UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Daily Ubyssey Oct 8, 1948

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0125453.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125453.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0125453-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0125453-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125453-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0125453-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0125453-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0125453-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0125453-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0125453.ris

Full Text

 The Daily Ubyssey
VOL. XXXI
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1948
No. 12
Province-Wide Search
For Lost UBC Student
Vanished  Without Trace
On Trip  From  Kelowna
Province-wide search is being conducted for missing UBC
student Michael Mclnerny.
When last heard from three weeks ago he was leaving
Kelowna by bus and planned to return to Vancouver by way
of Seattle.
Students Warned
Of Totem Photos
Students hoping to graduate
in 1949 are warned that their
photographs for this year's
Totem must be taken before
the alloted deadline. In the
case of any department or
faculty excepting Arts and
Commerce, this deadline is
Friday, October 8th
Arts and Commerce seniors arc
scheduled to go before ihe Totem
cameras all next week, but other
students are getting their last chance
COST NEGLIGIBLE
lt is pointed out that the price asked
is reasonable in view of the fact that
the student receives one mounted
portrait in addition to the picture
appearing in the Totem.
Strict adherence to the deadline is
necessary, as. the Totem Editor, Dick
Blockberger,  also  has his deadlines
to meet for publication,
STUDIO BEHIND BROCK
Photography studios are located in
the huts behind the Brock Hall, and
the cameramen are in attendance
from 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and from
1:30 p.m. until 5:00 p.m.
No pictures will be taken after next
week, and it is dubious if pictures
submitted after that time will be accepted.
The schedule Is as- follows:
Engineers, Aggie Teacher Training,
Social Work, Pharmacy, Law, Phy
Ed., Architects, and nursing—no later
than Friday, October 8.
- Commerce and Arts—Monday, October 1) to Friday October 15.
Notice Plasterers
To Be lined $10
Plastering the campus with unauthorized notices will cost the clubs
and individuals ten dollars for each
offense.
In a decision handed down October
1 and released today by Registrar
Charles Wood, the Faculty Council
said that such actioji is not in the
best interests of the university.
Campus organizations, already hit
by a shortage of funds, will have to
resort to i!he Quad notice board in
order to stave off the ten shekel
headache.
~$   I'he  only  comment  that  the  student made on  leaving  was that he
was going back to Vancouver by bus
so he could enjoy the scenery.
POLICE COMBINE
Provincial Police and U. S. Immigration authorities are taking part'
in the search, but as yet there has
been no sign of the missing student,
Mclnerny had travelled with the
Collingwood baseball team to Hedley,
September 4.
When the team returned to Vancouver,   he  went   on   tp  Mission  City,
where he stayed with a family friend
S. McGladery, until September 14.
NO REASONS #
His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Mclnerny,
received a letter from him on September 10. They stated that he always
wrote home when he was away for
more than a week. They can offer
no reason for his disappearance,
Mclnerny's intended route was
through the U. S. across to Seattle
and home to Vancouver.
When last seen he was wearing a
football jacket with Collingwood
crest on the chest, and light gabardine slacks.
BLOOD DRAINING
SET  FOR  MONDAY
AS DONORS MOUNT
Campus Red Cross blood clinic
will start taking blood Monday,
October 18.
Starting October 18 and continuing till October 22 blood will be
taken from people who ore signing up now each day in the Armories from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
More donors are urgently needed.
Ex-C
ouncwors
hi
Must
'tween classes:
Faculty Dodged
By SCM Forum
Testify In Fund Probe
Harwood, Livingstone Called
discussion on
the Christian
held by SCM
in room  312,
Evening  Closses:
No More Lectures
Cancelled: Faculty
Students may no longer cancel
their lectures.
In a letter to the Ubyssey, Charles
B. Wood, secretary of the Faculty
Council and University Registrar, reported that complaints had been received by the Aclminstrat'ion chiefs
that certain unauthorized notices
concerning the cancellation of lectures had been made.
The exact nature of these "unauthorized notices" had not been
made.
Mr. Wood said that only the Faculty
Council could cancel lectures on the
campus.
Linguists Given
Big Chance By
Extension Dept.
