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The Ubyssey Dec 10, 1937

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 Published Twice Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Vol. XX
CONFERENCE
QUERY BRINGS
400 ANSWERS
Thought Trends
Are Shown
Suffragettes may be spectacular; but It appears that
at U.B.C. the men are the real
reformers.
Out of the 400 odd questionnaires which have been
received by the National Conference Committee to date
some 76 per cent, have been
answered by men.
Party per sent ef the men and
SO per cent of the women have
a numerous variety ef oemmenta
and  Ideaa te offer, whieh  touch
all phases ef oampus life.
Particularly numerous are those
relating to the suggested "orientation oourse" which seems to meet
with almost universal favor.
INPORMAL  DANOES
Some have Ideaa for date bureaua
and Informal danoea while othera,
whoae mlnda have a social bent In
another direction, appear to be inclined towarda the establishing of
co-operative boarding houaea, eto.
Oplnlene   whieh   crop   up   frequently are theas  having rsgard
to    major    afflictions,    aueh    aa
overorowdlng, lack of time, and
the new type of Ohrlstmss examinations.
Other  phases  ot  campus  affairs
which come under observation and
comment include suggestions aa to
Senior  Advisor   systems   and   the
Paaa Syatem.
In January the oommittee will
publish a detailed report on the
inquiry, and will then endeavor to
proceed with some action along the
lines suggested by the questionnaire.
WANT MORE
Meanwhile, as numerous replies
are still being received, the boxea
will be left in the Science, Applied
Sclenoe, and Auditorium Buildings
until Friday, December 17.
According to a member of the
oommittee the response so far haa
been most satisfactory. It is hoped
however, that an inoreaaed volume
of replies will continue to be received, particularly from the women students.
VANCOUVER, B. C„ FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1937
■—^—^faa-^^-^_____.____^Ma———a———■-U.aa—a—-
No. 20
STERN
J
Lyall Vine, who was instrumental Monday evening in tightening up regulations governing
issuance of athletic strip.
Thursday noon eleven members
of the Canadian Rugby Club
appeared before the Discipline
Committee on charges brought
under the new ruling.
ADDITION TO
STUDY TIME
In response te raprssentatlona
made   te   the   President   by   the
Paeulty   Oommittee   en   Student
Affaire, arrangemente have bean
made to extend the heure of Library  aarvloa   during  the   Christmaa examinations.
Librarian   John   Ridington,   ln   a
notice sent to the Ubyssey, states
that until Thursday, December 16,
the Library will be open trom 8.45
a.m.   to  0.55   p.m.,   except  on   Saturday, December 11, when no evening aervice will be given.
The Library will remain open
until 9.BS thle evening.
First mention of the proposal to
extend Library hours was made in
a Ubyaaey editorial two weeka ago,
and waa followed by a request from
Students' Council that the Faculty
Council oonalder the matter.
"Yeomen" Rehearsals
During Holidays
Rehearsals for the "Yeomen of
the Guard" will continue throughout the Chrlatmas holidays.
Watch the notloe board for the
datea and placea for the practices.
Tryouts for principals are proceeding and those planning to take
theae parte are urged to attend all
meetings.
20 PLAYERS
WARNED BY
COMMITTEE
Fail To Turn
In Strip
Twenty members of the
Canadian Rugby Club have
until January 11 to hand in
their rugby strip, or the cash
purchase value of it.
Acting undsr new regulations
passed by oounoil Monday evening, the Discipline Oemmlttse
met Thursday noon, and warnsd
the offending athletes that If they
did not comply with the rules,
their marka would bs withheld
neat spring.
Only eleven of the 20 who were
summoned to the discipline session
arrived,    the   othera    disregarding
the order.
TEETH  IN  RULES
Monday evening, council, on motion of Lyall Vine, passed rules
that put "teeth" In the regulatlona
governing iaauance of strip.
Swift aotlon waa taken, and the
Canadian ruggers were sent letters
demanding their presence before
the Discipline Committee Thursday noon.
The players who did appear
objeeted to the "oraoklng down,"
but no relaxation of the rulee
will be allowed, eounell membera
declare.
Too much money has been lost
becauae of non-returned atrip, lt ta
claimed.
In many cases, officials believe
that players have no legitimate excuse for failure to return outfits,
and the new rules will put pressure
on all athletea who are lax in
bringing back strip.
Value of U.B.C. Is
Stressed in Speech
Of Student Prexy
Jean Meredith, chosen Monday
night as Students Council's official representative at the N.C.
U.S. conference in Winnipeg
this month. Jean is busy these
days attempting to quell new
objections to the co-ed award
system passed earlier in the
term.
Theologs  Plan
'Peg  Meet
WINNIPEG, Dec. 10. — For the
flrst   time   in   Canada's   history,   a
National   Conferenoe   ot   Canadian
Theological Students is being planned,   under   the   direction   ot   the
Student    Christian    Movement    of
Canada.     The   Conferenoe  will  be
held tn Winnipeg, Friday and Saturday, December SI and January 1.
The   Idea  ef  a   National   Conference  of Theological   Studenta
was eoneelved aa a result of Inquiries  made  by  eftleere ef the
Student     Christian     Movement.
The propoeal fer aueh a oonferenoo   reoeived  commendation
from    theological    etudente    all
aeroas Oanada.
Leadera   invited   to   the   Conference Include Dean S. C. Carpenter,
Dean of Exeter Cathedral, Exeter,
England;   Susanne  de  Dietrich,   a
secretary   of  the  World'a   Student
Christian Federation, Geneva;  President J. S. Thomaon, President ot
the   Unlveralty   of   Saskatchewan;
Professor R. B. Y. Soott, Professor
of the United Theological College,
Montreal.
'PEG TO   BE
BUSY TOWN
•MsasaaaisisMisssssaa
Jean Meredith will be the voice
of Studenta' Council at the N.C.U.S.
conference 1 n W1 n n 1 peg this
month, counoil decided Monday
night.
After a month or more of wondering whether it would take any
atand regarding the conference,
and after refusing financial aid to
the N.C.U.S. committee, oounoil
finally decided to send a delegate
of its own, thus indirectly aiding
the   committee.
To   the   N.F.C.U.S.   conferenoe,
alao to be held In Winnipeg, U.S.
C.    will    aend    either    Maleolm
Brown or Bob Smith.
Kemp Edmonds,  Ubyssey editor,
will  travel  to Winnipeg  to attend
the    first   national    conference    of
Canadian University Press editors.
Closing Institute
Lecture Saturday
Final meting of the Vanoouver
Institute for the Autumn Session
will be held in Room 100 of the
Arts Building Saturday evening at
8.15.
Speaker will be W. C. Mainwar-
ing, and the subject, "Electricity—
the Modern Aladdin. The lecture
will be illustrated with demonstration a.
Cagettes Sponsor
Tea Dance Dec.
27
A tea danoe sponsored by the
Girls' Basketball Club, will be held
at the Alma Academy, after the U.
B.C.-California English Rugby game
on Boxing Day, December 27.
All proceeda will be used for the
Injured Players' Fund, so a good
turn-out ia requested.
Kiwanians
Hear Carey
Vancouver members of the
Kiwanis Club heard on Thursday from student president
Dave Carey that the University of British Columbia was
beginning to pay dividends to
the Province, in the form of
knowledge, and in actual
money.
