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The Ubyssey Nov 15, 1938

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 ARTS   ~   AGGIE
COMMODORE
THURSDAY
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
ARTS   --   AGGIE
COMMODORE
THURSDAY
Vol. XXI.
'VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER  15,   19:>,8
No.  15
HEADLINE
From Canadian
University Press
FEATURES
COUNCILLORS  DEMAND
TWO LONG NOON HOURS
By   LLOYD  HAINES
That the Nazi Fascists are gangsters, the embodiment of the very
lowest elements In human nature,
was the opinion expressed by Mr.
Wilson Woodslde, well-known Canadian commentator on International
affairs, ln an exclusive interview with
'The Varsity.'
"Germany is morally rotten, but
she may remain Intact for a generation or two," he says.
Society has played Into the hands
of ruthless, unprincipled forces whose
policy ls to create disorder, disseminate evil, disorganize and confuse
social equilibrium and then smash
through with a mailed fist.
The democracies have Jeopardized
their very existence with their conviction ln the utter futility of war.
This weakness has given the dictatorships their crushing advantage. "If
Britain surrenders one more position
she ls lost," claims Mr. Woodslde.
He points out the whole cause of
liberty and Christian ethics ln the
world today as depending on this one
question: "Will the democracies see
their peril ln time to grapple with
it?" Their vitality has been undermined by their greater ease and
security. The fight has largely gone
out of them. "They need to wake up
to the fact that freedom Is worth
fighting for," he says.
The Nyan Conference ls, ln Mr.
Woodslde's opinion, the only positive
action taken by Britain ln seven
years. How clear it all was! A solid
front against the trouble-makers, and
the grievance disappeared as if by
magic.
The situation now is infinitely
more dangerous than lt was a very
few years ago. Italy was so weak that
she would have wilted at a frown
from London. Now she dominates the
Mediterranean. "She shouldn't," asserts Mr. Woodslde. "Italy Is a weak
country."
The Anglo-German Naval Pact
gave Oermany the chance she was
looking for. It instilled Britain with
a sufficient sense of security to allow
the Fatherland a head-start ln armament. Now Oermany dominates central Europe. "And her next step will
be ln the Ukraine," Is Mr. Woodslde's
prophecy.
Now, if ever, democracy needs a
champion, a leader to rouse it from
its lethargy and fife it with enthusiasm. Germany still fears Great Britain, by whose might she was crushed. She shudders at the thought of
the United States with her infinite
resourced. "Germany's might la much
over-rated." says Mr. Woodslde. "but
Prussia is a practical war-maker, a
Sparta. She is not a country with an
army, but an army with a country."
An international police force, a
Vigilant Society ot free nations, possibly the League of Nations revived
under a new name, check these Fascist forces of disintegration all over
the world. Ls what, in Mr. Woodside's
opinion, must save tlie cause of freedom,  if  lt   is  lo  he saved  at all.
For Britain, a war postponed may
be a war averted. She holds to her
age-old policy of detachment from
the vortex of Kuropo. She sees even
now a faint hope that Hitler may
destroy himself, as Napoleon did, on
Russia. "What I.iiidberg said about
the Russian ail-fleet, is only too true,"
affirms Mr. Woodslde. "Russia is terribly disorganized. But .she will fight.
Anyone will flght an aggressor." This,
coming from a man who carried a
couple of hundred undeveloped photographs out. of Russia in hl.s back
pocket, cannot be otherwise than
authentic."
Mr.    Woodslde    shared    the    narrow
Quarters   of   a   storm    trooper   during j
Ihe     Nazi     revolution,     moved     about!
freely   in   Berlin   during   Hitler's   election campaign and broke unexpected- j
ly   into  world   news  when  he  sampled
true    German    hospitality    for    refusing  the  Nazi salute.  On   this occasion
he   took   leave   of   a   certain   Munich
(Continued on Page Three)
See C. U. P.
Monday ni«ht Students'Conn-
c- il requested the Faculty to
len<jthen Mondny and Friday
noon hours hy an halt' hour and
U-a vi> "Wednesday a fternoon free
from 3.30 p.m. on, •
Justification for such a request
was derived from the fact that
many labs, terminate officially nt
5.80 p.m. but nctuully continue until 6 p.m. or inter.
INTRAMURALS AND L.S.E.
The   majority   of  University   students do not take part In athletics or
physical    education    except    through
the noon hour  intramural games.
With the lengthened noon hours
they will have opportunity to take
part in  the   sports activities,  and
at  the  same  time  arrive  at  their
following lecture on time.
These     lengthened      noon     hours,
twice  a  week,  will  provide  time  for
the clubs under the Literary and
Scientific Kxecutlvo and other A.M.S.
activities, which contribute a necessary University spirit in the student's life.
COUNCIL OPINIONS. .  . .
Kann Matthison: "The short noon
hour has almost killed Maury Van
Vliet's inter-mural program. It is
definitely harming Varsity spirit In
many ways. I would be entirely in
favor of increasing it by a half hour
since it would also help to foster
lnter-collegiate sport."
Struan Robertson: "The Parliamentary Forum and Film Society are
quite unable to put on any debates or
productions before a student audience. The Musical Society has already
complained. A longer noon would help
all the L.S.E. activities tremendously."
SEVENTY PRE-MEDS WANT
MEDICINE  FACULTY  HERE
NOTICES
All notices must be In by  10
Monday  morning.
TUESDAY:
Historical   Society, 4048 West
12th Ave., 8 p.m.
Last  day   for  book  exchange
pay off.
S.C.M.  Vesper Service, 4.3S.
WEDNESDAY:
Rowing    Club    meeting,    Ap.
.  Sc.   202,   12.30.
THURSDAY:
Symphonic Recordings, Arts
100,  12.40.
FRIDAY:
Alpha    Chapter   Phrateres
meeting      Lower     Common
Room,   3.30.
Canadian    Student    Assembly
open     meeting     with     Dr.
Grant  Lathe,  Arts  103.
Recorded      Chamber     Music,
Arts 100, 12.40.
MONDAY:
Canadian Student Assembly
illustrated lecture on China
by Dr. Orant Lathe, Auditorium.
Pep, Frat Men
To Cooperate
Hijwr and better social events
and campus activities are forecast at the I'niversity ol' P-.('.
as fraternity men become democrat ic and join t he I'ep ( 'lub,
according to Ken Shaw, president of
tlie   club.
At tt meeting of the Interfrater-
nlty Council hint week a motion
wus passed "that one or more men
from each fraternity be encouraged to join the Pep Club," it was
announced Monday by Douglas
Ford, Secretary of the Council.
PEP   DUTIES
In the past the Pep Club has
handled arrangements for Pep meetings, dances, and for football games,
and has supplied cheer-leaders for all
athletic: events.
FRATS AND PEPSTKHS UNITE
The fraternities have restricted
their participation in general campus affairs to a fow social affairs,
arul to such things as the supplying
of cars for parades, but a. certain
amount of rivalry and confusion has
at times existed between the Greek
letter men and the socially unranked
members of the Pep Club.
CO-OPERATION
Now, after a great deal of negotiations iu the lust few weeks, the
two  organisations  have  decided  to
get   together   uud   to   put   real   efll-
olency and spirit Into campus life.
Several   applications    for   membership   In   the   Pep   Cluh    have   already
been    received    from   fraternity   men,
and    a     complete     reorganization     of
methods   for   deuling with  social  and
other   extra-curricular   events   is   being  planned.
At the Monro Pre-med Club supper ln the "caf" Wednesday evening,
the campaign committee, formed to
Investigate possibilities of initiating a
pre-medlcal course here that would
be recognized by eastern universities,
gave a brief report of the results obtained.
Russ Palmer is chairman of the
committee, while Bill Barkley, John
Mackensie and Richard Oalpln are
the other members.
SEVENTY PRE-MEDS.
Since   there   are   over   70   pre-med
students   on   this   campus,   the   com
mittee  believe  that a  recognized pre
med course Is needed, and are aiming
ultimately   for   the   establishment   of
the  flrst  two years  of  medicine  here.
On   Monday   afternoon   the   committee  prepared  an  outline of  pre-
medlcal   requirements   in   Canadian
and     American     universities,     and
compared   these   requirements   with
the courses offered here.
One member of the committee stated that a great deal of the work here
13  unnecessary   arid  useless,  and  that
the     essential     features     of     several
courses could  be combined  Into suitable pre-med courses.
