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The Ubyssey Jan 26, 1960

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 THE UBYSSEY
Wednesday
Noon
VOL. LXVII
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 26,  1960
No.  39
CCF Pledges To
Fight For UBC
Strachan To Request
Increasing of Grant
'tween classes
ROBERT STRACHAN, provincial CCF. leader, makes his
point before a large student audience at UBC on Friday.
Strachan, speakingi in; Brock Lounge, promised support for
UBC's requests for operating grant increases.
—rPhoto by Cliff Arrowsmith.
Probers Meet
On Housing
By DEREK ALLEN
Three members of the AMS Committee probing the student
Housing situation met yesterday with Mr. Colburn at the Vancouver City Hall.
Colburn is head of the City
Planning Office's inspectors. It
is he who directs the men who
look for violations of Vancouver's zoning by-laws.
* Committee Chairman Dave
Edgar and committee members
Peter Haskins and John Hogarth
saw Colburn yesterday after-
aoon to find Out exactly how his
inspectors were interpreting the
zoning by-laws with respect to
students living in the area near
the University Gates.
The regulations under which
zoning inspectors operate were
revised in the form of a new
by-law which took effect June
18, 1956. This by-law, 135 pages
long with 12 pages of appendices
and maps, was described as
"very involved and complicated"
by-law student John Hogarth.
This by-law makes the Point
Grey Area an RS-1 zone, the
classification entailing the greatest number of restrictions. Only
two   roomers   or   boarders   per
POOR FROOD IS DEAD
Dr. Frood was found Monday hanging by his barf bag.
A note pinned to his vest
said.he was taking the Barf
way out because he couldn't
Jake such penetrating criticism
such as was voiced in a letter-
io-ihe-ediior of The Ubyssey.
Dr. I. M. Frood had been
the well known, expert on
Barf and mentor of The Ubyssey.
home are allowed in an RS-1
zone.
Since about one-half of the
Universities student body comes
from out of town, some 3300
students must find rooms in Vancouver homes. _
Most want to live close to the
University, and residents near
the gates have taken students
into their homes. Many . houses
have more boarders than the
legal maximum.
But according to a story iri
the Province Monday morning,
the planning office has decided
to get tough with residents of
illegal suites.
Homeowners will be given
only 30 days to meet legal
requirements with respect to
boarders in their homes.
And everybody living in base-
mento suites will be thrown out
because the 1956 by-law makes
basement suites, basement cooking facilities or basement plumbing facilities illegal.
You use your basements to
store coal in, or build a rumpus
room.
The results of the meeting at
city hall were unknown at press
time, but committee members
look on this meeting as a pivotal
point in their work.
Quite an amount of information has been collected from this
end — now to see what they
are Up to downtown, was the
opinion.
The committee will draw up a
brief to present to City Council
on behalf of the student council.
VARIETY SHOW
ON WEDNESDAY
WORLD  REFUGEE
COMMITTEE
Variety Show, Wednesday
Noon, Auditorium, featuring
the West Indian Calypso Group,
Hungarian Dancers, and songs
by Rod Smith and Gordon
Green. Show is in aid of the
UBC Refugee Campaign.
* *       *
GERMAN CLUB
Anyone interested in German
conversation classes, leave name
in Brock Extension No. 256.
Classes start Friday.
* *       *
UNIVERSITY  BAPTIST CLUB
The University Baptist Club
presents a panel discussion on
"Christ in my Faculty" in Bu.
223 at 12:30. Everyone Welcome.
* *      '*.
FROSH   UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Debate: "Resolved that Advertising Should be Controlled by a
Central Authority." Bu. 100,
12:30.
M.A.A.
Meeting, Wednesday noon, in
Men's Club Room, Brock.
* *       *
PEP^BAND
There will be a practice Thursday noon, HJut L-6. We will play
at the basketball game, Friday
night, Feb. 5th, 8:00 p.m. at the
Memorial  Gymnasium.
'TWEEN CLASSES
(Continued on Page 4)
 _ *—
Haskins Commission
Meeting Postponed
There will be no meeting o?
the Haskins Commission, as was
previously announced, at noon
tomorrow.
But the group will assemble
Thursday noon in the Board
Room, upstairs in the North
Brock, to hear a brief from
Fort Camp Vice-President Eric
Ricker.
Ricker is concerned with the
relation of the universities dormitories to student government.
Robert Strachan will support UBC's requests for operating
grant increases when the estimates come up in the Provincial
Legislature.
Strachan pledged his support
while visiting UBC with a group
of CCF MLA's on Saturday. The
junketing eight-man delegation
toured campus buildings and
spoke to student and administration officials.
Strachan did not give a definite statement with regard to the
CCF position on student fees,
but spoke generally, about overall financing of the University.
He demanded' that the Social
Credit Government live up to
their word and start matching
UBC's development fund, dollar
for dollar.
Last year the University requested an increase of 2.2. million dollars in its operating
grant. Only $650,000 was received in excess of the previous
year's grant. As a result, fees
were raised $100.
This leaves the university
short $550,000, the amount they
would not need to spend in order
to raise faculty salaries to the
level of the University of Toronto, the highest level in Canada.
The university  is anxious  to
see this increase go through to
keep our academic standard high
and our professors happy, so that
amount 'will probably be requested this year, along with
further increases to cover operating expenses for the three new
buildings being constructed at
present >on campus.
Turning to the Development
Fund, Strachan said, "the government must include substantial
monies for matching grants in
the next sitting of the Legislature."
UBC has received pledges
from the Social Credit Government—largely as a result of the
Second Great Trek in 1957-rto
match dollar for dollar .any. con~
tributions to the UBC Development Fund up to 10 million dollars. "■       -  - "'   '■:■
Private industry and the public have so far donated 5 million
to this fund, and pledged 4.6
million more. The government
has yet to give a cent to the fund.
"I was very impressed by the
members of the faculty, and the
See CCF.
(Continued on Page 5)
Debater Says UBC
"Cesspool of Vice"
By RALPH HENDERSON
"UBC is a cess pool of vice! Innocent freshettes are in constant danger of being debauched!"
These   startling   words   were
Apology
I wish lo apologise fully for
printing a letter in lhe Ubyssey
of January 22nd, in which a
rumour detrimental lo the
reputation of Peter Meekison
was reported. To the best of
my knowledge there is absolutely no basis to that rumour,
and I very much regret any
discomfort that this letter may
have caused Mr. Meekison.
for whom I have personally
the greatest respect and admiration.
Michael P. Sinclaii
uttered by Peter Fraser, speaking for the affirmative, in the
Legion Cup debate, "Resolved
that sex education should be
compulsory for all first-year
students," held on Friday noon
in Bu. 212.
Mr. Fraser and Graham Leslie
of Phi Delta Theta won the debate 2 votes to 1 over their opponents, Mike Clee and Brian
Marson of the U.N. Club, who
were defending the negative.
Mr. Fraser argued that UBC
students have an erroneous and
perverted attitude towards sex
matters — thus resulting in abnormal forms of behavior on
and off campus.