"Our unlveralty, new SS yeara
eld, le pouring baok Into the prov*
Inee muoh of the wealth that haa
beon Invested In It. There are
three main ways In which these
dividends are being paid," said
Carey.
"Firstly, the province is benefitting from the work of the
graduates, 77 per oent ot whom
are actually in B. C. today, and 80
per oent of whom are In Canada.
It oan be aeen that the Investment
in the university produces returns
locally," declared the apeaker.
SCHOLARSHIPS
"Studenta from our institutions,"
continued Carey, "have won altogether #500,000 worth of scholarships, and our graduatea have created an enviable reputation for the
unlveralty,
"U.B.C. studsnts hsad the Data
ef the National Resesrch Oounoil
soholarahlp   winners,   and   eels-
brated   professors  ef  ether  uni-
varsities rsgard eur graduatee aa
•tope'."
The   apeaker  went   on   to   ahow
how   every   faculty   has   gradually
built up, since the Inception of the
university,   a   separate   reputation.
He told how, "The record made by
the    graduates    at    the    Sorbonne
caused the French Government to
grant the highest honor to Dr. Ashton  and   President  Kllnck,  and  to
grant a  special  bursary  for  B.   C.
Graduates."
OASH  VALUE
"In   every   faculty   the   majority
of  ita  graduates  are  now  in  the
Province,  repaying  British  Columbians tor their Investments in the
university," stated the prexy.
The epeaker next proeeeded te
point out that the main portion ef
university   funde   are   epent   In
Vanoouver er B. O.
In salaries te the staff S47B.000
go almost dlreotly baok te Vanoouver,     and     In     expenditures
other than aalarlea eome S800,000
mr* spent locally.
Laatly    Carey    dealt    with    the
figures obtained aa a result ot the
recent    questionnaire    distributed
amongst the students by oounoil.
EXPENDITURE
"We students spend annually, In
Vancouver, oloae to a million dollars The Itemised account la too
lengthy to preaent here in its entirety, but we were aatounded by
the enormity of the auma expended
eaoh year right here in the city,"
said Carey.
Continued on Page 8 See Carey
CO-ED AWARDS
STILL CAUSE
OBJECTIONS
The new women'a award system,
paaaed in Ootober amidst wide*
spread dlaoontent from some sources, may be reconsidered, It waa
learned at council meeting Monday
evening.
A    petition    from    co-ed    Big
Bloekstsrs  came  before   eounell
asking   certain   ehangee   In   the
system for women's awards.
Counoil  did not choose to deal
with the petition, membera declaring that tt was the business ot W.
A.A. rep., Jean Meredith to settle
the matter.
SPBOIAL MEBTINO
"You'll have to call a meeting
and reconsider the whole system,"
Jean was advised, but she couldn't
see It that way.
"Why should I?" she asked. "It'a
passed now."
A eaustle remark from John
Bird waa taken te Indicate that
the matter ef ee-ed Big Blocks
cculd be dealt with by Jean Meredith ae she se cheeses, with
eeunell taking none ef the responsibility fer anything ahe
might de.
//
Varsity    Ball
In  Victoria
//
"Varsity Ball," an annual feature
sponsored by Victoria College, will
be held at the Empress Hotel, Victoria, on December 28th.
Mualcal background will be provided by Len Acres' and hla augmented oroheatra for the affair,
whioh is under the patronage of
Hla Honor the Lieutenant Governor
and Mra. Hamber. The Honorable
F. 8. and Mra. MacPherson, and Mr.
and Mra. P. H. Elliott.
It la expected that many students will be In Victoria at thla
time fer. the McKechnie Oup
game and will avail themselves
ef thle opportunity te participate
In a acelal, aa well as athletic reunion.
Tickets may be obtained trom
Struan Robertaon or Bill Hudson
for the modest sum of $1.60. The
dancing la from 9 till 2 and aupper
la Included.
rpHB increasing interest ot our
A young people in politics is one
of the significant features of the
trend towards national consciousness and more critical examination
of government policies and political  questions  in  Canada today.
The Interest of the Youth manifests growing awareness of the fact
that   the   existing   situation   of  instability and insecurity can no longer be treated as transitory and that
something must be done about it.
Young m*n and women are beginning to realise that aomethlng
CAN  be  done  about  It and  that
the character of what la eventually done will  be determined  by
the  foroea whieh  eompel   Ita  doing.
Young   people   are   learning^ that
their futures are Inextricably bound
up with the future of our country
as a whole and cannot properly be
considered   apart  from   lt.     Diminishing opportunities for University
graduatea equally with the growth
of   "blind    alley"    occupations   for
hoys   and    girls   in   general   bring
home  more  and   more   clearly   the
realisation that Youth ls faced with
a social problem which none of us
can afford to ignore.
THE PROBLEM OP OUR
GENERATION
The  problem  of the   Vouth   la
peculiarly a problem ef our generation.    In aome reepeete It can
bo desorlbed as THE problem of
our generation beoauae  It growa
out of the oondltlona of gansral
crisis through which we are living—which   le  the   erlsls  ef  the
decay   of   the   preaent   eeonomlo
ayatem.
This 1b at the root of ail our main
political problems today, but in no
caae is the relationship so clear as
in the case of the Youth. The world
was never so rich as today, production never so highly perfected and
the    material    necessities    ot   life
never  so  abundant  and,   yet,  insecurity and tear of the future were
never so widespread or Increasing
so rapidly.
It Is doubtful if there was ever
a period in which Youth waa so
conscious of its needs and so doubtful of being able to satisfy them.
Certainly there was never a period
when the possibilities of achievement on all fields of constructive
effort were so dazzling but opportunities for young people to get a
start so relatively scarce.
Youth and Politics
By TIM BUCK
Thla Is the ssoond of a aerlea of artlelea being pressnted to
students aoroaa Canada under the caption, "Youth and Politics."
The first article waa written by J. S. Woodsworth, M.P., fsderal
leader of the C.C.P. party. Thla aaoond article la by Tim Buck,
aeoretary of the Communist Party of Canada.
YOUTH WANTS
OPPORTUNITY
Capitalism could possibly provide Youth with food, clothing and
shelter but, except in case ot a
world war, capitalism can no longer provide Youth with a sufficiency
of opportunities and jobs. It is
precisely this characteristic ot the
present situation that makes the
yotith problem  Insistent.
Youth cannot be satisfied with a
"hay and oats" perspective. The
desire tor economic security ls one
of the major forces in man's life
but youth cannot be satisfied with
the hope of that alone because,
more than security. Youth craves
opportunity.
Opportunity for self-development,
for a career, for achievement in
some chosen field, and, above all,
opportunity to play a role ln the
shaping  ot events.
It ls this that makes legislative
proposals alone entirely inadequate as a solution of the problem
ot the Youth. Legislative measures
can be of tremendous assistance to
young people, can be utilized to extend opportunity for education, to
ensure that no boy or girl should
be robbed of the chance to study;
to provide vocational training facilities and  so  on.
It can be utilized to ameliorate
the conditions ot thousands of active,   intelligent,   young   men   and
women hut It can only be fully effective even in this respect when
it is utilized with full realisation
of the limitations imposed by the
economic conditions ot the system
within which we live.