FACULTY   ASSISTS.
At  Dean   Buchanan's  suggestion,  a
Faculty   committee   has   been   formed
to    make   a   calendar   statement   for
students     taking    pre-med    work    at
U.B.C.   The   sympathies   of   the   B.   C.
Medical   Council   are   with   the   student   pre-med   campaign   committee.
The  only   new  course   needed  for
the     prc-rllulcal     years     would     be
anatomy.   The   committee   hopes   to
have    this    course    Initiated    or    at
least   provision    made    In    the   new
Public   Health   building   for   such   a
course.
Vancouver   is   I he   ideal  site  for  tlie
development   of a school  of medicine,
according   to   the  committee.  It   offers
unlimited   clinical    possibilities.   As   a
seaport,  it contacts  a  wide  variety  of
cases, and  has  the  largest hospital  in
the  British  Empire  under one roof.
Dr. Jack Wright will speak to the
Monro   Pre-med   Club   in   Arts   208,
Wednesday,   November   16,   at   12.30
sharp.
PROF. SOWARD SPEAKS
ON WORLD CRISES
"The Outlook ,in International Affairs" was tlie subject outlined by
Professor F. H. Soward, of the Department of History, when he addressed the Vancouver Institute on
Saturday evening in tlie University
Auditorium.
Professor Soward stated that tlie
co-ordination of tlie peace forces of
the world is the only hope for peace.
Outlining in turn, all the crises in
Abyssinia. Spain, China, Austria and
Czecho-Slovakia, lie paid tribute to
the efforts made by Benes and Schus-
Mllgg.
DR. G. LATHE
TO SPEAK ON
ORIENT  TRIP
A campaign of moment to many
students both on our own campus
and across Canada will be waged
here from November 18 to 21.
Organized by Dr. Grant Lathe it is
part of the nation wide campaign for
National Scholarships.
MACDONALD IN  CHAROE  HERE.
The Student Assembly, created at
Winnipeg last Christmas, ls responsible for the co-ordination of all student activities. In this capacity it
will control the present campaign,
under the guidance, on this campus,
of Alex Macdonald. chairman of the
executive  of  the  U.B.C.  branch.
DR.   LATHE  TO   SPEAK.
Dr. Lathe, representative of the
Student Assembly on the International Student Delegation to China
last April, will be here for ten days
tc organize the campaign. He will
speak on Monday, November 21 at
12.30 ln the Auditorium, showing
movies of his recent trip. Again on
Wednesday, November 13 ln Arts 100,
Dr. Lathe will deal with the question
of National Scholarships.
The Canadian  Student  Assembly
has   arranged    to   have   a   special
committee on each campus for the
purpose   of   Investigating   the   real
needs  for    these    scholarships  and
the direction in which they will do
most good.
Outside   support   as   well   as   that
from the student body, ls being solicited   for   this  campaign.   Dr.   Lathe
will   address    several    church   bodies
while   here   and   will   also   make   an
appeal  to a  general  audience  ln  the
Silks Auditorium on Monday, Novem
ber   21.   He   will   be   in   Victoria   for
four days.
SLANDER SUIT FILED
BY PARTY INSTIGATOR
Preparations of the Law Society's
Mock Trial are under way. Don McGiil, Conservative leader in the P.D.C.
has filed suit in the Judiciary Court
of the Law Society against Elme
Jones for slander and defamation of
character, alleging that the latter
called him "a party ward heeler, who
to further his own political ambitions, instigated party politics on the
campus."
Counsel for the defense, Bernard
Reed, Liberal leader in the P.D.C,
when Interviewed stated, "My client
bases his defense ou the grounds of
'fair comment.' Since .Tones' statements arc true they cannot be considered   to   be   slanderous."
FREEDOM OF  SPEECH   UPHELD.
"We intend to defend the rights of
individuals to speak freely on that
whicli  is  tlie  truth."  lie concluded.
Reed  is  assisted  by  Paul  Volpe.
Plaintiff's counsel are Morris Belkin and Alex Sharp.
PROFESSORS TO STAND ON
ARTS-AGGIE BALL TABLES
Cows and Bales of Hay for Aggie Decorations; Swing by
Pawlett
The   highlight   °i'   "H   University   functions   will   take   place
Thursday evenin-.-' at the Commodore when Charlie Pawlett swnys
the    crowd    of   swiiiyin^    Arts    Ag^ie    students    at
Arts-A^jfio Ball.
tht
swnys
annual
NEGRO TEAM
WILL DEBATE
HERE j^RIDAY
TOURING   DUSKIES  TO
MEET VARSITY
FORUM   PAIR
APPLICATIONS FOR
MEDICAL STANDING
TO BE IN BY JUNE
The Registrar has received word
from the University of Toronto that
applications for advanced standing
in the Faculty of Medicine should
be In the hands of that University
by  June  15.
Students who submit their applications after that date cannot be
given a final decision until about
the middle of September; If they
are then refused, It is too late for
them   to  apply  elsewhere.
CARNEGIE   RECORD   RECITAL
The following programme will be
given Tuesday noon. Guest speaker
will bo Professor VV. L. MacDonald
hi  Arts 100.
Overture    to    Romeo   and    Juliet
(Tchaikowski).
Liebestoed  (sung by Kirsten Flag-
stad)   from  "Tristan  und  Isolde."
The Sunken Cathedral   (Debussy)
a piano solo.
Tlie programme is chosen and presented  by  Bob McDougall.  Pat Keat-
ley,  and  Geoff  Mllsom;   in  co-operation with  the Extension Department.
The Forum announces Its second
major International debate of the
season. This debate which ls against
the world famous globe trotting
Negro team from Lemoyne College
Memphis, Tennessee, will be held lit
the Aztec Ballroom of the Hotel
Georgia  Friday evening  at 8 o'clock.
Representing the Forum are Jim
Ferris  and  Bob  Hayman  who  will
uphold the negative on the resolution  that "World Peace Is Neither
Desirable Nor Possible."
The Lemoyne debaters, James Byas,
Charles Gllton, and their coach, Professor   Boris    Alexander,    have   been
the    guests    of    the    University    of
Hawaii   where    they  held    numerous
debates   until   November   11.
ANTIPODES   TOUR.
Previous to their stop in Hawaii
they had completed an extensive tour
of the Antipodes where they debated
every college and university with the
exception of the University of Western Australia. During their visit they
gave addresses under the auspices of
tlie Australian Broadcasting Commission on Negro Contributions to
American Culture and Negro Philosophy. Lemoyne is the flrst Negro college to debate ln  the Antipodes.
The Lemoyne debating tour has
been described as a 'novel venture
In International and interracial understanding.' The main purpose behind its Inauguration Is to show the
rest of the world that the Negro Is
capable of understanding the social,
economic and political questions of
the day.
MEMPHIS  BOYS.
Byas was raised and educated ln
Memphis. During his high school and
college years lie participated in extensive debating. He represented Lemoyne on their Goodwill Tours of
103G and   1937.
Oiltou vva.s also educated in Memphis. He has had a wide experience-
in college debating .having appeared
against representatives of nearly every
university in the United States. He
debated against Ihe Oxford University team of 1030 and the Anglo-
Scottlsh Union of 1937. Impartial
judges rate him the best debater and
speaker in  the  United  States.
Remember   the   place   .   .   .   Hotel
Georgia;    the   date   .   .   .   November
18;   the  time  ...  8  p.m.
Students   will   be   admitted   on   the
pass system.
SELL-OUT LOGIC
For many years the Arts-Aggie
has held the unrivalled title of the
greatest of social functions, for the
two'faculties. This year's event will
surpass  all   other  attempts.
This year's Arts-Aggie Ball promises  to  be  a  sell-out.
Only    two    hundred    tickets    have
been printed, and these are the only
means  of  admission.  No  more  tickets will be printed, so that those who
do not obtain one of the two hundred will be left out ln the cold.
The committee in charge haa a
simply   auper   program   lined   up,
complete with a quarter of an hour
floor-show—skits, and dancing.
The floor-show will feature a number of June Roper's most talented
pupils, and will precede the supper
dance.
PAWLETT AND LEE
Charlie Pawlett will provide his
usual smooth swing from 9 'till 2,
with Donna Lee, who haa already
made a hit at Thursday's Pep meet,
doing the vocals.
