the infection lasts a life
time if not cured or the resistance of
the constitution is not strong. It becomes chronic, spreads to every tis-
(Contlnued on Page S)
See WILLIAMS
CAMPAIGNERS
ENLIST AID
OF STUDENTS
The Campaign Oommittee apparently has benefitted by the criticism
whloh they have received during the
past two weeks. Their minutes of
February 3 contain aeveral points of
reorganisation which closely follow
suggestions made by Jr. Member Evan
apRoberts.
MORE  UNDERGRADUATES
Following Evan's suggestions that
the Alumni and Undergraduate committees should be separate, the minute was passed.
"That this committee . . . recommends that it be enlarged to include
more undergraduate students ... in
view of the fact that during the passage of time most of the members
have graduated; and that subsequently the committee be divided into two groups: one to be an Undergraduate committee carrying on the
active work of the campaign as a
oommittee ot the Alma Mater Society; and the other to be a graduate
oommittee to act ln an advisory capacity on matters of policy, the appointment of further oommittee
members to be left to Council."
COMMITTEES AIMS
The minutes further outlined particular aspects of the Campaign
Committee's alms, to supplement
those outlined In their constitution
which was published in the first edition of the Ubyssey last fall. The
pointa mentioned are:
"Promoting the construction of the
building, or buildings for which the
government has voted the stun of
8350,000."
The Campaign Committee have
received news and correspondence
whloh leads them to believe that a
(Continued on Page 8)
See CAMPAIGNERS
FROSH DRAW
FOR FROLIC
TODAYNOON
The exeoutive of Arts '42 announce
that the annual Frosh frolio will be
held Thursday night, Feb. 0, at the
Palomar to the muslo of Trevor Page
and his orchestra.
The traditional elass'draw will
be held today noon In the Auditorium when Professor Gage, master of ceremonies, will read the
names of the partners aa he draws
them.
Since there are more freshmen
than freshettes this year all undrawn freshmen will receive an extra ticket to take the girl of hla
choice.
DRAW RECORD
"A record of (he draw will be kept,"
stated Prexy Oeorge Stamatls, "so If
any are In doubt as to the Identity
of their partners they may consult
the executive."
It Is Imperative that all Froah be
in attendance so that any changes
can be quickly made should the
partners desire.
Freshmen are . Informed that if
they wish to take an upperclass student in place of the one drawn they
must first make arrangements with
their partner. In that case they must
purchase the second ticket.
TICKETS WEDNESDAY
Tlokets for the Frosh are obtainable upon presentation of their Students' pass at the Box Office In the
Quad tomorrow.
"Freshettes must get their own
tickets," said Stamatls yesterday.
Between three and four hundred
tickets will be available for upperclass
students at two dollars per couple.
These will be sold at the foot of the
caf stairs upon presentation of the
students' pass.
DECORATIONS  TOO
The Palomar will be decorated with
numerous streamers ln the Varsity
gold and blue. It is expected that
favors and novelties will be available
for all.
Refreshments will be served at the
main lunch counter If and only If
the freshmen retain the stubs on
their tickets. Otherwise they must
pay for their eats.
The dancing will oommence at 8
p.m. and finish at 1 a.m.
Remember Frosh; this is your frolic I
Government Authorizes Ten Instalment Loan
of $2,500; Governors Give Additional
$4,000 Grant for 1939-40
The Board of Governors have granted $25,000 to the Brock
Memorial Building fund it was announoed in a letter reoeived by
Carson McGuire last/night. $40,000 of principal is now available
and construction will begin as soon as approximately $0,900 can
be realized to meet interest payments.
These figures represent the maximum cost of the building and
it is possible that the required unit can be built at a cost of anywhere from $35,000 principal and proportionately leas interest.
f LOAN AUTHORIZED
Sa /"» \\ f\ \ -*W *\ \\ \ r\      Permission to make the loan whloh
kJCllVlCIl   91I1F   will be in ten installments ot $3,800.00
was reoeived by the Board of Governors on January 9. The loan waa
authorised by the Executive Oounoil
and the Council of Publio Instruction of British Columbia.
The Governors have agreed to
an additional grant of 84,000, In tho
1888-40 budget for the purpose of
Installing connecting service* to
the Brook Memorial Union Building
The total grant will be turned over
to the Permanent Brock Memorial
Committee who are in charge of tho
administration of all Brook Memorial Funds. The committee contain*
two A.M.S. representatives, Carson
McOulre, and Evan apRoberts, and
is under the chairmanship of Mr.
Sherwood Lett.
Campaign Well
Underway Here
Over a nation-wide hook-up of
OB.O. stations Canadians heard Paul
Martin, Ontario M.P., support the
Oanadlan Student Assembly Pan-
Canadian half-million dollar scholarship drive ln the Oanadlan Forum
program from 7-7.80 p.m. Sunday
evening?
Wednesday afternoon at 1.45 pan.
radio listeners will hear a second
program In the series over the C.
B. c. hook-up from Winnipeg.
In  Vanoouver  campaign  activities
are beginning to move swiftly, with
all high sohool principals giving their
undivided support to the scheme.
STUDENT SPEAKERS.
During the past week U.B.O. student teachers have addressed student
bodies In many of the local high
schools, including King Edward,
Prince of Wales, Lord Byng, Kitsilano, and two others. At all schools
students have given enthusiastic
support and have endorsed resolutions to Ottawa asking for the $000,-
000 grant for scholarships.
Next Thursday the rest of the High
Schools  ln   Vancouver   will   be addressed, and students will be asked
to send a resolution to Ottawa.
Also, in the near future student
teachers will  visit  schools In New
Westminster and North and South
Vanoouver.
Letters have been sent to all organisations and service clubs in Vanoouver, and IB replies have been received up to date, all favorable and
asking for speakers to address their
meetings.
MEDICAL SCHEDULE
Tuesday)
Arta  100,  noon—Dr.  G.  F.  Strong,
"Diseases  of  the  Heart"   (Illustrated).
Wednesday:
Ap.     So.,     8.80-8.80    p.m.—Medical
Alms.
Thursday:'
Arta  100,  noon—Dr.  C.   W.  Proud,
"Problems of Cancer."
H,,,,»III«IIIIIII«,>>IIIMII»,IIIIIIM«I,,I,II,MI,HI,IIUIIIIIIHIIIII»^IMMI»IIHHIIIIMIIII»I''''**'I*"»***'**M'I'''****I|*'**'*"*I'''*'*1
DIRECTORS I
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Last Saturday morning, while backstage, our staff photographer
smelt something burning and decided to Investigate. As he groped his
way through the smoke-filled auditorium, he tripped the shatter of his
camera, and here Is the result. The three gentlemen among the wreaths
of smoke are Mr. W. Gage, Mr. E. V. Young and Mr. Haydn Williams.
Mr. Young Is the dramatic director of the Musioal Society's production,
"Serenade," while Mr. Williams Is musioal director and Mr. Gage Is
assistant dramatlo director. When photographed they were taking time
off to admire their handiwork, and not trying to set the auditorium
en Are.
PLANS TO BE SUBMITTED
Plans for the building are almost
completed and will probably be submitted to the Students' Council in
the very near future. Working on
the sub-committee ln charge of plans
are Jaok Davis, Jean Story, the two
student representatives of the main
oommittee, along with aeveral faoulty
members.