A complete and permanent solution of the problems ot the young
people can only be achieved by a
complete and permanent change In
the economic basis of society because it ls precisely this economic
basis out of which the problems
grow.
Under the present economic setup, society is being strangled, as it
were, by the accumulated burdena
and privileges ot the past and the
problems of the youth are a direct
product ot the process.
RICHER CONCEPTION
OP CIVILIZATION
It might be said that the most
distinctive difference between youth
and old age is that Youth looks,
alwaya, ardently toward the future
while age looks longingly back.
Youth is in this sense the real custodian of civilization. The generation of students of today will either
march forward with the development    ot    civilization    to    greater
_______________________E_S________B_----B
helghta of achievement or go down
with It In ita decline.
The decisive thing fer every
young man and young women te
realise today le that the queetlon
ef whether It la te go forward te
greater heights er te decline will
be decided according te the direction ef the pressure of the greatest political fereee and that they,
the beye and girls of today, will
be the men and women whoae
political Intsrests and activities
will, decide.
This makes the problem of better conditions for students, a larger measure of security and extension of opportunity for Youth in
general a decisive question. It can
scarcely be denied that through
movements like the National Youth
Congress the studentry could become one of the moat Important
factors for defence and extension
of opportunities for democratic progress and in making our country
one ot the leadera ln the struggle
now going on to defeat the menace
of the rising tide of the new barbarism called Fascism, by a higher,
wider and more noble conception
of Civilization. Two
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, December 10, 1937
THE   UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publications Board of the Alms Mater Society
of the University of British Columbia
Phons  Point Qrey 206
Mail Subscriptions, $2.00
Office: 206 Auditorium Building
Campus Subscriptions, $1.50
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Kemp Idmonda
NEWS MANAGER
Dorwin Baird
SENIOR EDITORS
TUESDAY: Frank Perry FRIDAY: Dorothy Cummings
FEATURE EDITOR SPORTS EDITOR
James Beveridge Frank Turner
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Monty Fotheringham Bill Sibley
ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR EXCHANGE EDITOR
Jack Mair James Macfarlane
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Rosemary Collins Irene Eedy Beverley McCorkell Robert King
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITORS
Van Perry Hugh Shirreff Myrne Nevison
CIRCULATION MANAGER
Norman Depoe
REPORTERS
Jack   Bingham,   Joyce   Copper,   Joan   Haslam,   Ann   Jeremy,   Ozzy   Durkin,   Barbara
McDougal,    Jack    Merctr,    J.    C.    Penney,    John    Garrett,    Keith    Allen,    Victor
Freeman, Verna McKenzie,  Ed.  McGougan, Virginia Galloway,  Katherine McKay,  R.
Ker, Eiko Henmi, Lester Pronger, Doug  Bastin, Helen  Hann, Molly Davis.
SPORTS REPORTERS
Orme Dier, Norm Renwick, Basil Robinson, Frank Thornloe, Archie Byers, Bob Melville
Advertising Office
Pacific Publishers, Limited, 303-A Pender Street West, Vancouver, B. C.
Telephone: TRINITY 3002
All advertising handled exclusively by Pacific Publishers, Limited
UNIVERSITY  ENDOWMENTS
Theoretically the University of B. C. is a corporate body
independent of politics, politicians and the government of
the day.
But actually, it is just as much a state owned and controlled body as any rural school in the land.
Its income is from two sources only—the grant from the
government and" the fees of the students. The politicians
control the grant, which means they control half the University's income—which means they control the University.
It is not a good thing for the politicians to be in control
of the province's highest educational institution.
Disguise it how we may, the faculty and administrators
of the U.B.C. talk, work and teach with one eye on the job,
and one on Victoria.    They cannot do otherwise.
Nominally there is free speech and free thought at the
University. Actually there is not. The censorship of fear—
strictest of all censorships—is in continual operation.
This is not a healthy situation.
One solution has been advanced. British Columbia is
a land of many wealthy citizens, who have made their wealth
from the exploitation of the natural resources of the province.
In other countries, and in other sections of Canada,
wealthy citizens have made a practice of endowing universities, thus giving them sources of steady, independent
revenue.
No more than in other lands, can British Columbians
take their wealth with them into the grave. And a very
excellent manner of disposing of some of it would be the
endowment of the University of B. C.
Nominally, the U.B.C. is controlled by the finest representative body of citizens it is possible to gather together. If
the U.B.C. had an independent source of income, their control would be actual, not nominal.
In days of old it was considered a pious and worthy act
to endow institutions of higher learning.
Why should it not be so today ?
(Reprinted from  the "Vancouver Sun",  December (>.)
I
| anil 3>ktttl?B |
*>    By The Beggar Student    §
********>*>****»>**********
Well, well. Here we are, with a
nice clean sheet of
AFTERNOON....paper in front of
OF A FAUN us. And we take
up our pen (literary word for typewriter) and look
at it. It seems that on the very
last column we shall write in 1937
there should be some sweeping
message to deliver—something that
would uplift the heart, and send
everyone forth to face the world
(literary word for examinations)
with a smiling countenance and an
elan vital, whatever that may mean
to you. It means nothing to us, as
our French is rather spotty.
But outside a few flakes of snow
are drifting down; freshettes are
walking about with their arms
clasped to their bosoms, and registering cold. In the pub it is warm,
but murky with cigarette smoke
and the odor of neglected lunches.
A little group is unenthusiastically
playing 4-6-6;; the score is some
place in the Ave thousands, and
they are not having much fun, but
they keep grimly on.
By now you will probably have
realized that we have said exactly
nothing; and what is more, you
will be right.
*    *    **
So it seems that it is high time
we did aay some-
L.ITERARY thing. Perhaps you
BIOGRAPHY would like our autobiography. No ?
Well, here it is. As we lay kicking
and crowing in our cradle, if any
one had said that some day we
would be writing the best column
that ever appeared, and -which
would be avidly read, they would
not have been wrong; they would
have been a plain damn liar. Then
there was the Zoo, when we were
a  child, and now Varsity.
This   seems   to   be   rather   short,
but we have no Intention of telling
you everything.   We at least know
when to keep the mouth closed.
*     *     *
Last Monday morning the bus
stopped at Tenth
ODDS AND and Blanca, to pick
ENDS DEPT. up a beautiful
maid. She is taking Nursing, if our memory is no
worse than usual, but don't bank
on it. She stepped calmly aboard,
arnd munched a piece of toast all
the way to the Gables ... to the
smiles of the early risers, and the
glares of those who had not the
forethought to bring their breakfast along.
And Wednesday morning there
was a gent on the street car with
the left side of his face smoothly
shaven—and the right side still
covered with shaving soap. P.S.—
they both had nine o'clocks—and
made them. But late rising ia not
confined to us, anyway.
Merry Christmas. Heppy Noo
Year. Will somebody please close
that damn window?
ROOM AND BOARD tor University men at 4444 West 12th Ave.
Reasonable.
Here and
There **«*
The Exchange Editor
ROOM   AND  BOARD  for  one  or
two men students. New home,
nice rooms, good location.' 4467
West 13th.