The University Department
of Extension is offering thirty-
two evening Courses, four of
which will be particularized
study of languages and culture.
Dr. St. Clah-Sobell expects increased enrollments in his beginners
Russian class, paralleling the increased
desire of people to understand the
Russian tongue and culture and to
view it as an educational essential,
LARGER CLASSES
Madame I. Burnada, teaching the
extension course in conversational
French, is also anticipating larger
classes. Defense Minister Brooke
Claxton recently went on record as
advocating a working knowledge of
both French and English.
Stressing the importance of the
two languages in the Canadian Army,
he encouraged cadets in the Canadian military schools to become bilingual,
SPEAKING EMPHASIZED
Madame Burnard's course will emphasize spoken English, and will
feature films from the Extension
Visual Aid Department.
Professor G. E. McSpadden of the
Spanish section has prepared a course
in Spanish which combines conversation with practice in reading and
writing.
Further information regarding these
courses is available at the Department of University Extension,   UBC.
Open forum
1 "understanding
Faith" will be
today at noon
Auditorium.
Rev. Stanley Higgs, former
padre of the Vancouver Irish
Regiment will lead the discussion.
* *       •
QUEEN Candidate for Homecoming
will be chosen by Arts Undergraduate
Society at a special meeting in Physics
200 today at noon.
Would-be candidates are requested
to attend.
♦ • *
Public speaking enthusiasts are invited to attend a meeting of t'he
Speakers Workshop to discuss arrangements in Arts 106 at 12:30 p.m.
today.
To Explain Gym Fund 'Diversion'
Members of UBC Student Councils for at least two years
back will be asked to testify before the committee which is to
investigate the "diversion" of funds from the war memorial
gymnasium.
 : 0
Redshirts' Return?
Rifling Rouses
Ron's Rath
Ransacking of Tho Dally Ubyssey
editor-in-chlefs office late Thursday remained a mystery at press
time.
At 5:30 p.m. Ron Haggart returned to his Brock Hall office to find
drawers turned out, cupboards
rifled and papers littering the floor.
Cursory investigation failed te
reveal any thefts.
Investigators expressed the op-
ionlon that the entry may have
been staged by a party of engineers in search of a missing letter
Forum Upholds Right Of
Communist Law Members
Parliamentary Forum overwhelmingly decided that B.C.
Law Society is not justified in banning Communists from membership, at its Thursday session.
Hugh Legge, Leader of the Opposi-^
tion, who drew lots with Prime Min-
Radsoc  Player Stars
In  Little Theatre
Stuart Baker, Radsoc member will
be star of/Vancouver Little Theatre's
forthcoming production of "While
the Sun Shines."
Baker has recently been producing a variety show over CKMO.
"Whilyb the Sun Shines" will be
fcc.tur«!d at the York Theatre, October- p-22.
ister Jim Sutherland for the debate,
charged that barring of Communists
could be only the first step towards
complete political discrimination by
toenchers in which the socialist CCF
would be the next victim.
PRECEDENT ISSUE
He maintained that the issue was
purely one of precendent and that the
possibility that Communists might
follow the dictates of Moscow in their
practice could not be allowed to
cloud the issue.
"A good healthy division of opinion
in the Law Society will do more to
preserve   Canadian   democracy   than
an    uneasy
tained.
unanimity,"   he   main-
HEART NOT IN IT
Prime Minister Sutherland said his
"heart could not be in the debate"
held that the ideology of Communists
is in direct opposition to Canadian
ideals of democracy, and that, therefore, Communists could hardly be
expected to uphold our ideals in their
practice. *
Ted Olsen, government backbencher said that the very existence
of the oai'h of allegience to the crown
which Law Society members must
take should prevent Communists
from becoming members.
They will be asked to explain why
funds collected from the students
for the gymnasium were never turned
over to the project.
Student treasurer Paul Plant announced Thursday "t'he investigation
will check on any person who might
have been responsible."
The probe was ordered by an overwhelming vote at a general meeting
of  students Wednesday.
Principles in the probe are Grant
Livingstone, president last year of
Student Council, and Bob Harwood,
treasurer of the same administration.
