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The Ubyssey Mar 17, 1939

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 OET OUT AND
VOTE
Sty*
00£tf
CONGREGATION
AUDITORIUM
3 P.M. TODAY
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
■pa-i
Vol. XXI.
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, MARCH 17, 1939
No. 39
RECORDING TO
BE MADE OF
CONGREGATE
STUDENTS WILL. FORM
GUARD OF HONOUR
A recording will be made of the
conferring of the degree of Doctor
of Laws and Letters Honoris Causa
upon His Excellency The Right Honorable Lord Tweedsmulr, Governor-
General of Canada to take plaoe at
today's Congregation.
Through the efforts of the Varsity
Radio Sooiety, the record of this
ceremony ls to be kept In the permanent flies of the University.
At 3.60 p.m. His Excellency will
hold an Inspection of the C.O.T.C. on
the library lawn. Following this, the
guest of honor will visit the Administration Building to put on his robes.
Then a prooesslon of all dignitaries
will continue to the Auditorium stage,
the formal procedure commencing at
8.00 to 8.08.
The order of proceedings on the
platform is as follows: An address
by Chancellor McKechnie, followed
by a brief citation by the Acting
President, Daniel Buchanan, Introducing Lord Tweedsmulr.
Then the Chancellor will read
the formal granting ef the decree,
tlie acting President draping the
royal blue and red hood over the
Oovernor-Oeneral's shoulders.
A representative of the Students'
Counoil wtll then present Her Bxoel-
lenoy Lady Tweedsmulr with a gift
of flowers from the student body.
Following this, His Bxosllenoy wHl
deliver an address lasting for approximately twenty minutes.
At the conclusion of this, the assembly will sing the National Anthem, and the dignitaries will leave
the stage from whenoe His Excellency will visit the offloe of the Acting President.
STUDENT  OVARD OF  HONOR
In the meantime, every student of
this University is expeoted to form
a Ouard of Honor from the doors of
the Administration Offloe to the
Gymnasium, -where a reception Is to
be held.
Between these lines Lord Tweedsmulr will walk, Inspecting the students as he makes his way to the
gymnasium.
All those present at the Congregational proceedings are invited to
this informal tea,  when wives  of
the Faoulty heads will aot as host-
THE EX AND THE ELECT
MIIMHIMMHIMIIMIHIIIIHIHHHIHII
MmMIIIIIHIMHMIMIIHMI
IIMIIHHIMIIIIHI
Following the tea, whloh will continue until about Ave o'clock, a CO.
T.C. Ouard of Honor will form outside the gymnasium, to His Excellency's oar.
The recording to be made by the
Radio Society of the congregation
will be broadcast tonight over CJOR
from 6 to 6.30 p.m.
Council Announces Final
Program lor Today
TO  THE  MEMBERS  OF  THE
ALMA   MATER   SOCIETY
His Excellency, The Right Honourable Lord Tweedsmulr, Oovernor-
Oeneral of Canada, will receive the
degree of Doctor of Laws (Honoris
Causa), from the University of British Columbia at a special congregation on Friday, March 17th, 1930.
His Excellency has stated that he
would like to see the whole University and as many students of this
institution as possible upon this occasion.
His Excellency will inspect the
Ouard of Honor composed of the
C. O. T. C. under Lieutenant-Colonel
O. M. Shrum on the Library lawn
next to the mall at 2.S0 p.m.
After the inspection, before 3 p.m.
if possible, the procession will form
in the Administration Building and
proceed to the Auditorium Building.
Personal invitations have been sent
to each student in the Junior, Senior
and Oraduate Years. A general invitation has been extended to all
other members of the student body to
attend.
Immediately after the congregation
has ended. His Excellency will go to
the President's office for a few minutes   and   then   proceed   to  the  Qym-
(Continued on Page Si
See PROGRAM
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Off with the old—Min wtth the new. To the left is Carson McOulre, retiring A.M.S. president, who haa guided student affairs wtih a sure hand
and cool head during a trying year.
To his right is John Pearson who takes his plaoe aa the leader In
campus life. John has already proven himself capable; with the oo-operatlon of students he will maintain a great tradition.
PLAYERS DO
FINE JOB OF
COMEDY  HIT
ACTING,   DIRECTION
AND SET EARN
PRAISE
J. PEARSON NEW PRESIDENT;
THREE IN BY ACCLAMATION
John Pearson was eleoted President of tbe Alma Mater
Sooiety ln the elections Tuesday, defeating Darrell Braldwood.
President of hie olass In his freshman and sophomore yoars,
John has risen to tho ohlef offloe of tho student exeoutive m a
third year artsman. Bo haa beon prominent In sports. In
Canadian football and ae a member of the Men's Athletlo
Dlreotorate.
When nominations for other members of the Students' Council closed
at  5.00  p.m. Wednesday,  Biddy  McNeill, Basil Robinson and Bus Ryan
had been elected by acclamation.
Biddy McNeill waa elected W.U.
.S representative.    She  is a third
year arts student, and Is past pres-
dent of the Phrateres.
Basil Robinson, also ln third year
arts, was elected  M.U.S.  representative.    Hia election tops a successful
year during whioh he was the popular president of the Junior Class and
associate sports editor ot the Ubyssey.
Bus Ryan, a third year science-
man, was elected Junior Member.
He ls active on the campus as president of Solenoe '41 and as Master
of Ceremonies of the Mamooks.
Candidates for other offices besides
the  M.A.A.,  and  W.A.A.   representatives  will  speak  in   the    auditorium
Monday noon, and the elections will
follow Tuesday.
ONLY PREFERENTIAL
VOTES TORE COUNTED
From now on, ballots that do not
show the preferential system of voting will be declared Invalid, ln the
elections.
The new compulsory method  requires that there be no blank spaces
on  the ballot slpls. Put down  "1"
for  your  first  oholee  "2"   for  your
second, and so on.
To total the votes, the first choices
for  each  candidate  will  be recorded,
and   the   lowest   one   eliminated.   All
his  ballots   will   be  credited   to   their
second   choices  and  then   the   lowest
eliminated again.
GET  IT?
Third choices will then be totalled
and the lowest eliminated. In this
way, none of the votes are lost. At
the final elimination, choices for the
lowest candidates of the last three
are given to the other two. Understand? It's all quite simple.
To   put   it    briefly,    and    simply,
eaeh  student will have a share in
the   final   result,   and   If   his   flrst
choice does not get in, he can still
choose   between   the   other   candidates.
If  you  still   don't  understand  how
preferential voting works, mark your
ballots   preferentially   anyway!
l*M-M'"a**IMI*|-HI*M---M*l**IM**t****l********-M-IHI-**MM,IMI,l,
i<ll|----M-mMIMIM-.Mm<l|-||-||l-IMI'"M'*|ll|--.--MMIIMIIIIIII
Pearson WID Follow     '"
In Fine Footsteps
The   spring   elections    have    given
the   students  a  very  fine    president.
The choice of John Pearson carries
on   the  tradition  of   quiet    reserved
Alma Mater presidents given  to  the
university by past men such as Mark
Collins,     Bernard     Brynelson,     Jay
Oould, Dave Carey and  the present
chief   Carson    McOulre,      We    hope
that Pearson will carry on an  even
more Important tradition given to ua
by these men: that of accomplishing
some one thing to make the university more convenient for the students.
Brynelson started the Brook Memorial   Building   Campaign,   Jay
Oould   built   the   Stadium,   Dave
Carey Instigated the Student Campaign Committee.   Caraon McOulre
has   not    only    been    the    moving
force behind the Campaign Committee but has also performed a feat,
the greatness of whloh will never
be  fully   realised  by  any  student.
With the  help  of Bob  Smith  and
several    other    members    of    his
counoil    he    has    financed    $80,000
worth of buildings on only S30,O0O
dollars,
John Pearson is following one of
the finest, most conscientious, and
hardest working presidents that the
Alma Mater Society has known, and
it is our hope that he will carry on
in the path his predecessors have
shown him.
MIIIIIMIIIIIIHIMIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
MIIHItmillllHIMIIIIIimilllUMIIIIIIIItllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
By LESTER PRONOER
When the curtain rose Wednesday
night on the first performance of the
annual spring play there began a
delightful comedy that entertained,
without a single boring moment, an
appreciative  student  audience.
The Players' Olub deserves the
highest commendation for their production; both as art and as entertainment lt was more than satisfying.
OOOD VEHICLE
The choice of the play was an extremely happy one. It was one that
the players obviously enjoyed presenting and their characterizations
were consequently that muoh better.
We are informed that this selection
was made by the students of the Olub
—If so they have more than Justified
the responsibility placed on them.
Although less "arty" than last year's
"Playboy" lt was Just as artistic and
irtalnly much more entertaining.
ILBVBR ACTRESS
Best   acting   was   that   of   Cicely
olmes. Here was a difficult role of
hich she realised the full posslblll-
ies. Her portrayal of the dowdy Elsa
Sas very clever—her actions and pos-
ires alone expressed the character
bit the old maid. The only weakness
IP an otherwise flawless performance
as her tendency to overact In the
•st scene with Franz. In rehearsing
fhe love scene with him she was
father too stiff and awkward. Although humorous It was not convinc-
y.%g. Her change over to the charming
siren was deft and entirely credible.
On the whole hers was a finished and
enjoyable performance.
John Olen played a delicate role
with feeling and balance. His acting
was polished and left nothing to be
desired.
James Frazee was well cast as
"Meisslnger." The role ls made for
his style of acting and he rendered
an excellent account of himself.
Anne Carter was eminently satisfying as "Thona." Her acting reached
Its high point ln the scene where
Elsa feigns a faint, her exit being
particularly effective and well handled.
Another case -of splendid casting
was Dacre Barrett-Lennard as "Rudolph." He has a" nice appreciation
for fine shades of sublety and sarcasm and his numerous quips, usually in the direction of Meisslnger, were
expertly delivered.
Esme Caydzien made the most of a
small role. She played "Poldi" with
assuranoe and charm and the result
was a pleasant one.
"Arnie  Zander"  was   a  rather  indifferent role but played competently
by Thomas McDowell.
DIRECTION  OOOD
Although these individual performances were all splendid It was obvious that much of the credit for their
excellent work was due to direction.
Everything about the production
showed   capable   and   meticulous   dl-
(Con tinned on Page 8)
See PLAYERS
ACTION TAKEN
TO STOP LOSS
OF UBC BOOKS
COUNCIL AUTHORIZED TO
FLOAT $80,000 BOND ISSUE
UNION   BUILDING   SOON   TO   BE   A   REALITY:
OOVERNMENT WILL PAY  INTEREST ON  LOAN
The plans of the Students' Oounoil for the long-awaited
Brook Memorial Union Building reoeived the offlolal approval
of the student body, at the Alma Mater Sooiety meeting held
last Wednesday noon. There remain only a few legal matters
to be dealt with before the aotual construction of the building
begins.
A   memorandum   in   minute   form*——...  ____
was passed, authorising the Students'
Counoil to proceed with the floating
of an $80,000 bond issue to oover expenses incurred In the erection, furnishing, etc., of the new building.