The problem of sex at UBC is
a problem that is rapidly becoming worse as the student enrollment increases. Since high school
H.P.D. courses are totally inadequate and incompetent in sex
discussion and only 3 out of 500
city churches lecture on it, Mr.
Fraser feels that UBC should
take the initiative and give all
first-year students a compulsory
sex education "course.
Such lectures would: endeavor
to teach the student to take a4"Tuum Est"
more mature attitude towards a
subject that many parents feel
inadequate to talk about.
Mr. MarsOn, on ,the negative
side, stated that compulsory sex
education would mean setting up
a Dept. of Sexology for 2000
Frosh. The expense would be
collossal, he said.
"What would the labs consist
of if sex were considered a science?" he asked. Practical lab
demonstrations, -he continued,
would also be embarrassing to
some of the more timid souls in
attendance.
Sex education is a waste of
time, he said. The students coming to UBC know enough about
the subject (the average age of
Vancouver's un-wed mothers is
17) and should be mature enough,
without needing further education. Zoology and Biology
courses offer sufficient information for those with a craving for
more on the facts of life.
He stated that English 100 is?
a course which contains liberal i
sprinkling of sexy subjects, including, "Brave New World,"
which describes the Psychology
of sex, and the future of it; and
the highly suggestive poem,
"Naming of the Parts."
He     concluded     by     saying
"It's up to you
to get you own sex education,
and not the responsibility of a
UBC professor." #AGE TWO
HE    IPpirSSEY
Tuesday, January 26, 19601
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as Second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times a week throughout the University vear in Vancouver
by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C.
Editorial opinions expressed are those of the Editorial Board of The Ubyssey
and not necessarily those of the Aima Mater Society or the University of B.6.
Telephones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 and 14*
Business offices,-AL. 4404; Local 15.
Editor-in«Chief: R. Kerry While
Associate Editor . „ Elaine Bissett
Managing Editor ^__^ Del.Warren
[ News Editor i_ John Russell
C.U.P. Editor •_■ Irene Frazer
Club's Editor Wendy Barr
Features Editor  Sandra Scott
Head Photographer Colin Landie
Photography Editor __ Roger McAfee
r . Senior Editor:   Allan Chernov
Reporters and Desk:
f       George Railton, Vlad Romanchych, Derek Allen, Diane
' ;     Greenall,   Wendy   Barr,   Morley, Shortt,   Gary   Keenan,
Ed Lavalle, Irene Frazer, Bob Hendrickson, Art Powell,
and Ralph Henderson.
The Human
Side of It
Dr. Elfan Rees," chairman of the International Committee
for World Refugee Year, has presented a poignant picture of
the immensity of the problem of displaced rJeisoris.
The refugee problem may be called jpolitical and economic,
fedt it is much more than that, ft is essentially a problem^of
Murhan need and human happiness.
':■■    If World Refugee Year, in. which Canada Is participating
r with- 63 other nations, is stteceasfel, twit* as mariy dispossessed
persons may be helped as. in a normal year.
But this will still leave millions in the same position as
before.
Every refugee^ says Br. Rees, beEeves that this is going
to be his year of salvation. Since fhig expectation will not be
fulfilled for miiaons, the participating nations will have to
prepare for the disillusionment of next year.
This means a long-term program of financial contributions,
more compassionate immigration legislation, better housing
schemes in countries where refugees now are and vocational
teaming to give them technical skills. ^
It also means that their ration of hope and human dignity
mttst be sustained.
' Few orusades on behalf of ttie»fc, women; and children have
been more selffcss, in their origins and motives, than that of
aid for the refugees.
TODAY - MARTA VAGO
NOON-BUI06
SENSATIONAL 16-YEAR-OLL>HUr<fGAMAN PIANIST.
PLAYS FROM BACH, BEETHOVEN AND
MENDELSOHN
ite Isfieveiis RAW
k HERE!
ON SALE AT...
; • BROCK
• WOCBANJKS
» bus STOP
• QUAD
• AUDITORIUM CAFETERIA
35c
Darwinism:
Thoughts
& Themes
Recent press articles, TV, and
radio programs, have stimulated
a search for thoughts and themes
that might prove helpful "balancers" of opinion regarding the
popularized Theory of Evolution.
Friedrich von Muller, 1923
"It is astonishing how simple
modern theories become when
one puts aside everything that is
hypothetical, and allows only
the experimental facts and dis-
cdveries to speak for themselves."
Sir Ronald A Fisher, 1935, quoting'Augustus de Morgan, 1838
"But just as In natural philosophy, the selection of an hypothesis by means of observed facts
is always preliminary to any attempt at deductive discovery; so
in the application of the notion
of probability to the actual affairs of life, the process of reasoning from observed events to
their most probable antecedents
must go before the direct use of
any such antecedent, cause, hypothesis or whatever it may be
correctly termed."
Leonardo da Vinci, 1452-1519
"Thou must first have' a
theory, afterwards practical
work. Science is the captain,
practical work the soldiers. Practical work must be based on
good theory . . . There is no certainty where mathematics is not
involved, or which cannot be"
considered mathematically."
Robert E. D. Clark
"From the earliest days, evolution naturally appealed chiefly
to those with an anti-mathematical biae, Darwto among them.:
There were exceptions of course,
but on the whole; the great leaders of physical science in the
19th, Century — Clerk Maxwell,
Faraday, Kelvin and others regarded it with scepticism. F/om
that day to this, the most dogmatic evolutionists have very
often been antkmathematical in
their outlook, H. G. Wells for
instance, tells us that when he
was a student he'was-completely
unable te appreciate physical arguments,,.even in their most elementary forms."
Nature, 153, 15.  1944
"E.'B: Pbulton first read- the
Origin of Species in 1875 as an
undergraduate, and* throughout'
his life it was almost like a Bible
to him . . . Mathematics was as
incomprehensible to him as to
the master (Moseley at Oxford)
he served."
G. T. Romanes
"Then with a suddenness only
less surprising; that it's (the argument from design) completeness, the end came; the fountains of the great deep were
broken up by the power of one
man, and never in the history of
thought has a change been effected of a comparable order of
magnitude." • ' -
J. D. Hooker, 1862
"Your theory of evolution by
natural selection implies that if
every organism had survived
and produced offspring, then
every kind of plant and animal
that exists, and has ever existed,
would have been produced
without any natural selection at
all (as well of course as myriads
of others). In other words all
the characters present in all organisms were the necessary con-
Sequences of the earliest and
most primitive organism."
To this Darwin replied: "I do
and have always agreed."
(To be continued)
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Pubs  Pilfered
The Editor,
Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
It has been brought to our
attention that.many incidents
of pilfering have occurred in
downtown pubs! The managements of these establishments
are provoked by such incidents
and "are awaiting the chance to
prosecute those caught pilfering. These incidents, no matter
how small or insignificant they
may seem at the time, are of
a very serious nature. If we
are to continue to enjoy our
"pubbing" tradition these incidents must stop in order to
keep the name of our university from appearing before the
courts.
