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The Ubyssey Mar 6, 1919

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume I.
VANCOUVER, B.C., MARCH 6, 1919
Number 14
'VARSITY  THEATRE  NIGHT!
AT THE  AVENUE, MARCH  13
On Tuesday, at noon, the men of the
College met in a general meeting to discuss 'one of the big events of the year—
the University theatre night. J. L. Mac-
Donald, who is in charge of the arrangements, informed the meeting that the
Avenue offered the best advantages, so
it was decided that this theatre should
be our choice. On Thursday, 13th inst.,
it is planned to have a monster parade
of all the College" men before entering
the theatre. Pandemonium will probably
be released inside, but it is understood
that no objectionable "rough-house" will
be tolerated. Bright ideas are asked for,
but all "stunts" must be distinctly college-like. Everyone is asked to array
himself in gold and blue that evening.
After the affair the parade will come up
to the Auditorium, where "eats" will be
served  out.
Everybody   boost!     "Come   on,   Red!"
HELP!
The other day one of our regular
advertisers told us to discontinue his
advertisement. "We offered a 10 per
cent, discount to University students for
two weeks and not a single one demanded it." From this he inferred that
he was getting no value from our columns.
Advertising is a straight business
proposition, and a person who advertises
in the "Ubyssey" does it in order to get
results'. The students must make a
point not only of buying from our advertisers, as many of them have learned to
do, but to tell them that they are from
the University. Soliciting advertisements is a difficult part of the work of
the Publication Board, and we have to
have the co-operation of everyone.
MAKE    THE   "UBYSSEY"
YOUR NOTICE BOARD
"HIGH JINKS'
Everybody knows that the women of
the 'Varsity were having "High Jinks"
on Saturday night. Still we must tax
our energies to find words fitting to
describe the scene, so that the men may
know what they missed by being mere
men.
Consternation was indeed created by
the appearance of one foolhardy male,
who, however, made good his retreat
before the threats of gipsies, soldiers,
and, of course, Charlie Chaplin's cute
little cane. Many of the costumes were
marvels of ingenuity. People of ' all
times, and all countries, danced light-
heartedly together; Greek goddesses
smiled at Highlanders, while Prinette
pirouetted with a gallant cavalier regardless of the frowns of Pieoro. "Dear
Mabel" was there, with her Bill, and
Algernon escorted with due gallantry a
maiden of France. The Grand March
was so attractive that it was encored,
and the long stream of courtiers and
dames, orderlies and "flu" nurses, gay
youths of the 20th Century and gypsies,
passed a second time round the hall.
The ubiquitous red tie was visible, of
course, and red skirts and cockades
were taken as representing principles of
Liberte,   Egalite,   Fraternite.
The call for waiters was nobly answered by the "gentlemen," who served
the refreshments with skill and despatch. After this Miss Mclnnes complimented the undergrad. on the . entire
success of the evening, and presented
the prizes for the best costumes. Everyone was unanimous in declaring that
Miss Brenchley and Miss Coates, as
Buster Brown and Mary Jane, deserved
their prize, while Miss Darner's costume was the sensation of the evening.
Enquiries are still being received as to
whether that hat came from Paris. Miss
Rena Grant, as Charlie Chaplin, was
also  successful  in  carrying  off a  prize.
Musical Society
Annual Concert
CHORUSES AND COLLEGE GLEES
TO BE RENDERED IN HOTEL
VANCOUVER,  MARCH  28th
Final arrangements are being made
for the Musical Society concert which is
to be held in the ballroom of the Hotel
Vancouver , on Friday, March 28th.
This momentous step in the career of
the Glee Club has been taken on account of the increased number of students taking part in the choruses over
that of former years. This year's programme will excel all former concerts,
and in order to accommodate all who
are desirous of hearing the performance,
a larger hall than the University Auditorium  has  been  considered  necessary.
It has not yet been announced who
will take the solo parts, but the best
possible talent will be procured. The
Glee Club itself is especially meritous of
praise and one .decidedly new and vigorous feature will be the College Glees.
The other choruses have been chosen
from popular and well-known operas,
which would delight the most critical of
audiences. Altogether the programme
is of the highest order. Our own twelve-
piece orchestra will render several instrumental selections, besides accompanying some of the vocal numbers.
