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The Ubyssey Oct 6, 1936

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 LEON ERROL
THURSDAY
LEON ERROL
THURSDAY
Published Twice
Publications Board of the
Vol. XIV
Weekly by the
University of British Columbia
VANCOUVER, B. C, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1936
No. 4
PASS SYSTEM
FEATURE AT
A.M.S. MEETING
Last spring at the annual
A.M.S. meeting, the student
body voted, by a large majority, to raise the A.M.S. lee
from $10.00 to $13.00, in order to put into operation the
"Student Pass System," as
used at the leading universities in Canada.
This system consists in the
granting to every student of
a pass which gains the holder
admittance to almost every
university function, social,
athletic, theatrical, etc., for
which an admission charge
was previously made.
The resolution putting this system Into effect, as passed by the
students last spring, was submitted
for ratification to the Board of Governors, who rejected it. As the proceedings of the Board meetings are
private, there is no way of knowing what were the exact reasons
for turning down the project. However, the matter, as it waa submitted to the Board, was defective In
two respects: One: there was not
a quorum at the A.M.S. meeting
which passed the resolution; two:
there was held out as an Inducement to the student the possibility
of a 10 per cent reduction in price
at various downtown stores. This
last inducement, as it was pointed
out at the meeting, is an unfair one,
as it does not properly attach to
the pass system at all.
At Wednesday's A.M.S. meeting
there will be a full discussion of
the subject. If the resolution passes, after a fair and full discussion,
with a quorum present, we may
hope for a sympathetic ' reception
from the Board of Governors.
PROPOSAL FOR THE STUDENT PASS SYSTEM
FUNCTION
Present
Cost to
Student
Frosh Reception
.50
Initiation
.75
REMARKS
Cost to A.M.S.
for Waiving
Admission
Free admission to all students
350.00
Free admission to all first-year students
350.00
Ennglish Rugby—2 McKechnie Cup Games at 25c each
.50
Canadian Rugby—3 Games (to be selected) at 25c each
.75
Track Meet—The Major Meet, at 25c
.25
Pep Meeting—The Two Major Pep Meetings, at 5c
Basketball—10 Noon-day Games, at 10c
Players' Club—Spring Play, at 35c
Musical Society—Spring Production, at 30c
.10
1.00
Free admission to all students by arrangements
with the Rugby Union
320.00
Free admission to all students by arrangements
with the Big Four League
500.00
Free admission to all students
50.00
Free admission to all students
120.00
Free admission to all students
600.00
.35
.30
Debates—Three Major Debates, at 25c
.75
Class Party—One Class Party
Per Capita Cost for Year's Admission
1.00
$6.25
Free admission to all students
350.00
Free admission to all students
300.00
Free admission to all students
450.00
Free to Aggie Banquet, Senior Class, Arts '38,
'39, '40
Nurses' Party, Education Party, Science Class
Party
Total Cost to A.M.S. for waiving admission charges
Reserve for   safety and extra functions to be
incorporated later
Estimated increase in A.M.S. Revenue,
1,650 students at $3.00
—$4,950.00
1,237.60
$4,627.50
322.50
$4,950.00
Walker Prizes
For Memoirs In
Natural History
Two prizes, founded by the late
Dr. William Johnson Walker, are
annually offered by the Boston Society of Natural History for the
best memoirs written in the English language, on subjects proposed
by the Board of Trustees.
For the best Memoir presented
a prize of sixty dollars may be
awarded; if, however, the memoir
be one of marked merit, the amount
may be increased to one hundred
dollars, at the discretion of the
Walker Prize Committee.
For the next best memoir a prize
not exceeding fifty dollars may be
awarded.
Prizes will not be awarded unless the memoirs presented are of
adequate merit.
The competition for these prizes
is not restricted, but is open to
all. It is nevertheless the tradition
of the Society that the founder of
these prizes intended them more in
the nature of encouragement to
younger naturalists than as rewards for the work of mature investigators.
Attention is especially called to
the following points:
1. In all cases the memoirs are
to be based on a considerable body
of original and unpublished work,
accompanied by a rrenernl review of
the literature of tho subject.
2. Anything in the memoir
which shall furnish proof of the
identity of the author shall be considered as debarring the memoir
from competition.
.'1. Although the awards will be
based on their intrinsic merits preference may be given to memoirs
bearing evidence of having been
prepared with special reference to
.ompetition for these prizes.
4. Eaeh memoir must be accompanied by a sealed envelope enclosing the author's name and su-
U. OF SASKATCHEWAN
OPENS NEW STADIUM
UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN (W.I.P.U.) — The
long-awaited dream of the
sport lovers at the University
of Saskatchewan will at last
come true on Saturday, Oct.
3, when the Griffiths Stadium
is officially opened, and the
Saskatchewan Huskies meet
the Golden Bears from the
University of Alberta on a
rugby field that is truly their
own.
The Stadium has always been an
acute need ot the University. Up
to this time the team played host
to their visitors on a leased field.
The project has been raised many
times, but until two years ago nothing was done. Raising funds first of
all by means ot bowling tournaments, and later by subscription
and other means, enough was collected to erect a substantial nucleus to an important part of the
campus. Extensive plans for fully
completing the building and field
will make the Stadium fit to rank
with the University's finest buildings.
Sir Frederick Haultain, Chancellor of the University, will officially
open the Stadium. The game which
NOTICE
All those interested are invited
to the first meeting of Le Cercle
Francais which will be held tonight
at the home of Dr. Tipping, 5415
Cypress Street, at 8 o'clock. Membership Is open to 2nd, 3rd and 4th
year students—those Intending to
teach are particularly urged to Join.
All old members out!
Take a No. 7 car, get off at Cypress and 41st and walk two blocks
north.
PROSH   RECEPTION  TICKETS
Freshmen are reminded that, in
order to get their free tickets for
the Frosh Reception they must
wear their insignia. No ticket will
be given out to any student not
wearing the required green hat, placard, and nail polish.
perscribed with a motto corresponding to one borne by the manuscript, and must be in the hands
of the Secretary on or before
March 1 of fthe year for which the
prize is offered.
5. The Society assumes no responsibility for publication of manuscripts submitted, and publication
should not be made before the Annual Meeting of the Society in May.