Beware fellow drinkers and
think before you act.
BEER DRINKERS.
And Angrier
Pen Pals
The Editor,
Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
I have received a request
from a friend of mine in India.
He is interested in pen friends.
His name is S. V. Quadir and
he is a teacher in a high school,
teaching. English. His chief interests are story and essay
writing and education. He is
25 years of age and wishes to
have pen friends (both male
and female) of the same age
group. Those interested may
please write to him. His address is S. V. Quadir, M.A., Baptise Higher Secondary School,
Agra^ (u.pJ .India.
Thanking you,
Sincerely yours,
R. D. CKANDHARI,
Robson House, UBC.
Angry
The Editor,
Critics Pags,
Ubyssey.
Dear Mr. Sinclair:
Your editorial on the Critics
Page of January 22nd regarding Raven is misleading and is
not based on fact.
The policy of the Publications Board- is to charge all
publications which advertise in
the Ubyssey. It is a matter of
sound bookkeeping and has
nothing to do with "grasping
people who handle student
funds . . ."
Your statement that the advertising manager wishes to
"pocket a commission" is untrue. The Publications Board
of the Alma Mater Society has
a contract with the advertising
manager which states that no
commission will be paid to him
on advertising inserted in the
Ubyssey by the Alma Mater
Society or Alma Mater Society
Subsidiary Organization.
If you had taken very little
time and less trouble, you
would have found the above-
mentioned facts; however, you
chose not to and have cast
serious aspersions on the integrity of myself and Mr. Fris-
by. If your allegations had
been true, there would be
justification; however, they are
not true and an apology is not
only desirable but necessary.
You have violated a basic
tenet of the Free Press, having
written your editorial on false
assumption of fact — a very
dangerous tendency which you
should try to correct in the
future.
Yours truly*
JIM HORSMAN,
CorordmatDr, of Publications.
The Editor,
Critics   Page,
Ubyssey.
Dear Mr. Sinclair:
I was most interested to read
your "revealing" comments on
the Critics Page (?) the other
day. First of all, I find rather
extravagant your method of
criticizing Mr. Horsman and
myself. You have shown yourself to be completely irresponsible and not worthy of holding
the position of Critics Editor
by using the page in the manner you did on Friday. However, this is only one part of
the case, what you did say in
your "Editorial" contained one
and only one true statement—
that space was to be used for a
RAVEN advertisement. Everything alse appears to be a figment of your imagination.
There was a definite lack of information in your article and a
very noticeable omission. Do
you not remember your reaction when I told you of the
decision of Mr. Horsman and
myself to charge RAVEN for
the ad? Your first words were
—"Well I want the commission
for the ad then." How "grasping" can you get? You didn't
bother to find out or to listen
to me when I told you that I,
under contract, am not eligible
for any form of commission or
remuneration on Alma Mater
Society accounts.
The reason for charging:
RAVEN for the advertisment,
Mr. Sinclair, is a simple bus#
ness procedure carried out
every day. RAVEN was charged
because it was felt that it, as
any other organization or publication, should be able to pas
for space used for publicity.
Had we not charged RAVEN.,
what would we say to Film Society, Special Events, the Newman Club when they also asked
for free space? It is all a matter of bookkeeping Mr. Sinclair—no cash will be handled
•^-simply; a few journal entries
to transfer accounts from one
department to another—nothing extraordinarily—-find out
someday—knowledge of the
facts never did a person any
harm!
Finally, the irresponsibility
you have shown is one reason
where the Alma Mater Society
wishes to retain its power over
the Ubyssey.
LAURIE FRISBY,
Advertising Manager,
Publications Board.
APOLOGY
As I am personally responsible for all material that appears in this newspaper^ I
feel I must apologise for a
letter and an Editorial which
appeared on the Critic's page
of the last Edition of the
Ubyssev'. No facts whatsoever have been brought fcwlh
lo substantiate the claims
made against Peter Meekison,
Huss Brink, Dave Edgar, Jim
FTosman. and Laurie fra&f;
Had there been some* factual
baste for the claims we
would not have hesitated to
report them.
1 am therefore sumeroly
sorry for any embarrassment
jjiey may have caused
_RiK.WHrTE-|
mi
RfAD^
-RAVBf <Tt!testfay, January 26, 1*60
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
CLUB NOTES
MISS  MARTA  VAGO,  fifteen-year-old  Hungarian pianist,
will play at a free concert today at noon in Buchanan 106.
Brilliant Young
Pianist To Play
Miss Marta Vago a fifteen
year old pianist will play today
in Bu. 106 at noon.
She was born in Budapest,
Hungary and. started taking
piano lessons at five.
At eight she won the Haydn
Contest for ; children and later
jplayed over the radio and with
4he local symphony orchestras.
In 1956 she was admitted to
the Franz Liszt Academy of
Music in Budapest.
She came to the U.S. after
the recent uprising in Hungary.
There she studied as a full
scholarship student of Irwin
JTreundlich.
In  March   1959  she won  the
-m 	
By WENDY BARR
LEGION  CUP DEBAT    S
The second set of Region Cup
Debates between the winners
from the first set will begin today with a debate between Zeta
Psi and Alpha Delta Phi on the
subject "Resolved: that Canadian hospitals should be financed
by government-supervised lotteries." It will take place in Bu
217 at noon.
Next Monday in Bu 202 Phi
Deta Theta will debate against
Zeta Beta Tau on the subject:
"Resoved: that the death penalty should be abolished."
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
The Chinese Varsity Cub will
be holding its fourth annual Tri-
City Invitational Basketball
Tournament and Dance on the
29th and 30th of this month. Basketball games sponsoring two
campus teams and teams from
Victoria and Seattle will be played on Friday evening and Saturday afternoon.
The highlight of the weekend
will be a dance on Saturday from
8 p.m. to 12 p.m. in Brock
Lounge. An orchestra wift provide the music. The price is
$1.25 per person. Tickets and
information are available at the
CVC  clubroom  BE  255.
Hudson and Tingley
Reign Over Mardi Gras
Mary Hudson and Phil Tingley reigned over the annual
Mardi Gras Festivities, held this past weekend.
Youth Music Contest of the
Brooklyn Academy of Music in
the Piano Concerto in B Flat
Major, K 595 of Mozart.
Marta is now a sophomore at
Frasuus Hall High School, in
New York.
She is continuing her studies
at Juilliard School and increasing her repertoire and back
ground.
Her program today will feature: Bach—French Suite in G
Major, Beethoven—Sonata in D
Major, Schubert—impromptu in
B Flat Major, Kirchner—Little
Suite, Meudelsoohu—Etude in A
Minor. 9
The concert is free.
Radar Expert To Speak
On Trap Operations
A.E. Grauer
Re-elected as
Chancellor     '
The re-election of Dr. A. E.
Grauer as Chancellor of the
university was endorsed by the
Board of Management of the
U.B.C. Alumni Association.