Of this money, 880,000 would be
used  to  retire the  Stadium   bond
Issue, while $40,000 will be turned
over to the Brook Memorial Committee as building funds with whioh
to erect the Union Building.    This
Committee already has some 888,-
000 to be used to this end.
The remaining $10,000 will be used
as a furnishing fund, under the trusteeship  of  the  Students' Counoil.  It
is expeoted that there will be an addition to  this  fund   from the profits
of oo-ed balls of future years.
EXPECT  CONTRIBUTIONS
A proviso waa included in the minute, whloh stated that if any contributions were added to the $40,000
building funds, that the whole 840,-
000 would not have to be turned over,
but only that part of it whioh would
be necessary to make up the balance. As It is, the fund lacks from
82000 - $8000, but Council is confident
that this will be found through con
trlbutions from Faoulty and other
sources.
Any surpluses Incurred will be
turned over to the Alma Mater
Building Fund for the purpose of
finishing the Stadium, and providing
additions to the present gymnasium
for use of the women, etc.
STUDENTS REPRESENTED
The second minute which was passed requested the Board of Governors
to add the president and secretary
of Students' Council to the present
list of Brock Memorial Trustees, thus
providing student representation in
the administration of Brook Memorial funds. The present trustees are
Oen. Victor Odium, and Miss A.
Jamieson.
The    third    minute    aaked    the
Board of Oovernora to continue to
assess three dollars from eaoh student until 1880, In order to retire
the new $80,000 bond Issue.
The final minute authorised the aa
yet   unappointed    Furnishing    Committee to add to itself suoh subsidiary committees as its members shall
deem fit.    The members of auch subsidiary   committees   would   probably
represent   those   who   contribute   towards the Union Building.
While the Alma Mater meeting
was still in progress in the Auditorium a telegram was received at the
Council office from the Hon. John
Hart, stating that the Government
was willing to turn over the money
which they have been using towards
the Interest on the Stadium bond
issue to apply to the new $80,000 issue, but that they are not sure that
they can continue this policy for he
necessary eleven and a half years.
ELECTED BY ACCLAMATION
BASIL  ROBINSON
M.U.S.
BIDDY McNEILL
W.U.S.
BUS RYAN
Junior   Member
Dishonesty is once more rife on the
campus. This time It has Invaded the
library. It Is reported that 800 books
at a cost of $1,300 a year are taken
from the library, either from a mere
absent-mindedness or malic* afore
thought.
The Student's Council has taken
up this matter and advisee that
drastic aotlon wUl be taken regarding the theft and mutilation of
books from the stacks. Anyone
found guilty Is liable to expulsion.
It has been suggested that there
be a member of the library staff
posted at the entrance to the stacks
to check up on all outgoing books.
Furthermore, if this abuse continues,
It may be necessary to close the
stacks to the student body.
Although the library officials have
no definite clues as to the identity
of the culprits, they have their eyes
open for any suspicious looking characters. So next time you find yourself ascending the stairs from the
stacks absent mlndedly carrying a
library book or being tempted by the
fascination of some weighty tome,
pause and reconsider — remember,
crime does not pay.
DEBATERS TRIUMPH
IN SOUTHERN TOUR
The forum debating teams of Ray
Anderegg and Alex McDonald, Paul
Volpe and Frank Wiggs, who travelled south last Thursday to compete
in a debating tournament sponsored
by the PI Kappa Delta fraternity at
the Oollege of Puget Sound, and Dar-
rel Braldwood and Don McOill, who
went to Washington State, returned
with an impressive' record.
McDonald and Anderegg won
eight consecutive debates finally
being eliminated In the seml-flnals
of a seventy five team contest. The
judge of the semis expressed the
opinion that McDonald was one of
the most outstanding debaters he
had heard.
Volpe and Wiggs, the second team
to enter the contest, were eliminated
in the quarter-finals after winning
three   straight  events.
Throughout the tournament the
judges were unified In congratulating the UBC debaters on their
delivery, their polish and their bril-
llat  rebuttals.
While these two teams were in Tacoma, McOill and Braldwood were at
the University of Washington to engage in a symposium with their crack
debating team on "Unemployment
and  Suggested  Solutions."
ELECTION SPEECHES
M.A.A.   Representative  and  seconders.  Ap,  Sc.  100  at  13.30  noon
on  Friday, March  17.
Secretary, Treasurer and L.S.E.
Representative. Auditorium at
13.30 noon,  Monday,  March 30. Two
THE    UBYSSEY
THE  UBYSSEY
issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Sooiety of the University of British Columbia.
Friday, March 17, 1939
Office. 808 Auditorium Building
Oampus Subscriptions, $1.80
Phone Point Orey 908
Mall Subscriptions, $3.00
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Dorothy Cummings
SENIOR EDITORS
Tuesday
Irene BJedy
Friday
Jaok Mair
Sports Editor t Orme Dier
ASSOCIATE   EDITORS
Rosemary Collins Lester Pronger Ted Underbill
Associate Sports Kditors i Basil Robinson, Myrne Nevlson.
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Ossy Durkin       Florence Hurndall       Helen Hann       Joan Thompson
BUI Baokman.
Assistant Sports Editors) Lionel Salt, Jim Harmer, Austin  Frith,
Charles Craig.
O. U. P. STAFF
Editor
James Macfarlane
Van Perry
PUB. SECRETARY
Virginia Galloway
Assistants
Ann Jeremy
Joyce Cooper
CIRCULATION MOR.
Harry Campbell
REPORTORfAL  STAFF
Jaek Margeson, Pat Keatley, Joan Haslam, Jaoquss Metford, Ruth Millar,
Janet Walker, Brlta Vesterbaok, Bob Manson, BUI Osborne, Ken Vernon,
Dlok Jarvis
Advertising Office
Standard Publishing Co., 1087 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.O.
Telephone: SEYMOUR 4484
All advertising handled exclusively by Btandacd Publishing Oo.
Editorials
THE STACKS
The problem of thievery whieh has arisen over the pnst decade
or more in our university library ia one which is as natural as it is
serious. The present arrangement of stacks, which are in actuality
open to the entire student body, cannot result in anything but n
high cost of stolen books. Although this arrangement is on ideal
one, obviously it won't work out.
On the other hand it is not fair nor in the best interests of
scholarship that the stacks should be closed to undergraduates entirely. In fact the closing of the stacks to any students is too
harsh a measure and quite an unnecessary precaution.
The logical solution to the problem is the redirection of the
entrance to the stacks past the loan desk and if necessary the
placing of a commissionaire at the entrance to "spot" any library
books taken past the desk without being checked.
No student would resent this entirely necessary precaution
and all students but those guilty of the offence of removing library
books would co-operate to the necessary extent.
To leave such a valuable collection of books entirely open to
the public, for there is no cheek on who enters the stacks, seems
to us to be inviting just that sort of thievery which has resulted.
$80,000
There are no words to adequately express the feeling of a truly
spirited student on the subject of attendance at the Extraordinary
Alma Mater meeting Wednesday noon. It can be argued that the
meeting was not well publicized, ond those who so argue have
reason, of o sort. Hut if the U.T..C. students took any interest in
the expenditure of their money or in the transactions of their
organis-otion tho news of o meeting to discuss a loan of the magnitude of $80,000 would have spread rapidly.
Wo cannot believe that the students ore not interested in sums
of money, we know that tbey are far too poor i'or thnt. The difficulty arises in that they feel that there is nothing they can do about
decisions of their Students' Council. T.uckily the council is idealistic enough and sincere enough to make those arrangements which
are most beneficial to the whole student body. But the students
who do not attend Alma Mater meetings, nor vote for A.M.S.
positions, do not know thot their council is sincere, [t seems to
us more than foolish for these students to allow others to spend
fifteen dollars of their money every year without asking how and
why it is spent.
SUMMER SCHOOL
A rnther unfortunate ruling in regard to summer school timetables instigated this year is bringing protest from many of the
winter session students who had planned to write off three units
this summer as well as carry on their regular summer jobs.
Under the old arrangement students could plan their work so
they could attend two hours of lectures daily but the new system,
which fortnightly changes the hour at which lectures are to be
held, will exclude all those students whose time is not entirely free.
Now we have no doubt that the administration of the Summer
School have many good reasons for making this change but we feel
very strongly thot they could not outweigh the disadvantage to
many students who will be unable to take Summer School courses
because they have to earn money during their vacation.
Diamonds, Watches, Personal Gifts
FIRBANK and LANGE
USE OUR CREDIT PLAN
There is every possibility that this
will be the last sane column written
by your friend Scotty,
FINISHING     and lt ls with terrible
SCHOOL. regret    that    we    lay
down the pen for another year. But before we leave we
must perform several pleasant tasks.
We must congratulate John Pearson, President-elect of the Alma
Mater Society, and the three other
members of the Students' Council,
who have been elected by acclamation. Basil Robinson. M.U.S.. Biddy
McNeill, W.U.S., and Bus Ryan, Junior Member. The fate of the Alma
Mater Society will be in good hands,
we feel.
And  now  congratulations  are  due
to another organization,—the Players'
Olub.   "The   Cur-
THE CURTAIN       tain Rises" Is one
HAS RISEN. of   the   most   ex
cellent       produc
tlons that has appeared before Vancouver audiences ln many years.
The student audience on Wednesday night went mad about the whole
thing and demanded repeated curtain calls at the close of the performance. The humour appealed to them
and that says a great deal for any
play. No audience Is more unpredict
able than the student one. Success
on students' night augurs well for
the succeeding presentations during
the remainder of the week.
It  was   a   matter   of considerable
Interest  to us  to attend  the special
meeting of the
"OUR" ALMA Alma       Mater
MATER MEETING. Society held
on Wednesday
at noon. The purpose of the meeting,
which was supported by an Immense
crowd of crazed students, was to discuss the financing of the new proposed Brock Memorial Students' Union Building.
The mere fact that there was doubt
as to the presence of a quorum showed the keen enthusiasm of the student body of this institution. The
only matters of any importance were
the passing of a few minutes authorizing Students' Council to borrow ln
the name of the Alma Mater Society
a paltry $80,000. It really shouldn't
mean very much to the average stu
dent, we suppose. After all what does
$80,000 mean to us?
The Council submitted a plan
which was a monument to financial
ingenuity. But the students, we know,
like to show their powerful appreciation by absenting themselves as
conspicuously as possible from' all
meetings of thelr„own Society. This,
of course, ls a most commendable
attitude.
Few students realize that if the
motions proposed at the Alma Mater
Meeting had been defeated, there
would be no Union Building. Again
the Union Building ls not actually a
very Important thing in the lives of
the average scholar, ls it? It merely
represents a new step ln developing
this Institution from the stages of
infancy to at least adolescence.
Well,   enough   on   the  Alma  Mater
Meeting. Let us ramble back another
twenty-four hours to
WHOSE the      elections      for
ELECTIONS?      President  ot  the  Al
ma Mater Society.
There was a thrilling exhibition of
high-feeling, scrambling activity, and
profound democratic principle.