A HOST OF LOVELY CHRISTMAS GIFTS AT
FIRBANK & LANGE
Seymour at
Dunsmuir
SEY.  2088
PERSONAL JEWELLERS TO EVERY MEMBER OF THE FAMILY
By J.  D.  MACFARLANE
McGILL SPECIAL
Rich men's sons are not playboys! So say the men of McOlll
In a recent debate on the subject,
the basis of which rests on the contention that either wealthy men In
college have a monopoly on "various sorts of wine, and also of women," or that, because of family
tradition and because of the Innate
breeding of their background, wealthy men tend to be virtuous.
A bright spot appears with the
attempt at definition of the word
"playboy" wherein It ls stated that
the commonly-held version of such
a being is "a man who gets up at
6 o'clock ln the afternoon, ties on
a couple of scotches for breakfast,
and then goes out for his night's
work."
Fortunately, the speaker went on
to modify that by saying a better
definition for a college playboy is
a student who is "generally unprofitable and aimless. All students
are that," he stated, "and wealth
ls not essential for playboy activities; even the student of average
means can sow his wild oats."
The debate goes on to such
points as wealthy men having more
access to women and alcohol, and
wealthy men following family tradition and preparing themselves
for the position in life that is prepared for them. Hut that is neither
here  nor  there.
We thank the almighty that the
honorable gentlemen saw the real
point, i.e., that all students nre unprofitable nnd aimless. The playboy theme is an Americanism, and
n hangover of the old days when
college was the rich gentlemen's
paradise for the purpose of acquiring an aggregation of the facts at
life, cultural und otherwise. Today, college is university, and its
signlllcunce is preparation for a future life's work and the business of
earning a living.
That  students  are   unprofitable
and   aimless   Is   due   to   the   fact
that,    In    a    very    complex   world
that   is today,  most  students  are
trying to find a bssis upon which
to   yvork   towards   a   goal.      Incidentally most of them can't even
find   the   goal.
A    significant    fact    of    statistics
available  concerning  today's  undergraduates  Ih  that  most of them are
of im  ago  where  people  are  usually
cheerfully    adolescent,    and     trying
with    magnificent    gesture    to    disguise   the   fact   of   their   youth   and
Inexperience,   by   a   more   than   adequate adherence to the formal rules
of   conventional   sophisticated   society  in  which   they  do   their  best   to
ape the  social  solidarity ond power
of their elders.
If they do not do this, then they
are more than likely to be completely absorbed in figuring out Just
where they stand personally in the
maze of life's paradoxes which
exist today, and in trying out to
disentangle the mass of debris
which was the philosophy of their
fathers before the Oreat War, antl
the mad twenties came along. That
they should elect to walk alone in
as great a degree as others choose
to do exactly the opposite is perhaps more to their credit than
otherwise.
Anything which appears to be an
emulation of dead tradition is usually the result of youth's Incautious
morbidity; and efforts to carry it
like an Initiate usually results in
a fiasco, from which isolated facts
a certain number of pseudo-soeial-
ly minded people with a morbid Interest in such things are determined to create something, even if
they cannot And  sufficient facts of
substantiation.
•       •      *
U.B.C. is not the only place that
is smothered in questionnaires. McOlll students also are answering
one which has been published by
the Dally. In this we notice that
the question ls put as to whether
there ls any continuity in the
choice ot courses which the student
takes, and whether courses ln the
flrst year lend themselves to that
continuity.
Looking to B. C. we can only
raise our eyebrows and ask "what
White Shroud
Envelopes
Campus
By the Feature  Bdltor
'The anowl
It'a here I
Freshettes skip with glee on the
way from the library, beaming at
their fur-topped boots, and longing
to splat snowballs at the necks ot
their boy friends.
Lecturers lecture vainly, for the
collective gaze of their hearers
wanders to the window, and contemplates the fleecy flakes whirling and doodling down the soft
airs of the  quad.
At 0 o'clock, motor car owners
will steam profanely to the parking
lot with tea kettles of hot water
from  Mr.  Underbill's cafeteria.
Students who must purchase antifreeze and winter oil wtll be unable
to buy adequate Christmas gifts,
proving once again the Influence,
the far-reaching influence, of climate and geography upon economic
development.
LOVCLVI
It will snow for Christmas. It
will snow lu January, and there
will be fights upon the campus,
and all the Men's common-room
windows will be broken again.
There will be snow tights ln the
parking lot. Sclencemen will wear
their mountain-boots if they have
any.
Isnt it lovely?
Editor's Note Above story Is
presented In the belief that the
weather man Is alwaya right. If
It snows, our trust will not have
been  betrayed.
BREAKFAST
FOR V. C. U.
Sponsored by members of the
executive of the Varsity Christian
Union n breakfast has been planned to be hold at 8.30 a.m. lu the
Eden Cafe, 571 Oranville Street, on
Tuesday,   December   28.
Acting us master of ceremonies
will be .1. Forrester, former president of the Debuting Society of
Queen'H, und well known In that
capacity as a radio speaker. He
was also a distinguished player on
the   Queen's   Bnglish   rugby   team.
Chief speaker for the occasion
will be the Itev. Oeorge Kiddle,
prominent Vancouver clergyman,
well known for bis work among
young   people.
Members of the V.C.U. and all
others interested aro invited to attend. The price of admission is
Uf,  cents.
Is    this    word    'continuity'?"
Tlie report on tlie questionnaire
doesn't give much on this, but it
does state most emphatically that
a student advisory committee composed of Seniors and Juniors working under faculty supervision ls a
wonderful idea.
We have thought on this too.
How about a student advisory committee to Faculty on student attitude and on academics, etc. Then,
at least, students, might take a real
interest ln such affairs as academic
work instead of apathetically doing
no more than trying to keep within
regulations, and  to make a "pass."
\j$ GIRLS
corns in snd tee our
Party and Street
Frocks, she Smsrt
Costs. We will be
very pleased to show
you. Our slsss are 11
to 17 snd 12 to IS.
You will find thsy fit
luit right.
THE     G I R L S'
APPAREL    SHOP
445 GRANVILLE ST.
Cor. Granville snd Pondsr, lit fleer up
Look over our complete stock off
CHRISTMAS GIFTS
for sll members of ths fsmily.
HEWER'S HARDWARE
4559 West Tenth Elliot 1552
'They'll laugh when they tee us coming In a tlelgh—"
"They'll cheer when we hand out the Sweet Cap*)"
SWEET CAPORAL CIGARETTES
"The pure*! form in which tobacco can be emohed."—j(*anctt
I
Gifts
That
Endure
Spread ths hsppy Christ
mss spirit,throughout tht
sntirs yssr with s gif
from
Dean S. C. Carpenter
To Be Speaker at
Xmas 'Peg Confab
WINNIPEO, Dec. 10.—Announce-
ment was made today by the advisory committee of the National
Conference of Canadian University
Students, that Dean S. C. Carpenter
of Exeter, England, one of the leading figures in British religious life,
is coming to Canada the end of
this year as one of the chief speakers at the National Conference of
Cnnadlan University Students, to be
held  at Winnipeg.  December 27-31.
Dean Carpenter is not a newcomer to Canada, having given several
lectures in the Dominion. He has
won many high distinctions in
England. He is the youngest man
ever made Master of the Bar, succeeding in that offlce Dean Matthews of St. Paul's.