"Dr. Grauer has been an outstanding Chancellor who has
worked quietly, unceasingly and
very effectively for the University," said Mark Collins, Alumni
President.
He has been largely responsible for the attention that has
been given to faculty salaries.
The highly successful Development Fund Campaign was initiated and conducted under his leadership.
1 The Sports Car Club is sponsoring a discussion which will
interest all student drivers
Thursday at 12:30 in Physics
200.
At that time highway traffic
safety, accident and insurance
rates of the "under 25" group,
and other problems will be discussed by three men well-
acquainted by the topics, who
each have a different point of
view.
Corporal R. A. M. Crawford,
R.C.M.P. Radar and traffic expert of the University Detachment, Mr. M. E. Ferguson, Police
Magistrate for the University
area, and Mr. J. M. Jones, an
automobile insurance agent and
sports car enthusiast will be the
speakers.
Other topics' will be the operation and success of radar traps
in the lower mainland and the
traffic situation at U.B.C.
Moreover, a large portion of
the meeting will be allotted to
questions from the audience.
Corporal Crawford who has
recently returned from a course
in traffic safety at Northwestern
University is especially qualified
to speak on these problems.
If you have been bothered by
what seem to you to be legal
ambiguities, now is your chance
to get them straightened out by
competent authorities.
Miss Hudson, a member of
Alpha Gamma Delta was crowned at the Saturday night dance.
Tingley, of Phi Gamma Delta;
was named King on Friday
night.
Delta Kappa Epsilon won the
prize for the best table decoration. They built a simulated
pirate ship around their table,
depicting the Saga of Jean La-
fitte. All the members wore
pirate costumes.
This year the theme was
"Mardi Gras in the Old South."
Many varied costumes of life
in the South were worn.
WideProgram
Offered In
Summer Term
"The university is currently
planning its most varied and
comprehensive summer program
of academic, professional, and
cultural courses," according to
Dr. K. F. Argue, director of the
summer session.
He pointed out that the faculty
of arts and science alone will be
offering 113 courses.
Dr. Argue said that approximately 75 visiting instructors
from Europe and America will
complement the much larger
number of regular UBC instructors teaching during the
summer months.
Close to 200 credit courses
will be available at the University of British Columbia during the 1960 summer session,
from June 27 to August 12.
The extensive program will include courses in authropology,
biology, botony, chemistry, classical studies, commerce, home
economics, languages, fine arts,
geography, history, music, political science and education.
Over  1000
each dance.
students attended
This
office.
is  his   second term   in
All proceeds go to the Child-
rens Foundation. ,
The Ridge
Animal
Farm
JAN. 31
CORRECTION
Tickets to the Sunday,
Jan. 31st showings of
ANIMAL FARM will not
be available at the door,
as our ads indicated.
However, advance tickets
(legal under Lord's Day
Act) are available at the
A.M.S. Office at 75c.
CARTOONS
Film Soc presents . . .
from Russia, Red China, Canada, plus
Storyboard TV Commercials
Today 12:30 Aud. ,   15c or Series
Pass
FILM SOC PRESENTS
John Steinbeck's Gripping Story •
of the Depression
GRAPES OF
WRATH
Attention
English
Students
Directed by
JOHN FORD
Starring HENRY  FONDA 35c
ITODAY 3:30 and 8 p.m. THE AUDITORIUM
B
U.B.C. RADIO BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Time
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Eye Opener
Eye Opener
. Friday
8:30
Eye Opener
Eye Opener
Eye Opener
Eye Opener
.Eye -Opener   .
Eye Opener
Eye Opener
Eye Opener
9:00
Music Room
Music Room
Music Room
Music Room
Music Room
10:00
Musical
Showcase
Musical
Showcase
Musical-
Showcase
Musical
Showcase
Musical
Showcase
10:30
Musical
Showcase
Musical
Showcase
Musical
Showcase
Musical
Showcase
Musical
Showcase
11:00
Works of
Masters
Works of
Masters
Works of
Masters
Works of
Masters
Works of
Masters
12:00
Open House
Open House
Open House
Open House
Open House
12:30
Open House
Open House
Open House
Open House
Open House
1:00
Searchlight
Matinee
Searchlight
Matinee
Searchlight
Matinee
Searchlight
Matinee
Searchlight
Matinee
1:30
Matinee
Matinee
Matinee
Matinee
Matinee
2:00
Upbeat
Matinee
Upbeat
Matinee
Upbeat
Matinee
Upbeat
Matinee
Upbeat
Matinee
2:30
Open
Mike
Latinos
Latinos
Latinos
International
Houseparty
3:00
Jazz
Unlimited
Jazz
Unlimited
Jazz
Unlimited
Jazz
Unlimited   -
Jazz
Unlimited
3:30
Dixieland is
My  Beat
Dixieland is
My  Beat
Dixieland is
My  Beat
Dixieland is
My  Beat
Dixieland is
My  Beat
4:00
Carnival
in sound
Carnival
in sound
Carnival
in sound
Carnival
in sound
Carnival
in sound
4:30
Carnival
in sound
Carnival
in sound
Carnival
in sound
Carnival
in sound
Carnival
in sound
News on the Hour - Headline* en the Half-H«ur PAGE FOUR
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 26,1960
ATTENTION-FOIST YEAR...
The Hat is Higher
Than Wide
Are You POSITIVE You
Are Safe From TB ?
Are You POSITIVE?
BE POSITIVE - HA VE YOUR FREE
TB SKIN TEST
LET S STAMP (HIT TB
One of the biggest
threats to health in
British Columbia today is tuberculosis.
An average of 50
new, active cases of
the disease are found
every month, and
there are 21,500
known cases in the
province.
And since TB is a contagious disease,
every unknown case is a potential danger
to other citizens.
What's more, tuberculosis hits everyone's
pocketbook. It costs $15,000 to treat and
rehabilitate an average TB case and, since
treatment is given free by the government,
everybody helps pay for it through taxes.
The tragic thing about the high cost and
the suffering caused by tuberculosis is that
it is unnecessary.
FEEL SAFE
NOT SORRY
Have Your Free TB Skin Test
Make Your Appointment at the Health
Service Office - NOW!
CHRISTMAS SEALS FIGHT TB
TWEEN  CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
COMMONWEALTH CLUB
The Commonwealth Club presents Mr. Tehrat Husain, W.TJ.S.
Representative student from Pakistan together with a short film
on Pakistan. Tuesday, January
26th, 12:30 in Bu. 102.
* *       *
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS
ASS'N.
At the meeting in Bu. 102 on
Thursday, January 28th there
will be a program of recorded
music featuring the latest calypso from Trinidad and Jamaica.
There will be a party in the
Dance Club, Brock Extension, on
Saturday, January 30. Admission is 35c. All are invited.
* *       *
JAZZ   SOCIETY
Gerald Hodge, past president
of Jazz Society, speaking on
"Progressive Development in
Jazz History." Noon today, Bu.