Finances are being ironed out by
Carson    McOulre    and    Bob    Smith,
whose present plans are to amortise
$40,000 prlnolpal over the  ten yeara
by the $38,0000 grant from the Board
of Governors and $18,000 from bonds
floated by the Alma Mater Sooiety.
The AJM.S. loan will be financed
by means of the 18e-$-.9_ redistribution of the 88.00 student building
fee, whieh was authorised last fall
by the students.
This plan leaves the interest payments still outstanding.    A committee composed of Evan apRoberts and
Struan  Robertson   are   working  on
meana  whereby  the    extra    sum   of
money oan be raised.   apRoberts haa
been placed at the head of the committee becauae of fs\m suooess ln promoting   Homecoming   and   the   Victoria Invasion.
FUND SOURCES
Three possible sources of funds
which are being considered are: The
Brook Memorial Ball and similar
student functions; a government
grant to cover the interest as in the
case of the Stadium bonds; and Alma
Mater Sooiety funds now used for
activities.
Council members expressed themselves as confident that the minor
financial difficulties would be worked
out without too muoh time being lost
and that the Union Building will be
a reality in the 1989-40 terms.
The idea to ask the Board ot Governors for this grant ts traced to the
Victoria conference of membera of
the Campaign Committee.
It is thought that President Kllnck
was instrumental in the success of
the plan which was placed before
hint by Carson McOulre and Evan
apRoberts.
LOAN FUND PROVIDED
BY UNIVERSITY L0.D.E.
A loan fund of $100 has been made
available for the present session for
women of the second, third and
fourth years.
Loans will be made on the basis of
scholarship and financial need. Application forms may be obtained at
the Bursar's Office.
This fund has been provided by the
University Chapter of the I.O.D.E. rm'rtiw*
Two
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 7, 1939
THE  UBYSSEY
lamed twice weekly by the Studenta' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Offloe) 306 Auditorium Building ... Phone Point Grey 306
Oampua Subscriptions, 61.50 Mail subscriptions, 63.00
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Dorothy Cummings
SENIOR EDITORS
Tuesday
Irene Eedy
Friday
Jaok Mair
Sports Editor) Orme Dier
ASSOCIATE   EDITORS
Rosemary Collins Lester Pronger Ted Underbill
Associate Sports Bdltors i Basil Robinson, Myrne Nevison,
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Ossy Durkin       Florence Hurndall       Helen Hann
Bill Baokman.
Joan Thompson
Assistant Sports Editors) Lionel Salt, Jim Harmer, Austin Frith,
Charles Craig.
O. U. P.  STAFF
Editor
James Macfarlane
Assistants
Ann Jeremy
Van Perry
PUB. SECRETARY
Virginia Galloway
Joyce Cooper
CIRCULATION MOR.
Harry Campbell
REPORTORfAL  STAFF
Jaok Margeson, Pat Keatley, Joan Haalam, Jaoques Metford, Ruth Millar,
Janet Walker, Brita Ves ter baok, Bob Manson, Bill Osborne, Ken Vernon,
Dlok Jarvis
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Telephone: SEYMOUR 4484
All advertising handled exclusively by standard Publishing Oo.
Editorials
HEALTH WEEK
Health week, a program which is being sponsored on the cam
pus this week by the Monro Pre-Medical Club, has had an excel
lent commencement. Many speakers have been brcmght to the
campus in the past, and many of these speakers nre the finest
authorities in their field. But there has never been a noon-hour
lecture given to the students during the past four years which has
been received with quite as much enthusiasm ns wns the lecttiro
given yesterday.
The students appreciate the effort expended by the Medical
dub in sponsoring such an ambitious program.    If we may judge
from the effect made on those  attending the  meeting yesterday
noon, we can safely say that health week has already been a sue
cess.
But yesterday's meeting was only a beginning. The club plan
to present a series of films and lectures which, judging from a pre
showing, will be of great interest to every member of the student
body. Many drives and publicity campaigns have been sponsored
oh this campus, but wo may say that none have been so well
handled or so immediately beneficial as has been the flrst day of
Health Week.
I
CAMPAIGN OOMMITTEE REORGANIZED
~For tho past two weeks wc have beon awaiting the results of
a motion proposed by Council's Junior Member, Evan apRoberts.
During that titne it was not clear to us what were the facts on
which Evan based his accusations. We suggested the possibility
that he had nothing back of his statements. We waited for the
Campaign Committee to submit their report of progress. Throughout the entire fortnight we wondered exactly what Evan did have
back of his belief. We are still not sure what he was driving at,
*r if he was driving at anything in particular.
During this period of time the Campaign Committee swung
into a period of great activity. They mot several times a week
and did not leave their meetings for hours at a time. But it was
evident from their attitude that thoy believed themselves guilty
of some of tho accusations. In fact thoy have taken stops to reorganize their group. In other words, although we do not know
exactly what was meant by apRoberts, the Campaign Committee
give the appearance of a clear insight into the matter.
Consequently wo say that if we have in any way given the
appearance of doubting Evan's good faith or veracity, avion is not
our opinion. Wc wish to compliment him on the results of his
tabled motion. The committee against which he levelled his criticism have nothing but ",'ood words for him and we. too, must give
him his due. He has produced some sort of internal reform in our
committee.
It was quite a week-end, wasn't it?
Every one on the Campua appeara to
have absorbed a mite
THE KINO'S of Anglican culture,
ENGLISH for   the   English    ac
cents are 'something
horrible' at the moment. We, of
course, feel a trifle sensitive about
accents, particularly aa our connection with Viotorla is particularly
strengthy.
But on the whole the Capital City
reaoted very positively to the invading horde of 'little barbarians' from
tbe windswept steppes of Point Grey.
We noticed in the press ln Victoria
on Sunday morning no violent outbursts of passion against the University, although they cbuld not account
for the defeat of their valiant heroes
of the Crimson sweaters. They resigned themselves to the faot that
Fate was against them, we suppose.
On our return to the University,
however,  we  ran   into   a   group  of
students who are often
AND THE labelled aa "those of
THESPIANS the   Bnglish   acoents
We refer to the Players of the Campus. It Is our boun-
den duty to point out to the misinformed that the Players Club exemplifies very little that la English.
There are some members with a tinge
of the Oxford pronunciation, but very
few that are genuine Anglicans.
The Thespians are very amusing
at this time of year, for they are all
casting their verbal pearls before Ut'
erary swine like ourselves . . . whloh
ls a bad thing,
They have chosen a play oalled
"The Curtain Rises," by Benjamin
M. Kaye. We don't ken Mr. Kaye,
nor do we ken the play. In spite of
this disadvantage the play ia very
good!
We were sitting amongst a melee
of aotors, and deolded to discover
their reactions to
THEIR IDEAS the choice of play.
We questioned them
thus: "And what might you be thinking ot the new play?" This was a
bad start for the play is not Irish
They told  me  that very forcefully!
Finally one answered: "I don't like
It." This was better. We questioned
them further with the same Inter-
> rogation. Said another, "'Well . .
yes . . . elephants are pink aren't
they?" We feel that possibly the
person in question was attempting to
be non-commltal.
But another aoon volunteered that
"From the point of view of the Club
the play was the best one they could
get"; and at onoe another shrieked
that, "From the point of view of Art
lt was not the best they oould get
So where are we?