While Dean Carpenter is coming
to Cunada primarily for tlie Winnipeg conference of Canadian university students, lie has been Invited to lecture at Princeton, Boston and Drew Universities, Union
Theological and General Seminary,
.New York, and Trinity College, Toronto.
LATIN   VOCABULARY   LOST
- Black-covered     notebook.     Latin
vocabulary for Aeneld  VI.
please     notify     Enid     L.
through Arts  Letter Rack.
Fender
Butler
KEV  CASE  LOST
Key case lost ln University district. Finder please return to Mr.
Home's  Offlce.    Frank Walden.
DELEGATES TO MEET
All National Conference delegates are asked to meet on Saturday, December 18, at 12.15 noon,
in Arts 102. Plans for the Conference will be discussed and transportation   arrangements   decided.
! H. Jessie How. B.A. !
2            PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER           4
*f.                    Popular Library                     j
1   4451 W. 10th AVENUE      P. G. 67   J
*                                                                    •*
************************
Dr.
Cor
C. M. Whitworth
Dentiit
Telephone Elliot 1766
Hours: 9 to 5
Saturday: 9 to 1
10th  and   Sasamat St.
"THE   IT.   B.   C,   OF   DANCING"—
Freshmen or post-graduates will tlnd our courses easy to learn, with
a quickness that amases. Special rates September and October to
Varsity   students.
BALLROOM BALLET TAP
LILAS MOORE
R»co_nlssd Authority on Dancing
709 West  Gsorrtu Strsst
Trinity  1710
Make
McLennan, McFeely & Prior, Ltd.
Retail Store—556 Seymour St.
Your Headquarters For
ALL SPORTS
Requisites
Phone: DOUGLAS 21
Choose those "Just Right"
of Christmss Greetings.
cards from our selected stock
Ths stsff snd smployses of Gshrke's wish the studsnts
snd faculty of ths University s Very Merry Christmas and
A Happy Now Year.
QEHRKE'S
566 Seymour Strsst
Phono: Trinity 1311
"WE ARE YOUK DELIVERY SERVICE
B. C. DISTRICT TEL. and DELIVERY CO. LTD.
It bam > 81 e Wist HABTiNoe St. Seymour SMSB
APT-R   •    P.M.,    ALSO    SUNDAY.   ANO    HOLIDAY.!    S-Y.    9164 K
Head Ofricai  Marin* Building
TRUCKS.    MOTORCYCL.Be    ANO   BIKE    MIIIINOIRI
AVAILABLE  AT ALL  T1MEB Friday, December 10, 1937
THE      UBYSSEY
Three
more
light
than
heat
INTELLIGENT paopla find many
1 things te think about in ths
column contributed to tho Editorial
Page ot tho Vancouver Sun by Dr.
G. G. Sedgswlck, scholar, critic and
educator. Tho sharp and wsll-
storad mind of Dr. Sadgowlck
presents Intellactual rlchss to Sun
readers In a column llghtonad with
quiet humor.
VANCOUVER
SUN
To read ragularly Dr. Sadgowlck's
comment on the passing scene,
Phono Trinity 4111 and have tho
Sun delivered dally. Tho cost Is
60 cents a month.
A Story of Twenty-One Years
CONCLUSION
In 1928 the university gym was
built. The money for this had been
raised by a $3 increase ln the A.
M.S. fee. When lt was Anally built
the Ubyssey staff, as well as Students' Council, heaved a sigh of relief, for they both were responsible
for its  construction.
At the beginning of the 1928-29
term the Ubyssey Issued the following as their aims and policy:
(1) To aooerd end to advertise
thoae aotlvities ef the student
body whioh shall In tho opinion
of tho Publications Board, bo considered of legitimate and sufficient  newa  value.
(2) Te offer eonatruotlva orltl-
elam of aota and oondltlons af-
footing tho atudent body.
(3) To provide studenta with
a medium for aooeptable literary
and   orltloal   expression.
(4) To be te aome extant aelf-
supporting ae a raault of work
of tho bualnoss and advertising
staff.
The flrst serious treatment of
fraternities was contained in the
paper during the following spring
term.     Comments  had   been   found
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Held to the light, it shows the ENTIRE ink
supply-—shows days ahead if it's running low.
A wholly exclusive and original style—Parker's
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And not merely modern in Style, but modern also in mechanism. Ita SACLESS and
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from all earlier types, whether they have a
rubber ink sac or not.
Oood pen counters are now showing thla
pedigreed Beauty. Oo and aee and try it today.
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Maker, ot Qulnk, the new pen-
cleanhtf Ink.   I So, 3 Jo endup.
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PARKER  PENS SOLD AT
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For Complete Satisfaction Buy Your Parker Pern at
MITCHELL-FOLEY  LIMITED
522 HASTINGS STREET WEST
(Opposite Spancar's)
on these Institutions as early as
1921 but lt was not until 1028 that
anything of a constructive nature
was done either from the inside or
outside.
The Ubyssey Impartially explained both sides of the question. It
told of the Ideals of friendship and
brotherhood within the fraternities,
of thetr practical effects and their
lnfleunce on the university as a
whole. It made suggestion for improvement. As a result the Inter-
Fraternity Council was organized
to control the activities of AW fraternities at  U.  B.  C.
In January,  1931, the paper was
enlarged   to   Its   present   size.
8CN8ATION
A month later the right of freedom of the press ln the university
was discussed In an Interesting
spat between the faculty and the
Publications Board. On February,
1931, the Ubyssey published an editorial protesting against criticisms
of the paper made by professors
ln the class room. The editorial
inferred that professors sometimes
"talk  through their hats."
President Kllnck Informed the
editor, Ronald Orantham, that a
meeting of the Faculty would be
held to consider the editorial, and,
ln the meantime, the President
forbade the publication of any criticism of the actions of the staff.
The next issue, although it contained no critical editorials, did
contain correspondence from students that criticized the university.
President Klinck Immediately suspended Orantham. In protest, the
Ubyssey, after printing the "death
notice of free speech," suspended
publication.
In a letter to the president, Orantham   stated   that   it   had   all   been
an   unintentional   mistake,   that  he
had   not   understood   that   the   ban
applied   to  correspondence  as  well
as   editorials.     This  was  accepted,
Orantham   was  reinstated, and  the
Ubyssey   resumed   publication.
At the next meeting of the faoulty   it  waa   deolded   that   henceforth  only the  Studenta'  Counoil
and not the  faoulty, should take
any  aotlon   on   editorials,  or any
other mattar relating to tho Ubyssey.
In   1932   the   Ubyssey,   like   other
newspapers, protested against a 45
per   cent,   cut   in   the   government's
university    grant.     The     following
week  an   announcement   was   made
ot tho  formation  of a  publicity  department   to   present   to   the   public
the   vulue   of   the   university   as   a
provincial asset.
letters wore mailed to every
citizen In tho province. A delegation was sent to Victoria. In spite
of all this, the final result wns a
reduction In the number of courses
offered  by  tho University.
Whiskers
In The Dark
ii.ii.imii.i.in.i. Mil...... it tiiiiiiitii.ttti.it.iiin.hi
IS..I....I..I..II...IMHI.	
1933 was n banner yoar ln feature columns. Nancy Miles wrote
her column of wit, humor and
homely philosophy, and called lt,
"The   Time   Has   Come."