SUBJECT  FOR  1937:
Any subject in the field of
Botany.
SUBJECT FOR 1938:
Any subject in the field of
Ornithology.
CLINTON V. MacOOY,
Secretary.
Boston Society of Natural History,
Boston, Mass., U.S.A.,
September, 1936.
NOTICE, V.C.U.
A   U.B.C.   grad.,   Rev.   Douglas
Honeyford,    of    Marpole    Baptist
Church, will be the speaker ln Arts
206, Wednesday, 12.15.   All Invited.
follows will be the first of the
Hardy Cup series, and promises to
be an exciting and well fought
battle.
Mystery of
Mr. Gage's Box
By BILL KNOX
It all happened last week, when
Mr. Gage, ardent soul, was endeavoring to his utmost ability to
pound mathematics at perhaps the
dumbest class on record.
Finally it appeared that everyone had grasped his idea. With a
sigh originating in the region of his
solar plexus, the worthy prof, relaxed. At last! How peaceful-
how restful.
In the ensuing lull, however, a
fair feminine hand had been raised.
Mr. Gage smiled benevolently.
"Yes?" he cooed.
"Please, sir, I don't see It."
Professor Gage subsided in a
quivering heap of flesh and bone
on the desk.
Again he took up cudgels, though
this time with less vigor. "Can't
you see," he moaned, "that if I take
a piece of pie and divide it by zero,
I will have nothing left?"
"No, sir, I'm sorry, I'm afraid
I am from Missouri. But I'll tell
you what I'll do. Ill bring a pie
for experimental purposes on Monday.
And so it was that Monday, amid
hoots and shrieks from the class,
the Fair Young Thing deposited a
fat parcel on the desk.
A hush of expectancy descended
the assembled throng while
(Continued on Page 2)
GYMNASTS DISPLAY
GRACE AND FORM
.eon
Errol
upon
AGENDA FOR WEDNESDAY'S ALMA MATER SOCIETY
MEETING
1. The Minutes of last meeting.
2. The Treasurer's report of last year's finances.
3. The Secretary's report outlining Council Policy for
this year.
4. Discussion and resolution on the advisability of raising the A.M.S. fee by $3.00 in order to put into operation the Pass System.
NOTE
It is especially drawn to the attention of members
of the Society that Wednesday's meeting, after the
agenda has been disposed of, is open to any resolution
from the floor dealing with matters of general interest
to the welfare of the Alma Mater Society.
At Pep Meet
Thursday Noon
Leon Errol, veteran showman,
and one-tlmt oo-star with  Fred
Aatalre in mualeal comedy, will
entaertain U.B C. atudenta Thursday noon in the Auditorium with
hia vaudeville troupe,  It la announced by the Pep Club.   The
Froah Revue, which waa scheduled for thla date haa been postponed for two weeks.
The purpose of the Pep Meeting
is to advertise ticket sales for the
Frosh Reception, and permission to
use the auditorium has been granted by the Building Superintendent,
Mr.  Lea, on condition that there
will be no repetition by the student  body of  last week's moronic
display of bad manners.
Details of Mr. Errol's program
are still lacking, but it is expected
that the show will equal any that
have been thrilling "Beacon" theatre audiences during the past
week.
MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS
UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICE
1938-37 8eaalon
All students entering the University for the first time, and all
students who have not been examined by the University medical examiner within the last five years,
are asked to report with their class
timetable to the University Health
Service for registration and advice
as to procedure.
ART CLUB
First meeting of the Art Club
will be held on Wednesday, October
7, at the home of Margaret Haspel],
1992 W. 41st. at 8 o'clock. Everyone interested Is invited to attend.
From time to time the Joint meetings with the Letters Club will be
held, the first of which will be on
October 28 at the home of Professor Dilworth.
With thc flashing strength and
grace of trained athletes, instructors and leaders chosen from Provincial Recreational centres of the
Provincial Department of Recreational and Physical Education, directed by Chief Instructor Jerry
Mathison and managed by Ian
Eisenhardt, combined to give U. B,
C. students a display of fundamental
gymnastics, mat and springboard
tumbling, high box vaulting, pyramid building, fencing and dancing
which kept spectators sitting on the
edge of their seats expectantly.
A bevy of damsels kept front-row
Sciencemen calling for more with
their formal and exacting display
of fundamentals and the more acrobatic tumbling and pyramids which
were directed by Miss anderson and
done with unbelievable precision
and grace.
The men's performance under
Jerry Mathison exceeded the feats
of the girls in its strenuousness and
proved to be both exciting and entertaining, especially when a combination of four more pulled off
comedy stunts of their own creation
which looked simple but demanded
tricky work.
Special women's features were a
fencing drill directed by Mr. Eisenhardt, trimly costumed and clone to
perfection, a military tap dance
which made one wonder what those
feet would sound like hooked up
to a modern dance orchestra, and a
brilliantly costumed gypsy dance
which drew much male comment
and apreciativc applause.
Behind the scene of somersaulting and diving forms which drew
low-pitched whistles and well-intentioned mirth with an occasional
sinking feeling in the midsection at
the thought of the hard floor underneath, were Alf Batciiclor, in
charge of curtain and lights, and
and Ernie (irant. guardian and
equipment. The music was supplied
by Miss Ethel Shone, while the amiable gentlemen out front was Paul
Kozoolin,   Uirtner   Varsity   athlete.
A.M.S.  MEETING Tomorrow  Noon
_i Two
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 6, 1936
EDITOR IN CHIEF
ZOE BROWNE-CLAYTON
SENIOR EDITORS
TUESDAY; Kemp Edmonds FRIDAY. Dorwin Ba.rd
SPORTS EDITOR
• Dick Elson
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Ken Grant Dorothy Cummings
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Dave Sm th Bill Sibley
STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Stewart Calvert
Frank Turner
Peggy Higgs
Subscription Rates for Ubyssey:
Student rate, $1.00 per year. Rate for non-students, $1 50 per year.
Advertising Office
Pacific Publishers, Limited, 311 Province Building, Victory Square, Vancouver, B. C.
Telephone: TRINITY 1945
Advertising Staff:  Charles H. Munro, Howard D. Fletcher
All advertising handled exclusively by Pacific Publishers, Limited.