Pressing our point we managed to
squeeze out a little more Information.
Another member claim
AND ed tl\at the play "was a
OPINIONS magnificent exhibition
of drivel." Sounds like
good stuff. Following this up we
were given the opinions of the stage-
crew: "The play gives plenty of scope
for the imagination; the action revolves about a cocktail stand ....
which doesn't mean a thing!" And
again, "The setting for the play will
,be so modern as to give ohromlum
plated cubism a mediaeval ring."
By this time we were ln a muddle. And that's a bad thing. We
found after another hour that the
reason for the quaint processes of
thought amongst the Players is that
they really feel that "Mr. Kaye does
not know enough about the facts of
life." And a second reason is that
the play is not uniform ln its passionate intensity. One actor screamed "It's awfully mushy. I have no
chance to kiss ln the aecond Act, and
Afteen in the last!"
And so another Spring performance approaches. We trust its r e-
ception will be more coherent than
the opinions of the participants
therein. "After all," aald one, "lt ls
only light entertainment, with nothing    behind    It—absolutely    nothing.
PROGRESS
OF GERMANY
AT INSTITUTE
At the regular Saturday night lecture of the Vancouver Institute, Dr.
Isabel Maclnnes gave an Interesting
lecture on "The Medieval Oerman
Town," with lantern-slide illustrations.
Miss Maclnnes, who has spent
many years ln Germany, traced In
her lecture the development of medieval Germany from a series of purely agricultural communities to Individual and independent towns, rich
from the proceeds of commerce, secure behind their thlok stone walls,
GUILDS FORMED.
When the trades and handicrafts
developed, the cltisens become more
powerful, forming guilds, and demanding "Reichfrelhelt" or autonomy from their overlords. They realised the force of combined action,
and their guilds beoame not only
economic, but social and benevolent
organisations.
The latter half of the leoture was
Illustrated by a series of lantern-
slides, depicting the main features of
the towns of that period: marketplaces, walls, city halls, cathedrals,
and private houses.
The next leoture, whloh will take
plaoe on Feb. 11, will be given by Mr,
Roger Ouimet, Rockefeller Lecturer,
on "The French-Canadian view of
Confederation."
HEALTH FILMS
TO BE SHOWN
WEDNESDAY
As a feature of "Health Week" on
the campus, six films of a medical
nature will be shown ln Applied Science 100 on Wednesday, Feb. 8 between 3.30 and £.30.
Dr. Brandon of the Unlveralty
Health Servloe, will provide the
commentary on the Alms, each of
whloh will run for approximately
twenty minutes.
Included In the showing will be a
film on diagnostic and therapeutic
'technlc, among these, the Schlc Test
for diphtheria, mercuric corrections,
and methods of obtaining blood from
the juglar vein.
BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS
Three methods for performing
blood transfusions will be shown, as
well as a short reel on the restoration of function of harelip and cleft
palate. In this latter picture, particularly Interesting are the "before"
and "after" shots of patients.
"The Preparation of Codllver OU"
and "Vitamins" are other pictures of
a non-operatory nature.
"Allergy," its forms and treatment,
will Interest those who are addicted
to that perennial bugbear, hayfever,
and all Its tribe.
OPERATION
An operatary film entitled "Goitre Surgery" will -be presented towards the end of the showing, so
that those of the audienoe who prefer not to view anything really gory,
may leave the leoture.
To these showings, sponsored by
the Monrae Pre-medlcal Olub, the
public is cordially invited.
"READJUSTMENT OF
CRIMINALS" THURS.
SYMPOSIUM TOPIC
"How can we ln B.O. foster the readjustment of criminals to civilian
life?" will be the subject of a symposium to be held by the Women's
Public Speaking Club on Thursday
at noon in Arts 104.
Catherine Burnett will give the
Analysis; the solutions, Betty Henderson and Mary Ryan. Emily Fraser
will deliver the summary.
The lines are not even risque!"
We   suppose   the   Players'   Club   ts
an   Institution   on   the   Campus   that
lives up to the tra-
AND Ultions    and    cust-
CONCLUSIONS    oms,    but  we  wish
that these 'were a
bit more rational and Intelligible to
a layman such as ourselves.
R. H. Marlow, society photographer, for fine portraits, phone Trin.
21S7.
Speed.. •
Seymour 4484
Quality...
Service...
MITCHELL PRINTING and
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HERE AND THERE
(Continued from Pago 1)
ate Studenta as well aa the present
undergraduates.
The Federation is also seeking to
make this plan an International venture and we are attempting to obtain
exchange scholarship privileges with
certain Amerloan, British and European Universities.
In all oases of Federation Exchange Scholarships It muat be
pointed out that tuition for the
scholar la provided by the University receiving the student and great
credit muat go to those Universities
who have ao co-operated with your
Federation.
Recently the Federation has been
approached by members asking us
to bring pressure to bear upon the
Federal Oovernment to grant money
for a scheme of scholarships. This
has been carefully considered and
the Federation while thoroughly In
favour of the principle of Oovernment Subsidized Scholarships feeh)
that lt cannot back any plan until
a method of administering such
scholarships when obtained has been
worked out and a praetloal method
of approaching the proper governments has been devised, The Federation feels it cannot endorse any
plans In -which there is grave danger
of the money allotted becoming a
means of political patronage.
Suggest National Board
The Federation feels that the best
method of procedure in such matters
is to appoint a board of Scholarship
Trustees composed of the most prominent men in the Dominion who will
be willing to lend their time and.advice  in  this  matter.  In   fact behind
Fraternity and Sorority
Printing and Engraving
Our Specialty
DANCE   PROGRAMMES
INVITATIONS,   'AT  HOMES.'
LETTERHEADS   and
CHRISTMAS CARDS
GEHRKE'S
866 Seymour St.
_*_-_______---_--_-------t-«*riMta*«a*-'>-'
the Federations' plan to appoint an
advisory counoil lies a suggestion of
this nature—which point will be
elaborated in a subsequent artlole.
The officers of the Federation feel
that at tha present session the Federal Oovernment ia too oeoupled with
pressing matters to consider a scholarship scheme—if Indeed lt falls
within their jurisdiction. And therefore feels that lt Is advisable to concentrate on our preaent plana which
have been so successful In the past
and which hold such promise tor
the future.
In the near future the N.F.C.U.S.
will publish a handbook in whloh
will be listed all the scholarships
available to Canadian students—both
at home, in the United States and
in all countries of the -world. It is
hoped that auch a book will be ready
for distribution in the autumn of this
year.
EDITOR'S NOTE) In Friday's issue
a resume of the Canadian scholarship situation will be published tn
this column -with special reference
to the present Canadian Student
Assembly nation-wide campaign to
secure a half-million dollar grant
from Ottawa for national matriculation scholarships, the principle of
whioh the N.F.C.U.S. endorses, but
which, for, various reasons stated
above, does not, as yet, actively
aupport.
8. C. M.
The S. O. M. Vesper Service will
be held Tuesday at 4.40 p.m. ln the
Chapel of the Anglican Oollege. Rev.
Bert Grelg, representative of the
Provincial Council of Anglican Young
People, will be the speaker. Everyone
ls weloome.
TRINITY 3377
MACK A.