Decorations will be in a strictly
'Varsity   motif.   On   the   centre   of
each table will be a doll, dressed
up   to   represent   aome   particular
professor—Take your pick.
I      The   head   table  will   be   decorated
in a suitable Arts-Aggie motif, cows,
bales of hay as well as Latin dictionaries.
PATRONS
The following have been invited as
patrons: Dr. and Mrs. L. S. Klinck,
Dean and Mrs. D. Buchanan, Dean
and Mrs. F. M. Clement, Dean M. L.
Bollert, and Senator and Mrs. J. W.
deB.   Farrls.
Tickets may be obtained, while
they last, at the foot of the Caf.
stairs, for $3.00 a couple.
DEBATE ON  HITLER'S
DEMAND FOR COLONIES
Hitler's present demands for restoration of the former German colonics will be discussed at the regular
fortnightly meeting of the Parliamentary Forum which will be held
Wednesday evening in Arts 100 at
7.30 o'clock.
Frank Wings will speak for the
government and uphold the affirmative on the resolution that "Germany's colonies should be restored
to her." Frank Is an active debater
In Forum. At present he ts secretary of the P.D.C.
HIGH  SCHOOL  WINNER.
Opposing the motion i.s Bob Bonner, who, although a new member of
the Forum, has had a great deal of
debating experience in tlie High
School League. He was a member of
(he team that won the cup for Britannia   High  School   two  years   ago.
Professor J. Friend Day will preside.
Everybody is cordially welcome,
both to listen to and participate in
the  discussion.
Students Pay Homage to
U.B.C.'s Heroic War Dead
By T.KD UNDKRHILL
As the "Last Post" died away
through tiie corridors of the Science
Building, heads bowed, and thoughts
went back to other days, to faces
long gone but never forgotten. IT.B.C.
paid homage to those former students who gave their lives during the
Groat   War.
TWO   MI.NUTF.S  FOR
II KM KM Hit A NOB
Two minutes of silence . . . two
minutes during which Time rolled
back tho dark curtains of the years,
revealing war-torn Franco . . . mud
and shell-holes . . . gallant young
men facing death . . . two minutes
which meant a lot to those who
remembered.
Then the "Reveille," like a prayer
for new hopo and strength. A short
address followed, not a groat, (lory
speoch, only a few simple words
from ono of the "boys" who came
baok, paying homage to thoso of his
comrades who hail died in honour
upon tho Hold of battle, words which
wero   moving   in   their  simplicity.
Tho ceremony closed with a prayer, a prayer led by u pastor who had
beon overseas, a prayer that those
who gave up their lives did not die
in vain, that thoy shall not be forgotten.
There were three U.B.C. students
at the ceremony. Can It he that we
have ln some measure forgotten
that they died that we might live? Two
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 15, 1938
THE  UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Office: 206 Auditorium Building ... Phone Point Orey 206
Campus Subscriptions, $1.50 Mall Subscriptions, $2.00
EDITOR IN-CHIEF
Dorothy  Cummings
SENIOR  EDITORS
Tuesday
Jack Mair
ASSOCIATE   EDITORS
James Macfarlane
Friday
Robert King
Irene Eedy
Ozzy Durkin
Van Perry
Van Perry
ASSISTANT  EDITORS
Jack Mercer
Lester Pronger
C.  U.  P.  STAFF
Editor
James Macfarlane
Assistants
Ann  Jeremy
Joyce Cooper
Rosemary Collins
Joyce Cooper
PUB. SECRETARY
Virginia Galloway
CIRCULATION MOR.
Harry Campbell
REPORTORIAL   STAFF
Jack Margeson, Helen Hann, Pat Keatley, Joan Thompson, Bill Backman,
Joan Haslam, Ted Underhiil, Jacques Metford, Ruth Millar, Janet Walker,
Brita Vesterback, Bob Manson, Florence Hurndall, Bill Osborne, Ken Vernon,
Frank Spencer, Doreen Henderson.
SPORTS   STAFF
Editor: Orme Dier
Associates: Basil Robinson, Myrne Nevlson
Assistants:   Lionel   Salt,   Jim  Harmer,  Ormle   Hall,  Frank    Turner,    Austin
Frith, Byron Straight, Ted Pallas.
Advertising  Office
Standard Publishing Co., 1037 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone:  SEYMOUR 4484
All advertising handled exclusively by Standard Publishing Co.
Editorials
NOON-HOURS
For two yeni'8, tho students of the lAnivcrsity have employed
the long noon-hours for extra-onrri-'ular activities, such us intni-
lnurnl sports and literary and scientifie groups. Even with noon
hour lectures, they were nlile to enjoy a hall" hour of roe rent ion or
for lunch time. They had opportunity to meet their fellow students outside the lecture room, and in conjunction with Alma Mater
activities.
Those meetings, discussion groups, and friendly athletic
contests, tended to produce a friendly camaraderie, trom which
sprang  a  I'niversity  spirit  and  loyalty.
Students' Council are endeavoring to remedy, in part, the
present existing condition. They are request in ii' two noon hours
of one and a hull' hours duration, and that the specified noon hours
lie   free  from lectures.
ORGANIZATION  OF  NEW   OLUBS
For the organization of any cluh on the campus, there is a
necessary procedure, most important of which is the ratification
of Students' Council.
Tt is only hy this method that supervision of rumpus groups
can he exercised and controlled. Therefore, any student group
which carries the name of the University and represents the student body as a whole, should be thoroughly investigated and its
merits surveyed cnrefully before it is committed to function as
such.
Two groups this term, the Swing Club and Social Problems
Club, have organized themselves and functioned without the approval of Students' Council and have treated themselves as a
constitutionally organized  group,  which   i.s not  their standing.
BOOK THIEVERY
There exists among students of a certain group, a practice
which can only be termed as ono of the lowest—namely, taking out
library books on oall numbers other than their own. Inadvertently these students forget to sign their names on the same call
slips.
Consequently, when the book is overdue, for any great length
of time, a notice is sent to the student registered against the number. The innocent student then repairs to the library and explains
that he has not taken out the book. That is not the most, serious
side of the case.     The  book  very  frequently never appears again.
This, wo would consider, is the meanest type of thievery which
has beon existing on the campus, for ns long tis certain types of
students  have  boon  permitted  to  practice  this scheme.
A simple remedy for this condition would bo for all students
to present their identification cards at the loan desk when taking-
out   books.
Fraternity and Sorority
Printing- and Engraving-
Our Specialty
DANCE    PROGRAMMES
INVITATIONS,   'AT   HOMES,'
I.KTTKIIHKAIW   and
CHRISTMAS  CARDS
GEHRKE'S
BOO   Seymour   St.
NOTICE
All holders of vouchers are notified
that November 15 ls the last day on
which tho Book Exchange pays off.
Vouchers will be cashed from 12.30 to
1.30 today.
Letters  io  ihe Editor
Editor,  Ubyssey.
Dear Madam:
Our University Book Store needs
revision.
We have heard many students
complaining of the poor service and
the lack of books. Ordering a book ls
a matter of waiting weeks for results
and then sometimes there are no results—the book has not been ordered.
Everything Is Inefficiently handled.
As the book store ls the only place
that sells certain books, lt puts a
student at a serious disadvantage
when he cannot obtain them or has
to  wait several  weeks for a copy.
The Book Store Is not worthy of Its
name. This Is not Just the opinion of
one chronic complalner but the result  of  prolonged   Inefficiency.
It   ls   time    something    was    done.
Christmas exams are much too near.
WORRIED STUDENT.
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Madam:
A few weeks ago the Social Problems Club attempted to initiate a
project to have the students of this
University "adopt" four or five
Spunlsh orphans. The plan which we
were fostering would have involved
neither conHlct with any other campaign on the campus nor sacrifice on
tho part  of any student.
It was dependent for success, however, on the approval of the Students' Council. This body passed Its
Judgment in the following minute of
its  October  31  meeting:
"In view of the more urgent needs
of provincial welfare associations
and the Brock Memorial Fund, the
Students' Council does not favour
tho request of the S.P.C. regarding
relief for Spanish children made
orphans  by  war."
We wish to thank the numerous
organizations |and Individuals who
promised to support this project and
to express regret that we are unable
to establish this humanitarian ideal
as  an  actuality.    ,
Yours  truly,
KUNIO   HIDAKA,
President, Social Problems Club.