Committees have been arranged to.
carry on the work, and tickets will be on
sale next week. They will be limited in-
number, so be on hand early to procure
them from your class appointees, as
follows: Miss Wallace, 4th year; Miss
Fournier, 3rd year; Miss L. Coates and
Mr. Mitchell, 2nd year; Miss K. Grant
and Mr. Coope, 1st year. Further announcements will be made in next
week's issue.
PATRONIZE YOUR
ADVERTISERS UBYSSEY
March 6,  1919
IRELAND     &    ALLAN
"TLbe Boofc Xovers' iRetreat"
BOOKSELLERS  AND   STATIONERS
Phone, Seymour 602
649  GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
THE     YAMATO
Direct  Importers of
Japanese Silk and Fancy Goods
460 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Phone,  Seymour 2288
ENLARGEMENTS
Photographs copied equal to the
original. Duplicates, enlargements
and   miniatures   made   from   same.
Uancouver Photo Co.
(Established 1911)
649 GRANVILLE STREET
(Down the Marble Stairs)
Jaaljtntt - (Eraft
The
Waist Seam
Models
will   be   very   popular   this   season
with  young men.
We are showing these models in
single  and  double-breasted   styles.
SHOP OF
FASHION-CRAFT
StyflB. JflBfrr $C (Ho.
Uttmtr-u
514 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
WESTERN UNIVERSITIES
SERVICE CLUB
The club will hold a luncheon in the
dining hall of the Hudson's Bay stores
on the afternoon of Saturday, March
8th, at 12:30 o'clock. All undergraduates who are returned soldiers are invited to attend; a good time is anticipated. The charge will be one dollar
a plate. All who expect to be present
should give their names to either Mr.
Traves or Mr. Kingham.
EXCHANGES
A rowing club in connection with the
University of British Columbia is contemplated by the Men's Athletic Association, reports the Ubyssey.
This is a commendable project and
should be encouraged. But why stop
there? Why not a Canadian Intercollegiate Rowing Association, comprising crews from the University of British
Columbia, the University of Toronto,
Queen's, McGill, Ottawa, Dalhousie,
Acadia, New Brunswick and King's College? Here are all these 'Varsities situated, some of them at any rate, on
water courses not to be excelled anywhere on the continent, and yet not one
has a rowing crew. Certainly, it seems
as if we had much to learn in aquatic
sports from our sister universities across
the line as well as from those in the Old
Land. Now that the war is over, why
should not the Athletic Directorate turn
its attention to the proposition of forming a racing crew? A country that could
raise such eminent scullers as Hanlon,
Gaudaur and Scholes and Wright should
not lack for plenty of good material. Let
us hope that we may profit by the timely
example of U.B.C.—"Varsity."
Before you send the copy in,
Hesitate;
Put a comma or period in—
Punctuate!
Put yourselves in the typo's shoes,
Save him from the wicked booze;
You can do it if you choose—
Just punctuate t
—Linotyper's  Note.
Read the ads. on this page.
We Specialize in
GLOVES
DENTS       FOWNES
PERRINS
Ladies' and Men's
E. CHAPMAN
545 Granville Street
Success Business
College
Limited
B.   SCOTT   EATON,
Principal
B.A.,
Corner Main Street and Tenth Avenue
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Phone, Fairmont
2075
GIBSON STUDIO
Photographers
214-18   Blrk*   Building
Phone, Sey. 3430 Vancouver,  B.C.
HARRISON  &  CO.
K. H.  SEABROOK, Prop.
Drawing    Instruments    and    Materials
Architects', Engineers' and Surveyors'
Supplies—Nautical  Instruments
and Charts
Telephone, Seymour 5826
582 RICHARDS STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
MCDONALD'S
CHOCOLATES
For  Birthday Gifts
Granville  Street Near Robson
U.Morimoto&Co.