Out of an electorate of some 2300
"citizens" the glorious poll reached
the dizzy heights of a meagre 1100
votes" In other words the man elected can count on the support of a
little over one quarter of the Cam
pus. One quarter, although we do not
suggest that they will be rabid opposition, were not for him ln the
elections. But the other half of the
student body apparently prefer to
remain incognito, silent.
Yes It waa one of the finest .pieces
of that fine fighting spirit which
typifies this institution. Congratulations, and Ooom-bye.
Seymour  and  Dunsmuir
Opp. the Bus Depot
APPLICATIONS  FOR  I.R.C.
Applications for membership in the
International Relations Club will be
received fro*-, interested first and
second year \members. These should
be addressed to Kathleen Riley, Arts
Letter Rack and must be mailed before noort Tuesday, March 31.
Applicants* chosen will be invited
to the final meeting of the year, at
tho home of Professor F. H. Soward,
Wednesday,  March  32.
PASSISYSTEM
OFFENDERS TO
BE PENALIZED
The discipline committee has Anally taken action against those offenders who have been attending
clas sparties and other functions
using passes which do not belong to
them.
At the request of the Sophomore
Class Exeoutive the Mamook Club
was   delegated   by   the   Discipline
Committee  to  supervise  the  door
at  the   Arts   '41   class   party   last
week.
Those   entering   were   required   to
hand ln their passes and also to sign
before being admitted. The oommittee in charge marked the names of
any they considered suspect and the
signatures were later compared.
NO  FINES
Out of these, 17 passes were retained. Three of them were found to
be all right, but 14 were confiscated,
not to be returned this year. No fines
were levied, but in the future penalties may not be so light.
Jaok Davis, Discipline Committee
Chairman Is of the opinion that action should have been taken before
this. High School students have been
attending football games en masse
using University passes, and at he
Junior Prom approximately two
dosen outsiders came ln on Junior
passes, although as close a watch aa
possible was kept.
CONFISCATION
It is clearly stated on the pass
that confiscation will follow mlsue of
the privileges it entails. The student
also In signing his name promises to
abide by the rules of the Alma Mater
Sooiety.
Money la lost  to the University
through    students    lending    their
passes. One class will lose through
members of others taking advantage of functions whloh should be
open only to Its own olass. If the
passes   were   used   properly   more
speakers and entertainers oould be
brought to the University throughout the term.
Next    year    the-   system    will    be
changed and photographs of the pass
owners will be affixed to their passes.
Photos on Passes may keep
Crashers out of Functions
The pass system is being badly
abused, and the students are losing
a great deal of money through this
abuse, according to Evan apRoberts,
Junior Member.
His remedy, which he will place
before the Council, la that on registration, every   student   should   be
photographed, and that the photograph should be placed on the pass.
Passes oould not then be transferred  for  the  various   functions,   and
apRoberts  has  estimated  that  some
$1000 would be saved.    This amount
would  allow several  more artists to
be presented on the oampus.
NO EXTRA COST
Each student would not pay   anything extra for his pass picture, but
when   Totem   time   oame,   he   would
select one of the four originally taken, for the Totem, and pay seventy-
five cents.    This cutting of the price
of the Totem pictures would save the
students  almost  a  thousand   dollars.
Investigating the cost, apRoberts
found that the material would come
to $300, and that with the photographer's  time,  total  expenses  would
reach $500.
The photograph system is  used at
the  University of Washington.
BURSARY OFFERED
OUTSTANDING AGGIE
New scholarship awards available
for a few students have been announced by the Senate and the Board
of Oovernora.
The Oeldare Rladore Bursary Is
an  award of $175.00 for the students of Agriculture who have completed at least one year of   work,
and Is proceeding to a higher year
in the Faoulty.
The student receiving this bursary
must have given evidence of possessing    those     qualities    necessary   for
community leadership.
The award will be made cm  the
recommendation of the Joint Faoulty    Committee    on    Prise*    and
Scholarships in consideration wtth
the Dean of the Faoulty of Agriculture.
Applications    must    be     made   on
forms available at the registrar's office, and must be in the hands of the
registrar not later than the last day
of   the   sessional   examinations,   Friday, April 38,  1939
"Ever fallen, Bill?"
'Only for Sweet Capt I'
SWEET CAPORAL CIGARETTES
"Th* pureti form in which tobacco can be smoked."
"Let me serve your osr and your oar will serve you"
"Frank" Floke
U.B.C. SERVICE STATION
24-Hour Emergency Servloe. Oomplete Repair Facilities.
SOUTH END OF MoOILL ROAD PT. OREY 88
SPECIAL UNIVERSITY RATE
Saturday Night—$1.00 per person
PRESENT YOUR STUDENT PASS
Commodore Cabaret
872 Oranvllle Street
Sey. 41 for Reservations
f<* »* iw«>«<F*«<>*v*^wwn^^^wfw«**«w«vw«wwi^*«<n
CONVENIENT BANKING.
for University people . . .
Students and members of the faoulty of the
University of British Columbia will find the
West Point Orey Branoh of the Bank of
Montreal convenient to the University, and
will find a friendly helpful servloe awaiting
them here.
BANK OP MONTREAL
ZSTABUSHXO 1817
West   Point  Qrey Branch:   SASAMAT  AND TENTH
A.   B.   MOORE,   Manager
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UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.i 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.) Saturdays 0 a.m. to noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS, EXERCISE BOOKS AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Graphic Engineering Paper, Biology Paper,
Loose Leaf Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink
and Drawing Instruments.
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Have your home lighting oheokee' with
a light meter. One ef ear Heme Lighting advisers will be glee* te assiet you
in planning lighting fer the neatest
eye comfort, safety antl attractiveness.
scrVf*
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Phone for the Girl with the Sight-Saving
Kit. B.C. Electric, Seymour 5151. Friday, March ifr, 1939
THE   UBYSSEY
Three
CONCORDIA
or
A Feast of Reason
When an advertising man oan't
think of anything to say about something he ls supposed to advertise,
which ls pretty often, he has two
sure bets on Ice.
He knows that if he throws the
picture of a pretty girl into the ad
and then by easy word oarpentering
ties the pretty girl up with the product, this will stop 'em dead, which
is more than half the battle.
Or he can use the picture of a
highly eugenic baby. This has slightly leas stopping power, but the wallop is probably harder and more
lasting. Everyone looks at the picture of a pretty girl for reasons that
you don't have to discover from a
biology oourse but the picture of a
baby softens you up. Nobody oan
scan a bare and cheerful Infant without his face slipping into a fond
smirk that often doesh't stop this
side of fatuousness.
The best sort of babies to pose for
suoh pictures are those whioh have
been well nurtured. It waa either
Pavlov or John B. Watson who discovered that all a baby needs to be
happy is protection from loud noises
and a good firm support beneath him
(or her) but thia is not enough for
a baby intended to be brought to the
perfection demanded by advertising
men.
First such infants need the tender
care of two loving, even sappy, parents. Seoond they need their vitamins counted, their proteins and carbohydrates finely divided and their
reflexes and complexes very carefully adjusted. All this, when done
right, makes life Juat pie for the
baby, but, ot course, few parents are
equipped right off the bat to give
suoh service.
This Is where, aa many readers
have probably been fearing, the Vanoouver Bun comes in. The Sun maintains a regular department for Just
this thing. It is run by Mrs. Myrtle
Meyer Eldred, a lady who has raised
several children in the most scientific
manner possible and who has haunted child care olinios and laboratories
for many years, What Mrs. Eldred.
doesn't know about babies nobody*
does, we are Informed, and she
writes all her findings down for
thousands of grateful mothers to
read every day.
Probably there are right now at
U.B.O. several hundred young ladles
and young gentlemen who wouldn't
have their present poise, intelligence
and beauty except for the "advice
their mothers got out of Mrs. Eld-
red's column years and years ago.
In the natural oourse of events most
of them will be getting married one
of theae days, and we suggest that
the least they can do is to telephone
TR inlty 4111 and order the Sun delivered so that THEIR children can
be brought up with the advioe of an
expert instead of being experimented
on, in the old fashioned way, by a
young couple who don't get to know
muoh about babies until about their
third, thus giving the first two a set
of oomplexes that may cause them
to end up goodness knows where,
perhaps even as Ph.D's.
For anyone not Interested in this
aubject, the Sun's sport section is
good,  too.
—STENTOR.
•     •     •
•   ELECTION PLATFORMS   •
TREASURER
GOVERNMENT WINS
IN FORUM DEBATE
"As a deterrent capital punishment
has failed in tls purpose," claimed
Ray Anderegg as he lead government
foroes to a narrow viotory in support
- of the resolution, "Resolved that
Capital Punishment be abolished" at
the last Forum meeting Thursday,
Maroh 8.
In maintaining that capital punishment was a 'continuation of the
barbaric 'eye for an eye' polloy, Anderegg believed that society should
attempt to restore the Individual,
who murders through obsession or
emotional upset, rather than exact
vengeance by taking his life.
Speaking against the resolution
Austin Delany averred that the state
had to have an unnatural law to
control all potential murderers.
Bernard Reed, ln support of the
resolution, declared that Nature
makes a man punish himself—"the
punishment a man receives through
his conscience Is greater than any
punishment meritea out by the
state," he said.
BERT H0SKIN8
Having been nominated as a candidate to the position of Treasursr of
the A.M.S., I wish to present the following platform for your approval.
1. Rectification ot abuses oredited
by the Pass System in previous
years.
2. An adequate advertising campaign to inorease the interest of the
general publio in the University functions.
3. To co-operate with the student
body in using the Brook Memorial
Building to their greatest advantage.
4. To support the future building
oampaign to oreate greater accommodation for women athletes and to
oomplete the stadium Interior.
8. Budgeting to be oonduoted efficiently to ensure a high oredit standard.
Signed,
BERT HOSKINS.
•      •      •
JAOK STEVENSON
Since the eleotions of the spring
of 1088 at whloh I was a candidate
for treasurer ot the Alma Mater Society, I have been conscientiously
preparing myself for this very responsible position, for the year 1989-
40, should the members of the Alma
Mater Sooiety elect me to the position on Maroh 81.
I prsssnt myself for eleotion, tendering the following platform:
1. The completion and furnishing
of the Brook Memorial Union Building.
3. A building for the purpose of
addltlona Ueoture spaoe must be
sought to relieve overorowdlng.
Coupled with this, longer noon hours.
The government must be continuously approached until we receive
the $380,000 building voted tor, to be
built as soon as funds are available.
3. Contingent reserves should be
set up for the various administrations whioh, with toe stricter control
of budgets, particularly athletlo,
should create more efficient flnanolal
management.
4. For publicity tho work of the
Campaign Committee should be continued under two bodels, the undergraduate at\d alumnae.
8. University functions and games
be organised by a publicity manager
to make them pay.
6.    Limitation    should   not   be   allowed on our oampus.
Signed,
JACK   STEVENSON.
L*. S. E.
DARRELL BRAIDWOOD
Rightful promlnenoe, partially obtained by the L.8.E. this year, must
be fully achieved'next year. My platform ls:
1. Personal and frequent consultations with club exeoutlveo to transmit their opinions to Counoil.
2. Careful selection of Union
Building Rooms and improved allocation of present rooms to aid clubs.