STARK
UFE INSURANCE
U.B.C.  ROOST
SALISBURY LODGE ANNEX
'Where The Oang Meets"
LUNOH 20o
DINNER 35o
HOTEL
COFFEE SHOP     _({
and
DINING ROOM
Fountain for
After Theatre
GEORGIA
LUNCHEONS
DINNERS
TEAS
DANCES
formal or Informal.
SEY.  8742 Tuesday, February 7, 1939
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
CHANG SUEY
AND
The Case of Sherberfi
"Lemonade"
CHAPTER FOURTEEN
Suey Joins a Sooiety
Outterlng candles were sweeping
the sky with their powerful beams,
proclaiming the opening of Sher-
bert's "Lemonade." Milling around
In the foyer ot the University
Theatre were a brilliant crowd of
people, and a scienceman.
The scienceman was dressed formally ln a shirt, and was featuring
the new naked midriff between his
vest and hla trousers. His tartan tie
went well with his bag-plpey leg-
wear.
Alao outstanding among the
notables was a young I Delta
Slamma, who was attracting considerable attention by wearing a
dress.
Several freshettes standing In the
lobby  were   doing   things   to   cigarettes that shouldn't happen to a dog.
(       They  were  wearing  the   traditional
green around the gills,
DODGING THE BARRELS
Among the flrst of the celebrities
to arrive was Barrel Daldwood, who
■lipped   In   unobtrusively   with   his
. tongue   sporting   a   beautiful,   dark-
brown,   hangover   coat,  with  a  fur
•   ■   collar and a belt In the baok.
A pair of C.P.R. redcaps were
carrying the bags under Barrel's
bloodshot lamps. Barrel had Just
returned home, after spending two
weeks  on  the  North  Van.  ferry,
waiting for It to get Into Viotorla.
Next,   Rangy   (Snowhite)   Matter,
the  Himalaya  hambone,  minced   in,
to be stopped by Mary Ann, obtuse
Ubyssey scribe, whoae only claim to
fame  ia  her  reoord   of   8783  x's   to
the mile. Mary Ann opened up her
notebook.
"No autographs!  No autographs!"
protested Snowhite,   looking  around
. for a pen.
"Would   you   mind   telling   the
Ubyssey  what  you  think  of  this
great opening of "Lemonade," Mr.
Matter?" asked  Mary  Ann,  coyly
flapping her great, big eat*.
"I probably would never have won
the Miller Cup if I hadn't had a good
team  behind   me!"   declared   Rangy,
modestly.
ENTER IN
Next, Mr. Hedgequlck arrived with
a little beauty -weighing in at about
26 fluid ounces when bottled. Mr.
Hedgequlck had left a New Year's
Eve party just to be present.
f "Yippee!"  was  the  only   thing  he
had to say to the press at that time.
Resplendent In a tuxedo espeol-
aUy rented for the evening, Show-
en   Oflleld   wa*   standing   ln   the
aisle, telling   the   people   where to
L gO.
The people returned the favour by
standing in the aisle and telling
Showen where to go.
Finally, everyone waa seated, and
the fateful hour arrived. Mr. Oauge
stepped out in  front of the curtain.
"Ladles and gentleman," he said,
"we are asking you to remember
only one thing this evening.  ..."
Here his face took on a look of
fiendish glee. "... and that latitat we outnumber you 2 to 1!"
This was roundly booed by Mr.
Hedgequlck, who prooeeded to narrate with gestures how he had,
single-handed, put to route three
pink elephants, a cerise python, and
a lacey penguin, with only a glass
of water and two dozen aspirin.
For a minute, an enterprising
gentleman continued to walk up and
down the  aisles shouting:
"Programs,   programs!   You   can't
GET VALUE
IN PRINTING
for the activities
of your—
SORORITIES
FRATERNITIES
SOOIAL
and
OLUB FUNCTIONS
;
;
;
[
;
'
:
'
THE
CLARKE & STUART
CO. LIMITED
<            Stationers and Printers
550   SEYMOUR   STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
tell 'em apart without a program!
Know who you're hlttin,' folks, know
who you're hlttin'!"
Then the curtain rose on the colorful scene of the camp of the bandits,
with their leader, Romero (Derrick
MaoDarnit). For a short while,
everything went smoothly; but suddenly, the audienoe became aware of
the .fact that an awkward silence
had crept onto the stage. The silenoe
was followed by an even more awkward lull. Romero looked at the bandits, and the bandits looked back at
Romero.
"We oould play billiards, if we had
a CUE!" shouted Romero, tn a desperate attempt to make conversation.
But nothing continued to happen.
The enterprising gentleman started
walking up and down the aisles
again, yelling:
"Hot dawga! Hot dawgsl Get 'em
while they're still yapping, folks!"
A hot game of "Bottle, bottle,
who's got the bottle," was spreading
out from Mr. Hedgequiok'a corner.
Then, suddenly, things started happening on the atage. A white backdrop clumped down In front of the
scenery, stiffening three of the bandits. A huge, red sign was printed
on it.
"YOU SAY IT WITH PLOWERS,
AND WE SUPPLY THE BODIES"—
Chang Suey Enterprises, Ino.
It waa immediately followed by a
seoond baokdrop, that, brought the
total of oold bandits up to an even
half-doaen.
"DOBS YOUR HEAD ACHE?
COME TO US, WE'LL OET RID
OF IT FOR YOU."—C. Suey and Co.
Then the tardy Duke of Santa
Crua (Flank Scratch) tottered out
onto the stage, stared dumbly at the
audienoe, waved a flabby hand at the
wings, and croaked:
"Chang Suey I"
Pandemonium broke loose as the
Duke fainted into a waiting tuba,
and the horrible laugh of Chang
Suey rang out behind the scenery.
(Wait till Tarsan yodels for his
large-type elephants! We heard that
Oscar Scribble-well, ace reporter was
on the Victoria Invasion! Right?
Read between the lines.
POEMS . . .
and STUFF
CompUed by LEWIS ROBINSON
With apologies, I resurrect this
poem, from the past ln honour of
Health Week.
Look  Before  You  Lip
Before I heard the doctors tell
The dangers of a kiss,
I considered kissing you
The nearest thing to bliss.
But now I know Biology,
I sit and sigh and moan.
Six million mad Bacteria—
I thought we were alone I
*     *     *
A quiet room with the lights turned
low,
A soft touch on my shoulder,
A warm breath on my cheek,
A little face against my own—
Who let  that cat in?
NATIONS MINGLE AT
COSMOPOLITAN PARTY
The International Party, sponsored
each year by the Cosmopolitan Club,
will be held Tuesday, February 7, in
the Deutschland Cafe. A Dutch Treat
party has been planned, at a total
cost per person of SO cents for a
complete evening's fun.
International parties have in the
past years earned a reputation for
the friendly spirit which as been
shown among all the different
nationalities represented. There will
be no exception this year, so if you
feel you would like to go, get your
ticket from Verna Blaok, Norma
Dobson, Yoshlo Hyoda, Alf Kitchen,
or any other of  the  club  members.
HIGHWAY GUARD RAILS
FILM FOR ENGINEERS
"Tests on' Various Highway Ouard
Rails" film will be shown in the York
Room of the Hotel Oeorgla on Thursday, February 8, at 8.15 p.m. by the
Vancouver Branch of the Engineering Institute.