JAPANESE FANCY GOODS
Ladies' Wear Made Special to
Order
Hemstitching by Measure
MAIN STORE:
673  Granville  Street.    Phone,   Sey.  6410.
BRANCH  STORES:
57   Hastings   S.,   W.     Phone,   Sey.   2313.
932 Granville St.    Phone, Sey. 8723.
VICTORIA BRANCH:
1235  Government St.    Phone 4742. March 6,  1919
UBYSSEY
E. C. KILBY
The Hosiery Specialist
628 Granville Street
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Wellington and Comox
COAL
The Best for Kitchen and
Furnace  Use
Macdonald, Marpole Go. Ltd.
Sole Agents
1001 MAIN STREET
Phone, Seymour 210
MEN'S   GREY   SERGE
SUITS, $30.00
This suit has never been equalled
for office and business wear. As
staple as a blue serge, &nd quite as
serviceable. We are showing a fine
twill all-wool cloth at this price.
Coats are made in one of the new
three-button sack models. Collar-
less vests and medium-fittir,g trousers. An extra good value
at    $30.00
MEN'S    DARK   NAVY
SERGE SUITS, $32.50
A genuine West of England serge
in a rich dark shade. The lining
and interlinings are of the finest
quality. The shoulders, collars and
fronts are hand-tailored. A little
investigation will convince you
that this is the best value in the
city    $32.50
DAVID   SPENCER
LIMITED
MEN'S LIT.
On Friday evening, February 29th, a
novel entertainment was provided the
students of the University by the Men's
Literary Society. Each person, on
reaching the door, was duly labelled
with a red, green, blue, orange or some
other colored ribbon, and then sent in.
The ice was broken by a selection of
college songs, followed by a solo from
Mr. Coates. Mr. Adams, Mr. Rive and
Mr. Smelton, properly balanced on a
soap box, then vied with each other in
impromptu speech-making for the coveted prize. In friendly informality, Mr.
Adams gave a talk on "Mr. Denham,
Bolshevik," and "Mr. Smeeton and his
Foreign Policy." Mr. Rive discussed
that elusive topic, "Student Thought,"
and Mr. Smeeton told how a university should be managed. Everyone
agreed that the speeches were not only
humorous but clever. One bold member of the Bolsheviki was found missing when the time came for him to discuss that subject, but Mr. Denham ably
stepped into the breach. From an eminent position on the soap box, Mr.
Wood presented the prize, a tie, magnificently striped with red, yellow and
green, to Mr. Adams.
Mr. Mahrer played a collection of
modern piano selections, well known to
the audience, who spontaneously joined
in singing them. After this the floor
was cleared and dancing started. Cards
were also provided and other entertainments, capably directed by the master
of ceremonies,  Mr.  Rive.
After the second dance it was discovered why everyone had received a
tag. All were grouped according to the
colors of their ribbons and told to give
a short play on a given subject. The
greens came first, and, under the leadership of Dr. Sedgwick, gave a representation of an Irish Parliament, superior
to the performance of the wildest rah-
rah club. A pretty little patriotic drill
was next arranged, followed by a heated
Bolsheviki meeting. The audience was
also given a glimpse of the inner workings of the Student Council, as well as
examples of a properly conducted 'varsity lecture and a prohibition meeting.
The prize was given to the group receiving the most applause. The Irishmen
fought hard for the honors, but were
beaten by the patriotic division, led by
Mr. Wood and the dish pan.
Another feature of the evening was
the better baby contest. Each group
selected its two better babies, who were
carefully judged by Dr. Sedgwick.
Miss McCabe and Mr. D. A. Wallace,
the noted scientist, succeeded in capturing the yellow and blue ribbons.
Leckie Shoes
are    made    for   the    man    who    is
particular
Remember:    "The Quality goes in
before the Name goes on"
"That's  a Leckie"
University Students
Who have time to spare
could make no better use of their
time than in the
Study of
SHORTHAND
It will be of untold advantage
to you in taking lecture notes.
Most great speakers and many
great writers are good shorthand
writers.
What about  YOU?
Don't you think it would be
valuable to you also?
Enter any time—Day and Evening Sessions.
R. J. SPROTT, B.A.,
Manager.