Later, as a graduate, she wrote,
"Prancing on Parnassus." Another
popular feature named "Apes and
Ivory," contained poetry in abundance, "understandable only to the
Initiated."
The author of this column, Arthur Mayse, was the instigator of a
beard growing contest which caused considerable amusement on the
campus. Still another column was
called, "Are You Listenln'?" This
kept students Informed on the best
radio programs.
In the same yeor the "Campus
Crab" appeared and remained an
Institution on the campus for three
years. Its author, Alan Morley, ls
now a feature writer for the Vancouver "Sun."
"Looking Backward" also had its
corner ln the paper. Its purpose
was to review the significant facts
of the University since Its founding.
In the same year, "Smui Mut-
terlngs" came into existence and
have remained ever since with
varying degrees of popularity and
interest.
In 1934-35 the students were
warned by the Ubyssey against
floating a $40,000 bond Issue ln order to build a stadium. Instead
they were advised to Improve their
present track field and Its drainage
system. They took this advice.
Part time Physical Educational Instructors appeared for the flrst
time ln the same year. They have
since proved indispensable to the
University.
During the spring term a Brock
Memorial Supplement appeared.
This described a proposed Students' Union Building, the reasons
for its existence and ways In which
the money for its construction
could be procured. '
Last year part of the stadium
was built by means of a 13 Increase
in the A.M.S. fee. The Ubyssey
was in favor of this campaign and
did its best to build up student Interest  In   the  project.
D1
CONCLUSION
TT was Christmas Eve ln the Qeor-
glouB Tavern, and matted heaps
of Hetes littered the floor and table
tops, fast asleep or feebly keeping
time with beer glasses to the sweet
strains of carols from the street
above. Suddenly the door swung
open and In burst Graham Dearest
In a flurry of snowflakes.
"I've aaen hlml" he orled.
"I've aean Chang Sueyl Ho oom-
manda ua all to appear bafora
him at onee In Chinatown, where
he  haa good newa fer ual"
The Tavern lights blinked twice
and a man in a blue uniform began
stirring the drowsy Hetes from their
torpor. A few minutes later a dozen
luxurious motorcars were weaving
unsteadily towards Chinatown led
by Oraham Dearesfs yellow roadster.
HRSLS AT HEART
EJEP In the bowels of Chinatown
the men of Heta Ksl filed Into
the subterranean chambers of
Chang Suey. Massive doors closed
behind them, the atmosphere grew
heavy with incense In the dim light
nnd suddenly a deep gong crashed
three  times.
Curtains swished aside suddenly,
revealing Chang Suey in his flaming dragon robes, clutching his ancestral   wlng-jlng.
"Stand back against the wall!"
he commanded. "I am about to
open the trap door to the pool of
death and restore to you your
brethren sap Boberts, Hambury and
the  Scribe  Scrlbblewell!"
The Hetes obeyed without .any
noticeable enthusiasm.
"But I thought they had been dissolved!" objected Bud Murderum.
"How can you bring them back?"
SURPRISE!
AVE you never heard of electrolysis, my fren'?" smiled
Chang as the floor opened revealing   the  gloomy  pool   far   below.
"The caf coffee has never been
changed since the unfortunate but
necessary occurrence, and your
friends are still in suspension!"
."You're telling me," muttered
Donald McAlexander, grimacing as
the stench from the pool rose to his
ascetic  nostrils.
Chang clapped his hands once
and three henchmen appeared with
three heels attached to copper
wire. When each heel was lowered
into the pool Chang clapped his
hands again, and the buzz of generators could be heard. Slowly,
blurred shapes appeared around
each heel, and in a few minutes
sapBoberts. Hambury nnd Scrlbblewell were hoisted dripping from
the   pool.
"Anybody got a drink?" demanded sap Roberts trembling with
cold. "I'm so thirsty 1 could drink
a   Klaus   of   water!"
Hurriedly thnnktne Chang, the
Hetos wished each other a Merry
Christmas again and rushed off to
the Polar Club to discuss problems
of youth and their phone  numbers.
H'
|   WHISKERS   IN   THE   DApK  |
"... at the Library Loan Desk
a man and a woman were gazing
deep into each others' eyes ..."
AND THB  HAPPV   ENDING
AT the Library Loan desk a man
"^ and a woman were gazing deep
into   each  others   eyes.
"Christmaa Eve I" aald J. Meredith Tutt, sighing molatlly.
"Maria, darling, aay you'll be
mlnej"
A cold haughty voice Interrupted
them. "May I nee your library
cards, please?"
"Now look here, Panning, old
boy," said Tutt firmly. "It's Christmas Eve, and maybe we were talking in your old Library, but have
you no finer instincts? I'm asking the lady to marry me!"
"May   I  Bee  your  Library  cards,
please," the grim  ghoul repeated.
Tutt strangled him adroitly, and
The Spanish Grill
featuring
Mart Kenney's Music
WEDNESDAYS and SATURDAYS
NOTICE!     PIRST-YEAR    STUDENTS
WHY FAIL?
Usa SHURPASS NOTES and pass your
Christmas Exams.
Call No. 4 DICK BUILDING
Broadway and Granvilla
choice of
the
majority
rnB_*fiS_i
fenieuinuk. Chocolate.
THE BEST MILK CHOCOLATE MADE
Maria de Beandollert helped heap
Britannlcas over the corpse; then
the two lovers laughingly touad
their way out into the frosty starlight.
"You're Just like a schoolgirl
again, Maria," said Tutt. "I've
never seen you as lovely as you are
tonight!" Just as their lips met,
a sinister drone from the night sky
reached  thetr ears.
A huge gleaming monoplane,
glinting in the starlight, roared
overhear! and dived towards the
lovers. Something metallic struck
the ground close by, and the big
plane roared away towards the
West.
Tutt picked up the wing-Jing
where lt stood burled to the hilt
In n floor bed, and detached the
note  from  the handle.
"Farewell, my friends," the
note road. "Look again Irtf the
Arta Letter Rack and you will
find a bundle of keys. They belong to my llamasery at Changrl-
La which I offer to you for your
honeymoon. With the keys you
will find a deed to the C.N.R.
Hotel whioh I present to U.B.C.
for a Union Building. For myself, I go to defend my people
against the Japanese. Delenda
est Tokio! Merry Christmas.
Chang   Suey."
— THE END —
XMAS GREETINGS
to all the
STUDENTS
and
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
from your tailor
F. L. ANSCOMBE
4433 Wstt- 10th      Elliott 1540
(Continued From Pafe 1)
CAREY
In conclusion the student chief
described the tremendous spirit
shown by the student body ln taking actual material responsibility
for building the Gymnasium, the
Playing Fields and the new Stadium.
"We have oursolvea contributed to our Alma Mater tho aum of
•140,000 for the araetlon of
buildings. We are proud to be
able to aay this, and we are prepared to assist. In any manner
possible, to build a greater British   Columbia,"   he   declared.
REDUCED RAIL FARES
BETWEEN ALL STATIONS IN CANADA
FOR TEACHERS AND STUDENTS
FOR THE CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR  HOLIDAYS
SINGLE FARE AND ONE-QUARTER FOR ROUND TnIP
MINIMUM PARE 25c
First   class   and   coach   class.     Coach   class   tickets   good   in   tourist
sleepers,   where   operated,   upon   payment   of   regular   berth   charge.