106.
* *       *
CCF CLUB
Important General Meeting of
the CCF Club to be held Wed.,
noon, Bu. 218. Discussion of trip
Seattle, caucus meeting will also
■be discussed.
* *       *
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Regular testimony meeting,
Wednesday, 12:30, HL4. All Welcome.
* *       *
SAILING CLUB
General Meeting, January
28th, Bu. 217; 12:30. Elections,
films, and amendments to the
constitution. Everyone please attend.
WONDERFUL
TOWN
ALPHA  OMEGA  SOCIETY
Urkainian Dancing practice
today in Room 2 of the Education Basement. General meeting
of the Club on Friday.
* *       *
BIOLOGY   CLUB
"From Ghana to Kenya a
Biologist" is the subject of a
talk and film presented by Mr.
Bristol*- Foster, world traveller
and zoologist. In Biological
Sciences 2000, Thursday noon, al
12:30.
* *       *
AQUA SOC
There will be a meeting in
Bu. 217 on Thursday, January
28th. at 12:30. The agenda will
include discussion of a club
crest, tests, and the forthcoming
diving trip to Secret Cove and
Half moon Bay on Feb. 6 & 7. A
movie of the last dive and the
party will be shown.
* -x       *
BADMINTON
The regular session of the
Badminton Club this Tuesday,
January 26th, in the Memorial
Gym, will be cancelled to make
way for a Sr. "A" Basketball
Game between the Thunderbirds and Dietrich-Collins.
* *       *
ICE   HOCKEY
The UBC Ice Hockey team will
play in Chilliwack on Thursday,
Feb. 4th, instead of this Thursday as previously announced.
* *       *
PRE-MED   SOC.
Presents Dr. Halliday, who
will speak on Narcotic Addiction
Wes, 100, 12:30.
* *       *
FRENCH   CLUB
Conversation hour as usual,
Tuesday 12:30, Bu. 220.
* *       *
MATHEMATICS  CLUB
Dr. Macskesy will address the
Math Club on "Mathematical
Training in Hungary" on Wed.
January 27th at 8:00 pm in the
Buchanan penthouse. Those in
terested in mathematics are welcome.
* *       *
NISEI VARSITY CLUB
General Meeting on Thursday
at 12:30 in Bu. 205. Discussion
of the constitution.
* *       *
TENNIS TEAM
Men's Tennis Team practice
will commence again Mondays
5 to 7 pm. Women's practices
Thursdays 12:36 to 2. p.m. in the
Field House. .   1- '
* *       *
NFCUS
NFCUS interregional exchange scholarship applications
are available from Room 165,
Brock.
* *       *
GERMAN  CLUB
The German Club takes you
to a visit of Austria from the
20th Century to Baroque-Age
and the world of Mozart. Wed.,
12:30 in Bu. 202.
* *       *
FILMSOC
Foreign cartoons and story
boards today at 12:30 in the
auditorium. Admission by series
pass or 15c.
* *       *
AFSU
Dr. Breskly will speak and
show a film and slides on Le &
Ski Franchise on Friday, Jan.,
29, at. 12:30 in Bu. 102. All
skiers welcome. To be given in
English.
* *       *
AD AND   SALES   CLUB
The Ad and Sales Club will
hole! a general meeting today in
Bu. 216 at noon. Second term
activities will be discussed. All
out please, as otherwise we may
have to dissolve the club.
* ■     *       *
SPRING FASHION  SHOW
Thursday, January 28 try outs
for the Spring Fashion Show
from 12:30 - 2:30 in the Mildred
Brock. All girls interested please
turn out.
FORD MOTOR COMPANY OF CANADA LIMITED
University Graduate Recruitment Program
Ford Motor Company of Canada   Limited  is seeking
qualified applicants for a two-year Graduate Training .
Program. The Program is based on the concept of "on
the job" training with a minimum of three to four different assignments over a two-year period.
Opportunities are available in such fields as Manufacturing, Sales, Finance and Purchasing.  Candidates will"
be selected on the basis of scholastic ability, work interest, extra curricular activities, etc.
A COMPANY REPRESENTATIVE WILL BE CONDUCTING
INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS ON
February 1st. and 2nd., 1960
ARRANGEMENTS  FOR INTERVIEWS  MAY BE MADE AND FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE PROGRAM  OBTAINED AT  YOUR
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE •Tuesday, January 26, 1960
THE    UPYSSEY
PAGE FIVE
"Gateway" Editor Attempts
To Give Up Council Seat
EDMONTON — ( C UP) The
Students' Council of the University of Alberta refused this week
to let the editor of the campus
newspaper, the Gateway, give
up his non-voting seat on Council.
Joe Clark, editor of The Gateway, asked council that he no
longer be required to sit as a
member of the council. He suggested that the editor serves no
good purpose on council, and
that his presence might be used
to levy undue influence upon
tiie opinions and the editorial
freedom of the paper.
His request came on the heels
of a suggestion voiced at the annual CUP conference that editors should not sit  on  council.
Council members contended
that no such influence had occurred in the past, and suggested that there was little danger
of it coming now. They also
said that it was ^convenient for
council to have the editor on
hand so he could report on the
activities of his paper.
The Gateway is the only
major student organization with
a seat on council. Clark argued
that if the paper could sit on
Help Needed For Housing
Financial Woes
Of Student Probed
A UBC student committee is
preparing a brief on the financial problems of university students to be presented to the
.federal government early next
fall.
m
The executive of the National
Federation of Canadian University Students (NFCUS) announced that the federation's
committee at UBC in eo-Opera-
tion , with the administration,
and the faculty of the university
is  now  working   on   the year-
C.C.F.
(Continued from Page 1)
extent and variety of research
work being done," Strachan said
at the conclusion of his'visit.
Said AMS President Peter
Meekison of the visit, "it was
obvious from our discussion with
them that they were keenly interested in the university and
were made more aware of our
many problems by their brief
visit."
They requested especially that
they be kept informed of the universities problems, he added.
long study.
Areas of study include: scholarships, bursaries, loans, and
tax exemptions.
A spokesman of the executive
said, "On the basis of the latest
reports it is evident that higher
education is becoming a luxury
for a majority of families with
an average income."
He pointed out that the executive, "does not believe families must be forced to sacrifice
unduly their standard of living
because of the extremely high
cost of helping their children attend university."
According to figures published
by the Dominion Bureou of Statistics in 1957, the average student is able to save only $443
from summer and par-time employment. The cost of one year
at university is, on the average,
$1212.
A preliminary brief will be
presented to the government on
National Student Day February
11. The full study will be reviewed at the annual congress
of the federation prior to the
presentation next fall.
council, so should other groups
financed by the Students' Union.
However, council members
said that the newspaper was different from other , Students'
Union organizations because of
its activity and influence.
South America
Scholarships
Now Offered
A partial scholarship program
to South America is being offered by the National Student
Association for students interested in Latin America affairs
and who have a knowledge of
Spanish.