Phone,  Seymour 1911
"MIKADO"
Our  Specialties:
Silks,  Kimonas,  Ladies'  Wear
Made to Order
Opposite the Orpheum Theatre
766 Granville St. Vancouver,  B.C.
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For   Light  Refreshments,
Ice   Cream   and   Candies
at
774 Granville Street UBYSSEY
March 6,  1919
Clubb & Stewart
Limited
309  to  315  Hastings  Street,  West
SPRING MODELS
in  Young Men's  Suits
"20th  CENTURY BRAND"
and other first-class makes
SPRING HATS
The very latest—-the smartest
types we have ever shown. See
them before deciding where you
will buy.
Phone, Sey. 8380
The
Northern Life Assurance
Company of Canada
it  a  good   Company  to  Insure with
EDWIN J. GALLOWAY
New and  Old Book Shop
Specialists   in   University   Books
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
Capital   -
Reserve  -
- $15,000,000
- $13,500,000
THRIFT AND  SECURITY
Open a Savings Account with The
Canadian Bank of Commerce. If more
convenient, accounts may' be opened
and deposits made by mail.
Ten Branches in Vancouver District,
Including  the   following,   which  are  in
the vicinity of the University:
Falrview—Corner   Sixth   Avenue   and
Granville
Kltsllano—Corner Fourth  Avenue  and
Yew Street
Mount   Pleasant—Corner   Eighth   Ave.
and Main Street
UBYSSEY
Issued    every    Thursday    by    the    Publications
Board   of the  University of  British   Columbia.
Extra   mural   subscriptions,   $2.00  per   session.
For   advertising   rates,   apply   Advertising    Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief Ian.    A.    Shaw
Senior   Editor Alfred   Rive
(  Margaret Browne
Editors   I  Patricia Smith
I   Reginald  E.   Cribb
Chief  Reporter T.   Preston   Peardon
DEPARTMENTS
Musical  Editor Leopold J.  Mahrer
Military   Editor Claude   P.   Leckie
Exchange   Editor Agnes   M.   Ure
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager W.   John   Allardyce
Advertising Manager John  N.  Weld
Circulation   Manager J.   Gordon   Fraser
Editor for the Week Reginald E.   Cribb
THE C. O. T. C. DRILL
Mr. Sutcliffe stated on Monday evening that the Faculty had recommended
the students' petition for the abolition of
the O. T. C. Senate will likely discuss
the matter on Wednesday, but it will be
impossible for any definite action to be
taken before this week's drill. It might
be well that all drills be attended pending the final disposition of this problem.
THE   STUDENTS'   COURT
On Monday evening, for the first
time in the history of the University,
the Students' Council sat as a court for
the trial of an alleged student misdemeanor. Some criticism was raised by
counsel in the trial as to the validity of
the Court. Let us see how discipline in
the College was maintained in the past
and how it is to be maintained now
and in the future.
In the days of McGill University College, the Faculty were solely responsible
for discipline, investigated alleged misdemeanors, determined whether or not
they were misdemeanors, and, if necessary, inflicted such punishment and
issued such warning as might be deemed
necessary. There was not, at that time,
any definite fixed code of laws covering
all forms of "crime," and there is no
such code  to-day.
With the coming of the University
and the principle of student self-government, the responsibility for discipline
and punishment was put in the hands of
the student executive, with the Faculty
as a Court of Appeal. The constitution
states that the Students' Council may
act as a court, but the form of procedure
in that court is not stated. Therefore,
had it been desired, the Council had the
right to hold a private enquiry, in which
no counsels would have appeared, and
the defendant, plaintiff and witnesses
would have been directly examined by
the Council. It was thought to be fairer,
however, to hold the trial in open court
and follow in general the conventional
court procedure. It was considered impossible to introduce the technicalities
of civil or criminal law, as no student
could be conversant with all the phases
of a complicated mass of statutes, rulings and precedents. General court
procedure was adopted merely as a convenient form, but there was no intention
of trying a student for breaking University  statutes by common law.
If the students object to this form of
trial, the Council has and will use the
power of holding private investigations
as mentioned above. As regards punishment for offences, the Council may
recommend the form which this shall
take to the Faculty, who have the final
decision, as in all other phases of self-
government.
MY  MABEL
(A Trio of Triolets)
I.
Behind a white syringa tree
I kissed my pretty Mabel.
We sat together,  I  and she,
Behind  a  white   syringa  tree,
And there was no one near to see.