BAD PUBLICITY
The exhibition of rank bad manners at the first pep
meeting of the year may be considered just fun by a minority
of the student body, but it is in reality far more serious than
they will permit themselves to admit.
In the first place the repeated warnings of the building
superintendent are not mere bluff. According to reliable
advice reported elsewhere in these columns, any further flour
spilling, lunch throwing, or anything similar will immediately
result in a complete barring of Pep meetings from the Auditorium.
The second effect of these disturbances is probably
much more serious. The fact that the uproar Friday is
directly traceable to Sciencemen with a smattering of Arts
and Aggie sophomores cannot alter the black name given to
the student body as a whole by such conduct.
Stan Patton has every right in the world to refuse ever
to play again at the University, because of the exceptionally
rude reception he was accorded last Friday.
The University does not want this type of publicity, and
it is time the student body realized it.
ELECTRIC SHOCK
The exhibition of "Old Bill" in Stanley Park this summer brought doubt to the mind of every student who viewed
It.   According to the signs it came from London.
Vile deceit! Everyone who has travelled the University
Boulevard route recognized It as one of the U.B.C. fleet,
chosen because It was the only one that could make the
run downtown.
S. M. U. S.
The Hounds Want
To Be Hunted
There was a SMUS meeting last
Thursday, and about half of Science turned out. There will be no
initiation of the second year, but
it doesn't mean that they aren't
Sciencemen and that they don't
have to go to SMUS meetings, even
the old faces would look good in
numbers. So what the hell, fellows;
let's all get out and uphold Col.
Wilkin, who quoted to us from an
Arta professor last Thursday that
"Science is the only organized body
on the University Campus."
The Canadian Institute of Mining Metallurgy are holding their
convention in the Vancouver Hotel
from October 7th to 10th inclusive.
There are technical sessions daily
that should prove interesting to all
student engineers. Further particulars may be found on the Ap. Sc.
notice board.
Here is a list of the executives
of Sc. '78: Prexy, Gordon Snelling;
Vice-Prexy, Jack Harris; Secretary-treasurer, Bob Peebles; M. A.
R., Jim McCammon.
Science '40 will hold their elections in Ap. Sc. 208 on Wednesday
noon, so get out and vote.
The upperclassmen want to know
what Sc. '40 is going to do about
the pep meeting that they usually
hold.
There will be a meeting of the
U.E.S. in Ap. Sc. 100 Thursday
noon.  Let's go, gang.
Many campus organizations who
desire publicity it; Vancouver newspapers do not realize that they may
get It with less effort It they contact the campus representative of
the paper they wish to use. A list
of these "campus newshounds" is
given below:
Vancouver Province: Jim Beveridge, news; Ron Andrews, sport;
Margaret Ecker, social.
Vancouver Sun: Alan Morley,
news and sport; Zoe Browne-Clayton, social.
Newa • Herald: Dorwin Baird,
news; Frank Turner, sport; Peggy
Higgs, social.
Meeting To Form
Film Society
There will be a meeting of all
those interested in forming a University Film Society today in Arts
100 at 12 sharp.
The Society proposes to affiliate
with the Vancouver branch of the
National Film Society, and special
rates will be given 20 members
to attend showings of their Alms.
This is an opportunity for students
to see pictures which, because of
their appeal to a limited public,
could not otherwise be seen.
The meeting will be a short one,
as   Arts  100 will  be used  by an
LOST
Lost on Thursday: pair of pigskin gloves. Please return to the
Council Office.
fr-H
Corsages  -   -   -  75c and $l>°o    j
We are iust as near as your Free delivery within City
phone. limits.
Ritchie Bros, wo Granvme st»« Sey. 2045
DANCING LESSONS —
You want more friends, more fun     You want
to be able to go  to  the next party with  the
poise   that   comes   of   being   a   good   dancer
Telephone  Bayview 5506 or 5333 R
GRACE MacDONALD
3657 West 9th Avenue, at Alma
Random Ramblings
THE STUDENT  PRINCE
LEAD KINDLY LIGHT
n these dark days of the bloody
Soph-Frosh campaign, when every
doorway reveals a new vista of desolation and eggshells, and no man
knows at what moment he may feel
the icy blast of a Are hose on his
neck, there is one glimmering ray
of hope to comfort the long-suffering non-combatant. On Thursday,
d.v., Peace will return, the Hon and
the lamb will lie down together, and
freshman and sophomore will walk
the paths of learning again, hand
in hand.
The dark hours of strife have
not been unbrightened by shining
deeds of heroism and self-sacrifice,
however. Who, that saw it, for example, will ever forget the sight of
the immortal Morley striding alone
into No-Man's-Land just as the two
armies met, and knocking the opposing generals' heads together In
the name of Peace and Humanity?
The story of Morley the Peacemaker, must surely go down ln him
tory with that of the Three Hun"
dred at Thermopylae, or Horatlus
at the Bridge, even though the dignity of this occasion was somewhat
marred a moment later by a Are
hose on an adjacent building. After
all, we have no reason to believe
that the heroes of antiquity would
have reacted to Are hoses any differently than those of our age.
L'INTCRNATIONALE
The lnsiduous red menace within
our walls has reared its ugly head
again. This time in the form ot a
red lunch pall upon the pure white
surface of a sorority table. The
object ln question is, admittedly
only a half-sited version of the familiar proeletarlan model, and its
red lacquered sides have a truly Patrician gleam; nevertheless, the
significance of the symbol should
be recognized.
The lunch pall, rather than the
hammer and sickle, should, tn my
opinion, have been chosen by the
Communist party as the emblem of
the great working class. Factory
workers, trainmen, longshoremen,
loggers, day laborers, truck drivers,
street car conductors and even, it is
alleged, the modern cowboy, are
only a few of the great army of
lunch pall packers. Differences of
vocation, politics, and race are forgotten in the best Marxian manner
when the noon whistles of the
world herald that long-anticipated
moment when the pleasantly
weighty black box yields up Its
treasure.
A red lunch pall on a white sorority table . . , what a topic for our
after-dinner politicians!
TERPSICHORE
Gallant upper-classmen who condescend to dance with bashful
freshettes at the Frosh Reception
this year will run less risk of getting maimed for their generosity.