This film, prepared by the Missouri
State Highway Commission will be
commented on by A. E. Foreman,
Esq., M.E.I.O., consulting engineer.
Ernest Smith, A.M.E.I.C, will be
chairman for the evening; the public
is cordially Invited.
Robsrt Strelght
MORE GRADS
IN PRISON
THAN OUT U.S.
"In a certain part of the United
States there are more college graduates Inside prison walls than outside. As an average example, college
students here today will And It hard
to take." Such was one of the many
startling statements made by Mr.
Robert Straight, vocational guidance
expert, ln his address to students tn
Arts 100, Friday noon.
OCCUPATION CHOICE.
When choosing an occupation, the
following points should be considered. The importance of the position as
compared with others, the possibilities for the future, and the extent of
Its   organisation   should   be   lnvestl
gated before a deoislon Is reached.
The  applicant should  take Into
consideration   his   sex,   raee,   and
nationality. A most essential atudy
should be the economic and woric-
Ing conditions of the occupation.
The opportunities to learn together
With qualifications required, whether
Inside or outside the industry itself,
are worthy of study as well as the
opportunities  for   promotion  ln  the
chosen position.
ENGINEERS I. Q.
On top are olvil engineers, running
a very close second 'are ohem. engi
neers, and third plaoe are teachers
of elementary schools.
Factory packers and sorters are
loweat with hairdressers, carpenters
and nurses coming close to the last.
Mr.  Straight offered to give  anyone an Intelligence test or give them
the results of any tests that they may
have taken, hi high school.
sue of the body and causes disorders
of the nervous centres and ^heart.
In    Vancouver    10-18%    of    the
heart deaths are due to syphlis and
many  nervous   disorders.   Syphlis
lowers the resistance so that the
victim succumbs more readily.
This disease  la transferable   from
mother  to  child  before  birth,    with
resulting     premature     births,      stlU
birth, and maimed and blinded chll
dren.
CURE   TREATMENT
The   period   of   Infection   lasts   for
a   short   time   after   the   commence
ment  of cure  treatments,  but  If the
patient     leaves     before     completely
cured, lt becomes infectious again.
Cure  can   be   accomplished    for
theae   diseases   and     healthy    offspring may result.
Many are on  relief as a direct result of this type of disease and come
ln from  the mines and  lumber districts to live In the metropolis. Many
are partially disabled and  become a
liability to the community.
Wherever economic oondltlons prevent marriage, frequently a prostitute ls made. If the pre-marital test
goes into effect many women and unborn children will be protected.
CITIZENS PROBLEM
Venereal disease is the problem of
every citizen and the best method of
control is to atart with the root and
source of the spreading of the infection, which Is with the prostitutes.
In  Vanoouver,  78%   of  the  men
Infected, have contracted  the  disease from prostitutes.
Prostitutes  are   never   segregated,
they are always moving to avoid the
health authorities, and present forged    medical    certificates    to    satisfy
gullible men.
Others   to   satisfy    the    medical
profession   send   .new   recruits  or
uninfected prostitutes to be examined   and   then   use  their  medical
certificate.
"It ls impossible to wipe out prostitution,"  stated   Dr.   Williams,   "but
it is possible to reduce It and at the
same time, that will reduce the number of cases of venereal disease and
Its   spread."
NATIONAL SCOURGE
"The Indians of our provlnoe are
as badly scourged with venereal disease as with tuberculosis," added Dr.
Williams.
At the League of Nations In 1984
It was revealed that the Incidence
of  venereal   disease   was   highest
among the latin races and In North
America.
In Canada there ls a criminal code
which   If   enforced   would   prosecute
the   habitues  of  houses   of   prostitution   and    would    thereby   limit   the
number  of  houses  and  consequently
discourage many from continuing ln
the profession.
In Vancouver the venereal disease
clinic provides specific medication
tor patients, tree advice and treatment outline io any physician, and
on requeat give examination to the
Individual  patient.
Typewriter
Poundings
Today we are ln a curious mood;
and ln such a condition we are suddenly inflicted with an Insatiable de
sire to think and to reflect.
COST OP BDUCATION.
During our reflections we thoughtfully considered the cost of eduoatlon
in this present day; the cost as borne
by you, by us, and by Joseph J. Pub
ltque.
As was Inevitable we could not
refrain from contemplating the different types of peoples ln the world
who seek to acquire an eduoatlon. As
you all know, there are many classes
of peoples. For the sake of brevity we
will divide them Into the HAVES and
the HAVENOTS. The HAVES are
those who have parents with an
abundant Supply of money. The
HAVENOTS are those who have not
parents with lots • of money.
The HAVES are divided Into two
groups. There are those who work
for their education because they
realise that Independence Is an essential quality to have. And then
there are the others.
HAVENOTS.
Now we come to the HAVENOTS.
These are the persons who by the
sweat on their collective brows toil
In the summer as miners, as fishermen, as loggers, as ranch hands, as
truck drivers, as mechanics,1 so that
they oan earn the necessary $178
dollars plus, to continue or start their
education at the University of B.O.
These are the persons who scrimp
their way through college in pursuit
of an education, so that they can
better social, scientific and polltloal
conditions ln our present civilisation.
These are the peoples who sacrifice
their youth In a period of self denial
so that they can later on be In a
position to help humanity.
These are the people who protested
against the $28 Increase ln the fees
last spring.
TtOs'-'trtevtase to them means the
difference between a new pair of
shoes, a new dree*, a new boat, instead of laborious mending and
patching. It means that tbey can so
-ta a'-'ten'oent show and -see some of
the better pictures Instead ot not
going at all. It does not mean less
dancing at the Commodore or Cave,
for these students Have never seen
nor do they want to see these places.
We think that the picture of the
HAVENOTS is fairly clear.
JOE.
Next we consider Joe. We will admit that Joe ls a nice figure when
he ls regarded collectively. But take
Joe Publlque apart; and consider Joe
Ego and what do we find.
We And that J. E. contributes not
so muoh to your and our education.
He sends hi* own children to high
schools; If he doesn't why all this
talk of over-crowding ln the high
schools of Vanoouver today? His
children receive free tuition tor the
greater part of their school years; in
fact, right up to Junior matrlc.
All J. E. pays ls the small cost of
the text books, which former high
school .students know ls lnflnitesmal
compared to the oost of the University texts. Yes, he also pays Incidentals oonneoted with education.
Now, we all admit that J. E. and
a few more J. E.'s pay indirect taxes;
and that part ot this tax goes to the
maintenance of the schools In thla
province. What we would like to
know ls Just what percent of this tax
is apportioned over to the U.B.O. and
in the form of grants. |
SANS.
Again we would like to know Just
who, of Joe Publlque, pays the taxes
Is lt the transient population that
goes by "sans overcoat, sans rubbers,
sans shoes, , sans shirt" or ts it the
landowners, and that steady population that ls the backbone of the
province?
We know lots of these SANS boys;
our observation and knowledge of
those living on THE SKIDROAD
PALACE ls that they are not SANS
an addiction for Liquor, cards, horses,
German Exchange Student
Describes Home Campus
By MIMI  SCHOFIX-LD
University life in Oermany ls similar to that of Canadian universities,
declared Alphonse Oesterle, exchange
student from Oermany, when interviewed amidst the usual afternoon
uproar of the caf last week.