(What harm,  if  I  was  able?)—
Behind a white syringa tree,
I kissed my pretty Mabel.
II.
Among these wood anemones
My Mabel lies a-sleeping.
0 will you, busy little bees
Among these wood anemones
Tell my dead, darling Mabel—please,
That  I  stand  here  a-weeping.
Among these  wood anemones
My Mabel lies a-sleeping.
III.
As snowy flakes that melt in rain
So joy may turn  to sorrow.
My Mabel's dead, and feels no pain
As snowy flakes that melt in rain,
1 stand alone, bound by Life's chain,
And  so  must stand,  to-morrow.
As snowy flakes that melt in rain,
So joy may turn to sorrow.
G. G. C.
Heard in the Biology Lab.
Boss—How long can a man live without brains?
Schell—I don't know; how old are
you? March 6,  1919
UBYSSEY
T^EEP   the   happy   memories   of
College days for all time.
Bridgmans Studio
will    help    you    with    pictures    of
established  reputation
At the same address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
VIOLONCELLO
MISS MAUDE SCRUBY
A.R.C.M.,  L.R.A.M.
Receives Pupils, Ensemble Classes,
Concerts, Recitals. Visits Vancouver weekly (Tuesdays).
Studio: 709 Georgia Street
Telephone, Bay. 189
CUSICK
SERVES   GOOD   EATS
692 BROADWAY, WEST
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
J.aP.?o*ter,D<L
TWO   STORES:
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
FIT-REFORM
WARDROBE
345  Hastings Street
We sell clothes for young men and
men who stay young
CORRESPONDENCE
(The editors accept no responsibility for
statements made in this column.)
Letters must be brief. They should be
legibly written on one side of the paper
only, and, if typewritten, must be double-
spaced. The name and year of the writer
must be enclosed, but the letter may be
published over the initials or a pen-name if
so desired.
The editors consider themselves under no
obligation to publish any one letter.
"JARRING   REPETITION"
Any day in the halls, you may hear College Spirit being denned as an "animal that
ain't," as far as U. B. C. is concerned. We
beg to  differ.
The very fact that we are alive to its
absence, in whatever degree, indicates that
we possess it.    Think that over!
Would it not be a wild conjecture to say
that, on the night of many a College function, several (if not twice that number) of
our agitators could be found down town,
and in their pockets very likely would be
reposing slips of cardboard labelled, "C4,
C5, Friday evening only."
"To be good is noble, but to teach others
how to be good is nobler—and less trouble."
Some of us think that Mark Twain said a
mouthful.
Just let's pretend that we have a College
Spirit (what a worn out phrase) and act
the part accordingly. It isn't what you do,
it is how you do it. You are going to look
back on these days: why not make them all
that you could wish to recall.
Good Old U. B. C.
T. V. L.
JOSEPH CONRAD
A deeply attentive audience at Dr.
Sedgwick's lecture on "Joseph Conrad,"
before the Vancouver Institute, testified
to the interest aroused by the writings
of this talented writer, whose work is
such a tribute to the English language.
A Pole by birth, Joseph Conrad stands
forth unique in the history of our modern literature.
"Look out there!"—not very attractive words, perhaps, to our ears, but to
Joseph Conrad they opened up new
vistas, for with them he heard for the
first time that English tongue which
was to be the medium for the exposition of his philosophy.
Dr. Sedgwick told how the future
author, influenced by his father's admiration for the English, grew up with the
ambition to be a sailor on a British
ship.
At the age of 35 he turned to literature.
Inspired by his life on ships, he
preaches the doctrine of a world community and fidelity to one's comrades.
His books tell of the lonely soul,
divorced from its fellows, striving to get
into touch with them again. A hearty
vote of thanks was accorded Dr. Sedgwick at the close of the lecture.
Cuthbertson's
619   Hastings  Street
648  Granville  Street
VANCOUVER,       B. C.
Furnishings    for    YOUNG   MEN
Just Received
TRESS' CAPS
A popular British make—ask to
see the "MASCOT;"
Price, $2.00 up
ARROW SHIRTS
A fine selection of pattern makes
choosing easy.
Price, $1.50 up
PERSONALITY BELTS
are popular with Young Men.