3. Extension of Frosh orientation
and Awards System.
4. L.S.E. oontaot with Counoil on
general matters.
My qualifications include the presidency of the P.D.C. and A.M.U.8.,
executive posts in the Law Society
and Parliamentary Forum, and a
wide interest in club work. I feel
that progressive action and understanding of club problems are essential  for L.S.E.
Signed,
DARRELL BRAIDWOOD.
•      »      •
OSBORNE DURKIN
In brief, I intend to do the following things:
1. Establish a Musical Directorate,
with the appointment of a permanent director at its head.
2. Further the possibilities of establishing faculties of Music, Law,
and  Medicine  on  this  campus.  This
^^ It has a delightful satisfying flavour—
this new mixture of
ebolce Virginia and
Burley tobaccos,
blended with Perlqu'e
and Latoklo. TVy il.
PHILIP MORRIS
PIPE TOBACCO
75c and
$1.00^^.
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<5^lT...       SEYMOUR 2405
^^^             Pren Delivery  Anywhere in City Limits
RITCHIE'S   .   .  .   840 ORANVILLE
can be done through L.S.E. organisation.
8. Ensure adequate student representation on all Union Building
Committees,
4. Inorease the scope of L.S.E.
activity, and simplify ita present
structural form.
8. Encourage the Immediate construction of a Women'i Gymnasium.
This is vital to the progress of Intra-murals and compulsory Physloal
Eduoatlon.
8. Lengthen noon-hours, and eliminate leotures and labs after 2:80
Wednesday to make room for increased L.S.E. and intramural activity.
7. Support the oampaign oommittee through better publlolty of L8.E.
endeavor.
8. Reorganise eligibility rules and
Pass system In order to make more
equal the rights of Sclenoe and Arts
faculties.
I havs thoroughly Investigated the
possibility of effecting the above proposed  ohanges,  and I  am  confident
in my ability to carry them out.
Signed,
OSBORNE DURKIN.
• •      •
RICHARD MONTGOMERY
I propose, for the pleasure of the
A.M.S., the following policy under
L.S.E. for the coming session.
(1) To act, In the true spirit of
L.S.E. to enoourage club initiative
and to be friend and representative
of olubs on oounoil.
(2) To establish the Brock Memorial Building as home for L.8.B.
aotlvities and, through this medium,
to present more events of a cultural
nature under the pass system.
(8) To give definite aotlon in regard to National Scholarships and
Phi Beta Kappa.
(4) To give full support to the
Campaign Committee, winning public favor through Open Houss and
extended radio programs.
<8) To bring a polloy of questioning constructive oiitiolsm to oounoil,
especially tn regard to the Totem,
time-table revision and the pass-system.
Signed,
RICHARD MONTGOMERY.
• •      •
LEONARD ZINK
As a oandldate for the office of
president of the L.S.E., I wish to
briefly state my platform.
I will sincerely attempt to promote
and extend In the interests of the
constituent clubs of the L.S.E. the
following:
1. To organise and make arrangements for rooms and furnishings for
the L.S.E. in the proposed Union
Building.
2. To sponsor the appearanoes of
representatives of intellectual, political and artistic life.
8. To further the work In bringing Phi Beta Kappa to the oampua.
4. to promote and further the system ot awards In the L.S.E.
8. To promote Open House
through the co-operation and organisation of the various clubs wltbin
the faculties.
8.    And lastly;  endorse, in the interests of the olubs of tho oampus,
the administration as carried out by
the membera ot Students' Counoil.
Signed,
LEONARD  A.  ZINK.
PAMELA RUNKLE
Before I present my platform for
president of Women's Athletlo Association may I say that I am willing
to devote my time and energy to the
Interests of the women students and
the Alma Mater Society as a whole.
I would endeavor to:
1. Promote a successful functioning of the new Women's Atheltic
Directorate.
2. Oreate a wider Interest among
the women In an extended intramural program.
3. Support the request of Student
Council for the establishment of a
department ot Physical Eduoatlon.
(Sgd.) PAMELA RUNKLE.
W. A. A.
ROSEMARY COLLINS
In accepting the nomination for
the office of President of Women's
Athletics, I have for my - objective
the furthering of physical education
and athletics for women on this
oampus.
The following is an outline of my
platform:
1. A closer oo-operatlon between
the various women's athletic clubs,
the W.A.A. Exeoutive, an dthe Students' Council, by getting the Women's Athletic Directorate underway
at the beginning of the fall session,
for the purpose of assisting team
managers with problems of budgeting, hiring ooaohes, and organising
trips.
2. The organisation of Class Athletlo Representatives into a oommittee to meet regularly, thus working
for a greater enthusiasm in lnter-
class competition.
8. An enlarged "mixed intra-mural" program.
4. A greater enthusiasm for U.B.C.
representative teams suoh as Grass-
hockey, Swimming, and Archery, etc.,
by a more interesting program of
activities for these organizations;
and by a full explanation of the system of Athletic Awards to be given
at the flrst W.A.A. meeting of the
Fall  Session.
Signed,
ROSEMARY   COLLINS.
M. A. A.
HARVEY CARRUTHERS
Fellow students: As candidate for
president of M.A.A. my platform Is:
1. Revision of prsssnt Big Blook
Awards System.
3. Longer noon hours for Intramural sport.
8. Greater inter-faculty competition In sports.
4. More inter-colleglate sporta.
8. Greater. recognition ' for minor
sports.
Although the above "five point"
program entails muoh work and effort, I promlss to glvo my sincere
support to its fulfilment.
Qualifications:
1. Four years rugby (Captain 1888
U.B.C. team).
8.   President    Inter   -   Fraternity
Counoil.
8.    President Solenoe '88 Two yrs.)
4.    Present strip manager.
6.   Five years Varsity experlenoe.
Signed,
HARVEY CARRUTHERS.
•      •      •
JIM HARMER
In aooeptlng the nomination for
the position of Men's Athletlo Representative, I will endeavor to cooperate with any oounoil whioh the
student body ohooses to sleet, and
will cast my ballot in tbe way whloh
will most benefit the Interests of the
university.
Aa the salient points In this program I would advocate:
Expansion of the intramural program by extension of the noon
period.
Addition of bleachers to the stadium and completion ot the interior
to improve facilities for the smaller
athletic clubs.
Establishment of a permanent publicity agent to promote university
activities off the campus.
Continuation of the Athletlo Directorate to reduce the initial expenditure on athletics.
Introduction of a physloal eduoatlon department.
In conclusion I would like to thank
all those who supported-my nomination.
Signed,
JIM HARMER.
•      •      •
RANJI MATTU
I believe that muoh greater stress
should be plaoed upon Interoolleglate
Competitions. The popularity of a
University depends upon ths aggressiveness of Its organisations. Let us
make our name known in Soooer,
English Rugpy, Canadian Football,
Badminton, and Traok throughout
Canada and U.S. A.
Before we had an Educational Instructor, our University waa nothing
In the field of sports, iToday, we have
advanced to the point .where It Is
Impossible for one man to handle It
alone. If we are to progress, an assistant must  be  appointed.
Athletic Clubs present a dual Job:
New ones must be assisted; Old ones
rejuvenated.
The appointment of the New Assistant, a. revision of the Award System to Include all outstanding players, and an adjustment of the Big
Block Club, will develop Interest not
only in Inter-City and Interoolleglate
work but also ln Inter-Murals—the
nucleus of all Unlveralty Sports.
If I  may sponsor these  things,  if
I may have the Students' support in
these matters, I willingly aooept the
nomination.
Signed,
RANJI MATTU.
•      •      •
LEE STRAIGHT
I pledge mysslf to the following
tasks:
1. Support Residue Building Fund,
for girls' gymnasium and stadium
floor.
2. Further promotion of Rugger
and Canadian Football for Inoreaaed
revenue for athletics.
8. Promote intercollegiate* basketball league,
4. Support completely, the Intramurals, and the hour and a half noon
hour.
Qualifications:
1.   Totem sports editor, two years.
3. Class exeoutive experience.
8. Varsity sport writer for olty
papor, two years.
4. Big Blook Olub.
tIMIIIMMMMIIIIMIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIMtMIHHHHIIIIIimMMMMM
VARSITY SERVICE
STATION
"AT THE GATES"
"OUR SERVICE MEANS
HAPPY MOTORINO"
MIII*l*M*IIIIIHIIIIM*tlllltl***H* IHHIIM* Ml,*,*,**,
SECRETARY
JANET FLECK
As a oandldate for the position of
Secretary of the Alma Mater Society,
I am prepared to oarry out the requirements stipulated for suoh a
position with the utmost efficiency.
Aslds 1from the extensive work entailed, any projeot whloh will promote or better the relationship.
(1) Between the University and IU
outside contacts;
(8) Between the Students and the
Faoulty;
(8) Between   the   Studenta   themselves;
will be heartily endorsed by me.
It Is with these fundamental and
essential planks that X herewith submit my platform for, and aooept the
nomination of Secretary for the Students' Counoil.
Signed,
JANET  FLECK.
• •      •
RUTH HUTCHINSON
Past experlenoe has shown that it is
irrelevant for a secretarial oandldate
to give a platform. The purpose of
elections in this position is to ehoose
a student competent for her specific
duties and sufficiently aware of all
student activities, to cast an Intelligent vote on matters brought up by
members heading specific departments.
Ruth Hutchinson has been In olose
touoh with the university all her life
so that ahe haa a full knowledge and
appreciation of all student problems.
Since she has come to university she
has taken part in every university
activity, particularly the'Musical Sooiety and Phrateres. ,
Ruth Hutchinson will make a good
seoretary.
• •      •
FLORENCE JAMIESON
As candidate for Seoretary to the
Students' Counoil, I am fully aware
of the responsibilities ths position
entails. In view of the faot that next
year's Council will bs faced with
problems of prime Importance to the
student body, I am prepared to cooperate fully, as a secretary should.
X pledge myself to share the sincerity of my fellow councillors In
order that administration of student
affairs be carried on efficiently, vigorously, and earnestly. It Is only
with the realisation that my vote on
Council must be employed wisely and
thoughtfully that I aooept my nomination.
Signed,
FLORENCE T. JAMIESON.
ILA SIR6AR RELATES
PROBLEMS OF INDIA
Believing that the only solution to
the world's problems lies through the
church, the youth of India are looking forward to a universal united
chUrch to solve these problems, Miss
Ila Slrgar, a graduate of the University of Punjab, told a student audience which filled Aggie 100 yesterday
noon.
Speaking under the auspices of the
S. C. M., Miss Sirgar, in a little less
than an hour graphically portrayed
the student thought of India in regards to Independence, the ohureh,
and international relations.
Dealing with the attitude towards
Independence she claimed that India
was not lighting Oreat Britain but
the forces "of imperialism and exploitation" as exemplified by the
Anglo-Saxon race.
"The majority of the studenta,
realising the contributions Oreat Britain has made to the development of
India, are willing to accept her as a
friend but not as a ruler," Mlas Slrgar stated.
Illiteracy is one of the greateat
problems facing India today whloh ts
being attacked by students. A chain
letter scheme of making India literate within three months was revealed
by Miss Slrgar.