Mr. Oesterle, a native of Karlsruhe, Is a graduate of the University
of Freiburg near the Black Forest of
Oermany. Through the National Exchange Scheme, the members of the
Phi Delta Theta Fraternity on this
campus arranged that he should
spend a year in British Columbia,
NO CHOICE
He had no choice in the Canadian
University he was to attend. Exchange students from Canada, however, can state their preference of
the Oerman Universities. By this
arrangement the student reoeives
free board and a consideration of
fees.
ACADEMIC STUDIES
Registered in third year at the
U.B.C, Mr. Oesterle Is taking English 0, Economics 4, Agricultural
Economics 2, Oovernment 2 and History 11. He is also engaged on his
Ph.D. thesis "Tenancy in Canada."
We asked him if he found tha
strange language a drawbaok In hla
work here. He replied that because
he had studied English for three
yearf at home, he had little difficulty
after the flrst while.
But he still finds our colloquialisms strange. Especially waa he
pusaled when he was asked by the
solicitous fraternity boys after his
first day here 'how he was getting
along.'
Life, we discovered, is not all toil
at the University of Freiburg. For
one thing, the lectures are on a different basis than here. They are
more like publio addresses and the
professors never call the roll. It ia
literally Tuum est.
NO CAMPUS
Mr. Oesterle's oollege, like manyot
those in Europe has no campus. It
is situated ln the middle of a real
university town. Therefore the students haven't so muoh scope for recreational walking.
They have their caf, which, according to Mr. Oesterle, is the best
lecture room. We were very disillusioned to hear that even In Germany where one would Imagine
beer would flow like water, there Is
none served In the oaf.
"One must go around the corner to
a restaurant for it," says Mr, Oesterle with a longing look in his eye.
However, it ls more aocessable
since no driver's license or similar
documents need be shown to prove
that you have reached an age of discretion,
SKIINO AND SOCIALS
One of the most popular forms of
recreation for the Freiburg student
ls skiing. Like our enthusiasts here,
they band together ln groups to rent
cabins and spend the week end skiing on the mountains of the Blaok
Forest district.
Another difference between our
students and those of Oermany Is
that the Oermans are older than their
Canadian prototypes.
This Is because the men are required to serve two years military
service and the (Iris one year
learning household management.
But these added yeara do not detract from their enjoyment of sooial
■i-iMi-iiiiimiimiiii ,, , , ,,,
angel with
black wings
bv/oo
 '<• •••! •■•<,,•> tltlMI	
The time: Just after the witching
hour of midnight. The place: on
board the "Princess Norah" as she
slipped over the rolling waters of the
Oulf, bringing the "invaders" baok
from Victoria. The cast: Mary Ann,
and a young man with a very Important position on the campus.
The plot: Mary Ann holding the
young man's hand, and mouthing
sweet motherly things ln his ear, as
he. disgorged several helpings of the
Empress Hotel's best pastry over the
lee-rall.
MR. C H. SCOTT TO
CONDUCT COURSE IN
ART APPRECIATION
The Department of University Extension Art Appreciation oourse under Mr. O. H. Scott of the Vanoouver
School of Art, will begin on Wednesday, February 8 at 4.80 in Arts 100.
Mr.  Scott  will  discuss drawing,
etching,' pen  and' Ink Illustration,
humourous draughtsmen and Contemporary British Fainting.
All of  the  leotures  will  be  Illustrated from the Carnegie Art teaching set, supplemented by other prints
and slides.
Students wishing to take advantage of this course may register for
the series of six leotures for a fee of
80c.
CAMPAIGNERS
(Continued from Page 11
i
building of this cost will be erected
this year.
"The prevention of any possible future limitation of attendance at the
University," and "obtaining, subsequent to the enlargement of facilities and attendance at the University,
of more reasonable rate of fees."
A full report of progress was submitted by the committee last night
at the request of Students' Oounoil.
The details will be published ln a
later Issue of the Ubyssey.
PAPERHANOER
PAINTER
Neat,    Clean    Workmanship
Minimum qf Muss and Upset
JOHN ADAMSON
FRASER  1878-L
New  Season's Wallpapers
The   Hotel   Vancouver
presents
MART KENNY
at   the   Spanish   Or ill
and women. A large number of them
are not SANS a desire to turn 'exhibitionist' when they hit town with
a six months stake.
Those of us who oould have been
among the SANS boys, and at one]
time   have   been   and   worked   and
saved our money for our education.
We do not consider ourselves suckers at all because we have done this;
we believe that the suckers are those
who 'beef about the system, the
times, and the. government, meanwhile expecting some man with a
sense of decency and self respect to
support them and all their parasitic
demands.
We still think that the HAVENOTS
pay more than ninety-five per cent,
of their education cost, J. P. and the
SANS boys to the contrary.
life. Although their funotions are
much like ours, one thing pusaled
Mr. Oesterle at the Junior prom, he
Just couldn't Imagine tbe purpose of
all the little books with their attendant pencils.
HUXOM CO-EDS
The Oerman co-eds, despite popular opinion are not more buxom than
ours. It ls true, however, that they
do like their beer.
But a Oerman Casanova always
buys his co-ed wine when he is really
trying to impress her with his
oharms.
We   asked   him If the fraulelns
of Freiburg differed from the girls
here, to whloh he replied reasonably, "Well, they  are  very   much
the same except that they speak
German."
One interesting feature of Oerman
University   life   is   their   Health  Insurance policy.    Each student, upon
entering   oollege   pays   Ave   marks,
which takes care of him in case of
sickness    or    accident.     The   skiing
accidents, however, became so numerous that they were  forced  to put
this sport in a elass by itself.
£IM,HIIIIIHIIIItllllllllllllt«llt,MiHI*lltllimM|MIH,M«„«,H(l
VARSITY SERVICE
STATION
"AT THE GATES"
"OUR   SERVICE   MEANS
HAPPY MOTORING"
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INVASION RESULTS:
Varsity, Id—Viotorla, 0
U.B.O., 8—Oollege, 3
Dominoes, 43—Varsity, 29
Victoria Hookey, 2—Varsity 1
IOE HOOKEY
FRIDAY NIOHT—FORUM
U.B.O. vs. OONZAOA U.
FREE SKATING AFTER
<
Four
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 7, 1939
Varsity Takes McKechnie Tilt 16-6
Bird Stars As 'Birdies
Down Fighting Redmen
By FRANK TURNER
Give them an old school tie getting, co-educational clamour
and Collegiate banners flying, then watch Varsity Thunderbirda
zoom gracefully upward into rugger upper strata alighting only
when the victory zone has been reached. That's just another way
of saying Coach A. B. Carey's fifteen stalwart ruggers flashed
near-perfect form last Saturday afternoon in Victoria's MacDonald Park to soundly trounce the Capital City's Crimson Tide
16-6 in a thrilling McKechnie Cup battle.
The Blue and Oold triumph definitely aohieved a trio ot satisfying
results: (1) Spelled superb success
of tha annual Invasion. (3) Brought
Initial doom for the Islanders In
match play thia year. (8) Created
possibility for Varsity's retention of
the gonfalon.