Your own initial on Sterling Silver
Buckle.
Price, $1.75 up
The
Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial  Stationers   and   Printers
Students'   Loose-Leaf  Binders
Educational Stationery
School  Equipment
Drawing   Instruments   and   Materials
320   SEYMOUR  STREET
(Opposite  C.P.R.  Depot)
Vancouver, B.C.
Fresh  Cut  Flowers
Funeral  Work  a   Specialty
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists, Nurserymen
and Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head   Office:
48   HASTINGS   STREET,   EAST
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728   GRANVILLE   STREET
Phone,  Sey. 9513 UBYSSEY
March 6,  1919
The HOME OF
GOOD SHOES
JiTBeu,
UMITCB
WE     HAVE     ONLY     ONE
AIM—that   is,   to   sell   you
shoes    that   will    prove    so
Thoroughly  Satisfactory  that you
will always    come    here    for your
foot wear.
CLUFFSHOECO.,Ltd.
649 Hastings Street, W.
FACULTY COLUMN
L-l-F-E
is just one d thing
after another
EVENTS
Big, important events are happening every night.
BE PREPARED
to meet your associates on an
equal basis.
BY KNOWING
of what has happened over
night.
READ
THE   MORNING    SUN.     A
wealth of information and
special features of particular
interest to you and every
member of your family are
daily portrayed by the world's
greatest writers, both men and
women, in
The VANCOUVER DAILY SUN
ORDER your copy delivered at your home
now—the cost is
TRIFLING, 15c ?Ji^Ty
SEYMOUR   40
The Forestry Course
The short course in 'Forestry, instituted by the Department of Soldiers'
Civil Re-establishment, which has been
in session in the Commercial Building
of the University since November 21st,
is among the most numerously attended,
popular and interesting of the courses
offered to returned men.
The course is of five months' duration.
It includes Forest Botany, Mensuration,
Utilization, Protection and Improvement, Administration and Silviculture.
In addition, lectures are given in business English and Correspondence, in
Mathematics and Forest Surveying and
Mapping. A special effort is made
throughout to achieve a thoroughly
practical course, and approximate the
actual conditions encountered in the
routine of the forest ranger's work. To
this end field practice in log scaling has
been taking place at mills located convenient to the University, the mills of
the B. C. Fir and Cedar Lumber Company, Hanbury Lumber Company, and
the Cotton Shingle Mill being available
to the scaler students, enabling them to
get practical knowledge of the processes of the manufacture of logs and
bolts into lumber and shingles. Before
the completion of the course it is
planned to accompany the students to
representative logging camps near Vancouver, and in these to spend a certain
amount of time in the cruising, mapping
and surveying of timber lands.
The course is in general charge of Mr.
E. J. Hanzlik, a graduate of the University of Washington Forestry School.
The services of Mr. Hanzlik have kindly
been loaned for this work through
courtesy of the United States Forest
Service. Up to the time of his coming
to Vancouver he was engaged in preparing scientific forest working plans
for the continuous production of timber
upon the Snoqualmie National Forest.
The Forest Products Laboratory, maintained by the Dominion Government in
the Commercial Building, under the
direction of Mr. L. Brown, is also
available for the students in this course,
and the apparatus already installed for
testing the bending and breaking strains
of timber is of great value to the
students.
In addition to the regular course of
study prescribed, special lectures by
experts and authorities are given. Mr.
T. P. Mackenzie, Grazing Commissioner
for B. C, has discussed grazing problems and plans in their relation to
Forestry, and shown the importance of
lands   lightly   timbered   with   yellow   or
lodgepole pine in the development of
the cattle and sheep industries of tlfe
Province. Mr. Roland Craig, of the
Conservation Commission staff, and a
recognized forest authority, is among
others who have given these special
addresses.
Twenty-two students are engaged in
the Course—17 being from B. C. and five
from Alberta. Upon its completion
these men will be qualified for minor
positions in the Dominion and Provincial Forest Branches of the Permanent
Forest  Rangers'  Force.
All. the students are keenly interested
in their work, and the prospect of steady
growth and development of the course
seems assured. Indeed, with the vital
importance of forestry as a basic B. C.
industry, it may well be that in a comparatively short time the instruction at
present given will expand into the long
contemplated University School of
Forestry.