Dropping ln at the "Vinery" (advt.)
the other afternoon after an autumnal promenade, we found a bevy of
green-bonnetted beauties taking advantage of free dancing facilities
and an afternoon off. The stag-line
will form on  the right. . . .
FOR P8YCHOLOOI8T8 ONLY
Boarding houses are the chief
topic of conversation among our
out-of-towners at this time of year,
and we are reminded of a story
about a former student here. His
room was directly above that of a
business man whose nerves and nuances had suffered from the stock
market crash, and who objected to
the noise the student made coming in from late parties. Chief
among his complaints, was the way
the youth dropped his shoes on the
floor while undressing.
Returning one night from a dance
the student dropped one shoe, then,
remembering the sleeper below, he
carefully lowered the other one with
no noise, and went to bed.
Half an hour later he was awakened by pounding on the floor. "For
Ood's sake," came the agonized
voice from below, "go ahead and
drop the other one, and let me get
back to sleep!"
"QUICK HENRY—THE FLIT!"
Young Men's
Clothing
Specialists
SUITS and OVERCOATS
Stock or Made-to-Measure
$22-50,
and up
See ui for your Tuxedo
DEEM and LONG
498 SEYMOUR, at PENDER
Trinity 2212
iiHiHiuiiiiiiiiiniuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
Applications For
Rhodes1 Scholars
Due This Month
Choice to Bo Made
In Docombor
The choice of the Rhodes
Scholarship for 1937 will be
made in December of this
year and the closing date for
the receipt of applications by
the Secretary for British Columbia will be October 31,
1936.
The qualifications for eleglbHlty
require that the applicant be a
British subject with at least Ave
years domicile ln Canada. He must
be unmarried and must have passed
his nineteenth but not his twenty-
fifth birthday on October 1st, of the
year for which he Is elected, and
must also by that date have completed two years study at one of the
universities in Canada. An applicant may make application tor a
Scholarship ln the Province in
which his horn eis situated or for
any Province ln which he has received at least two years of his
university education before applying.
POUR QUALIFICATIONS
In making the selection the Com*
mitee follows that section ot the
will of Cecil Rhodes in which he
defined the general type of scholar
he desired. Four qualifications
were mentioned which are briefly:
(1) Literary and Scholastic attainments; (2) Qualities of manhood,
truth, courage, devotion to duty,
sympathy, kindliness, unselfishness
and fellowship; (3) Exhibition of
moral force of character and of Instincts to lead and to take an interest In his fellows; (4) Physical
vigor, as shown by fondness for and
success in outdoor sports
Mr. Rhodes desired that his Scholar should be chosen for a due combination of these tributes and he
laid special emphasis upon those
mental and moral qualifications
which would be "likely in after-life
to guide them to esteem the performance of public duties as their
highest aim."
Applications forms for Scholarship are now obtainable from the
Registrar of the University of British Columbia and from the Secretary of the Selection Committee, W.
Thomas Brown, 470 Granville St.,
Vancouver, B. C.
Meeting of the Publications Board
at 12.30 Thursday in the Publlca
tlons Office. All new reporters
must attend, also any whose trial
assignments have not been marked.
Avcepted reporters: Annette Smith,
O. N. Cull, Jack Zack, Beverley Mc-
Corkell, Stewart McDanlel, Pat
Bibbs, Monty Fotherlngton, Rosemary Collins, Archie Macaulay,
Margaret Flndlay, J. Crowhurst,
Kay Mann, Bill Knox.
Mr. Gages Box
(Continued from Paga 1)
from   various   points   were   heard
brutish noises, including low gurglings, and the smacking of chops
in anticipation of the feast.
With a flourish, and a smirk, Mr.
Gage unveiled the article, disclosing perhaps the smallest pie ever
on display.
"I," said that worthy, "shall take
it home and eat it, bringing the
correct answer, or sending you my
death notice."
TO THE GRADUATING CLASS
The Totem staff thlt year it considering the ponlbility ot incorporating Individual photos of every member in every class In the University.
To allow for this possible number of pictures being taken on the
campus, it Is absolutely imperative that we have the photos of the
Senior Class by the 31st of this month.
We know the class of '37 Is a bustling, spirited group who have
consistently shown initiative and co-operation. Please give the Totem
the benefit of your co-operation—FILL OUT THE TIME-TABLK
BELOW: CUT IT OUT AND DROP IT IN THE PUB. OFFICE MAIL
BOX   AS  QUICKLY  AS  POSSIBLE.
Name	
Hours Free through the week  (write them  In  spaces provided.)
Monday   Tuesday Wednesday   Thursday   Friday   Saturday
Morning
Afternoon
Correspondence
Editor, The "Ubyssey,"
The University of British
Columbia, Point Orey, B. C.
TO THE GRADUATING CLASS
OF *36
and
MEMBERS OF THE ALMA
MATER SOCIETY
This is to state that I am holding a receipt from the Brock Memorial Building Fund treasurer
for the sum of four hundred dollars  ($400.00).
This donation represents the
major portion of the valedictory
gift of the classes of '36 to the
University.
A Areplace, situated ln the central common room of the Brock
Memorial Building shall be designated by a plaque aa representing
the Valedictory Gift of the Classes of '36.
(Signed) BRUCE A. ROBINSON,
President of the Graduating
Classes of '36.
Artona
* PORTRAIT STUDIO
833 Graavilla Straat
Say. 3737
BOB REID STUDIOS
•     TEACHER OF
COSTELLO METHOD for
ALL BRASS INSTRUMENTS
Correction of All Embouchure
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Otto Cesana Principles of Modern
Harmony  and Arranging
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Phone: Point Gray 608
OUR STORE is well stocked with goods you will not see in
any other stationery store.    Come in and have a look
around.
PRINTING of the best.   Let us print your Dance Programs,
Fraternity and Sorority Stationery.
The
CLARKE & STUART
550 Seymour Street
Company Limited
Stationers and Printers
Phone Trinity 1341
Vancouver, B. C.
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DANCING
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*      Stan Patton's Orchestra      *
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AT REDUCED PRICES all your
Graphic  Engineering Paper,  Biology  Paper,  Loose-leaf       BOOK  SUPPLIES
Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink, and Drawing Instruments.       SOLD HERE
A   WET   BOOK
Is Soggy Reading!