The flrat man is given one leaaon.
In order to get the second he muat
paaa the content on to five other
Illiterate persona who muat In turn
do the aame. When thla la done then
he receives the aecond leaaon. The
only drawback to thla plan, aooord-
Ing to Miaa Slrgar, waa that aome ot
the people did not want the aecond
lesson.
In connection with the churoh ahe
atated that the main problem waa
the winning over of the non-ohrta-
tlan foroes who pointed to the Imperialistic nations, aa exponents of
Ohriatianity, to ahow the failure of
the ohureh to promote peaoe.
MODERN LITERATURE
SUBJECT OF ADDRESS
Mrs. John Crelghton, M.A., Special
Lecturer for the Department of University Extension, will be the speaker
at the Vancouver Institute on Saturday next. Her subjeot la "The Destructive Element—a Note on Contemporary Literature." The addreaa will
be given ln Room 100 of the Arts
Building of the University. The ohalr
will be taken at 8.18 by President
John Ridington.
The  Hotel  Vancouver
presents
MART KENNY
at the  Spanish  Orill
PAPERHANQER
PAINTER
Neat,    Clean    Workmanship
Minimum of Muss and Upset
JOHN ADAMSON
FRASER 1878-L
New  Season's Wallpapers
HISTORICAL SOCIETY
ELECTS EXECUTIVE
The final meeting of the Historical
Society waa held Tueaday evening,
Maroh 14 at the home of-Mra. O. W.
Kldd when members discussed "Amerloan Foreign Policies."
The following exeoutive for the
year 1939-40 was elected: Proteaaor
Soward, Honorary President; Donald
Pyle, President; Donald Sage, Secretary-Treasurer.
All second and third year students
wishing to join the sooiety are asked
to get In touch with Donald Sage,
Men's Arts Letter Rack.
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GEHRKE'S
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THE    UBYSSEY
Frii
$__^
March 17, 1939
CHANG SUEY
THE CASE OF THE CHINESE CONTORTIONIST
or
CHANG SUEY MEETS HIS END
Chapter Seventeen  (Conclusion)
Repeated by request!  Conclusion.
"Hitler can't know what is going
on right underneath his nose, or he
would shave it off."
—Chang Suey xxxxxx?
What has gone before t Hefter V.
Coke met Mabel, the Spanish Sparrow In the Old Beet Hall. He didn't
know then that Bluober was Fred's
father-in-law, nor that Rover, a
dog, was skulking In the curtains.
Uncle Frank did. Read on.
"BlastI" orled Miaa Dotty Oum-
mlngs, adroitly shifting her Remington to the other side ot her mouth.
"Who's got a slug of tea?"
(It should be noted here that, ln
newspaper circles, g-i-n is pronounced "tea". Similarly, r-y-e ta pro-
nounoed "coffee", and so on.) It was
a strange soene. The half-lit room,
the half-lit people, the groaning machinery of the printing presses as
they turned out the Ubyssey, all
merged Into an atmosphere ot gloom.
"Who's got a slug of tea?" snarled
Miss Oummlngs, turning nasty.
But alnoe it was an acknowledged
faot that Dotty squeezed the bottle
until the horses whinnied, there were
no offers.
Oosle Gherkin had abandoned his
baby carriage to tear off aome posters,
reading "Vote Gherkin I Pull In your
belts with Gherkin I", and "Make it
a steamroller eleotion! Vote Gherkin I"
Mary Ann, that weed in the backyard of Journalism, oaokled fiendishly
as she played on the floor with a
little heap of dirt, most of whloh had
been gathered In the Oaf, molding It
into a column.
Red (Bashful) Thunderpill was
hanging trom a rafter by hla knees,
trying to snap a ploture of Pan
Verry, who was sitting In a dark
corner, cheoklng ovet a little item
with blue eyes.
But suddenly, the door crashed
down with a bang that Jumped the
bottle right out of Mr. Hedgequlck's
hands, three blocks away. In an official statement to the press, Mr.
Hedgequlck muttered, quote, "It was
stronger   than   I   thought.",   unquote,
SPRING
. . means exams, but has lots
of desirable connotations,
too . . romanoe, growing
things, ooming summer . . .
and the flowers that typify
It all. Oome to Rrown Bros,
and see how lovely are the
aprlng blossoms this year.
Keep flowers in your room
. . . sport some on your person . . . give them to the
ourrent flame. It doesn't
cost as muoh as you think.
JOE BROWN  (Arts '88)  Mgr.
FLOWERFONE
SEY. 1484
OET VALUE
IN PRINTING
for the activities
of your—
SORORITIES
FRATERNITIES
SOOIAL
and
OLUB FUNCTIONS
THB
CLARKE & STUART
OO. LIMITED
Stationers and Printers
850   SEYMOUR   STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
and hurried out to hall a passing
flask. There, framed in the Jamb (not
the first Jamb he has been framed
ln) was the arch-criminal, Chang
Suey. Oosle Gherkin cursed fluently
as the rest of the pub staff took
refuge behind Oozle Gherkin.
But there was a strange, panicky
light, in the eyes of the fiend, as he
backed into the room with his pigtail kinking and unklnking ln rhythm, nervously (a little trick he
learned from Hoary (Cruiser) Van
Fleet, during a tight football game).
As his baok pressed against the wall,
a dark, mysterious figure stepped after him into the room. It was Fretty
Woodouts, the Freshman's Friend,
and his eyes gleamed vengefully as
he advanced on Suey.
"Suey," murmured Fretty. "I've
hated you for more than a decade.
Now you must die!"
The fiend ln Woodward's clothing
seemed to be hypnotised by that terrible gaze, and he tried to slide away
from lt, towards the presses. Fretty
opened his mouth, honed his tongue
on his bicuspids, and prepared to
blast.
But at that Instant, Ohang Suey
slipped on a spot of grease, and, with
a horrible shriek, toppled Into the
maohlnery of the presses. For a short
while, some of the lesser known
Chinese proverbs Issued out of the
grinding metal, then all ories ceased,
and Fretty Wood smaoked his lips
happily. In a few minutes, some individual bowls of rice and a bad
smell emerged from the end of the
press, but Ohang Suey waa dead. The
fiend is dead, long live the fiend!
Now the line forms on the left (no
pushing, please, lady) for we are taking beta at 1000 to 1 that O. 8. will
be back next year. But don't ask me
why.
Watch for the biography of Ohang
Suey, soon.
START CAMPAIGN TO
CLEAN UPCAFETERIA
A "Clean-up Campaign" by the
W.U.S. and M.U.S. to Improve the appearance of the cafeteria will be the
result of a Faculty objection to the
Council that the condition of the
place  is  deplorable.
Jean Stordy and Jack Davis, W.U.S.
and 'M.U.S. representatives respectively, have decided to put the matter
before the Inter-fraternity Council
and the Panhellenic Society. The
committee believe that instituting a
cleanliness reform at fraternity and
sorority tables would serve to set an
example to the other students.
"The procedure of leaving lunch
papers around ls not confined to the
caf", Jack Davis said, "The majority
of studenta have no pride whatever
in the appearance of the grounds.
"The movement will be a forerunner
tor the opening of the Brock Memorial Building," Davis aaid, "We will
want students to show a pride In the
new Union Building by keeping lt and
its furnishings ln good condition."
J
MORE SCHOLARSHIPS
OFFERED GRADUATES
Two outstanding graduate students
ln any of the three Faculties, Arts
and Science, Agriculture and Applied
Science will be awarded a scholarship of $125.00, through the District
Grand Lodge No. 4, B'nai B'rlth,
through Samuel Lodge, Vancouver,
B.C.
The winners shall indicate satisfactory plans for graduate study at
the University of British Columbia
or at any other University approved
by the Joint Faculty Committee on
Prizes and Scholarships.
Only one scholarship shall be
available ln any one Faculty ln any
one year.
Applications must be made on
forms available at the Registrar's
Office and must be in the hands of
the Registrar not later than the last
clay of the sessional examinations,
Friday, April 28, 1939.
Easter parade with streamlined shoes and adjustable heel straps
for open toes and heel slippers . . . appear in the style lists for this
season . . . black patent, cranberry and pine rust are the fashion favorites in color . . . open toes have smaller openings and appear in both
plain and tricky designs ... at Raeson's Mezzanine Floor Shoe Store,
808 Granville Street. . . .
Walk into the new modernistic and luxurious headquarters, turn
right and step up the deep carpeted stairway to the fashionable store
where the one price $6.60 reigns. . . . There is a sad and lonely science-
man around the campus these days . . . and all because his girl friend's
boy friend has come back to town. . . .
Natural wooden heel* and ba.ketweave thonged sandals are
delightful for summer wear . . . while for campus the crepe soled
oxfords . . . some with snub toes . . . others with the open toe and
lacing trim are a comfortable easy-going shoe ... in white, blue and
other spring tones. . . .
While on the Mezzanine Floor of Raeson's take a peek at the
hosiery and bag department . . . hosiery at 85 and a dollar, and to
match your handbag. ... It occurred to a pretty brunette to enquire
of her COTCer friend, as they sat in the caf one day, what he would
do if she cried. . . . "If you cry," said he with a threatening look, "I'll
stand up and ahout at the top of my voice, 'All right then I'll marry
you.' "
fi        fi        fi
No matter what anyone else tells you, the weatherman included,
spring is here and so are lacy collars and cuffs with demure black
bows ... at seventy nine cents a set. . . . Pique in white with applique
can pep up a plain dress or will change for the eton collar for afternoon occasions. . . . Printed scarves in gay foliage patterns are priced
from $1.00 to $2.9). . .   *
Love in its highest form was uttered by a political 'diacussioner
and law club member when he declared, "I'd love her even ii her
father did have a million!" . . . White gloves for graduation and other
events are $1.98 ... at Phoebe's Hosiery Shop, 713 Dunsmuir Street. .
Sensation hosiery are sensational (a bit o' Oirish) and are a rosy
mauve for the fushia spring suit or tones with wild violet frock. . . .
These stockings are in the popular mesh heel and toe and are $1.00 per
pair ... a real Easter treat. . ..
fi        fi        fi
The library is a marvellous place . . . one reporter complains that
he can't write his stories well, unless he does it in the library . . . and
here we thought they were studying all the time. . . .
fi        fi        fi
Shoulders are going higher, bodices trimmer, and skirts are youthfully gathered at the waistline. ... So decrees fashions for feminine
apparel. . . . Tricotine coats on fitting lines with the three inch padded
puffed sleeves appear in the Easter stock at Lora Lee's Dress Shop, 2814
Granville Street . . . jonquil tones in a nubbly crepe mixture forms a
youthful belted jacket with a sand trim skirt. . . .
Well of all things . . . Chang Suey refuses to come to the pub. tea,
because he's scared he might have to sit next to a girl!. . . . Graduation
dresses will be arriving soon so keep in mind the address, 2814 Granville Street. ...