STUDENTS' COURT
The first session of the Students'
Court was held Monday night. The
judges announced that they would be
governed by no precedents, as there
were none affecting such a court. "The
law of common sense" was to govern
the actions of the Court.
There were four charges brought
forward by Lieut. Letsch, as adjutant of
the C. O. T. C. The three cases first
tried were dismissed on the grounds of
insufficient evidence. The fourth case
was more complex, and at 12 o'clock the
Court adjourned until Wednesday.
Standard Tea Rooms
BREAKFASTS
LUNCHES AFTERNOON   TEAS
222-230    Standard    Bank   Building
Corner  Richards  and  Hastings  Streets
HOCKEY
Victoria at Vancouver
MONDAY, MARCH 10
8.30 P.M.
Prices:
Reserve   Seats,    80c;     Promenade,
$1.10;    Box   Seats,    $1.35.     Entire
Balcony    Unreserved.    55c;    Boys,
25c.    Prices include tax.
Reserve  Seats now on sale at the
GROTTO  CIGAR STORE
622 Granville Street
Phone,  Seymour  23420 March 6, 1919
UBYSSEY
The  Greatest  'Cellist of
The Age
The Greatest Musician
CASALS
the Spanish 'Cellist
Coming to Vancouver
FRIDAY,  MARCH  14th
He is recognized by the musicians
of the world as the biggest artist.
Kreisler says: "He is the greatest
musician   that  ever   drew   a   bow."
Tickets,   $2.00,   $1.50,   $1.00
Plan  at  Fletcher  Bros.'  Music
Store
R.C.Purdy,Dd.
Famous Chocolates
and
Home-Made Candies
Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
675   GRANVILLE   STREET
EXCLUSIVE
COSTUMIERES
For Women, Misses and Children
575 GRANVILLE STREET
MUSICAL NOTES
French Band to Play at Orpheum
Some time in the distant future Vancouver may possibly have a Massey
Hall of its own, but, until that Utopian
era arrives, we must be content to have
"unique" concerts, which begin at 11
P. M. The concert which is to be given
at this hour by the French Army Band
of Veterans at the Orpheum on Monday,
March 10, is unique in more ways than
one. Every one of these veterans is a
medalist of the Paris Conservatory for
proficiency in his particular instrument,
and this is a sure indication that this
band is one of the best that has ever
come to America.
In these days, when we hear so much
about Bolshevikism, it is interesting to
recall that the Paris Conservatory was
founded in 1794 by the National Assembly; the very best men of the time
were chosen as members of the Faculty,
and the text books were printed at the
expense of the government. To-day,
the Paris Conservatory is the greatest
institution of its kind in the world.
Entrance is gained by competitive, examination, and tuition is given free of
charge. The result is that this conservatory is a national institution in the
truest sense of the word; the standards
are extremely high, and, therefore, the
fact that all the members of this French
Army Band are medalists of this institution speaks for itself.
Pablo Cassals
Since the day when, as a boy of 16,
Pablo Cassals, while still a pupil of the
Barcelona Conservatory of Music, received a decoration from the hands of
the Queen of Spain, his name has been
synonymous with the greatest attainments in the field of violoncello music.
Cassals came first to America in
1914. His playing created a veritable
sensation, and his name rapidly became
a household word in this country. His
return this year is being hailed as one
of the greatest musical events of the
coming season, for, while the violin, the
piano, and other instruments, can each
claim several great interpreters, when
one speaks of the violoncello, one knows
but one great name—Pablo Cassals.
A Sad Case
The  patient  was  sick,  and   swallowed
a spoon.    Now she can't even stir.
Dr. Ashton (after commenting on the
quantity of "padding" in the third-year
French exam,, papers): "You people
ought to be upholsterers!"
Exclusive Styles
in
for
young men and
Voung 01 omen
JiHE  NEW STYLES IN  FALL
AND WINTER FOOTWEAR
are  certainly handsome.
For the young woman, the new
military heel boot, with cloth or
buck tops, in colors of brown,
grey, or black.
For the young man, the new
shades of tan, with leather or
Neolin soles; also smart styles in
black.