Keep your books dry in one of our academic
suitcases—from 35c.
HEWER'S HARDWARE
4459 West 10th
Phone ELLIOTT 1552
"Let me serve your car, and  your car will serve you."
"PRANK" FICKK
U.B.C. SERVICE 8TATI0N
24-Hour Emergency Service — Complete Repair Facilities
SOUTH END OF McGILL ROAD PT. GREY 53 Tuesday, October 6, 1936
•THE     UBYSSEY
Three
"Dear Daves-
University It under way, if the
Players' Club tryouts are actually
taking place, at I believe they are
this week.
Oh dear, It hardly seem* possible
that eight years ago I too "Sir
Petered and Lady Teatled" It all
one week-end, lost my appetite, was
speeohlees and seared to death. And
I got in but I never expeoted It
■ut remember, don't forget to
earry yourself upright, don't beat
your chest like King Kong and for
goodnsss sakes spsak slowly. You
might toll your Lady Tsasls this,
too.
Lovingly,
CLAUDIA."
(Your married sister Just in oass
you forgot.)
LAUNDRY CO LTD
SEYMOUR   1424
Gibson Discusses
Fourth National
Study Project
To discuss plans for the fourth
annual national study project of
the League of Nations Society in
Canada, James A. Gibson, Arts '31,
now travelling secretary for the
society, was a campus visitor Friday and Saturday. Mr. Gibson met
officers of the International Relations Club and also conferred with
Professor Soward, faculty advisor.
He explained that the Society is
working out, nationally, eight principal programs, the local application of which was his concern on
his present visit.
1. The Society's National Study
Project as part of which syllabus
of studies for groups all across
Canada, together with bibliography
and special texts was being prepared.
2. The Society's International
Affairs Lecture Program.
3. The Society's International
Affairs Information Service to head
which one of Canada's most distinguished younger students of international affairs has just been
appointed.
4. The Society's International
Affairs Literature Service, which
during the past year had brought
together the Canadian agency for
all the principal organizations publishing in Bnglish in its field. Including the League of Nations itself, the International Labor organization, the Institute of Intellectual
Co-operation, the Royal Institute of
International Affairs (London), the
Institute of Pacific Relations, the
Geneva Research Centre and the
New Commonwealth Organization.
5. The Society's publication program (new sheet, special circulars
to associated organizations, etc.).
7. The Society's National Conference Program.
8. International co-operatoin.
Mr. Gibson also announced that
the League of Nations Society is
sponsoring a National Peace Action
week (November 8-14) in which it
is hoped the Alma Mater Society,
as a corporate member of the national organization, will participate,
On his return journey to Eastern
Canada, Mr. Gibson will speak in
the various university centres on
the subject of the national study
project, and "Canada and Canada's
Neighbourhood." Linked in with
this will be a series of twelve radio
broadcasts over the national hookup of the Canadian Radio Commission on November 5.
Doug. Raymond's Band
At Happyland
WHILE STUDENTS SWAY
FROSH DOFF ARRAY
To the strains of "Hail U.B.C." from Doug Raymond
and his ten-piece orchestra, five hundred freshmen and
freshettes will officially doff their greenery at Happyland
on Thursday night, according to Audrey Horwood and John
Witbeck, who are in charge of this year's Prosh Reception.
Freshmen and freshettes may ob
Bags of Flour
End Pep Meet
Stan Patton's Swing
Comes to Abrupt End
A deluge of small bags of
flour marked the conclusion
of the first pep meeting of the
year, which was held in the
auditorium last Friday at
noon. Thrown by excited
Sciencemen from the balcony
this storm of missiles terminated what was otherwise a
fairly dull meeting.
Stan Patton and his orchestra
supplied the principal part ot the
program, and opened with "Hail U.
B.C." Dave Carey, captain of the
English rugby football team, acted
as Master of Ceremonies, and after
appealing for the whole-hearted
support of those Interested, Introduced the second and third teams,
and Anally each Individual member of the Thunderbirds, who sang
the time-honored rugby song.
■NGINIIRS WOn NOAH
After several other songs, Lloyd
Hobden, the energetic cheer leader,
called for "Mr. Noah" from the
sciencemen, but got the "Engineers" instead. This unfortunately
was the signal for a very regrettable disturbance.
A number of playful students
with more enthusiasm than sense,
hurled bags of flour from the gallery, causing quite an uproar. It
was quite a few minutes before the
meeting quieted down.
RADIO CLUB
A meeting ot the Radio Club will
be held in Room 109, Mechanical
Building, at 12.30, Tuesday. Plans
for a University Amateur Station
will be discussed. Anyone interested in Radio Communication is
invited to attend.
LUNCH EATERS
Notice is drawn to the fact that
the boxes at the east end of the
caf are for the use of those who
bring their lunches to varsity. It
Is requested that lunches shall not
be left on the tables, but deposited
in the boxes mentioned above.
HISTORICAL 30CIETY NOTICE
There Is a very limited number
of vacancies for third and fourth-
year members of the Historical
Society.
Please address applications to
Joan Plnhorn, Women's Arts Letter
Rack.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
The first meeting of the Psychology Club will be held on Tuesday,
October 6th, at 8 p.m. sharp, at the
home of Dr. J. W. Pilcher, 1844
McGill oad. All members of the
club, and those who are new members are asked to please be on time
and to make a special effort to attend.
The study of the club this year
will be directed towards a semi-
clinical discussion of the problem
of Post Adolescent Adjustment, a
problem which is especially lntrig-
Ing, as it vitally affects each student entering the University for the
first time, who in most cases Is
cloaked by the atmosphere of a
nursing high school, and then suddenly thrown Into an entirely different environment where he must
shift for himself. How can he; how
did you adjust yourself most effectively, or have you yet succeeded
in doing so? What adjustments
are necessary to create a happy and
co-operative atmosphere in the family as the children pass through
their adolescent years? when young
married couples set off on their ad
venture of life together? when divorce threatens the very foundations of our family life today? Such
practical questions as these will be
dealt with as far as possible ln a
clinical manner this coming year in
the Psychology Club.