GOOD GOING
From November 26th to January 2nd inclusive.
Returning, leave destination up to snd
including January 31st, 1938
Obtain certificate  from your Principal and present  it when purchasing  ticket
to the railway ticket agent.
TRAVEL    RAIL
COMFORT        •        SAFETY        •        ECONOMY
ISSUED BY
THE  CANADIAN  PASSENGER   ASSOCIATION
We have a big surprise this week. And it's going to help ever so much
in Christmas shopping. Fred Holmes, the store up at 12th and Granville, where
all the town's plutocrats buy their haberdashery, carries a stock of gift suggestions  for  the ordinary buyer.
Besides his smartly tailored pajamas, shirts and dressing gowns, Mr
Holmes sells all sorts of clever gift combinations, such as a wood cigarette
box containing men's garters, linen handkerchiefs with the initials outlined
in black (they look so very aristocratic with evening clothes) as well as
numerous other small  gifts  for 50 cents or less.
One lonesome Zete found himself downtown in the Georgia with all his
money spent the other night. So he stood on the corner and asked passers-by
for carfare.   He got It   too.
M        *        ■¥■
Sprechen sie Deutsch? You can still pass your German exam if you get
in touch at once with Baron von Wittgenstein at Studio 109—603 W. Hastings.
Telephone for appointments—Sey.   1740.
*        *        4t
D U's still can't figure it out, but they received a bill for $200, expenses
for the '38 party. Sto,- Bpatt 0taff _ffli0hw $011 A ifernj QUjrtHtmaH
2nd DIVISION RUGBY
At Douglas Park
VARSITY vs.  HARLEQUINS
ENGLISH RUGBY
3.30 at Stadium
VARSITY vs. OCCASIONALS
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, December 10, 1937
DOBBIEMEN TO SHOW IN STADIUM TOMORROW
RENEW LOOP CHAMPIONSHIP
BID; BATTLE LOWLY GRADS
Would Tie Meralomas For Lead With a Win; Jim
Harmer Returns to Senior Warfare; Bird Out
Varsity's high flying Thunderbirds of the rugger field
are expected to keep right on flying over the injury-ridden
Occasionals at the Varsity Stadium tomorrow at 8.80 in a
Miller Cup fixture.	
WALK-AWAY
Fresh from the feat of taking the
Victoria Rep. aquad to the cleaners
and baok again, the 'Birds are well
on the way to repeating last year's
performance and the game on deck
for tomorrow la regarded by the
famoua Dobbiemen aa a mere walk
away after the atlff tilt ot laat
week.
Injuries have taken their usual
tell  and  Johnny  Bird  and  Lyall
Vine   will   be   en   the   sidelines
nursing last week's sere spots.
Canadian Footballer Jim Harmer
will strut his stuff in Vine's usual
spot and give the railblrds a chance
to settle the much disputed question of the abilities of the expon*
enta of the two grid games. Ernie
Teagle will take over Blrd'a poaltlon at fullback while the reat ot
the team la expeoted to line-up aa
In the laat game.
Although the 'Birds started the
aeaaon in a bad slump, they have
oome back like fifteen rubber
checks and at preaent are fighting
tor the lead like the "Miracle Men"
of old and only an upset ot the
flrst order can keep the Studenta
trom this year'a crop of silverware.
—DIER.
Beat  Victoria
Veralty'a victorious Thunderbird McKechnie Oup Ruggers
swept en through the etrcng Viotorla Rep team laat Saturday In
a game that waa marred by the
leae te the Islanders ef their etar
wlngman, BUI Brewn.
Pull credit fer the vlctcry goee
te the fighting determination ef
the Varclty fcrwarde, who outplayed the reat ef the field In
their heada-up co-operation. Tha
vim from Victoria had the leeala
etymled en their own heme field
ae they tackled and herded the
hitherto mighty Varaity threee
fer lessee.
Arts First Team Wins
Ice Relay Battle
The Arte Plrat Team, drawing
cut In frcnt In the laat lap after
an exciting atruggle, emerged
victorious In ths annual Arts-
Science Relay Race at the Rotary lee Oarnlval at the Porum
cn Wodneeday night.
The Science Plrst Tsam,
which finished seeend tc the
Artsmen, had their bid for vie*
tery ahattered when the versatile Jim Harmer fell en the first
tusk and left hie fellow Science-
men tee great a gap te fill up.
Even at that, Jim Uaaher, racing
laat fer the Labcratcrymen, managed te held eff a determined
bid frem the Arte Second Team,
and finish In seeend place by a
whlaker.
Truaaell, Oulget, Oler and
Berry made up the winning Arts
combination, whllo Harmer, Pre*
vensanc, Lambert and Uaaher
repreaented Science.
GIVE 'EMTHE AXE
Olve 'em the exe, the axe, the axel
Olve 'em the axe, give 'em the axe,
give  'em  the axe,  WHEREI
Right   In  the   neck,  the   neek,  the
neck I
Right   In   the   neek,   right   In   the
neek, right In the neck, THERE!
-   Thla  la ancther pet California
yell.    Let'e greet the team with
'em en  Boxing Day.    Learn 'em
and de VOUR  bit.    Or elae cut
'em out and bring 'em along with
yeu.    But,  KNOW 'EMI
LEARN THIS YELL FOR THE
27th
CALIFORNIA BEAR
Oececeeelden BEAR I
Cal'foooooonla'a BEAR!
Qrrrr — rrrrr — rrrrrAHl
v
BRITISH WALKERS
By Stacy
. . . Comfort Afoot
Get your feet inside s pair of these, snd learn s now
lesson in foot comfort, foot smartness and foot economy.
Hera are shoes that really havs everything—shoes that
step out in class—shoes that cost you an amazingly low
price.  See them today.
TWO
STORES
STACY'S
SHOES
FOR
MEN
762 Granville Street
Opposite Lyric Theatre
LIMITED
528 W. Hastings
Opposite Spencer's
OD_______________E
Sport Snaps
by
Frank Turner
Flynn Winner
In Class Pass
Heaving Tilt
ms yeu flick eff tne
hard, solid and freaen bit ef bulbous matter that waa your nesc,
and yeu have a couple ef choice
words frscse en you aa yeu "hie"
the edd fellow-sufferer en route
to U.B.O. these bleak, eeld, and
blue mornings, Just think ef the
tcugh time these prairie gephcre
have aa they emerge frem the
comparative warmth and solitude
ef snow, er the fun the Yukon
Ingloo-dwsllsrs have whsn that
extra blast ef flame melts away
their year-reund  heme.
Yeah—you think of thoae little
thlnga—and you, and you be thankful for our mild and temperate
clime—I'll take Southern Oal. and
the chance ef the edd shewer.
OLIMATB CRAOK  . . .
And Just before we paaa from our
traditional grouchy mood, one more
climatic crack'a ln order . . . that's
the one coming when Varsity tracksters faithfully "mush" out to practices garbed in the usual Alpine
outfits, and trudge out to do or die
tor dear old Alma Mammy, defying pneumonia, and wondering
why snowshoes, skis, or hob-nailed
boota with a couple of dosen socks
were not included tn the strip Issued them.