Spring coats and suits for Easter to fit both small and average
heights appear in dainty lilacs, beiges and blues which are favored by
royalty . . . light evening gowns for spring and summer occasions are
of net and lace with attractive jackets and accessories. . . .
fi        fi        fi
Psychologists have raved about tho ladies being color blind to a
greater degree than men, long enough we thinkr . . . We firmly believe
that heretofore men havn't had the chance to show their disabilities . .
their chance comes now to prove they have the discerning eye and
faultless taste with top jackets in cobalt blues, dusky greens and pine
rust, and intriguing window pane checks as found at Fred Holmes,
2845 Granville Street. . . . These are the 'woven in the British Isles'
Harrotex tweeds, and herringbone top jackets with the capacious
pockets and belted back ... to be perfectly faultless in color matches
perfectly tailored coats, and guaranteed imported apparel visit Mr.
Holmes on South Granville. . . . Slacks in flannel and gabardine ranging from light sand to bottle green will harmonize with the top jackets
and form a smart ensemble for any undergraduate. . . .
fi fi  v     fi
An artist's palette can't be compared to the profusion and variety
of color that is tinting the spring blouses at Mrs. Paton's Lingerie Shop,
2793 Granville Street . . . cream yellow, corn, maize, leather to lilacs,
cornflower blue, moss greens and deep wines are a few of the shades
of the blouses . . . dainty white with jabot of lace and black velvet
ribbon neck band reflect the fashion of the wasp waist period. . . .
A seven years' romance has been broken up and all the Phi Delt
has to say is, "I don't mind if that stock doesn't pay any dividends . . •
non-crushable material is featured in the English blouses while tucked
waists add a note of the tailored. . . .
Sports hankies with the French block print are a colorful acquisition for the Easter outfit . . . white lingerie show the feminine frills
and laces and are reasonably priced at 2793 Granville Street. . . .
fi        fi        fi
Between study sessions in the library an ideal relaxation is a walk
terminating at the hospitable Dolphin Tea House on Marine Drive,
five minutes from the Quad. . . . Superior afternoon tea with an
appetizing selection of cakes and hot rolls will drive away all exam
blues. . . . Alma 0103 is the new password for telephone connection
with the Dolphin. . . . Spring has come to the heart of one Musical
Society lass, but she doesn't seem to be getting much response even
though she went to all the trouble of calling a new president "Chicken
Pie" all through a recent banquet. . . . Reservations for gatherings of
smaller clubs, sororities, and fraternities should be made early to avoid
disappointment. . . .
20****?'**"
B. O. T. F.
On Monday, March 27, the B.O.T.F.
is sponsoring a meeting at which Dr.
Ivor Jennings will discuss present
problems in world affairs.
The meeting will be held in Arts
100 at 12.30. All are welcome and
those Interested are asked to submit
questions to Lome Kersy.
DEBATERS DISCUSS
RAILWAY UNION BILL
Governor-General Jennings, retiring Honorary President of the Political Discussions Club, will prorogue
the present session at the final meeting of the P.D.C. on Tuesday, March
21, in Aggie 100.
Debate on the railway unification
scheme, sponsored by the Conservatives under Don McOill, will be concluded. It is expected that Jack Ewan
of the Conservative Party will move
a vote of censure against the wasteful wheat policy of the Mackenzie
King Liberal administration.
NOTICE
Lost, on Wedneaday evening, .either
in the library basement or in the
Auditorium building, one perfectly
good scarf, of black and white* pattern . . a veritable masterpiece and
not the kind of thing you like to
lose . . . please return to Mr. Horn's
office or to the Pub, to Basil Ro bin-
son.
LOST
Around latter part of last week—
brown folder, containing student * *ass.
Film Society card, and pers onal
papers,—name on pass Denis L.
Swan. Return Publications office..
Now Oftermd
In the familiar pouch or new
slide packages. A tastier, milder
cigarette made from much
better tobaccos.,TVy them.
Buckingham
<    I C.  A R I    III    S £>
POEMS .. .
and STUFF
CompUed by LEWIS ROBINSON
Algy
Studies
for Exams
Thought of the week: A oonsolsnoe
is that six sense that oomes to our
aid when we are doing wrong—and
tells us -we are about to be caught.
• •      •
The student has hia splendid grade.
His thesis done—his work is great;
He studied while the others played—
Now jeers at Fate.
He studiss through the livelong day,
He knows not Dsadly Fear her pinch.
His lot seems light, his hsart seems
gay-
He has a olnoh.
Yet though my grade Is low and dim,
And I must toil ere I make good—
Think you that I would ohange with
him?
You bet I would!
• •      •
Just    a    thought t     Familiarity
breeds attempt.
• •     •
Dipsy Doodle
My love has flew,
Her did me dirt.            «
Me did not knew
". . . You know, Its really frightful
how some people can't keep their
wretched proboscldea (I think that's
right) out of other people's business.
I mean to say, here I was all set to go
to this Arts '41 thing the other night,
and I was all nicely got up In white
flannels and what-not, looking really
Jolly decent, don't you know, when
In pops this pest—he's one of thea«
frightfully efficient chapa who's always bristling with pocket ealendars
and pencils and things whenever
they're needed,—and aays 'do you
realise that In exactly 36 days you
start writing your final exams?', and
then pops out again.
WeU, really! A thing like that's
most upsetting. I was quivering like
an aspen ,or whatever those things
are that quiver, and of course, after
that, I couldn't go out and enjoy myself, zt wouldn't be orlcket, would It?
Absolutely not. So I had to alt down
and haul out the old books and work
like the very deuoe. And there's no
column and no danoe, and no nothing. Dash ltl
Her was a flirt.
Ths shock was rude;
Let's love forbid,
Lest you get doed
FOUND
History I. notes on the bus Maroh
16. Apply Mr. Horn's offloe.
Like I been did.
•     •      •
Wondering)  Why ia lt that the
girl wtth the leaat principle draws
the most interest.
LOST
Black wallet with student paae, In
Science Building, Friday. Please return to David King or Mr. Horn's
offloe.
"How'd Jo* finally Oet
Mabel's Pathorto content
to their Marriage?"
"When he found out
Joe bought thos* smart
clothes of his at Tip Top
Tailors,h*saia any
man who was as good
a |udg* of valu* a* Jo*
could tako car* of his
daughter."
2595
HAND-CUT AND INDIVIDUALLY TAILORID
TO YOUR  PIRSONAL MIASURIMINTS
TIP TOP
TAILORS
LIMITED
199 W. HASTINGS STREET
037 ORANVILLE STREET
711 COLUMBIA ST., New Westminster
TTU239 Friday, Marcfr 17, 1939
THE    UBYSSEY
Five
Y*:
YOUTH PLANS
ARE SUCCESS
OVER ALL B.C.
YOUTH     TRAINING     PLAN
OROWINO   RAPIDLY
During the past week, the Extension Department, one of the most
progressive and ambitious branches
of this University, has reached a new
peak In the suooeas of Its Youth
Training Plan.
This  plan,  whloh  Is designed  to
provide a , closer contact   between
the University and  the people of
rural   communities,   waa   Inaugurated tn this provlnoe as recently as
laat October. It provides for a series
of short schools at various centres
throughout the province.
These schools are tree to all young
men and women between the agea of
10 and SB, who are not gainfully employed, Including those who are living at home, on the farm, or In amall
rural centres, and are not receiving
wages.
VARIETY OF SUBJECTS.
The schools are of about two weeks
duration In eaoh plaoe. They Inolude
studies In soils, animal husbandry,
farm mechanics, and other farm
topics, nutrition, clothing, health,
handicrafts, recreation, community
leadership, eto. Full use ls made during the lectures, of all means of visual Instruction. Evenings are taken
up with non-vocational leotures dealing with literature, music, and other
suoh subjects, and are open to the
general public.
Throughout the two-week term of
each sohool, all the meals and accommodation of the students and
their Instructors are provided for, as
far as possible on a co-operative
basis. This makes It possible to run
the schools in a very economical
manner.
RAPID DEVELOPMENT.
The first of the schools, which was
started at Cloverdale, B.C., last October 10, had an enrollment ot between 40 and 80. From then until
Christmas, during which period' the
five instructors visited several more
towns, the enrollments rapidly increased to about 70. Since then, however, the development has really
been remarkable.
The two schools, at Salmon Arm
and Revelstoke, have been so much
In demand that they have actually
had    to    restrict    attendance.    The
latter    school    had    1S6    students,
some   of   which   eame   70.  miles   to
attend.
Nowhere    Is    the    success    ot    the
movement more evident than in the
letters  which  Extension  Department
Director,   Dr.    Shrum   has   reoeived
from students and others. The spirit
of enthusiasm with which the travelling   schools   are   welcomed   at   each
town is sufficient testimonial ot the
exoellent work that they are accomplishing.
ARTS '41 CLASS PARTY
We the executive of Arts '41,
wish to take this opportunity to
thank the Mamooks and their
president. Ken Shaw, for their
excellent co-operation and assistance at the Arts '41 Class Party.
(Signed)
Executive of Arts "41.
CARNEGIE RECITAL
The last in this year's series of
recorded Concerts, sponsored by the
Carnegie Record Committee, will be
held next Tuesday at 12.40 in Arts
100. A special program has been arranged which will probably include
the "Carnival of the Animals" by
Saint-Saens. Ouest speaker for the
occasion will be Prof. Walter Oage.
The last S. C. M. Fireside for the
term will be held Sunday, March 18,
at 3 p.m. at the home of Frank Mc-
Nair, 1107 West 33rd.
Mr. Morrison, founder of Alexandra Community House, will be the
speaker. All are invited.
V. c. u.
Mrs. W. E. McAllister, of Vancouver, will address an open meeting on
Friday, March 17th, at 12.45 p.m., ln
Arts 206.
On Sunday, March 10th, at 4.00
p.m., there will be a Fireside at
"Peace Haven", 3196 Argyle Ave.,
West Vancouver. Speaker will be
Mrs. Beedham. A party will leave on
the 3.30 p.m. West Vancouver Ferry.
Following the Fireside there will
be a Church Service, at 7.30 p.m.,
conducted by V. C. U. speakers, at
the West Vancouver Tabernacle, 28th
Street and Marine Drive. Mr. Robert
Birch, Arts '30, ls the pastor.
Everybody  weioome.
illHMMIIMI*MIIIHMHHIMIIHIMMMMHIIIHMM*IHMIMMIMI.H**
1 -P°etlT I
IH*tlllHMMIIIIIHmil*iniHMM**<ll*ll*llllllll**IIIIMIHItMlllfl
Wisdom Is a foolish thing that failed
me.
Silence  and  ddrkness can  have  my
life
And  fools  may   have   the   chill   of
platitudes.
Pale disease, heart's sorrow, I wish
Your sobbing
That I oould shuffle out my steps in
lonely streets
Hearing fiddles play through mist,
Dumb, weak, with wasting sadness
A shroud of tears.
i
Wild melody of winds
Moan higher
Wisdom is a foolish thing that failed
me.
—Dalhousle Oasette.
Ermlntrude Hopkins broke her spine,
And passed away at half paat nine.
Her   mother   waa   sorry   and   said,
"What a pltyl
I'm already late for my train to the
city."
—Harvard Lampoon.