The group will visit Brazil,
Argentina, and Uruguay during
the summer of 1960. The leader
of the group will be an outstanding professor in the field
was cast . . ."
During the group's stay in
each of the three countries they
will meet with student leaders,
visit universities, attend receptions, meet with the leading representatives vof the governments, visit factories, speak with
leaders in private industry, meet
with leading, members of the
clergy, and do general sightseeing in the countries.
For further   information  concerning    the    program,    write:
i NSA,  Study-Travel Department,
12161   Shattuck   Avenue,   Berke-
J ley 4, California, USA.
QUESTIONAIRE
FACULTY-
YEAR -
NAME	
LANDLADY'S NAME	
ADDRESS -	
Has your landlady received notice to convert her house?.
If so, how long was she given to do so?	
Did she appeal? If so, what was the result	
Further particulars 	
Do you know of any other Student with the same problem?
UBC STUDENT HOUSING COMMITTEE
CLASSIFIED
LOST—Monday a.m. Jan. 18,
a grey-knit scarf, in new chem-1
istry building near Chem. 250.
The scarf is a keepsake and the
owner would be most, grateful if
returned to College $hop or call
Bill at AM 1-1809.  *£.,-
UBC student's wife'with 3-yr.
old daughter will baby-sit days
or evenings. Has transportation.
Phone AL-2311-L.
HALL AND CATERING
SERVICE
Special Attention fqjr
University Functions
>2723 West 4th Ave.
RE 1-2814     -     WE 9-3827
varsity
theatre
4375 WEST 10TH
AL 0345
ENDS TODAY
Mack Sennett's
"THE GOLDEN AGE
OF COMEDY"
Winner of 2 Academy Awards
on  the  same  program
The Comedy Hit
"LAW AND DISORDER"
JAN. 27-30th
2 FIRST RUN HITS
"BEHIND THE  MASK"
Starring
Michael Redgrave
Behind  the  scenes  drama of
a great hospital
plus
Virginia  McKenna  and Bill
Travers in
"PASSIONATE SUMMER"
One Complete  Show
Commencing 7:30 p.m.
CLASSIFIED ADS
FOUND Pen, owner can claim
by identifying. Phone AL. 0710-R
Edwards.
1951 MORRIS Minor, excellent condition, $225—or best
offer. Phone John at AM. 6-6493.
FOUND a slide ruler around
Wesbrook or Auditorium. Call
evenings telephone AL. 4757-L.
LOST—one brief-case taken
from cafeteria on Thurs., Jan.
21. Carl Floe—3494 West 20th.
RE. 8-9335.
RIDE wanted from McGill
and Boundry (just above the 2nd
narrows) to make 9:30 classes
daily. Please phone Stan Stewart at CYpress 8-5612.
SELL or swap. White Indian
sweater with blue antique auto
design. Worn only twice. Size
36-38. RCA Portable Radio with
batteries. Phone evenings. Bruce
RE.   3-5387.
;~FOR Sale U.B.C. Coat Sweater-
brand new will sell for $10.00
also Engineers sweater $7.50.
Call after 6:30 p.m. RE 3-0783.
RIDE Wanted! From vicinity
of Marine" Drive and Victoria
Drive. Phone FA. 7-4209.
RIDE WANTED! 8:30 a.m.
from 39th and Mackenzie Sts. to
UBC. Please call Miss Wilson,
Local 240/257.
LOST — 10" x 10" (approx.)
goldfish bowl, by Library Natural Pond. Please return to Rm.
369, Buchanan Bldg. Fish will
appreciate it.
RIDE WANTED—From vicinity of Marine Drive and Victoria
Ave. Phone FA 7-4209.
LOST—il pair ladies glasses
with blue frame in vicinity of
Wesbrook Camp. Finder please
phone AL 3529-L.
RIDE Wanted! One Way Daily
from Boundary Road and McGill
St. (just above 2nd Narrows), for
9:30 classes. Phone CY. 8-5612.
FOUND — 1 pair thick lens
spectacles, with brown frame—
in vicinity of Wesbrook Camp.
Phone AL. 3529-L.
WILL the person who left his
gymstrip in my '51 Vauxhall on
Tuesday afternoon, please call
me — Mike McConnell, AM 1-
3202.
FOUND—A wrist watch, near
Memorial Gym. Owner may
claim by identifying. Phone Bob
Turnes at AL-1724.
ENGINEERS REQUIRED
Opportunity for a career in engineering with a progressive and expanding company for graduating or postgraduate engineering students. Summer employment
opportunities for third year undergraduate engineers.
SEE OUR RECRUITING
PERSONNEL ON
MONDAY AND TUESDAY
February l and 2,1960
CALL AT UNIVERSITY
PLACEMENT OFFICE
FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS
1>AN AMERICAN
PETROLEUM -CORPQ&UIQH FMJE SIX
TSS-fiYSSEY
Tuesday, January 26, I960
Co-Editors:      nn Pickard, Ernie  Harder
"Staff: Mike Hunter, Fred Fletcher, Alan Dafoe, Dieter Urban.
Mike Leads J.V.'s
With 18 Points
The slow-starting UBC Jayvees have begun to move.
Led by gangling centre Mike
Potkonjak, the Jayvees dumped Cloverleafs 72-48 Friday
night, and bounced Dominion
junior finalists YMCA 70-57 on
Saturday.
At half-time Saturday, the
sharp-shooting juniors trailed
only by one point, 28-27.
JV's better inside shooting
put them in front by six points
at "the three-quarter mark. Then
Potkonjak took over, dumping
in .three successive driving lay-
Women Clash
In Tourney
TJBC's Thunderette Basketball
Team hosts Kelowna, Trail,
Portland, Calgary and the local
Hastings squad January 29-30 in
an invitational basketball tourney at the Women's Gym.
UBC faces Trail, Calgary
meets Bastings, and Portland
challenges Kelowna Friday night
Iri the double knockout compett
tiba.
Saturday at 7:30 in the finals
ef the consolation round get underway with top spot being decided in the final game at 9:00.
A little color will be added by
a special Free Throw contest
featuring the number one scorer
of each team.
Tickets for the first Thunderette Invitational basketball tour-
nameat are on sale now. Tickets
for the individual games on Friday and Saturday night will be
35c for students at the door.
Tournament passes may be
purchased at the A.M.S. -office
or from any Big Block member
for $1.
ups to give JV's an insurmountable margin.
Throughout the first three
quarters play was highlighted by
sparkling outside shooting by
JV's Bill McDonald and the Y's
Bob Lewis.
POTKONJAK TOP SCORER
Potkonjak was high scorer for
JV's again. Mike added 18 points
to the 19 he poured in Friday.
Bill McDonald got 16, and Ron
Juriet led the Y with 13.
Friday night the JV's dumped
the Cloverleafs for the second
straight 'time, this time by an
embarassing 22 points.
Dave Osborne finally got un-
tracked, placing next to Potkonjak in the scoring, with 15 pts.
Dennis Mooroheade added 11.