•      •       •
Editor's Note — We consider that
Council's action in refusing the
Social Problems Club permission to
collect funds for Spanish Orphans
ls more than Justified. It seems unfortunate that any university club
should think they have to look past
this campus for worthy recipients
of uny funds they might collect.
With the Students' Council worrying
about ways and means to collect
money for the Union Building they
were quite right in keeping this
money at  home.
However these were not the reasons for their decision. They considered that insofar as they did not contribute to local charities they were
not Justified in contributing to
Spain. Recent Investigations of slmi-
lur charities have shown thut more
often thun not money has not
arrived  at  its  destination.
Gov'nor General Medalist
Returns to Alma Mater
Of medium height with a small
moustache, he looks more like the
typical business man than a professor. Who Is he? Harold Smith,
M.A.. Ph.D.. professor ln the Department of Physics at U.B.C, and a
former student at this University.
GOLD  MEDALLIST
Dr. Smith attended High School ln
Vancouver, for some time at John
Oliver. In his third year at U.B.C.
he took the University scholarship
as head of the Arts class for that
year, and the following year, 1927,
won the governor-general's gold medal  for leading the graduating class.
He took his M.A. in Mathematics
and Physics here in 1029, and from
1927 to 1929 assisted In tho Department of Mathematics and acted as
demonstrator in the Physics Department.
PHYSICS   RESEARCH
AT   TORONTO
The following three years Dr.
Smith spent In research work ln
physics at the University of Toronto working under the late Sir John
McLennan. During this time he was
aided in his efforts by three scholarships from the National Research
Council of Canada. It was here ln
1930 that he received his M.A. in
physics, and  In 1933 his Ph.D.
A memlier of the staff of the
University of Toronto from 1032
to 1035, he turned In the latter
year, to Industrial  research, ehelf-
ly In the low temperature Held.
Here he distinguished himself In
the realm of science by devising a
simple method, successfully used,
for removing n forty-ton shaft
from one of the 75,000 h.p. generator units In tho Niagara Falls plant
of the Ontario Hydro-Electric System.
HONORARY PRESIDENT
OF  SCIENCE  '42
In September of this year Dr.
Smith received an appointment as
lecturer in the Department of Physics at U.B.C. and returned to his Old
Alma Mater. He has since been
elected honorary president of Science '42.
Dr. Smith, In speaking of this
University, said that he had been
Impressed hy the number of graduates who were holding Influential
positions In both academic and Industrial fields throughout eastern
Canada and the United States. He
did not mention his own academic
achievements which would do credit to any Institution. The undergraduate training here he thought
to compare favorably with any In
the east.
TODAY'S STUDENTS
MORE  SERIOUS?
Dr. Smith's Impression of the
students today is that they seem If
anything more serious than they
wero ten years ago, but perhaps lt
is Just the different standpolna from
which he sees them.
IMPERIAL DEFENSE
BILL  TODAY  NOON
Further discussion of McOill's bill
for Imperial Defense will be heard
today ln Aggie 100 at 12.30 o'clock.
At the request of the Conservative
lender. McGiil, last week's meeting
was adjourned until today, when
more supporters are expected to attend.
So far the main opposition to the
measure ls that the members of the
Empire are not unified in their needs.
A A
This symbol of excellence goes
for the Arts-Aggie Ball — and
the Brown Bros, corsage that
will help make It a success for
you.
Phone Sey. 1484
Joe Brown  (Arts '23), Mgr.
ROS.
& CO. LTD.
665 Oranville Street
Dance at
Commodore Cabaret
872  Granville  Street
Seymour 47. for Reservations
NOTICE
Contributions of candid snapshots
of Freshmen on the campus as they
go. have gone, or will go about their
daily business will be greatly appreciated by the Totem editor; and any
plx used will be given a credit line
. . . . where possible. Hand prints in
to the Totem editor in the Ubyssey
office.
LOST
Black soft cover notebook ln Biology 1 Lab. last Thursday. Finder
please return to M. B. Goodwin, Arts
Letter Rack.
THE NEAREST BANK IS
The Canadian
BANK OF
COMMERCE
Tenth and Sasamat Branch
"A general bank business
is transacted and accounts
of the faculty and students
of the University of British
Columbia   are   welcomed.''
•
BANKERS   TO   THE
Al.MA MATER
SOCIETY
0. R. Myers, Manager
"Let me serve your car and your car will serve you"
"Prank" Picke
U.B.C.  SERVICE STATION
24-Hour Emergency  Service. Complete Repair Facilities.
SOUTH END OF McOILL ROAD PT. OREY S3
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UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.: 0 a.m. to S p.m.; Saturdays 0 a.m. to noon
LOOSE  LEAF  NOTE BOOKS,  EXERCISE  BOOKS  AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Oraphlc   Engineering   Paper,   Biology   Paper, ALL YOUR
Loose  Leaf  Refills,  Fountain  Pens  and  Ink      BOOK SUPPLIES
and Drawing Instruments.
SOLD   HERE
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SHARKING BATTLE OF
GUYS AND GALS AT
BERKLEY VARSITY
BERKLEY, Cal., Nov. 14 (CUP) —
Who-put-the-shark-ln-the-c o-e d s-b e d
ls the problem placed today in the
hands of the Dean of Men at the
University of California as fraternity
Alpha Delt wages war with sorority
Zeta Tau Alpha.
Following the California-Oregon
football game some of the coeds ln
the Zeta Tau Alpha sorority protested that some of their members
had been endangered by flying beer
bottles from the general direction of
tho Alpha Delta Phi fraternity house
next  door.
The fraternity boys were warned
by police that "even if you didn't do
it—don't  do  it  again."'
No sooner had the law returned to
H.Q., however, than there came a
call that some of the co-eds had been
forced to suffer the indignity of having tomatoes thrown at them. Not
only that, but further Investigation
revealed the fact that not long before one of the girls had discovered a
dead shark in  her bed.
The young lady said she didn't
know who had done It, but she looked with meaning at the house next
door  occupied  by  the  Alpha  Delts.
The police thought it somewhat
confusing and handed the matter
over  to the  Dean of Men.
THURSDAY   SYMPHONY
The regular Thursday recital of
symphonic music from the Carnegie
Recordings will be given as usual at
12.40 noon ln  Arts  100.
The program consists of two selections: "The Siegfried Idyll, by Richard Wagner and "Brlgg Fair" by
Frederick Dellus.
Dear David:
Scandalous procedure, I calls it
—having all your Major Functions on Thursday evening — two
days are wrecked now Instead of
Just Saturday as ln the good old
days, who are these athletes anyway?
Do hope the Arts-Aggie ls a
"good time" party, and not like
last year when you spent one
hour looking for your collar button and ended up by using the
stud the laundry puts ln your
shirt.
I   hope   you're   studying   hard!!
CLAUDIA.
ZORIC
LAUNDRY CO LTD
IMS Richards.   Sey   1424
HOTEL
COFFEE SHOP
and
DINING ROOM
Fountain for
After Theatre
GEORGIA
LUNCHEONS
DINNERS
TEAS
DANCES...
formal or Informal.
SEY.  5742
Political Correspondence
for Adults
IN the immediate past of Canadian Journalism fairly simple
stuff has passed for political correspondence. The aim has,
generally, been to make the party friends of the newspaper
Into angels, the opposition into fiends and to establish the fact
that reformers were lunatics. In the direct reporting the clash
of ideology and Interest, the workings of the mysterious process
called democracy, have been treated with all the Insight and
illumination required for a brisk account of a dogfight. This
condition is changing, and to no one goes greater credit for
the change than to Mr. Bruce Hutchison, whose intelligent
dispatches from Victoria and Ottawa have practically created
a school of political reporting acceptable to adult minds. For
the news and for the facts, issues and personalities behind the
news, the Vancouver Sun commends to Intelligent readers the
dally articles by Its Victoria and Ottawa correspondent, which
can be read most conveniently by telephoning Trinity 4111 and
ordering the Sun delivered every day.
VANCOUVER SUN
Phone Trinity 4111 for Daily Delivery Tuesday, November 15, 1938
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
ALONG
By PROXY
What with the snow, the Armistice
holiday, and a couple of social functions over the week-end, I'm feeling
ln a Chrlstmasy mood this morning.
And a person in a mood like that
should feel—and I do—that it's better to give than to receive. So I'm
going to give. I'm going to give a bit
of panning here and there. It's some
time since I've done any beefing, and
I wouldn't want to get rusty.