APPLICATIONS FOR
SCHOLARSHIPS DUE
BEFORE APRIL 28
Applications for medals, scholarships, priaes and bursaries, other
than those awarded for general proficiency must be handed to the registrar not later than the last day of
examinations, Friday, April 28th. See
Calendar, Section "Medals, Scholar-
ahlps, Priaes, Bursaries and Loans."
Scholarships, prises and bursaries
to be awarded to returned soldiers,
or dependents of soldiers on the basis
of academic standing will be allotted
to students who are known to be returned soldiers or dependents of soldiers. Information In thla regard
must be submitted by all applicants
for these awarda.
PROGRAM
(Continued from Page 1)
naslum for the reception. The afore
mentioned  invitation  to the student
body also Includes the reception.
While His Excellency is In the
President's office the members of the
student body will be expected to form
a lane on either side of the road to
the Oymnaalum, which His Excellency will traverse.
It ls hoped that each member of
the Alma Mater Society will personally comply with the Oovernor-
Oeneral's wish.
(Signed) O. McOUIRE,
President,
The Alma Mater Society.
(Signed) JAOK DAVIS,
President,
The Men's Undergraduate
Society.
MOVIE EXECUTIVE
SPEAKS TO FILM SOC.
Speaking Thursday noon before a
large group ot students interested in
the production of motion pictures tn
Canada, Mr. Fraser, executive secretary for   the   Canadian   Film   Committee,    gave    some    interesting   Insights into this field and Its future.
He  stressed   particularly   the  importance  of the  documentary   films
especially when   they   are   used   In
conjunction with a film library. There
is at present a large market for Canadian film, both at home and abroad.
People tt seems are Interested ln
Canada and would like to   know
more about its scenery, Industry*
and Inhabitants.    It   Is   with  the
view ot arousing interest In this
type of film that Mr. Fraser ts making this survey.
Motion picture production is not as
impossible as it seems, he said.   Enlarging  further   he   explained   how
some  of the English  documentaries
TOTEM ARRIVES ON
CAMPUSTHIS MONTH
Appearance of the,new 1888 Totem
is assured before the end of the
month of March by the editor, John
Oarrett. "The exact d.te Is not absolutely set, but lt will be so close to
March 28 or 20 that it will not matter," said Mr. Oarrett.
Arrangements for the sale of the
Annual to students will be set up,
and notification given by meana of
the Ubyssey on March 24, and by
signs all over the campus.
*' Students who have paid their dollar down will be able to purchase
their Totem by bringing 82.00, and
the receipt for the $1.00. Other students who have not paid their dollar
down will be able to get a book for
three dollars ($8.00) until the supply
gives out.
It la hoped by the editor to have a
huge ceremony when the Totem
comes to the campus. What lt will
be, nobody yet knows, except the editor, but further information will be
gvten later.
were  produced  on a   veritable   shoe
string, those interested in the work
having  little more   than   their  own
overwhelming enthusiasm with whioh
to overcome the difficulties involved.
Mr. Fraser   haa   come   recently
from England,   where   he   worked
wtth the Strand Film Company In
the   production   of   dooumnetary
film.
He la beginning hla survey on the
West Coaat and wtll work eastward
interviewing the many organisations
Interested  across  Canada.
UMBRELLA LOST
Will the person who took the blue
striped umbrella from the table ln
the Upper Common Room by mistake, please return It to the umbrella
stand.
PLAYERS
(Continued from Page  1)
rectlon. Enunciation and gestures ln
particular were evidence of this.
One of the most important contributions to the general success was
that made by the stage setting. Both
ln design and workmanship the setting was beautifully executed with
superb results.
The third act began with a rather
strained atmosphere — the players
seemed to have started on the wrong
foot. Best act was the second. Here
the acting was smoothest while the
setting was most beautiful—the furniture and lighting being especially
noteworthy.
On the whole "The Curtain Rises"
was good theatre and good entertainment—we predict the curtain will
rise many times before the end of
its run.
DR. CAMARGO WILL
SPEAK TODAY NOON
Dr. Oonaalo D. Oamargo, outstanding author, editor and religious leader
of Mexioo, will speak In Arts 100 at
13.30 noon today.
Dr. Oamargo ls one of the three
visitors to Vancouver from the Madras World Christian Conference at
which sixty-seven countries were
represented.
As editor of the "Lumlnar", a
quarterly magazine for the thinking
olasses of Mexico, and as columnist
for one of the Mexico Olty dallies,
Dr. Oamargo Is Intimately acquainted
with the present situation ln that
area.
Dr. Oamargo'a purpose will be to
attempt to Interpret ln the light of
the Madras Conference conditions in
his own country.
"U.B.C. Presents ..." is enjoying
considerable attention from Vancouver listeners, Judging from comment,
made ln the studios of CJOR following last week's presentation. Apparently the new organization has given
University talent the chance lt -leeds.
All credit to Ozzy Durkin (he aaya
lt ahould be 'Osborne', but he's atlll
Ozzy to us) for his Initiative and
sales ability In giving the old Varaity
Time orew a new lease on life. It
would have been so easy to let things
go on, and say that the program waa
much Improved over last year,' but
Ozzy wasn't satisfied.
We will admit that the Varsity
Time programs of 1838-38 were muoh
Improved, but a variety halt-hour
that gives full scope to all Its talent
Is harder to produce than tears from
a poker-player.
But Osay went ahead with an expansion plan. Instead of half-an-
hour of third rate student potpourri
on the air, he haa obtained a half-
hour drama program that hae excited muoh favourable notloe, aad
a newa broadcast that hae gained a
large number of Interested listeners.
Further, University Radio la looking  far  ahead.  If   luok  la with  ua,
there'll be   a atudlo   in   the Union
Building, and there'll be B.C. network
and   maybe   National   network   programs  emanating from U.B.O.  next
year.
The  FORD V*8
It is one thing to write the word "economy" into an advertisement. It is another
matter to build true economy into a car . . . without sacrificing power and
performance, size and roominess, quiet comfort and'luxury.
The inherent economy of the 1939 Ford Y- 8 starts with the modest price tag,
and "carries through" with every revolution of the powerful Y-type 8-cylinder
engine. (In fact, owners from every province report 22 to 27 miles per gallon of
gasoline!)
And of course, the expert service which Ford dealers render at low cost is
another Ford economy "angle."
We suggest that you arrange with your nearest Ford dealer for a thorough
demonstration of the 1939 Ford V-8. We believe you'll agree it's "The Quality
Car In The Low Price Field." Ford Motor Company of Canada, -Limited* Ford,
Mercury, Lincoln-Zephyr and Lincoln Motor cars.
FORD      BUILT      MEANS      TOP-VALUE
TOP-VALUI   FORD   PIATURIS
STYLI LIADIRSHIP •¥- SS H.P. V-TYPI t-CYUNDIR
INOINI * HYDRAULIC BRAKIS •*- TRIPLI-
CUSHIONID COMPORT -¥■ STABIUZID CHASSIS
•¥ SCIINTIPIC SOUNDPROOPINO.
DILIVIRID PRICIS
In VANCOUVER b«flln at
$961 for '•"> v~* Coupe
$1 /0-25 fer D« Lux* P«rd V-S Coup*
Uemntm and rmgUtraHem he only mxtra. Price* Include
many Hrnm* of dm*irable equipment. Wide ctSo.ce of
body type* and colour*. INTER-HIGH
TRAOK MEET
TOMORROW    -    STADIUM
FROSH RUOBY
2.16—BROOKTON POINT
SATURDAY
Six
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 17, 1939
Varsity Boatmen Meet Washington
FROSH RUGBY
TEAM MEETS
MARPOLE XV
WINNERS      TO
VICTORIA
PLAY
Rowers Go Intercollegiate
At Big Saturday Regatta
Tho flrst intercollegiate rowing regatta in "Western Canada
comes to Vancouver on March 25 when the U.B.C. eight races
against the lightweights from the University of "Washington.
This will be the flrst time the Varsity outfit has had the chance
to show their stuff before a home-town crowd and after weeks of
constant practice they are fully confident of putting up a good
showing before a crowd that may include the Lieutenant-Governor,
TBA DANCE r
As a preliminary to the main event,
the U.B.C. seoond eight will raoe
against a picked orew from the Vanoouver Rowing Club's best.
There Is a possibility of a tea danoe
taking plaoe at the Rowing Club after the regatta and Oraham DarK
Ing, prexy of the Varsity Club, Is ex--
peoting a big crowd to turn out to
see for the first time the new Varsity
shells that were purchased this year.
MEET THE LADS
The U.B.C. orew will take their
plaoes as follows:
Stroke—Bob Pearce, powerful senior stroke for the past two years.
Seven—Bob Hayman, a Kelowna
oarsman from last year.
Six—Charlie Nash, rookie solenoeman who rowed 600 miles down the
Yukon last year.
Five — Lloyd Wilson, oame up
atrong from last year's Juniors,
Four — Doug Patrick, experienced
oarsman from last year's Juniors.
Three—Bob Mclntyre, also from
the younger team of last year,' Is
showing great promlss.
Two—Bill Lynott, holding the sams
seat as laat year and ahowing the
same flght.
Bow—Brlc Flesher, coming along
strong from last year's younger
squad.
Coach—Professor F. Brand, who received his training from Oxford.
Diok Montgomery has staked out
the course over Coal Harbour, ao If
you want to see the sport that thrills
and all that, come down and watch
our boys take the Huskies from over
the border for a ride on the 2Bth.
FROSH RELAY MEN
WIN ARTS'20 RACE
A hard running bunch of relay
men from Arta '48 powered home in
flrat plaoe In the Arts '30 on Wedneaday, to come within four seoonda
of the record In the traditional grind.
The Anglican eight captured seoond placo and the Aggie and Arts '38
squads took  third and fourth places
respectively.
RECORDS BROKEN.
The young Artsmen didn't look too
good at the start but their last four
men fairly flew and they all broke
the former lap records. Ward De
Beck of Anglicans was the flrst record breaker. The famous miler took
nearly a full minute off of the former mark for the long third lap.
From then on the Freshmen really
went to town. Alan Hurst started off
the fire-works by making up ground
on the fifth lap and trimmed 5 seconds off the old mark.
Ashley Shatford made a sensational drive in the sixth lap, breaking
the old mark by 15 seconds. Then
Nanalmo's Joe Ryan burned Up the
pavements to crack 25 seconds from
the seventh lap record. Basket bailer
Doug Alexander finished up the race
for Arts '42 cind broke the record for
the eighth heat.
NOTICE
General meeting of Rowing
Club, Tuesday, 12.30 In Applied
Solenoe 202. All members out for
distribution of Tea Danee Tickets
for Regatta.
JUNIOR SOCCER
The last in a successful series of
games for the Junior soccermen will
take place on Saturday at Nanaimo
Park, when the collegians tangle
with   Ex-Douglas.
Manager Yosh Hyodo , who has
been doing great work with the Juniors all through the season, requests
all the following plnyers to be at the
Varsity  Oym at 2.00  p.m.
Ooodwln. Oordon, Logan, McBurney, Ralph. Nikaldo, Mahood, Minl-
chiello,  Clark,   Stewart,  Hooper.