FRIDAY'S SUMMARY
Jayvees (72)—Potkonjak 19,
Berze, Farenholts 5, McCaUum
4, McDonald 6, Moorehead 11,
McLean 2, Brousson 5, Osborne
15, English 5.
Leafs (48)—Jennings 6, Gim-
p%e 4, Heathcote 4, Dean 6,
Lorenz 14, Larsen 4, Braith-
waite 4, Holyoake, Terris 6.
UBC Team Wins in
Women* Basketball
"UBC's junior women's basketball team swamped Nabob 66-33,
Thursday.
-UBC controlled both tire backboards and the scoring.
Shelia Ledingham was top
scorer with 17 points. Diane Mc-
Pherson poured in 13.
Sharon McGee and Muriel
Watney did most of the rebounding for the Varsity squad. They
contributed 11 points each, also.
Jean McDonald also hit double
figures, picking up 16 points.
COLLEGE
SHOP
OPEN DAILY IN THE BROCK EXTENSION
11:30 a.m. — 2:30 p.m.
For An Your Campus Needs
FEATURING
• FACULTY SWEATERS
• STATIONERY AND SCHOOL SUPPLIES
• GYM SUPPLIES AND SWEAT CLOTHING
• FACULTY PINS
• CRESTED JEWELLERY
• UBC BLUE JACKETS
LOST AND FOUND
Owned and Operated by the A.M.S.
SHORTS
Dieter Weichert will be competing this Saturday at 2:00 in the
Memorial  Gym when UBC meets Washington  Huskies.
SPORTS   MENU
WEDNESDAY
Basketball
Braves vs Rollins
8:30 at Lord Byng.
THURSDAY
Basketball
U.B.C.  Sr.  Women 'B' vs
_   ■ - -Crystal Freeze
7:00 at King Ed Gym.
FRIDAY
Basketball
Thunderette   Tournament
Evening at Women's Gym.
J.V. vs Dietrich Collins
at U.B.C—8:30.
Braves vs Sandpoint Navy
at  U.B.C—6:30
Thunderbirds at Alberta
SATURDAY
Basketball
Thunderette Tournament
evening and afternoon
at Women's Gym.
Braves vs Sandpoint
Kits Community Centre—12:15
J.V. vs Seattle Medcalf
Thunderbirds vs U of Alberta
at Alberta.
Swimming
A.A.U. Meet
A.A.U. Meet
at Seattle.
Gymnastics
GYMiiastics vs U of Washington
at U.B.C.
Wrestling
Okanagan Championships
at Kelowna.
Men's Grasshockey
Hawks  vs Pedogoues
at UJB.C No. 2.
Varsity  vs Mont  Cast DogerB
at Memorial No.  1—2:45.
U.B.C. golds vs  Cardinals
at U.B.C No. 1.
Redbirds vs U.B.C. Blues
at U.B.C. No. 2—2:45.
Swimming
Synchronized Swimming
Championships
at Crystal pool—9-8 p.m.
WOMEN'S   HOCKEY
Women's hockey teams suffered losses to Queen Margaret
School in Saturday's hockey
round-robin.
Varsity defeated Victoria College 2-0 but lost 2-1 to Q.M.S.
The UBC team lost both their
games.     Vic   College    dumped
them   2-0  and  Queen  Margaret
won 5-0.
WRESTLING
UBC's wrestling team travels
to Summerland to take on Ques-
nel   next   Saturday.
This is a part of a tuneup series that will eventually lead to
the WCIAU meet at the Univer-
city of Alberta March 5.
Heavyweight  Bill Maslechko,
who took both Ms bouts in the
squads  last outing, has  been  a
standout.
SQUASH
UBC's squash team split two
matches over the weekend.
They lost 4-1 to Racquets Club
Saturday, at the Racquets Club
courts.
Chris Scott notched the lone
UBC victory,  edging Neil Mac-
Pherson three games to two.
'   Sunday, the team whitewashed
UBC faculty 5-0.
BRAVE BASKETBALL '
UBC Braves dropped a cliff-
hanger 70*65 to a strong Cecil
Hotel team Saturday afternoon.
After UBC's Ian Matheson had
tied the game at 64 each with 40
seconds remaining, Cecil's Lynn
Holmes hit with a jump shot,
scoring what proved to be the
winning points for the Senior B
squad.
Braves' Jack Dumont tallied
16 points to lead all scorers in
the see-saw contest.
Braves next outing is a league
game against Rollins Wednesday,
8:30, at Lord Byng Gym.
SOCCER
The Dutch Lions defeated
Varsity 2-1 in an exhibition soccer game at Oak Park on Sunday afternoon.
The Fera Sheet Metal-UBC
Third Division contest which
was scheduled to be played on
Mclnnes Field was cancelled because of poor conditions.
PAN AMERICAN PETROLEUM
CORPORATION
CALGARY, ALBERTA
Offering Career In:
PRODUCTION/ADMINISTRATION
Permanent employment opportunities for students graduating
with a B.  Com.  or B.A.  degree.   Summer employment for
third year undergraduates in either faculty.
Recruiting Personnel will visit the campus on Monday and
Tuesday, February 1 and 2, 1960.
See University Placement Office for further particulars.
RENTAL & SALES
• Full Dress
• Morning Costs
• While and Blue Coats
• Shirts and Accessories
• $1.00 discount to
UBC Students.
E. A. LEE Ltd.
623 HOWE MU 3-2457
ANY QUESTIONS?
About Your NFCS Life Plan
A qualified underwriter will be in the NFCUS Committee Room each
Wednesday and Friday from 11:30 to 1:30 until the January 31 deadline to answer your questions.
Room 165 BROCK EXTENSION (Basement) Tuesday, January 26, 1960
Tfffi    U B-Y S-S-&Y
PAGESEVEr*
Bisons Easy Prey For Birds
Whole Team Scores
In Weekend Victory
By MIKE HUNTER
UBC Thunderbirds showed
last weekend that they will have
no trouble topping the Western
Intercollegiate Basketball conference.
The west coast powerhouse
clobbered the University of
Manitoba-Saskatchewan.
The play was ragged and
rough, as the far superior ball-
handling and shooting of the
Birds caused the Prairie boys
to resort to football tactics.
EVERYBODY SCORES
Coach Jack Pomfret used his
reserves liberally, and every
Bird hit the score sheet in both
games. Ken Winslade led the
Birds again, with one of his
best weekends yet.
Ken led the scorers on Saturday with 19 points, Norris Martin potted 11, and Ed Gushue 10.
Friday,  big   Wayne   Osborn.'
netted   15   points,   while   Barry
Drummond, Winslade and Mar-
; tin each added 13.
Although the margins of victory were a big 20 points each
night, it might just as well have
been forty.
The Birds toyed with the inept   Manitoba   defense,   scoring
many easy layups.  The Bisons
- threw the ball away often  on
fast^break attempts. They were
continually sucked out by simple
fakes, and usually made no attempt to recover after they were
beaten on a play.