For a long time now I've had something I want to get out of my system.
I've been postponing lt from week to
week, giving space to more timely
topics. But I believe that the time
has come.
At the beginning of the term, with
the Dean's kind permission, I signed
up for eighteen units. I felt very Important and scholarly about the
whole thing. I found that I'd need
about ten text-books—more books
than I'd ever needed before. That
also made me feel  very  Important.
So I went to the "Dept. of Book
Store"—whatever that means—to order my books. There, darn it, I was
made to feel suddenly very unimportant. I was told that If I wanted certain books, I'd Just have to wait, that
was all. Who did I think I wos to
expect the books waiting there for
me? After all, could the Book Store
know what every student on the
campus was going to take this winter?
I slunk out of the door, feeling
very much like a high school student
who has played hookey. But I had
ordered the books, so I decided to
wait the two or three weeks that
might be necessary. I waited. That
was nearly two months ago. And I'm
still waiting for all but the two books
I was lucky enough to get somewhere
else.
Don't you, Joe Reader, and you,
Mr. Book Store, think that the plans
of our professorial stall might be
considered in the ordering of texts?
When a certain lecturer In Economics
decided to change the text ln his
course, doesn't It seem logical that
the Book Store would be wise to that
before the students discovered lt? It
does. But nothing was done by the
Book Store to prepare for that
change. Ninety per cent, of the class
Is still waiting for books. And the
Xmas exams exactly four weeks away.
There are times when I don't mind
being treated discourteously. But I
always feel that there has to be good
reason for that kind of thing. On
one or two occasions I've been rubbed
the wrong way by members of the
"Dept. of Book Store"—whatever that
means. And I know that, along with
the other students on the Campus,
I keep the Book Store ln existence.
A  bit  paradoxical.
Yes, I feel that we, the people of
the university Campus, don't really
get a break when lt comes to the old
text-book  question.
Another thing. Who are the people
who are drawing salaries as clerks
in the Dept. of Book Store? There,
readers, is a very funny thing. I've
visited other colleges. Several of
them. And In every single one, available jobs on the campus were given
to students.
At other schools, hard-up students
are given every chance to work their
way through. Certain jobs In the
Cafeteria and the Book Store are
held by students. There are people
on this campus who would be very
thankful for a chance to pay that
extra    twenty-five    by    working    part
U.B.C. LIBRARY RANKS
SIXTH IN ALL
DOMINION
Did you know that we have one
of the finest libraries ln Canada?
Our    library    building    alone    cost
more than three-quarters of a million
dollars. The cost of the books ls about
$230,000.
SMALL  STAFF.
We have a staff of 15, which ls not
many for a library of this size, but
they form one of the most capable
staffs  ln Canada.
Four  of  the   staff  are   M.A.'s, and
several have their B.A. degree.
SNAPPY   SERVICE.
Our staff  ls  not only  capable,  but
efficient.   In   most   big   libraries,   one
has to wait from IS minutes to half
an   hour,   and   sometimes   longer,   ln
order   to  get  a  book.  We,  at  U.B.C,
are fortunate that we rarely have to
wait  more  than  about  five  minutes.
In   size,  our  library   ranks  about
sixth In Canada, having a total of
approximately  11S.000 books.  There
are,      however,      many      privileges
granted   al   our   library   which   are
not granted at those of greater size.
This   year,    several   changes   have
been   made   ln   the  library   hours,  so
as   to   provide   a   still   more   efficient
service. The  library  is  now open  for
77 hours a week. The daily hours are
trom  8.15 a.m.  to 0.15  p.m.  Students
are   now   allowed   15   minutes   before
S.30    lectures,    ln    which    to    return
books taken out the night before. The
library is now open on Saturday afternoon until 5.00 p.m.
SENIORS APATHETIC:
FROSH MAKE BIG HIT
Photographs for the Totem of this
year are approaching the finishing
line, as Artona Studio's completed
his sojourn on the university campus. All appointments for photographs—be they of Seniors ln any
Faculty, Sciencemen, or students of
the second and third years—must be
made at Artona Studios in the city.
(Telephone . . . Seymour 5737.)!
TRADITIONAL   APATHY
The Freshmen class has won the
hearts of the Totem authorities by
arriving in hordes to be 'shot'. The
Senior Artsmen, however, have
proved themselves to be as apathetic
as any other good graduating class;
and there still remain some 125 of
them   to  be  taken.
Flguies supplied by the Totem editor show that out of 75 Science seniors only 33 have been photographed;
of 40 Commercemen only 7; of 25
Aggies only 6; and of 11 Nursing
Sclencewomen exactly none. The
editor expressed the opinion that
publication of these statistics might
possibly Inspire the classes ln question to a mite of further enthusiasm.
HURRY!   HURRY!
The next announcement from the
editor is that the last deadline for
returning Freshmen proofs is Thursday of this week, and, to facilitate
rapidity, arrangements have been
made whereby students may leave
their proofs with the chosen print
marked clearly on the back at the
Ubyssey office, Instead of taking
them to town. It will be appreciated
If all photos are taken by the end
of this month, as the early appearance of the book next spring virtually depends upon this one factor.
time in the Caf or in the Book Store.
Yet such a thing has never been
thought of, apparently. And we, the
students, are paying the salaries of
clerks and waitresses, when we could
be paying the way of fellow students.
The students of the university run
nearly every phase of university
business. Are we going to continue
lo overlook such an Important business proposition as the Book Store?
Let's give ourselves — and especially
those who need it—the break we deserve.
CHANG SUEY
ln
THE TEMPLE
of the
GOON GODS
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Pioneer Laundry & Drjr Cleaners j
Seymour 8334 |
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CHAPTER SEVEN
THE FIEND AND THE PHANTOM
A sombre, crimson, super-streamlined pogo-stlck roared down the
Mall, skidded around a corner, and
hurtled Into Forestry Project No. 3.
For a split second, the powerful
headlights picked out a herd of timid
Aggies licking the salt off of some
old lunch papers. The machine
screamed to a stop before the dim
bulk of the Unholy Temple of the
Ooon Oods, scaring up several flocks
of wild fiats that had been hanging
upside-down in the nearby trees.
Whipping off his goggles, Chang
Suey stepped out of the cock-pit,
and, pausing only to kick off his
gum-boots, entered the Temple. Then
the Dirty Nine piled out of the cabin,
looked around furtively, and, with
scant originality, promptly fell down
an  open  man-hole.
Inside the Temple, there was considerable activity. In the grandstand
and bleachers were seated several
thousand cheering fans, but silence
oozed from the Royal Box, which
was occupied by King John, King
John's court, and King John's long,
white beard. The yellow glow of
clusters of fire-bugs showed the horrible scene in the arena. Around the
raised dais stood fifty heavily-veiled
goons, dressed in the traditional
ceremonial costume of beach sandals, purple bed-spreads, and brown
derbies. On the dais itself was bound
a struggling figure which was alternately gasping and shrieking, to the
side-splitting amusement of the customers. Suddenly, a hush fell with a
dull plop, as Chang Suey entered
the arena surrounded by members
of the Pip Club, who bore large banners advertising the Yellow Menace's
special, cut-rate prices for "Lifelike, stuffed Graduates" and "Living
Sclencemen that talk and eat like
Humans."
They reached the raise just as the
last of the preliminaries was ending.
The preliminaries consisted of dragging terrified Freshmen to the sacrificial altar, forcing them to smoke
their own pipes, and carrying them
away.
Chang Suey held up his arms for
silence.
"Ladles and gents," he said, jrener-
ously.
The crowd cheered in approval of
this   unexpected   flattery.
"The preliminaries are over, and
we shall now have the main event,
the torture of the traitor, Horace Q.
Fizzle!"
Suey's fiery words, combined with
sight of the victim being strapped
down to the altar, caused several of
the more Pepsl-Colad spectators to
rush, growling, from their seats. But
the goons, led by Elvira May Goggle-
fisher, quickly raised their heavy
veils, and the bloodthirsty ones immediately fell back, carrying with
them their dead and wounded. Swiftly, Chang Suey laid bare Fizzle's unobtrusive chest, and raising on high
a red-hot iron, he plunged It Into the
qui sring flesh of a Oalner'a No. 1
Brand Welner. The crowd roared
encouragement as he munched the
zep  meditatively.