Start your college year right;
Let ANDERSON PRINTING COMPANY LIMITED
take over your printing responsibilities
We can print anything from a Dance Ticket to your Annual Year Book.
455 Hamilton Street Phone Seymour 3400
tain their tickets free of charge at
the Quad box office Wednesday and
Thursday noon. Tickets for upperclassmen are expected to be on sale
on the same days at 50c each at the
Auditomium box office.
The increased floor space at Happyland will be a welcome innovation
at this year's affair, with one of the
largest Frosh classes in history to
be welcomed. Widespread interest
in the initiation by upper-classmen
threatens to swell the crowd to capacity, and students are advised to
secure tickets as soon as possible.
Rumours that the amusement
park at Hapypland would be open
on the night of the Reception were
denied by the Hastings Park management, to the chagrin of many
students. The Reception Committee, however, promises that the affair will be "different." Buffet refreshments will be served, and the
dance will last from 9 p.m. till 1
a.m., the "unveiling of the Frosh
to take place at 11 o'clock sharp.
FOLK-CRAFT
FESTIVAL
NEXT WEEK
A Folk-Craft Festival will
be held at the Hotel Vancouver on October 14, IB, 16 and
17, to which university students, attending during the afternoons, will be admitted at
a special reduced rate. These
tickets will include a tour of
all the exhibits.
One of the features of the program will be a review of historical
costumes and outstanding customs
of five National groups—Albanian,
Chinese, Czecho-Slovakian, Japanese and Norwegian—by Mrs. E.
Bernulf Clegg. Mrs. Goodwin Gibson will be commentator.
The guest artiste at the morning
and afternoon sessions, Mile. Cornelia van Guens. has come from her
own country, Holland, for the occasion, and will sing some Dutch
songs of tile past few centuries. She
will also speak of the folklore of
her people.
Dr. C. M. Whitworth
Oentist
Telephone Elliot 1766
Hours: 9 to 6
Saturday: 9 to I
Cor. 10th and Sasamat St.
of**
WIEMAN FUR CO.
We can remodel your old fur
garment into 1936-37 style, or
take   if   in   trade  on   new   furs.
3783 W. 10th Ave.    Bay. 2179
—tbe car in rugged condition i$ tbe car that is
cheap to run."
—WALLY ARTHUR
WEST POINT
GREY GARAGE
4378 West 10th Avenue
Phone: Pt. Grey 560
Dr. W. A. Carrothers, who
has returned to the University, after two years of absence while heading the
Provincial Economic Council.
Japanese Frosh
Reception Tonight
The Prosh Reception ot the Japanese Students' Club will be held
this evening, Tuesday, Oct. 6, at
the aristocratic Oold Room of the
Melrose Cafe.
An Interesting varied program
haa been arranged to entertain the
17 members of the class of '40.
The committee in charge consists
of Klmlyo Kagetsu, Irene Uchida,
Tommy Shayama, Bill Iwasaki, Albert Taklmoto, Oeorge Tamakl and
Roger Obata, who will act as master of ceremonies for the evening.
FOREST CLUB NOTICE
The first meeting of the Forest
Club will be held on Tuesday, Oct.
6, at 12.20 p.m.. in Room 235, Applied Science. This will be an organization meeting and a full turnout of all Interested in- forestry is
desired. Election of this year's executive will take place.
Your Photographer
"The Latest in Portraiture"
3708 West Tenth Avenue Phone: Bayview 1398
Nan Ashumrth
GOWN and SPORTS SALON
Half Sizes a Specialty
3763-10th Ave. West Bay. 520
KNOCK! KNOCK!
Who's there?
Art.
Art Who?
Arts '39 Class Party.
Men and women of the University, you must come to the Arts '39
Class Party either at the Spanish
Orlll or the Commodore, probably
on October 29. There Is aa excellent, enthusiastic executive behind
it, and big plans are being made.
There will be a draw for those who
like draws. So everybody out.
Olrls, don't forget it's still Leap
Year.
MUSICAL SOCIETY NOTICE
The postponed  meeting of the
Musical  Society will  be  held at
12.15 today In Applied Science 100.
Members and applicants are asked
to attend.
Dr. W. A. Visser T'Hooft, of Holland, a well-known scholar and a
very popular student worker, will
speak Tuesday noon in Arts '100.
A cordial invitation is extended to
students to come and hear him.
U. B. C
Very
UNIVERSITY GIRLS
desirable,  freshly  decorated
housekeeping rooms.
Phone layvitw 9029X
Co-Ed Gown Shoppe
Announcing
the arrival of carefuly selected, latesfl 'Fall Fashions, at
very special prices.
Sole agent in Point Grey for
"ORIENT" HOSIERY
4519 WEST TENTH AVE.
(Bus Stop)
A    WONDERFUL    DANCE    FLOOR
Iring your party ,and enjoy this
most beautiful spot ... the
grape vinery, which it decorated
with Japanese lanterns, it something unusual in beauty.
A wonderful open fire every
evening . . . available for private parties, social meetings,
and dances . . . phone Point
Grey 39.
JUBILEE PARK
SOUTH   MARINE   DRIVE
Dtrtttly Utkini
Tht   Vnlvtrtity
BLIND   FLYING    IS   SAFER
THAN     BLIND     BUYING
WHEN an aviator, soaring high above the clouds, is flying blind, the radio
beam that science has developed for him, guides him like a talking magnet,
safely through.
So it is with advertising, particularly the advertisers in The UBYSSEY.
Through its columns *n found Vancouver's most representative advertisers—
those who offer VALUE to the readers of The UBYSSEY. Those readers are
U. B. C. Students, Parents, Grads, Faculty and Friends.
Today, The UBYSSEY is a newspaper which in the attractiveness of its
editorial design and in the excellence of its advertising content is unsurpassed
by any single issue ever previously published. Why? The answer is manifest—
because you have advertisers!   Reciprocate—
PATRONIZE YOUR ADVERTISERS
<
Number I in a series of advertisements released by PACIFIC
PUBLISHERS LIMITED in tbe interests of their Clients—the
advertisers in The UBYSSEY.
> Rugby-
Soccer—
SPORTS RESULTS
lit Varsity 6—Occasionals 6
2nd Varsity 0—Meralomas 0
3rd Varsity 3—Challengers 0
Varsity 0—Twigg Island 6
*JPO
W. A. A. NOTICE
There will be a W. A. A. Meeting
on Wednesday Noon
in Arts 104.