5    Their rebounding grew worse
■ as   the   game progressed,  until
all it consisted of -was pulling
down UBC players rather than
the ball.
PLAY ROUGH 	
The particular aggressor in
most of the cases was Manitoba's Ed Melnyk, billed as a
star shooter and rebounder.
Several threatening gestures
with his elbows drew the ire of
the crowd and UBC team, the
Birds were called for "getting
to close."
Saturday, after several elbow-
swinging displays under the
Birds basket, Melnyk gave
Norris Martin the hip after
Noot had grabbed a rebound.
Norris fell on the floor, and
Melnyk jumped on top of him
and grabbed the ball A jump
ball resulted. Even in football,
piling on draws a 15-yard penalty. Ed Pederson told Mr. Melnyk so in no uncertain terms
BISONS HAVE TROUBLE
Manitoba had further difficulty in the third-quarter when
Melnky threw the ball into play
in the direction of two Manitoba
guards. But the two players
were in a huddle (discussing the
cheerleaders, perhaps?) and the
ball went over their heads and
out of bounds.
Manitoba apparently didn't
bring     their     much - publicized
Matz & Wozny
548 Howe St.       MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suite
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted suits
modermized in the new
single breasted styles.
Special Student Bates
shooting eyes with them. They
lacked the ability to score from
the outside, gaining most of their
points on foul shots (23 for 37)
and close-in shots late in the
game when the Birds relaxed.
The brightest spot for the 80.0
fans who attended both games,
was the sparkling play of
veteran Ken Winslade. Winslade
thrilled the crowd with long
floating one-handers, short tip-
ins, and sensational driving
layups. He added 32 poits to his
total, which will increase his
leading average.
Coach Pomfret's second platoon showed well also. Keith
Hartley took a beating under
the boards, but dished out. a
couple of rousing body checks
in addition to scoring 10 points
in the two games.
Ed Gushue started to score
again also, getting 16 points, all
told.
PLAYOFFS FAIR?
The Bisons obviously had a
bad weekend, and should be
much tougher when they meet
the Birds in Winnipeg next
month. But they shouldn't be
tough enough to win.
And this brings up the Olympic controversy again. Two
teams, one from BC and Alberta
and one from Saskatchewan and
Manitoba, will represent the
west in the Dominion playdowns.
This Bison team is said to be the
top team in their own section.
But here are at least six or
seven teams in BC and Alberta,
including the Thunderbirds that
are superior to Manitoba. Therefore, five or six better teams will
be eliminated, whereas Bisons
wil have little opposition to
select the Olympic team.
Next weekend the Birds
journey to Edmonton to take on
third-place University of Alberta.
SUMMARIES:
Friday—UBC (84)-Drummond
13, Way 4, Berardino 3. Hartley 4, Osborne 15, Gushue 6,
Pederson 9, Winslade 13, Martin
13, Dumaresq 4.
Manitoba (53)-Torgerson 9,
Embry 8, Melnyk 12, DeVries,
Zelmer 9, D. Novak, Sedun 6,
Henderson 7, B. Novak 10, Harvey 2.
Saturday — UBC (73)-Drum-
mond 8, Berardino 2, Hartley 6;
Osborne 4, Gushue 10, Pederson
6, Winslade 19, Martin 11, Dumaresq 2, Treleaven 5.
Manitoba (53)—Torgerson 8,
Embry 6, Melnyk 5, Zelmer 15';
D. Novak, Sedun, Henderson 2,
B. Novak 5, Harvey 6, Devries 6.
Wayne Osborne (30- watches Norris Martin (44) grab a rebound from Manitoba's John Embry.
Rugby star Dave Howard and
his Thunder-bird teammates
will have lo wait, until Saturday, February 6, rb meet Vancouver Reps in the McKechnie
semi-final.
Season Starts
For Gymnasts
The 1960 gymnastics season
opens Saturday, January 30, at
2:00 p.m. in Memorial Gym
when UBC Birds face Washington Huskies in a dual meet.
Dieter Weichert is again leading the strong Varsity team,
which is expectett to dominate
Pacific Northwest competition
this season. Weichert is backed
by teammates Alex Ross, Gordie
Gannon, Rheal Finnigan, Walt
Mclntyre, Al. Limber, Dick
Avender, Bill Kayf Monte Engel-
son, Adrian Hahkey and Bill
Whitelaw.
Alan Dafoe Scores
Winner For UBC Peds.
The UBC Pedagogues gained
a 1-0 decision over Blackbirds in
a muddy B Division men's grass
hockey encounter Saturday afternoon at Connaught Park.
Both teams were bogged down
continually during the 70 minutes of play. Late in the first
half, the scoreless deadlock was
broken when the Pftds ewitre
forward, Alan Dafoe, sent » ris
ing shot past the surprised Bluebirds goalkeeper.
On the whole, however, the
forward line failed to connect
on many goal-scoring opportunities. This unit was ably backed
up by an alert halfback line and
a generally tight-checking defence. In goal, Romy Babouin
picked up his second shutout of
the season.
FEMALE HELP WANTED
Employment early May to after Labor Day
Ability to type essential. Prefer students who are. per-
manents residents in Greater Vancouver area and are
completing first year. Apply by letter to J. F. HUGHES,
Executive Vice-President, Greater Vancouver Tourist
Association, 596 West Georgia St.
REPRESEPfEATlVES OF THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
Will visit the university to discuss career opportunities
with graduating and post-graduate students in
ENGINEERING-
• MINING
• METALLURGICAL
• CHEMICAL
• ELECTRICAL
•' MECHANICAL
• CIVIL
CHEMISTRY AND GEOLOGY-
On February 8th, 9th and 10th
We invite you to arrange an interview through
Your Placement Office
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
Copper Cliff, Onto Ho |»AGE EIGHT
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 26, 1960
FORTUNE MAGAZINE CALLS US...
"the   most
hellishly   modern
old-fashioned   company
in  the  world!
rr
... AND THEY'RE RIGHT!
We believe in the old fashioned virtues that pioneered
a sprawling trading empire across Canada. Virtues such as
dependability . .. determination . . . integrity ... .
and the spirit of adventure.
W& are looking for aggressive young men . . .willing
to accept a challenge : . .men who will fit into a progressive
management team.
If YOU ewe willing to accept a challenge/ then join a
modern company as a Junior Executive in Retail Merchandising.
YOU'LL FIND WE'RE MODERN IN GIVING YOU:
• a good starting salary
• continuous and rapid advancement opportunities
• interesting and challenging work
• formal management training
Come and discuss the many fields open to Graduates this
year. YOU can have a brilliant future with the Hudson's
Bay Company!
Make your appointment today
Representatives of the company will be conducting
interviews on the campus, January 27th and 28th.
Call Your Personnel Office On the Campus
•WMTPO '*a3rati#B<I*<I so«JO *so*£- &% xxwn. ssvp pnooos s» pespiaqftaT
* 9
INCOHPORATEO  Zff   MAY   I67Q.

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