Suddenly, Suey pointed at Horace's
incapacious   bosom,   and   yelled:
"Aha!"
The crowd seemed to like this and
echoed:
"Aha!"
"See!" cried Chang Suey, "There is
final proof, tattooed in Eleanor blue!
There is the Discipline Committee
coat of arms—two monitors rampant
on  a  field  of  flipping nickels!"
The goona were hard pressed by
the near-sighted. Suey snapped his
lingers, and a continuous film of
Totem photos for the last twenty-
four years flashed on a scl'•en before
Horace's horrified eyes. Ho went
out like a light half way through
the Freshman class of 1020. The
climax had arrived. Chang Sue/ produced a flask filled with a vile g>oen
liquid. Ho held it up for all the
crowd   to  see.
"This,"  he   roared,  "is  distilled Cif
FORMER MATHS CLUB
PREXY TEACHING
HERE NOW
The President of the Mathematics
Club of 1028-20 has  returned to   the
University campus  ln  the  person  of
Dr.   R. Hull,  M.A.,   Ph.D.
FAIRVIEW  SHACKS
Born ln England, he came to Vancouver ln 1909 and went to school
here. In 1919 he enrolled at the B.C.
University on its former site and
completed two years there. For the
next several years he taught in various parts of B.C. Returning to
University he received his B.A. and
then his M.A. ln the following year.
He received his Ph.D. degree ln
Chicago two years later.
Since then he has travelled over a
large part of the United States
teaching and assisting. In 193S he
was a fellow of the National Research Council of the United States.
PAPERS  ON ALOEBRA
During those years Dr. Hull wrote
several research papers and hopes to
keep up his work, especially In the
study of Algebra and the theory ol
numbers. Last summer he took a
course in higher mathematics.
In respect to his office, Dr. Hull
wishes all who come to him to know
that the brain on hts desk does not
belong to him but to his partner.
"Mine isn't pickled yet," quoth he.
h. n. McCorkindale
addresses teachers
Mr. McCorkindale, superintendent
of schools for Vancouver, will address
the B.C.T.F. and the Education Class
on Wednesday, November 18th at
12.30 in Arts 204 on "Educational
System In Some European Countries."
C.U.P.
(Continued   from   Page   1)
hotel much in the manner of "the
daring young man," his baggage flying with him.
He freely admits the peril of his
trade. "What they can do to you in a
modern dictatorship is almost unbelievable," he says. Yet. dauntless,
crusading free-lance that he ls, he
returns again and again to the scenes
of action, never faltering from his
high ideals, telling the whole truth,
where Truth is thought lightly of and
Liberty is incredible.
NEWMAN   CLUB
Meeting of the Newman Club will
be held Wednesday, November 16 at
8 p.m. at the home of Mrs. D. J.
Costello,   1926  West  17th   Avenue.
Reverend Fr. Jordan will speak on
the relation of the ENCYCLICALS
to present day problems.
A grey-white spotted coat left ln
the Cafeteria was taken by a person
with a coat nearly Identical. Will the
person who exchanged this coat
please get in touch with O. Wood,
Men's Arts Letter Rack.
coffee. The contents of this flask
will  kill  this—"
But he never finished the sentence.
For a blood-curdling moan swept
down from the rafters, with the hollow  words:
"Did you say 'flask'?"
King John screamed something
about the ghost of Joe Miller, felt
his beard, and hissed out of the door
yelling that he was going to the barber. But it was not Joe the Jibe, but
the ghost of Hedgequlck that wafted
gently down ln search of the flask,
Chang Suey climbed hand over hand
up his pig-tail, and dove out of a
second story window. The rest of the
crowd suddenly remembered that it
was due elsewhere, and left in a
body. Unseen hands released Horace
C_. Fizzle, and he had momentarily
escaped   his  just   deserts.
Can Chang Suey wipe out the
ghost  of Hedgequlck?
Exclusive Camera PORTRAITS
At  Popular  Prices
HOPPINQ
with
MARY ANN
Variety, the spice of life, and the glamour for every evening gown
comes in a mvriad of rich jackets and evening blouses in lame, which
glints in jewelled lights the white chiffon period gown would be
admirably topped with the wide lapelled natty gold jacket . . . short
sleeves and buttoned waist form some of the outstanding of this
colorful completion of the hooped skirt gown. . . . Other colors are
silver and steel .... or if you prefer a corded silk in black and white
for the offsetting the blue or ruby tints of your gown it is only $3.9$. .
According to a history professeur ... he didn't mind the student
sleeping in a lecture . . . but when it came to sleeping through the
mid-term . . . well . . . anyway he did. . .
Cherry red was the color of the evening blouse worn by a brunette
senior . . its dainty round collar and long sleeves gave added smartness
to the flowing dinner dress in black transparent velvet. . . . Mrs.
Paton's Lingerie Shop at 2793 Granville Street, has many distinctive
blouses of this type . . . and the price will fit any coed's budget. . . .
They range from  $3.9$   to $10.00.
fi fi fi
Gosh! Exam time tables up already! |You know what that
means—exams—but worse still it foreshadows the annual agony of
Xmas shopping. You can save a lot of headaches by doing your
shopping neatly and nicely at Fred Holmes, 2 84$ Granville St.
Mr. Holmes has a complete line of quality woollen goods—all
imported from old England. Comfy dressing gowns—in heavy
Melton cloth or very light non-crushable wool. Smokng jackets—
ideal to go with a pipe, a book, and a foggy night. Then there are
Jaeger camel-hair and wool sweaters in tasteful colors and knits.
Remember, too, that a man always needs another tie, and you'll
like his sox—in flaming reds or sedate browns. And of course scarves
—but we could go on and on. See Mr. Holmes' selection yourself and
remember a small deposit holds any article.
fi fi fi
Stockings are the daily concern of every campus coed, no matter
whether she be a freshette or a hope-to-be graduate. . . . Phoebe
Hosiery Shop, 713 Dunsmuir Street, is the special shop for all discerning coeds . . . for the evening slipper is the attractive mesh toe and
heel in "Evening" shade . . . and are only one dollar per pair. . . .
The Union College boys have been complaining that they are
distracted from their noon hour studies by the lambeth walkng of
several girls down the college mall.
To protect the crown coiffure from the climatic drizzle or pre-
Christmas snow, a dainty evening hankie in midnight blue with floral
pattern in ivory and gay colors . . . with that mink coat velvet
scarves n bright tones or paisley and Roman stripes with harmonizing
shades which will offset  any fur wrap.
fi fi fi
Informal events always bring up the eternal question of 'what
to wear'. . . . Lora Lee Dress Shop, 2814 Granville Street, has some
of the smartest models in soft woollens and plaids . . . one particularly
intriguing ensemble . . . plaid skirt with perky little jacket top in
green velvet  .  .    deal  for an  informal meeting or  the  lecture  room.
A young coed sighed audibly on sighting a handsome grad . . . and
declared that she had quite a fancy for him. . . . "Do you know him
very well?" one asked her. . . . "No," was her reply, "but I watch his
maid darning his socks every morning."
The ambition of every young lass is to have a soft woollen dress
in black. . . . Lora Lee showed us one the other day ... to offset the
sombre color tone of the dress were tiny buttons of brilliant green from
front neck to waist and belt of the same material. . .
fi fi f)
All your shoe worries arc over. Raeson's Mezzanine floor at
644 Granville Street have the supreme footwear, both day and evening
styles . . . especially dancing in enchanting satin slippers with satin
trim. . . . Smartest of these is the white with suede tinted the same
shade as your favorite evening gown. . . . Winning the fastidious
coed's heart is the dainty inside facings of white or peach.  . .
Two Phi Kaps arrived at the table, one wth his arm in a sling,
the other displaying a bluc-and-gold stage shiner . . .  any connection?
Enticing are the velvet evening slippers with the open toe and
heel. , . . These are in black with contrasting colors ranging from pastel
tints to deep ruby and wine tones. . . The toe straps gather in a turkish
cluster and are held by a rhinestone clip which is matched by the
strap clip at the ankle . . . the prices are from $6.9$ to $7.$0 . . . and
it's only six  weeks till Christmas.  .  .  .
MARY ANN
LOST
Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity pin.
Misplaced on campus. Return to A.
M.  S.   Office.
Illllll, HIIIHHlHIHIHIHHIItlllllHItHtlHIIHHHHHIIHIHIII*
Just   about   all   you   could   ask
for    .    .    .