We have an Expert Fitting
Service.
Ingledew
Shoe Co,
m Granville street
"Vancouver's   Smartest   Shoe
Store" UBYSSEY
March 6,  1919
SUITS for
Young Men
The   Largest   and   Best   Stock   in
the City
STYLE
QUALITY
VARIETY
Every line offered at a price
which cannot be equalled for real
Suit  value  anywhere  in  the  West.
Our Guarantee goes with everything we sell—-"Your Money's
Worth  or  Your  Money  Back."
WILLIAM DICK
Limited
33-49 Hastings, East
Vancouver, B. C.
RENNIE'S  SEEDS
They Always  Grow
Send for Catalogue To-day
WM. RENNIE CO., LTD.
1138 HOMER STREET
872 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 530
If the 6-cent fare is not
necessary to-day, why did
the City Council grant it
last July?
If it was necessary then,
it is necessary until there
is a decrease in the cost
of the street car ride.
Why not leave it to the
Public Utilities Commission?
CHEMISTRY SOCIETY
The regular meeting of the Chemistry
Society was held on Wednesday, February 26th, when two interesting addresses on the history of Chemistry
were given by Mr. Pound and Mr.
Wrinch, members of the freshmen class.
The society feels justly proud of its
members in Arts '22, as this is the first
year in the history of the society in
which freshmen have taken an active
part at the meetings.
Mr. Pound dealt with the Phlogiston
period, when Chemistry first assumed
its proper place as a science.
Mr. Wrinch followed, dealing especially with the work of Lavostier and
Dalton, whose famous atomic theory
has proved the solution of many problems of chemistry.
The next meeting of the Chemistry
Society will be held Wednesday, March
12, at 8 p. m. Dr. E. H. Archibald will
speak on "The Rusting of Iron."
SCIENCE
Once again, two unhappy delinquents
were hailed before the Science Court
last Friday. J. W. Rebbeck was charged
with a crime so frightful and degrading
that we would not dare to mention it
here. Suffice it to say that he was
charged with disgracefully misconducting himself with a young lady and that
the jury, being generous, acquitted him.
L. S- McLennan was charged with extortion. His case gave full scope to the
lawyers who delved deep into legal interpretations and brought up precedents
and authorities by the carload. He was
found guilty and, to the great joy of the
rest of Science, enriched the coffers by
a fine of fifty cents.
IN   FLANDERS'  FIELDS
Struggling   to   stem   the   rush   of   barb'rous
hordes
Who wrought in Flanders untold misery,
A fallen soldier slowly breathed these words:
"Take up our quarrel with the foe.    If ye
Break  faith  with  us  who  die,  we shall  not
sleep,
Though   poppies  grow  in  Flanders'   Fields."
He died.
Beyond his poppy-laden grave the deep
Hun ranks pressed on.    Long years his message cried—
In  vain?    Nay,   to   this   grave   came   answer
low:
"We  have  kept faith, O valiant  dead;  sleep
on
Where Flanders'  poppies  grow.    Your  hated
foe •"
The   speaker   paused;   his   eyes   triumphant
shone.
Far   off   a   broken   throng,   with   grovelling
whine, crawled, whipt and sullen, toward
the gloomy Rhine.
L. B. W.
The Great-West Life
Assurance Co.
HEAD    OFFICE:    WINNIPEG,    MAN.
Assets, December 31st, 1917,
Over 24 Millions
As soon as possible every young
man should create an estate by pur-,
chasing a life insurance policy.
Investigate the merits of The Great-
West Life, and it will not be necessary to seek information elsewhere.
Inquire at
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Branch Office for B.C.
Remodelling; Skins Tanned
FURS
A  SEALSKIN   COAT   or   a   fur
piece made up by us is a thing
of beauty.
H.  E.  TAYLOR
Repairs
508   DUNSMUIR   STREET
Phone, Sey. 4891
WELL-PRINTED
STATIONERY
Means Everything
to Your
Business Success
Get   Your   Next   Supply
from the Pioneer
Printing House
EVANS & HASTINGS
578 SEYMOUR STREET
Phone, Sey. 189     Vancouver, B.C.
None  but  Union   Mechanics  Employed

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