Four
THE     UBYSSEY                                                                    Tuesday, October 6, 1936
*      Sey. 9151
STAR CABS *
U.B.C., GRADS BATTLE TO 6-ALL DRAW
_i_                            _i_                            _i-                            -i-                            _i_                             .aW
Manager: Bob Strain, 'S3
x           x           x            x            x           i*
Twi
(DO)iF(£
RAIN PROVES
HANDICAP
But Coach Hitchins
Satisfied
"We have no alibis for the result
of Saturday's game,—but—," said
Dave Kato, soccer manager, In
speaking of Saturday's game with
Twigg Islanders at Wilson Park
which was the locale for a mild defeat for the Senior Soccer boys.
In spite of the muck, mire, mud,
and mob, the game was interesting
throughout and the lopsided 6-0
score Is no evidence of the poor
play or lack of spirit of the Thunderbirds.
"Coach Hitchins was thoroughly
satisfied with the team and feels
that after a few more practices and
unified workouts, the team will be
able to hold their own with the
best of them," states Dave.
POSTER, MAHOOD GOOD
During the first half Varsity
hold tho Islanders to a 1-0 acore.
Quayle,   burly   center-half,   waa
outstanding   during   this   eanto,
and tho combination of Poster-
Mahood  waa  consistently  good
and should prove to bo outstanding In future aoeeer battles.
The team was hard pressed during the second half, but in spite of
the fact that Foster, inside right,
and   Mahood,  outside  right,  both
Freshmen, were doing or dying for
their dear old Alma Mammy, the
squad  was  unable  to  uphold   the
good old Varsity tradition for winning a game now and then.
LACK OP TRAINING
The mucky field was no help
to the boys as they are definitely
not "mudders."    Instead of kicking the ball, which seems to be a
vital factor in the game, they often found themselves sprawled on
the ground—which is no way of
giving your all for the cause.
Bish Thurber did not show up as
well as was expected, but he too
was apparently handicapped by the
gory battle-ground.   The many and
valiant attempts of Quayle, Foster
and Mahood to score and set up a
counter-attack   on    the    Islanders
were stopped by Thomslc and Graham, the Islander's  goal-gleaners.
The 6-0 score evidenced a definite
lack of training says Dave Kato,
but with more practice the soccer
team should soon be able to field a
much more improved squad.
Mcralomif-U.B.C. Tic
Paving the way for the 1st dtvi-
sioners, softening up the rain soaked turf, Varsity's 2nd A's, and Meralomas battled to a 0-0 tie on Saturday in the first league tilt of the
season.
Meralomas, taking their first
fling at the English code, fielded
a well-balanced team, with plenty
of power In the scrum. Varsity
on the other hand have a speedy
three-quarter line which did most
of the ground-gaining for the Collegians.
Frank Williams, brother of Freshman Tom, was the outstanding star
on the 'Lorna squad, while Lumsden and McCammon were the leading lights on the Blue and Gold
team.
Classified
advertising
1929 OAKLAND TOURING.
Good looking, reliable transportation. Good buy at $140. Phone
Trinity 1541 L.
OLYMPIC CONTENDER
Howie McPhee, U.B.C.'s and Canada's representative at the
1936 Olympic games, has once more returned to Alma Mammy's
folds. Sprinting, studying and "Junior Membering" will keep
Howie fairly busy during the coming year. Captain of last year's
track team, he has vowed he'll speed up Council's business.
3rd TEAM WINS
Displaying the traditional Varsity spirit, the third division
ruggers wallowed in the mud to
hand a 3-0 defeat to New Westminster Challengers at rain-
soaked Douglas Park. Smith and
Robertson were the goal gleaners for the college boys, and
were ably assisted throughout
the encounter by a well balanced
team.
MANAGERIAL SYSTEM
OFFERS OPPORTUNITY
By FRANK TURNER
Each and every year the old cry of "We want managers" is heard, and every year it is heeded by the energetic
and ambitious who aren't looking for something for nothing,
but something for something.
Perhaps you dont' get that—It
simply means that sport-minded
undergrads, feeling the urge to attain honor and dlatinction In University life take managerial positions because of Inability to take
an active part In the aforementioned sports.    Reward and recognition is theirs each semester,
finally   reaching   a   peak   where
they receive a Big Block sweater
In their last year.
Such a summary is only another
| way    of    defining    "success"—and
success can be yours if you're interested.
The U. B. C. managerial system
which offers you this golden opportunity, covers all the major sports:
rugby, football, basketball, soccer
and track. Each sport has senior
managers (usually fourth-year students), associates (usually second
or third-year students) and juniors
(nearly always Frosh). Applications are now being taken for the
latter two positions. See Friday's
"Ubyssey" and notice boards
around the campus.
OBJECT— EPPICIENCY
The object of the system is to
give maximum efficiency in the administration of university athletics
with regard to such matters as
league meetings, games, playoff
series, team tours, and finances. The
senior manager represents his sport
in the Men's Athletic Executive,
while all the managers represent
the University in the league councils.
Finally the "Reward and Recognition"   that   managers   receive.
Specifically:—The  Senior  Manager   is   given   a   regulation   Big
Block sweater in light blue color
with a gold "M", and the Junior
a plain letter "B. C."
With cush a perfect setup, there's
no excuse for "not applying—no excuse unless you're absolutely without  hope.
An aid—Senior managers: Rugby,
Syd Walker; Football, Gord. Grant;
Basketball, Art Eastham; Soccer,
Dave Kato; Track, Joe Rita.
Revised Program For
Intrimuralt
The intra-mural committees under the organization of Maury Van
Vliet announces a revised and more
varied program for this year which
will include such sports as rugby,
soccer, basketball, track, cross
country, Mall race, and Softball.
EQUAL  STATUS
This year the status of every
sport will be the same, each having equal rating toward the total
point standing for the year. The
pointa possible In each Individual
game will be approximately 75,
and all tournaments will be sudden-death games.
Swim Practice Sunday
The first practice of the Swimming Club will be held at 8.15 Sunday night at the Crystal Pool, with
Jack Reid, the coach, present. The
practice hours will be 8.15 p.m.