ALL OOOD
Every member of the Point Grey
student squad turned in above-par
exhibitions, but fullback Johnny Bird,
threes Harry Lumsden and Tod
Trembley and forward Jim Harmer
deserve extra orchids for magnificent performances. Victoria's Jack
Grogan, who made more than the
odd fumble during the afternoon,
collected the locals' six-point total
on a brace of penalty boots.
Varsity's stook on the kick exchange which opened with the start
of the tilt was slightly higher than
the Vlotoriana', as Bird consistently
out-booted Grogan during the flrst
10 minutes. Finally, a couple of minutes later Captain Strat Leggatt
opened the scoring for U.B.O. with a
brilliant kick and follow up effort.
Harmer failed to convert. Orogan
tied it up at 8-all with a penalty a
little later.
BIRD BOOTS ISM
Johnny Bird again scintillated
when he planted the sphere between
the uprights from thirty yards out
to complete another three-quarter
effort which booted the oount to 7-8
for Varsity. At this stage of the
game it was mostly Viotorla forwards va. Varsity threes.
Tod Tremblay, speedy loper and
opportunist, intercepted Barber's
pass at the middle stripe and romped
the rest of the way for a crucial try.
Thia left the soore 10-8 for U.B.C.
at the half.
Conductor Delamont's Varaity Band
must have struck up a Viotorla tune
at this point tor the Crimson Tide
swept menacingly downfleld for the
next fifteen minutes. This last-ditch
drive, led by a scrappy sorum, waa
thrust baok by brilliant defensive
work by the Carey-men. Lumsden
and Bird were particularly effective
in this regard.
TIME OUT
Harry Lumsden retired with a
pulled muscle just paat the midpoint of the second canto, and was
followed shortly by Mattu. The latter struggled back afield and finished
off the tussle in a semi-dase.
Aa a fitting climax to a hard-
fought, well-earned viotory, the same
scintillating Bird completed a 88-
yard three run just before the final
whistle, leaving a joyous band of
Thunderbirds in the van, 18-6.
U.B.CB WIN
Point Orey Students' seoond flrst
division squad—the U.B.C. fifteen—
oame through for the initial rugger
triumph on the Victoria Invaalon
laat Saturday at MaoDonald Park
by eke-ing out a thrilling 8-3 victory
over Victoria College.
A ding-dong battle was the type
produced by the duo of Collegiate
contingents, and it wasn't until just
before the first half whistle that Ian
Richards chalked up the flrst Varsity
count on a brilliant three-quarter
effort. Basil Robinson converted to
make it 8-0 for the Blue and Oold
(Point Orey variety) at the breather.
FIVE FOR  ROBBIE
Ritchie Williams brought his Victoria College mates back In the flght,
falling on the pill over the Varsity
line after a series of loose scrums.
This whittled the Point Orey margin
to two pointa.
Basil Robinson put the tilt on ice
for U.B.C. with a scrappy try a few
minutes later, which left the Invaders in front 8-8.
IMMIMHMMmiM'MMII*MMMMMM'IM'-MM*Mi*l**l**MI''MI*ll*l*
CO-ED SPORTS
By MYRNE NEVISON    .
IIIIIIIIIIIMMMIIMMIIIMMIMUIIMHIMMIIMMIIIIU---IM-HIH--III,
HOCKEY.
The Blue and Oold hookey Invaders lost out 3-1 to Victoria In a hard
fought game that saw Betty dole,
star fullback for tho collegians, play
the seoond half with a dislocated hip.
Playing on a very rough pitch, the
co-eds had difficulty at first ln adjusting themselves to a hard-hitting
type of play Instead of their usual
dribbling and short passing game,
and Victoria soon soored to take the
lead. Anne Carter tallied to put the
students baok in the flght a few minutes later but another goal by the
Islanders just before the breather
gave them the winning margin.
The seoond half was marked by
the astounding Inability of the collegians to shoot as they muddled
around the Viotorla goal for most of
the time.
Hard checking caused the Injury of
Betty Cole early In the aecond half
but the plucky young lady didn't
bother Informing the team of the
incident and played gamely on In
spite of nearly fainting several times.
DIVOTS.
Terribly tired out from the game
and lack of sleep the previous night,
several members of the team tried
vainly to sleep ln their stateroom six
feet away from the orchestra and
dancing fellow students. . . . and then
there was the Vanoouver photographer who took the team's picture
Saturday morning on the boat and
who wouldn't listen as Pauline Scott
tried to tell htm that the dock was
fast receding—then the amased look
on the man's face as he found out
that little fact for himself and hurried off neglecting to take his seoond
picture and murmuring that the boat
couldn't have sailed.
2 EXHIBITION,   2 LEAGUE
TILTS ON TAP FOR 'BIRDS
By BASIL ROBINSON
Mr. M. L. Van Vliet and the squad of basketball players he
coaches will step*up one more rung in their long ladder of exhibition tilts tomorrow in the Gym, when they entertain St. Martin's
College, Lacey, [Washington, in another noon-hour epic.
Manager Alex Charters has a rather complicated line which
he is using to publicize this game. In an effort to draw a goodly
crowd to the Gym, the Ubyssey will attempt a synopsis of Mr.
Charters' line of thought and speech.
"How good are they? Ohl pretty
fair, pretty fair. Y'see, St. Martins'
AGGIE FLASH
Here we have Tod Tremblay one
of the main reasons for Varsity's
convincing 16-6 victory over Viotorla.
His thrilling 70-yard dash for a try
was the highlight of a game which
saw the lanky wing turn In his most
brilliant performance of the season.
CRICKETERS CRUSHED
IN HOCKEYUPSET
Not content with knocking over the
league-leading Vancouver Hockey
Olub the previous Saturday, Varsity
continued its steam-roller drive to
the playoffs by crushing the Cricketers 6-3 on the Varsity Campus on
Saturday.
The Blue and Oold aquad have
been kicked around by every team
In the league, but the under-dogs are
really going now, and with a vengeance! The game was featured by the
play-making of Ian Cameron who
soored two Thunderbird goals and
made openings for at least half a
dosen others. Hutchison got two
counters and Lennox tallied the
other. Archie Macauley played his
usual all-star game.
Team: Kldd, Lennox, Pargey, Hutchison, Cameron, Thompson, Moriat,
Parker, Maoauley, Byers and Huster.
FIGHTING FROSH DOWN
'LOMAS FIFTEEN 8-3
IN HECTICENCOUNTER
Our Freshman crop bf ruggermen
loomed as a definite threat Saturday
when they downed a hard-playing
Meralomas outfit to take an early
lead in the seoond half of the schedule, 8-3. The win was the third victory in a row for the Oreenshlrts who
look better every time out.
Clement put the Frosh one try up
when he plunged over the line from
a close scrum-down and red-thatched
Oordle Pyle added two mors, pointa
to the score with a nicely-placed
convert. The Meralomas scrum played an aggressive game and at times
the encounter proved a little too
rough, only the fine condition of the
players saving them from serious accident.
YOU HEEL!
With the score 8-0 In their favor
going into the second half, the Freshmen changed, their tactics and began
to play the same type of game as the
Meralomas. The referee had a hard
time getting the scrums to bend
down, both sides being willing to let
the other one heel while they charged.
Tackling became hard with the
Meralomas, comprised of quite a few
high school stars, coming out on the
wrong end. Stiff from a morning
game, they were no match for the
aggressive Freshmen and although
they were able to push over one try
they failed to reach the Frosh total.