ARISTOCRATIC
HAMBURGERS
Limited
10th and Alma
TAKE    SOME    HOME     f
MII,II,IMIII,(>III,I,M,,I*I,IIIHMIIIIIIIIIMMIIIM'I(IMII,IIMI|-
The   Hotel   Vancouver
presents
MART KENNY
at   the   Spanish   Grill
The Historical Society will hold a
panel discussion "Federal-Provincial
Relationships", at a meeting to be
held at 4648 West 12th Ave., 8 p.m.
on Tuesday.
TRINITY 3377
MACK A.
STARK
LIFE INSURANCE
897
ORANVILLE
(At Smythe)
Silk Hat
ICE CREAM
After Theatre
Specials
MARGARET FINLAY,   Arts  '31
JACK  PARKER,  Alls   '30
2664 GRANVILLE
E   S
TIES    •    HOSIERY    •    ARROW SHIRTS
TIP-TOP FASHIONED SUITS
SKI-TOGS • SPORTSWEAR
BAYVIEW  93S0
I   R   E
South Granville's Home of Smart
Men's Wear
For FORMAL   •   STREET   •   SPORT RESULTS
VARSITY 6—K. of 0. 1
VAN. REPS. 14—VARSITY 5
VOLLEY BALL FINALS
WEDNESDAY—12:30
GYMNASIUM
Four
THE    U BY SSEY
Tuesday, November 15,  1938
*•«
SPORT
VIEWPOINTS
—by Basil Robinson
SOCCER.
On the soccer front, things are
booming once again. Having decisively defeated the league-leading
South Vancouver 10-1 and ln so doing having given themselves the confidence to go places In the Vancouver
and district Loop this winter, Charlie
Hltchens and his boys are not sitting
back and letting the grass grow under their feet. Anything but.
The latest activity ls that of bringing a Wednesday League team to the
campus to engage in combat every
Wednesday afternoon. This ls a welcome Idea, will supply the boys with
that much needed practice game during the week ln preparation for the
Saturday tussle, and should do much
to stimulate Interest ln soccer on the
campus.
COME  ON ALONO.
Last week Ian Elsenhardt's Pro-
Recs provided the opposition and
more or less stampeded over the Blue
and Oold sphere-booters who were
without at least three of their regulars. But seriously don't forget, some
Wednesday afternoon when you feel
like a good old scream, stagger out
to the soccer field and do the honors
for Charlie Hltchens and the round-
ball crew.
BACKS   OOOD.
Fred Sasaki, heralded by the Ubyssey as a freshman find this year, has
proved Just that, according to members of the squad. The stocky Japanese boy adds some much-needed
finish and constructive ability to the
half-line. And speaking of half-backs,
Jack Rush has take nover capably in
the pivot position, and, they tell us,
woe betide the unfortunate fellow
who ls so presumptlous as to take
risks with our Jack.
Captain Alan Croll, who represented the V. and D. League ln the recent Flve-a-Slde competition on
Armistice Day, is probably the most
dependable man ln the lineup. The
blond skipper, who's been battling
on the soccer fronts for some time
past, plays left fullback and is a real
bulwark to the Varsity side.
TOUGH   LUCK   ROD.
We've been hearing so much lately
about rugby Injuries that lt Is refreshing in a sense to hear that the
handling code Is not the only game
fierce enough to produce broken
limbs. But then on the other hand,
we'd really like to hand out our sympathy for what it's worth to Rod
McMillan of the soccerites, who sustained two broken wrists and a broken rib in the cause of Alma Ma. It's
a very tough break for Mr. McMillan
who normally is one of the spearheads of the Varsity attack, but it is
also most annoying for Coach Hltchens who has been heard lately lamenting the lack of punch ln his
firing line.
ACCOLADES.
To Vancouver Rep who played the
right kind of a game against the
Thunderbirds and had their pains
rewarded ... to the Gridders who
kept their win streak intact ... to
the Senior A and Senior B girls basketball teams for keeping on trying
to win a game . . . stay In the battle
girls and something's sure to happen
... to Marge Lean for her amazing
archery. . . .
Au  revolr.
R. II. Marlow, society photographer, for (Ino portraits, phone Trin.
1.157.
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I VARSITY  SERVICE
I STATION
I "AT   THK   GATES"
I "OUR   SERVICE   MEANS \
I HAPPY MOTORING" _
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R
UGGER
EVIEW
By JIM HARMER
VANCOUVER REPS  14—VARSITY  5
University reputations and Ideals
are supposedly built on tradition. The
score above indicates how loath
U.B.C. are to divert from said tradition, for lt was Just a year ago on
Armistice Day, that Vancouver defeated Varsity ln that memorable
game. It must also be remembered
that Varsity later conquered the
Reps and Victoria to keep the McKechnie Cup, so the boys are out for
a repeat performance.
SOME   SURPRISE.
However the loss Friday was a distinct surprise and disappointment for
the Thunderbirds who figured that
they were going to bat a 1000 ln the
win column this season. Even without the services of Vic Moore, Al
Oardlner and Bill Colledge, Varsity
hoped for a win over the Rep aggregation.
But such was not the case for the
ALL-STARS, with scant regard for
scoring records compiled by the
Studes, clipped the wings from the
Thunderbirds, then trampled them
into the mud. Play was much closer
than the score Indicated, however,
for territorially the Blue and Oold
had a decided advantage over their
white-clad rivals, but the high-
powered scoring punch failed to click
in the crucial moments.
This was due partly to the "wet-
blanket" defense thrown over the
sparkling trio of McPhee, Lumsden,
and McPhee, but mostly the blame
goes to the B.C. forwards who failed
to feed the ball to the backfleld. In
set scrums the much heavier Reps
gained possession three-quarters of
the time, due in no small measure
to methods employed by the "old
stagers" on the Vancouver side. It
was only in the loose scrummages,
where Varsity, by virtue of a faster
packing scrum could heel the ball
and get their threes ln any kind of
scoring  positions.
Ted McPhee and Harry Lumsden
were the outstanding men on the
Varsity side, Ted's touchdown being
the best individual run of the day.
Howie McPhee was too closely marked to shake loose on any long runs,
end the ball seldom reached either
Tremblay  or Leggat on  the wings.
Ernie Teagle played sound rugby
at fullback despite a bad case of
amnesia, caused by a boot on the
bean early ln the game. Basil Robinson, suffering from nothing more
than the Jitters, turned in a swell
game  at  half.
BULLSEYE!
Special University Tuition
Pure   and   Applied   Sciences —
first   year.
Advuiieed   Mathematics,   Mathematical   Physics, History, Philosophy,   Languages,   etc.
1470 West   5th Ave. (Cor. Gran.)
Marge Loan, star of the archery
aiiia/.ons on the campus, lines one up
i»< the recent all-Canada competition
in   which   she   places  second.
'_.' * ■<ilil..l..i,.||,|,,,,|l|t||,tillMMIIlll,lllllMIMIIII
| _
I Have a real |
| HOME-COOKED   MEAL I
|     with Mr. and  Mrs. Thomson  at     I
As You
Like   It
By NnCI
VARSITY  6—-K.  of  C.   1
Friday's opus of tho gridiron, the
Kny ceo   game   at   the   Stadium   nn
Armistice   Day,   was   Just   a.   game
of   football   that   the   Vurslty   boys
happened   to   win.   It   came   as   a
matter of cottrse, no ono was surprised, ln fact I was cold.
In rather dull procedure the game
rolled   on   from   anti-climax   to   anticlimax with Pearson and Boland the
star kickers  of  both teams  controlling   most   of   the   play.   The   Varsity
line   was   Impregnable,   the   Kaycees
wasn't.
AFTER YOU, PAL
But lt took a Farlna-less Blue and
Gold squad a long time to And out.
Everybody carried the ball. Henderson, who used to play a fair end
position carried lt, Joplln a swell
blocking back carried it, Williams
did and ap Roberts too. go what?
Andy Boland, red-thatched Kaycee
back, threw passes and what's more
the  ends  caught  'em.
Fred Joplln carried the brunt of
the Varsity attack and for an erstwhile blocking back he was a find.
A swell line-plunger he gave the
Varsity regulars a much-needed rest,
although one of those triple-reverses
with Williams carrying the ball was
needed to put the ball in scoring
position.