Sunday, 7.30 p.m. Tuesday, and Wednesday afternoon at a time to be
arranged later. All prospective
members are asked to pay their
fees at Student Council office before
Saturday, and to enquire there
about the special pool admission
rate, which is available only to
Varsity swimmers.
HANDY TO YOU —
CHEAPER FOR YOU!
UNIVERSITY TRANSFER
4264 WEST 13th AVE.
GRASS HOCKEY
All the grass hockey girls are
requested to obtain their equipment at noon today in the gym. A
charge of fifty cents for the laundry is required before the sticks,
pads, etc., may be taken out.
BASKETBALL
Senior A linen) will practice 7.00
a.m. Thursday. List of players will
he posted in the gym. Wednesday
noon will see Senior B's and Inter-
nioate A'h also on  the  floor.
"MAURY"
RUGGERS DRENCHED IN
SAT. AFTERNOON TILT
Teams Hold Swimming Gala
As Rain Drenches Stadium
Playing in the cold, chilly drizzle of Saturday afternoon,
Varsity and Occasional swam and skidded to a 6-all draw
on the rain-soaked Stadium, before a handful of shivering
spectators
The game had all the traditional
flght shown in annual college and
ex-college battles Remembering
the Rugby Club song, both sides
tried to sing the song to the tune
of vicious tackling, and march
off the field leaving fifteen corpses
on the field. Although not successful in their murderous attempts
they nevertheless did manage to
shake a few drops off their dripping
strip, and at times, play some smart
rugby.
CAREY AT  HALF
With Dave Carey again at half,
Varsity's three line had its usual
speed and efficiency, doing most of
the yard-gaining for our Miller Cup
entry. The Grads, on the other
hand, have a heavy, experienced
scrum which they used several
times to advantage during the spasmodic cloudbursts.
Just to say It was a hard-fought
battle, would only partially describe the closeness of tho tussle.
One penalty apiece during the first
half, and one try apiece during
the seeond made up the 6-polnt
total scored by the two teams. In
both cases the Grads oame from
behind to knot the count.
The three points scored by U. B.
C. in the first half came by a lucky
break. After about 20 minutes of
scrappy play, the Collegians were
granted a penalty for some under-
the scrimmage fighting. Noticing
the lace on the soggy pigskin was
broken, Referee Jack Hall presented
Dave Carey with a brand new, dry,
and untainted ball, which Dave
calmly procedeed to place-kick
straight between the uprights.
Another break was responsible
for the Occasional score in this period. A grad power drive had advanced the pill to the IT. B. C. 25-
yard line, where one of the many
knock-ons caused Jack Hall to toot
his whistle- once more, and order
the boys to "scrum down" once
again.
In the pile-up which ensued,
someone in the mass put an extra
dint In Harry Pearson's well-taped
ribs, which gave the Grads a penalty kick. Howie Cleveland, taking the place kick, lobbed the ball
ln the ozone, and watched the
sphere wobble between the goalposts, hit the crossbar and bounce
over.
The second 35 minutes was a repetition of the first, with neither side
having any apparent advantage.
Varsity took the lead once more
when Strat Leggat, following up
his own kick, cuddled the ball ln
his arms, and plunged over. Dave
Carey failed in the attempted conversion.
The final Occasional score was
the swetest play of them all. Starting from a line-out on the U. B. C.
40 yard mark. S t a c e y weaved
through a mass of Blue and Gold
players, passed to Barret, who in
turn passed to Hanbury. Hanbury
struggled to the 10-yard line, and
upon being tackled shot the ball
across to Wood who went over
standing up.
We give you the walking
Athletic directory of the
campus, Mr. Maurice Van
Vliet. Starting on his sec
ond year as the head man
in UBC sport, Maury has
outlined an excellent Intramural pogram.
* Public Stenographer $
¥ Neat, Accurate Work *
* At Popular Lending Library   *
$4489 W. 10th AVENUE        P. G. 67$
* *
Jutt about all you could ask for . . .
Aristocratic Hamburgers
Limited
Kingsway at Fraser   —   Tenth at Alma
Vancouver, B. C.
Fairmont 106 Bayview 4448
"Take Some Home"
FENCING
Good news for fencing-minded
co-eds—if there are enough of
them, steps will be taken to get an
Instructor, and start a club. Signify your desire by writing to
Clair eSt. John—Arts Letter Rack.
I GET MY CLOTHES and
FURNISHINGS
from
CHAS. CLAMAN
315 WEST HASTINGS
We took you in your
infancy . . . Let us take
you now, in tbe year of
your majority!
BRIDGMAN'S Studio i
Students'
Vliet Service
BAY CLEANERS,
DYERS & TAILORS
2594 Sasamat, Cor. 10th Avt.
BUS and CAR TERMINUS
Opposite Vancouver Drug
PHONE: PT. GREY 118
UNIVERSITY-
BUSINESS COLLEGE,
NORMAL and  SCHOOL
BOOKS BOUGHT and
SOLD.
<#>
BUSY "B"
Book Store
508 RICHARDS ST.
ART8  '37
There will be a meeting of
Arta '37 on Thursday at 12.30 in
Arts 100. It is necessary that
all members of the claaa attend,
to discuss the class party,
Alma Service Station
24-HOUR "GARAGE SERVICE
Broadway at Alma
Bayview 74
WANTED!
A lew students with good city
connections who wish to make a
few extra dollars in spare hours.
No selling. Call at 252 BROAD-
WAV WEST, between 9 a.m. and
5 p.m., oi phone FAIR. 292.
USED CARS
THE PLAINEST FRESHETTE wouldn't travel today in
Cleopatra's chariot. Tastes change. Let me fix you up
with a car of which you can be proud—I can do this for
anywhere between $100 and $300.
SEE
JIMMY DEE
Seymour 5224
at
A. B. BALDERSTON LIMITED, 1190 GEORGIA STREET
Authoriied Ford Dealers
SPUDS... leave your mouth fresh
25
FOR
25c
CORK TIP or PLAIN.   Also, Spud Fine-cut Tobacco for rolling your
own, 10c the package.
ROCK CITY TOBACCO COMPANY, LIMITED, QUEBEC
Canadian and Independent

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