Oordle Wallace hard playing scrum
man finished off the scoring for the
day with another try for the university lads.
College play Just about the same
brand of baaketball aa do Seattle
College.   And   on   our   Christmas
barnstorming tour, we Just (don't
you love the "Just") lost to Seattle
College."
Here we Insert a sub-illustration of
Mr. Charters' publicity gag. You see,
Seattle College will be up here to
oppose the Thunderbirds on Friday
evening, and so, by that neat little
comparison, our astute manager was
killing two birds (ordinary birds not
Thunderbirds) with one stone.
BACK TO NORM
If you're tired of this seml-oonver-
satlonal diction by now, we'll revert
to a more or less normal atyle.
In between these two promising
exhibition games on Tuesday and
Friday, the oagers will alao have to
settle the small matter of two league
gamea, Wednesday and Saturday.
Wednesday night Stacy's will
travel to the campus to be dealt
with, and Saturday, Rann Matthison
will lead the boys down to the V.A.C.
gym where they will meet Tookes.
Both these games are absolutely
crucial aa victories would mean Varsity ls conceded a reasonable chanoe
of making the playoffs, while one or
two losses would almost certainly
pull down the shutters on oampus
hopes.
And now,  the  schedule  for  the
week)
Tuesday,' noon,   Varsity   vs.   St.
Martin's College.
Wednesday,  0  pjn.,   Varsity  vs.
Stacy's.
Friday, 9 p-m., Varsity vs. Seattle
College.
All games at Varsity Gym.
The game Saturday night, bringing together Varsity and Tookes mri\\
probably be the seoond In the double-
header at V.A.C.
In ease you're wondering, the Victoria Dominoes defeated the Maury-
men 48-39 Saturday at the High
School Oym in the Capital City.
The uncanny long - shooting of
"Busher" Jaokson for the locals spelled defeat for the campusmen, who
forestalled the flashy Domino offensive with a smooth-working sone defense.
By Straight led the Thunderbird
scorers with 8 points, while Rann
Matthison, who played the whole
game and was probably the best
man  "afloor," came second with 8
A
DOUBLE
DELIGHT
flnttt roasted filberts
Jarssy Milk Chocolate
A TREAT-ANYTIME
ON BAR-DAILY
C.WW
INTERCOLLEGIATE HOCKEY
GONZAGA
THUNDERBIRDS
FORUM
8:00 p.m.
Friday, February 10 Admission 25o
Free Skating following the game
INTRAMURAL RUGGER
GETS GOING TODAY
When the smoke cleared away af
ter Friday's baaketball double-header,
only four teams were left in the fight
for supremacy. So. '43 bounced out
the Frosh 18-18 with Curwln leading
the way. Sc. '39 did likewise to the
Aggie quintette, Bacon netting five
pointa for the winners.
On Wednesday Arts '41 will play
Arts '89 and on Friday Sc. '42 meet
Sc. '89.
The nifty, brand new rugby trophy,
a silver mounted football, will go to
the lnter-class rugby winners. Today
at noon, on the upper field, the opening klckoff will take place in the colorful tourney. Arts '89 will field a
team to battle the Aggies ln a game
that may lack somewhat in skill, but
the boys should make up for it ln
enthusiasm. On Wednesday, Sc. '40
and Anglicans clash and Thursday,
Sc. '41 meet Arts '41.
This ls a quick knock-out tournament and even the winning team will
play four games at the most, maybe
three, bo turn out and help your
class to have the flrst engraving on
the trophy.
SKIERS BOUND FOR
RAINIER TOURNEY
The Ski Olub have also been bitten
by the travelling bug. On Thursday
ten of their number will set out for
Mount Rainier where they will meet
the University of Washington contingent ln a tournament to decide
the Inter-colleglate supremacy of the
North-West.
The chosen members making the
trip are Mickey Pogue, captain; Phil
Thomas, Wally Thomas, BUI Sharpe,
Bill Smith, Oerry Harkley, Alan McDougall, Campbell Kenmulr, Paul
Cook and Al Fraser.
Oddities in the news—Snow conditions on the North Shore Mountains
were Ideal for every type of skiing
and many enthusiasts were ■ there
showing off their skill. On Grouse,
"Heathen" Douglas MacPherson, His
"Idle Self" Russ Snyder, "Lasy"
Bruce Hutchison, and none other
than "Turnover" Charlie MoLean
were disporting themselves. Pogue
and Sharpe gave Hollyburn the onoe
over.
There will be a meeting of the
Ski  Club  today  noon  at  18.48  In
Applied Science 387.
PUCKSTERS OPPOSE
BULLDOGS FRIDAY
This Friday hockey fans will have
the opportunity to see one of the
continent's best Intercollegiate clubs
In aotlon. The Oonsaga Bulldogs, the
strongest loe sextette In Amerloan
intercollegiate circles, play UB,.C. ln
a return match that should be the
best In history.
The only oollege team to defeat the
Spokane contingent ths year was the
Toronto Varsity Blues who managed
to nose out the Bulldogs ln the dying
moments of the game.
The Oonaagans present a colorful
aa well as star-studded line-up, their
roster reads like an NHL team with
players picked all the way from Win-
HITCHENSMEN DRAW
1-2 WITH KERRIES
Charlie Hltchens' oampus soccerites
lost a great chanoe to draw up even
with Kerrisdale In the V. and D.
League race Saturday when they
battled to a 1-1 tie in a ding-dong
contest at Gamble St. Grounds.
Dave Todd gave the Kerries a one-
goal lead half-way through the first
half, crashing Bert Rush's oross with
a well-timed drive to the corner.
Leong In the student not had little
chance to save.
FRED SCORES.
Down by this goal at the half, the
Thunderbirds lashed a spirited attaok
which saw Sasaki equalise after 16
mlnutea from a scramble In front of
the net.
Apart from a short from Bert Rush
which rattled the Blue and Oold
citadel, Varsity had nearly all the
remaining play, but oould not finish
ln front of goal.
Minus McMillan, the firing line
was pitiful during the second half,
the halves feeding them well only to
have their efforts wasted.
in the
NOTICE
The weights have arrived
stadium I There will be a
meeting on Wednesday at 18.80 In
Arts 308. Maury Van Vllet will be
there to get thlnga going. Don't
It!
nipeg to Nelson.
Needless to say all the players are
Canadians and have performed for
senior clubs In Winnipeg, Moose Jaw,
Regina, Saskatoon and Calgary, to
mention a few. Their sooting potentialities are best recorded by the fact
that ln 31 games they have averaged
six goals per game. The Thunderbirds may not down the Bulldogs but
you may be sure that the local gang
will be in there battling for a full
60 minutes.
EXAMINATIONS
are like taxes—they are sure to eome. Low marks ln one subject
often mean failure. Prevent that failure—get your "College
Helps" catalogue now and ohoooe helps for your courses. Send
for your free oopy new.
THE BOOK EXCHANGE
"OaasSa's aoek-Olearlag Mouse"
870 Bloor St. W., Toronto, Ontario
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HOW'S YOtfR
GOLF GAME?
To be accurate you
must learn the Fundamentals of the Golf
Swing. The winter season Is the time to Iron
out your difficulties and
learn how to enjoy
Golf.
Hal Rhodes Golf School
11B5 W. Pender Street       Seymour B233
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