HE   SCORES!
The boys went ahead in the first
quarter when Joplln plunged over
from the five yard line after Williams had run thirty yards. Evan
ap  Roberts   missed   the  convert.
Varsity scored again in the third
quarter right fro mthe kick-off when
Henderson botted a ball almost to
the dead-line and Crawford was
rouged  trying  to  bring  lt  out.
Only other score of the game was
the Kaycee singleton in the last
quarter when Boland kicked to ap
Roberts who was rouged trying to
bring  it out.   (I  said   that  before).
FROM  THE  END  ZONE
A very good crowd witnessed the
team from under blankets — the
crowd that is, not the players . . .
Hal Straight, burly sports ■'liter, a
lone figure In the press box got
bounced on the bean with a dame's
shoe full of peanuts -nails ln the
Union building to you.
LINE  OOOD —
The line line was Varsity's big
asset on Friday, thoy were really
opening up big holes. The Knights
line on the other hand bogged down
their interference and left the ballcarriers on the loose.
One of theae clays, Varsity is going to break up some team's passing
attack antl will we boaurprlsed! They
have the weakest pass defense ln the
league; a running pass will fool them
every  time. I
• Sport Snaps •
By FRANK TURNER
BASKETBALL.
Back again! This time with a
hoopla review of the 1938-39 Thunderbird entry.
The count's one and one on Van
Vliet's scrappy cagers and tomorrow's
the night when test No. 3, in the
form of Dr. Garnet Montgomery's
"Tookes", will be written by members
of Varsity's Senior A squad. They
tackle the latest addition to the Inter-City loop at 9.00 p.m. ln the campus gym and hope to change the
current question mark Into an exclamation point—via the victory
method  Dora   dear I
Boss Dier insisted that inside dope
on the team was what his two faithful  readers wanted—a starting quintet ls the result of research.
HERE  THEY   COME.
Viewing the College cagers from
an opposition guard slot, we find Don
Livingston, a real Freshman find,
fighting for the sphere at the tip-off
and flipping it over to Alex Lucas,
third year star, who gathers lt in
fro mills right forward position and
starts dribbling down floor. "Luke",
nearlng the becoming hoop, whips
the pill over to Brud Matheson, second year Senior A ace, who pots 'em
from hts left forward slot with uncanny  conslstecy.
When the front line gets ln trouble,
there's always Rann Matthison, captain for the second successive season,
and By Straight, ln his second year
of Varsity hooping, overseeing the
play from guard posts. Both Rann
and By are smooth playmakers as'
well as accurate snipers.
STILL  THEY  COME.
And lfVHir opposition guard is still
day-dreaming (call lt what you will,
the Thunderbirds sure breezed
through "Opp's" defense), he might
even find time to glance bench-ward
for the rest of the U.B.C. crew. He
does—he has to—it's a column—-and
spies Maury Van Vllet carefully noting the way his hoop machine ls behaving, accompanied by Managers
Alex Charters, Les Martin, and Tom
Cantell.
Eyes right, and there's young Doug
Alexander, smart Southpaw shot
who's Just finished clambering under
Alma Mammy's folds. Doug's a real
asset at forward. Shift the pupils
again in the same direction and it's
Dick Miller from Victoria, studying
the play of Rann and By, for those
are the duo he replaces at a nod from
Van Vllet.
Glance by Richard and there's a
Dominion champion hooper —. Doug
Gross. Doug's the lad who played
with Westerns last year when they
took Canada by storm. Gross is a
fighting fool—plays forward. Another
gaze-shift, and you'll find Jack
"Spud" Davis, Council member and
player on the Varsity Dominion
champ outfit of '37. "Spud" fills In
at either guard or centre. Next to the
post and it's time to turn to other
sport swirls.
U.B.C. CO-EDS FINISH
SECOND IN ARROW SHOOT
By MYRNE NEVISON
National renown has come to our
campus again for the first time since
1931 when the basketball girls played
in tho Dominion finals, but this time
it I.s tho archers who did the trick.
Led by the spectacular showing of
Marjorie Loan the girls placed second in the recent Dominion-wide
telegraphic meet with a total of 1267
points to Margaret Eaton's staggering   Hum   of   1707.
Star   of   the   local   contingent   was
Marge   who   carried   off   second   place
In    tho    Individual    scoring    with    270 \
points.
Bouquets to the rest of our team
(especially   to   Hortense   Warne)    for
hteir    splendid    showing.    They    are
Betty    Cole,     Hilda     McLean,     Mary
Craig,   Emily   Fraser,   Lillian   Johansson,  and  Jean   Pratt.
BASKETBALL
The luckless Senior A basketbal-
lera will try again tomorrow night
when they tangle with Shores Jewellers In th.i preliminary to tlie boy's
game. So far unsuccessful In their
objective to win a game tho girls
are sf.il in thero trying. Coach Bob
Osbcrne has some excellent material    vhlch   should  start  to   click   soon.
1 he Senior B team, a rather un-
kij.iwn quality to say the least, play
a ,ain tomorrow night ton but down
lit the Y.M.C.A. gym. They will meet
il.X.L.- -and  Heaven   help  them.
THE   GABLES   INN
"AS NEAR  AS YOUR  PHONE"
SEYMOUR 240S
Delivery   Anywhere   ln  City Limits
EyS   .   .  .   840 GRANVILLE
•tSAocolate tBoJL
SEfrgilspiis
Sport Sputterings
By  ORME  DIER
ALPHONSE  AND  ALL THAT
So you don't like the sport page this issue, eh Alphonso? Well, Al my
boy, that ls Just too bad. The trouble with the world today ls that everybody ls too reactionary. (Sermon.) Everybody likes headlines. We don't:
we have to write them. And for years now every sport page ln the country
has been presenting the news objectively, and even If Alphonse doesn't
appreciate lt, the Ubyssey scoops again by giving the world the first
subjective  sport  page   to  come  off  the  press.
And   not   only   that,   but   the   public   ts   always   wrong   anyway   and   if
Alphonse and  his  pals don't like  this set up, they can  go to  .  .  .  reading
Mary Ann once  more.
THE  ORIGINAL MARCH  OF SLIME
And now we come to the Important things of life; the hard cold facts
of a tough world. That's right Al, it's football we mean. Does anybody
know just what the score ls at the grand old gridiron game in the Big
Four League now? We think there is a chisel going on somewhere and
that momma's little white haired boys ln the blue and gold are taking the
rap for the officials ln the setup.
Now everybody knows tho league is supposed to be run at a small
margin of profit, but when the righteous Interpreters of the golden rules
og gridiron throw a game out for no other apparent reason than to draw
the suckers back for another battle lt sounds as though the golden goose
had laid a bad egg.
SNIFF!   SNIFF!
After all, Barnum may have been right in his neat little epigram on
the susceptibilities of Joe Fan, but even on a good day there are only 60
minutes to the hour. If the boys ln command of the league really want
their filthy lucre that badly, it would save a lot of trouble if the players
all chipped in a quarter for the good of the cause, and then they could
go out and play for the fun of it without the ancient aroma of officialdom
cramping their style.
INTRAMURALS
And now a word about intra-murals. It Is just about time that somebody did something about this whole setup. The idea of the schedule is
to give everyone a chance to get exercise but the way things have been
going over at the gym these days, the only one that is getting any real
exercise  is  the  janitor  who sweeps  the  place.
Come on fellows, let's get out and give Maury, the maestro of the
'murals   a   little   support.
u.
LUNCH  25c
B.C.
SALISBURY
ROOST
LODGE ANNEX
35c
"Where The Gang- Meets"
!                                                               DINNER
BE COLLEGIATE—Smoke  a  Pipe  .  . .
Peterson's Keg. $!8.00—SPECIAL $1.70
WORLD WIDE  NEWS
Across from the Commodore
J 1111 ■ 111111 H111111111H111111111111 H 111111 H 11 It 111111111111111H It MII11
i     HOW'S YOUR
f    GOLF GAME?
867
Granville
To he accurate you
must learn the Fundamentals of the Golf
Swing. The winter season ls the time to Iron
out your dilltciilti'-M and
learn how to enjoy
Golf.
Hal Rhodes Goll School
1155 W. Pender Street Seymour 51233
<
*l I M 111II11111II111111111111
IIIMIIMIlHIIII
CROSS COUNTRY RACEI TODAY 12:45, ALL OUT

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