The Frosh Ruggers, pointing to
what they hope will be the Lower
Mainland Championship, are propping this week for their clash with
Marpole with this and the Bell-Irving Cup at stake.
Victorious over the Ex-Brltannla
gang last Saturday 8-0, the Freshmen earned the right to taokle Marpole, winners of the flrst half of the
Vancouver Rugby Union's seoond
division. Winners of thla contest,
which will be played at Brookton
Point at 2.18 tomorrow, will meet an
Invading Victoria team for the provincial title.
MARPOLE STRONG.
Marpole are no set-up, In fact are
rated over the Frosh, who will nevertheless trot out on the green full of
the old Vahslty spirit, hoping that
sufficient of their schoolmates will
be equally embued and turn out ln
droves to view the conflict.
Chief centre of interest among
campus sports outfits since they hit
their winning ways, the Frosh have
been Improving every time out under
the able guidance ot Coach Stan
Farquarhson and are rated, on this
campus at least, an even chance of
taking the Marpole laddies who will
marshal a very strong outfit on the
Brockton grounds tomorrow.
CHINS UP. LADS.
The greenshlrCs have a notorious
reputation for being a speedy hardhitting aggregation who give and
ask no quarter, and the Marpole
squad will meet them on equal
ground ln this respect. Winning the
first half of the schedule in powerful
style, Marpole coasted through the
second half and thus were overlooked until recently. Now they loom
as the biggest threat the Frosh have
had to face all year.
Fame carries Its difficulties, however, as the Frosh and Manager Jim
Stinson are rapidly finding out. Interest in the ventures, that is of a
Frosh team, rested on the shoulders
of a meagre fifteen men at the beginning of the year. Now, with the
Frosh definitely in the running,
everybody is turning out to practise
and the poor harassed manager and
coach are hard put to pick a strong
but faithful fifteen.
YOU  OOTTA  BE THERE.
Fame, too, can come in lethargic
style, as the students are finding
week after week. Pats on the back
Monday morning are swell, and the
kids confess they like lt but they do
wish their well-wishers would turn
out and vocalize their adoration. Try
it! You'll see a bang-up game win or
lose.
■ l**MHtllllH**tttl**HII*tlMt*lllllll(Mt*MIII*l*ltll(IIIHII(llltl!M
CO-ED MURALS
By OERRY ARMSTRONG
ltllMttl«imi*tlll*tll«IIHII*M*tt*llll*«t*lllll**MII*t**lltl*ll**)**t*
This year's graduating class finally
revealed its superior skill on the volleyball court when it defeated the
Sciencemen and Nurses team in two
fast and furious games of scores
15-12, 15-13.
Next Monday Juniors play Science
end Nurses, while Aggies meet Seniors. A good time is promised for all
who turn out . . . Can the Aggies
hold those rising Seniors? . . . Can
the Juniors keep up with the Sophs
in the race for second place? . . .
since Education and Theologs are almost  a  certain  bet for  top honours.
MURAL MAESTRO
Above pictured Maury Van Vllet Is
feeling happy about the success of
the Intramural activities for the past
year. He foretells even greater things
for the lnter-class competition next
year.
TRACK STARS
ERIN OO BRAOH
IN TRAINING
INTER • HIGH    MEET
TOMORROW
Just about the time the rest of the
campus wanders distractedly over to
the library packing large loads of
books, the Track -Team starts on a
spring spree of activity, entertaining
and visiting people from here to
Idaho.
And this year ls no exception. A
strong group of cinder-pounders and
weglht-throwers say "boo" to Old
Man Exams ln the near future as
they fulfil a tough schedule made to
order for them by Track Manager
Sammy V'olfe.
HIGH SCHOOL FIRST.
Starting with this Saturday on the
campus, when a high-school Ail-Star
bunch will come to the Stadium for
a meet with the collegians, the track-
ERIN OO BRAOH
sters will be busy right up to within
a week of examinations.
On March 25 another home meet
will take place, and this time lt will
be civil war as the strong and ambitious Frosh bunch challenge the
ability of the rest of the assembled
Varsity strength.
WASHINGTON RELAYS.
First venture across the International Line, the border to me, will
be on April 1, when a twenty-man
team will travel to Seattle to meet
Washington Frosh.
Hammering back to local pastures,
our lads will then entertain the University of Idaho's large contingent
for at least three days starting April
3rd. A big track event will take place
on the 9th, and following this there
is a possibility of Sammy Wolfe entering the Washington Relay Carnival on the 7th and 8th of the same
month.
THRU
the
HOOPS
by Roy Bell
INTRAMURALS
Anglicans now hole) a scant 12
point margin over Arts '39 nnd after
two crucial inter class events next
week, one of these classes should
pretty well cinch possession of the
Oovernors trophy, since Aggies, although in third place, are 82 points
behind the leader.
Next Tuesday noon, the Canadian
football throwing competition will be
staged. Every class will field three
men, who will each be allowed three
throws. The longest heave by each
man will count.
The long awaited inter class track
meet will come off next Wednesday
at 3.30 p.m. There will be nine events
staged: the 80 yard low hurdles, 50
and 100 yard dashes, 440 and 660
yard race, the shot put, discus throw
and the high and broad Jump.
F.XIT.
As the call for strip goes out ... so
goes basketball. Another season has
wound-up and another championship
has not been won. . . . "Hello Ma, we
tried hard but we lost." . . . good
sportsmanship, the old school colors
et al. . . . Stop I You're killing me.
Of the three quintettes of oagers
to represent Varsity ln Olty Leagues,
the Frosh were by far the flghtin'est
(witness . . . Initiation week.) They
fought so hard and so well as to
bounce themselves Into the City finals and forthwith Shores so rudely
bounced them right out again*
By far the most successful, they
suffered but one defeat thru-out the
entire season and a lot ot credit In
thla direction is due "By" Straight
for his work of organization and
more especially for his coaching. All
Prosh are ready, willing, but possibly
unable to move up Into the higher
circles. Their hooping futures at
Varsity rest in the hands of Van
Vllet and the other gods.
BEEOOTIFUL BEES.
The Senior B'a, a further notch up
the ladder, labored and strove . . .
getting nowhere. They wound-up Just
there. A good coach (Bugs Bardsley)
and a good team, but the company j
they were travelling with was also
good, too good . . . this ls where we
get off.
Here ln the persons of Al Menzles
and Art Barton, we have Senior A.
material, and here,  too, ls a fervent
ERIN OO BRAOH
wish that they may travel in better
company next year. The '39-'40 version of the Bees will be composed of
all those unfortunate (?) Senior A
loser-outers and will be (mark my
words) . . . could be a winning aggregation.
BEEG ONES.
Of the "Bigwigs" there ls very little left to aay, everything has been
said of them. They were both lucky
and unlucky, losing the easy ones and
winning the tough ones, upsetting
practically all predictions and winding up by dropping a third spot playoff to Munroes.
The misfortune ot losing big Alec
Luoas near the close of the season
was possibly the factor that laid
them low. Had it not been for this,
we think we are safe in saying they
would have ended up ln third spot
all by their lonesomes. For next year
(Happy Days) we have great material, great prospects and great hopes.
COME BACKS.
Those of this year's stalwarts who
are certain of returning are "Brud"
Matheson, "By" Straight, Don Livingston, Wally Johnston, Alexander,
Alex Luoas and Miller. Mayhap Rann
Matthlaon will also return to the fold.
Last of all (I saved lt for the last),
we have three other would-be greats
who will be putting ln an appearance
next fall.
NEWCOMERS.
The first of these and a person all
you cage fans will remember is Pat
Flynn, who thrilled us with his spectacular play last season. Pat has been
playing baseball and basketball
around Port Alberni (and I might
mention working) for the past year,
and after twisting wrists with loggers ln that league, he should be
more than able to bowl them over in
our own. Another luminary on his
way to the campus is big Jim Seott
(0 foot 4, so help me). Jim has been
starring with the champion Chllli-
wack Valleys ln a small sort of a
way. He only scored 21 points in the
IS X A MIN ATI O N S
They   count—and   you   can   count   oa   better   grades   If   you
consult  "College  Outlines." Write for our  free  catalogue.
THE BOOK EXCHANGE
"Canaan's "Book-Olsar-ng .Bonis"
370 Bloor  St.  W., Toronto,   Ontario
CRICKETEERS READY
FOR BI6 SEASON
ERIN GO BRAGH
It's time to pull the flannels out
of  the  mothballs they  have  been
reposing tn all year and douse the
old   willow  bat  in  linseed  oU,  because the ortoket olub has started
to roll and It won't be long before
there's action on the cricket front.
A   well-attended   meeting   on   the
campus  last  week  was  the  occasion
for much rag-chewing and discussion
about   the    plans    for    this  season's
team.  It  was   decided   to   adhere   to
ERIN OO BRAOH
last year'8 policy of entering a team
ln the First Division of the Mainland
League, and to shelve the Idea of
starting a seoond team as there
would probably be difficulty ln raising enough money and getting sufficient players.
ROBINSON SKIPPER.
Basil Robinson, who had a hand ln
the organization of the olub last year
and played all season under last season's skipper, Dave Carey, will captain the team this year. Bob Morris,
feared as one of the fastest bowlers
ln the city league, was elected President of the club.
"Bill" Hurst, Magee High School's
gift to Varsity cricket circles, will be
Vice-President and Manager for the
coming      campaign,      while      John
Lower Mainland Final game.
A  third  blgfellow  is Doug Pedlow,
star of another championship outfit,
ERIN GO BRAGH
the Shores. He, too, ls a eager of
merit and of height and ls a would-
be student player.
So let's raise the roof of the gym,
put it on props and out of all this
material glean a championship squad
for '39-'40. Here's good hooping to
you.
YOU THAT BURN
THE MIDNIOHT OIL I
A dismal figure huddled over
piles of long forgotten notes
. . . digesting facts and formulae and frequent cups of
coffee . . . burning the "mid-
night oil" In desperation
while the exams draw nearer
and nearer. /Oil burning Is
not a pleasant subjeot
whether the oil is "midnight"
or automobile. In regard to
the latter you can buy no
better when you aak for
HOME
GAS
You Can Buy No Better!
1
Thwaltes, who bore the brunt of a
lot of work last winter will handle
the thankless Job of Secretary-Treas-
ERIN OO BRAOH
urer, with his well-known reliability.
Dr. Harry Warren, was appointed
Honorary President for the second
year in succession.
Indications are that the talent
from the high schools and the increased interest of Orads will make
the club even stronger than last year
ERIN OO BRAOH
when lt turned in a number of surprising performances.
Speed. •.
Quality...
Service...
Seymour 4484
MITCHELL PRINTING and
PUBLISHING OO. LTD.
1037   WEST   PENDER   STREET
HHHIIIIIIMIHHmm.lHHlHIttHlimilMIIIMIIHIIHIHHMIMtHltlM *(ll(,UIIIIII,(M,,l„Mtll	
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HOW'S YOUR
GOLF GAME?
To be accurate you
must learn the Fundamentals of the Oolf
Swing. The winter season Is the time to iron
out your difficulties and
learn - how to enjoy
Golf.
Hal Rhodes Golf School
1155 W. Pender Street        Seymour 5333 *
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J

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