Ensrgstlc Maury Ven Vllet, Incidentally ene ef the greateat
why sport at U.B.C. la definitely
on the up-awing thsse days, haa
taken the lead In thla respeet,
and la even now trying to rearrange the aporta aehedulee eo
that potential cinder • acraplng
atara might have at least a 0-60
chance of doing something In
their field. Maury rings the bell
when he saya that Track la definitely a aeaaonal aport and as
auch, ahould not atart until late
eprlng.
"VIM AND VIOOR" VAN VLIET
SPEAKS
Naturally Maury, or "Vim and
Vigor" Van Vllet, as a fellow sport
reporter is wont to name our genial athletic, director, ls right again.
Aa he points out, not only would
trekkers have more chance of
cracking records, chalking up first,
and clicking for victories in Inter-
Collegiate competition, but there'd
be also less danger of real ability
being smothered hy an avalanche
of crocked knees, pulled tendons,
and wrenched muscles cauaed by
wintry blasts whistling through
frail human flesh.
TID BITS
If Councillor Lyall Vine has his
way, Varsity studes will once again
Invade Victoria — thla time when
Dobble's ruggers clash with Victoria reps in the final McKechnie
cup go on the 29th of thla month.
. . . The relay fight staged by four
U.B.C. ice teama in the Rotary Ice
Carnival on Wednesday night
turned out to be a farce, with Dler
of the flrst Arts squad, and Usshsr
coming ln about half way through
the race . . . and Jim Harmer, usually one of the star • blade artists,
tripping himself right at the start
of the grind. . . . Orehlda to the Pep
Olub for last Saturday's pep meet,
the best on the campus for some
time. . . . Pat Plynn, star rookie on
this year's hoop quintet, created
quite a furor In the Intramural forward pass competition by heaving
the ball well over the BO-yard mark
—backfleld ace? . . . The Senior
hoopera will again entrain southward in the flrst week of next term,
probably playing Pacific Lutheran,
Portland Varaity, Albany College
and Portland's Multnomah Club en
route. . . . And the Senior Managers, at prevent wearing the regulation light blue manager's sweater
with a small "M" on the sleeve,
can still get a big blook—but thia
year, instead of receiving it the
flrst term, they'll garner it in the
spring—if they earn it by their
work during the season. . . . And
here's a last-minute flash ... all
typea of exama'll be here this
Christmaa—finals, mid-terms, one-
hour, two-hour, ete. . . . start now
and avoid the rush to the B.A.C.
degree counter.
The last Intramural contest before the Nesl ssaaon saw Arts '41
pick eff flrst spot In the Forward
Paaa contest last Tuaaday at the
Stadium. The eentsst proved to
be a wowing aueeess and the
bcyc threw the egg all ever the
field with great abanden.
Arts '41 heaved the ball a collective dletance cf 44S feet te cop
1S pelnte In the raee fer the Governor's trophy. Science '41 picked eff 12 points fer second spet
with a distance ef 892 feet and
Arta '40 cams In third fer ten
points with S67 feet.
Pat Plynn waa declared Individual champ with a heave ef 161
feet, a toss that would net a
touch-down In any grid game.
All-tar footballer Evan ap Rob*
erts let gc a toss ef 160 feet te
take cccend spet In the eentect.
main buildirg
MACDONALD   COLLEGE
hs niMlhssst el * dream leaf
cherished by Sir Wllll.m C.
MeedeaaM—dile residential aenaseetsrUa
sellsfls bearing his asms was formally
ceased In 1907 ss s ssntrs ef learning
Is efrleukurc sad household selenee.
British   Consols
CO-ED
SPORTS
CHRISTMAS   GIFTiS
We have s pleasing variety of
Zipper Portfolios and Zipper Ring Books
with er withes, leaks.
Also Papular Advsrtiaed Mskss cf
Fountain Pens and Pen Desk Sets
THE CLARKE & STUART CO. LIMITED
STATIONIRS PRINTtRS INORAVIRS
|550 Seymour St. Phone Trin. 1341 Vsncouvsr, B.C.
By MYRNE NEVISON
Varsity's Senior A hoopettes'
lack of confidence in themselves
was clearly evident again Monday
when they lost a rather listless
game 37-17 to the fast stepping
Fort Oarry aquad.
Tho studsnts have a good team
but won't realise It. In spite of
their listless playing so far thla
aeaaon, two of them, Ena Clarke
and Lola MeEwen, have been
picked to play on the All Star
team.
INFERIORITY COMPLEX
This Inferiority complex is an
old story with the co-eds. Last
year they never won till just hefore
Christmas; then they were practically unbeatable the rest of the season. This year'a team la even better than last year's. Come on girls,
wake up to yourselves.
•      •      •
SR. B's WIN ONE
Veralty'a   Senlcr   B   hoopettea
est  mn  example  for their  clatar
teama by dawning the  Empress
Jam quintette 13-9 In a lew soor-
Ing epic at the campua gym Wedneaday.   Thla win put Varaity In
third alet.
A basket by Margaret Porter put
the students In the lead, while tallies  by Lois  Harris,  Lilian  Johan-
son and Margaret gave them a 6-1
margin.    From then on they were
never headed.
CLOSE CHECKING
Clos checking was the order of
the day with neither team gaining
many opportunities to shoot.
The co-eds had but six players
out while Empress used twelve.
Nice   going,   girls.
Sophomore Co-eds Are
On Top of 'Mural Heap
Sophomote stand supreme ln Intramural  circles  having  won  both
tbe volleyball and archery contests.
In volleyball, ths Sephe under
the captaincy cf Shellah Hutchinson, ran up a total ef 816 pelnte
thle asaaen. The Education girls
were ceeond with 116 markorc.
BESS'TT  BEAUTY 8H0ME—Thl. Soaion Yeur Csntr* et Inttrttt  It Yourjalf
4'St ____-»*_>* Let   us   design   yesr   coiffure   fer   those
exciting Xmss dstss.
INDIVIDUALITY A SPECIALTY
Low Prices. s
51        TINTH  AND ORANVILLIS.
NONE  BETTER THAN THE BESS'TT
'UfBB'tt
Deatity
fihn,iii_r__*,»AYV|iW •"'
J-7*tUf»_*C- THERE  IS NO
PIONEER LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS LTD.
*       Seymour 8334       *
"A COMPLETE LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING SERVICE"
Licensed SANITONI Dry Cleaner
Freshettes Win First
Place In Ice Carnival
The Freshettes made their place
ln the term honor list by carrying
oft flrst and second place ln the
Rotary Ice Carnival relay. Skating
in the winning team were Oerry
Armstrong, Valerie Oardiner, Jocelyn Wickson and Joan Haslam.
$&&*& Ju^I/li
U\*
Giant   Collegiate   Dance   Contest
Tonight Till 1 a.m.       Admission: 50c
Two Btsutlful Cups Awards*! Wlnntrt
Ds Santh snd hit ntw 13-pltes OrchMtra
Bsahy and Hli Swlns Jam Band
Balloons,   NcwtltlM,   Nolta  Makers,   Etc.
DANCING   EVERY  WED.,   FRI.   and   SAT.
BIG   COLLEGIATE   DANCE   EVERY   rRIDAY

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