The investigations, however, will
probably search further back into
the records to uncover reasons for
what AMS authorities call "mismanagement of student funds."
No member of the Faculty is expected to be on the committee of investigation. Plant will head the probe.
Resolution calls for: a committee
including treasurer Paul Plant, be
formed to launch the investigation
into the fiscal policies of the Living-
stone-Harwood administration.
Committee will:
1. "Assess and report" on those responsible for the misappropriation of
Memorial  Gymnasium  funds.
2. Draw up an amendment to the
Constitution to prevent further misappropriations. •
Student Council will begin Monday to lay the groundwork for the
full scale investigation.
Instigator of the probe, student
Bob Dodd, agreed Thursday that
"misappropriation" was inaccurate in
referring to the diversion of funds
from the memorial gym.
Prosecution of past councillors is
not being considered by the investigators, Plant said. There is no thought
of finding criminal intent among paSt
administrations.
Leading Contralto Opens
LSE  Concert  Programme
Herta Glaz, leading contralto of the Metropolitan Opera
Company, will open this year's LSE concert series on Tuesday
at 1:30 in the Auditorium.
 ■ -®   Born   in   Vienna,   Miss   Glaz   won
immediate   success   with   the   State
Rhodes Scholarship
Forms Obtainable
Applications for consideration for
the Rhode's Scholarship must be in
the,hands of the Registrar not later
than November 1. No consideration
will be given applications received
after this date.
A Rhode's Scholarship is tenable
at Oxford University and may be
held for three years.
Value of the scholarship is 500
pounds per year.
Application forms may be obtained
from the Registrar's office.
Spirit Willing, Flesh We^
New Union CollegeHead
Is Man Of Many Colors
The new principal of Union Colege at UBC, Reverend William b.
Taylor has "been around."
After graduating from the University of Toronto in 1926, Taylor
taught at the University of Agra,
in India for 17 years, and just returned to Canada a year ago.
While  in India  he taught  philosophy  and  psychology   to  B. -A,
and M, A. students.
DUAL CITIZEN
Apart from being a Canadian
citizen, he is also a citizen of India.
As if this wasn't enough to complicate the situation he travels on
a British passport,
Taylor refuted reports that Union College might be closed because of the lack of students. The
rumor was rife when the United
Chuch held their convention recently.
Taylor feels, that the college has
a future and that it will continue
to  expand  its activities  and  use-
fullness.
WONT CLOSE
He stated that "Union College,"
here on the campus, is at Canada's
gateway to the Pacific and is
the only theological college apart
from Anglican College to handle
students of the province and it is
very unlikely that it would close.
A committee has been formed to
investigate such a course but he
said it is extremely unlikely that
any action will be taken.
FEW SPORTS
The spirit is willing but thc
flesh is weak when it comes to
taking part in sport these clays
according to the energetic principal.
While at U of T he ;was active
on the football field and the basketball floor but now he feels
that about the only excercise he
can indulge in is a mild game of
tennis,
Opera in Breslau when she was only
eighteen years of age. Following concert tours of Europe, she was introduced to this continent in, 1937 with
the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra.
HIGH ACCLAIM
During the 1942-43 season she joined
the Metropolitan Opera Company.
Her debut as Ammeris in Aida on
Christinas night 1942, was received
with phenomenal acclaim.
Since that time she has appeared
with every major symphony orchestra in North America, performing under the batons of .such conductors as
Toscanini and Koussevitzky.
LEADING ROLES
She has sung leading roles with
the Metropoliton in Chicago and St.
Louis and given recitals from coast
to coast. She is currently leading
contralto of the San Francisco Opera
Company.
Her concert on Tuesday will feature selections from the Operas Carmen and Roselinda. She will also
sing songs by Handel, Bach, Schubert
and Brahms.
Aggies Frolic
At Bam Dance
White Rose Ballroom will overflow
with farmers and old time music
when Aggies hold their first function
of the year, the annnual Barn Dance,
Suitable fall motifs will decorate
the walls. Tlie Indies are required to
bring box lunches. Ron Jones and
his orchestra will provide the music.
Tickets are on sale now at the Aggie
Building.
Pre-Meds Must
Register Now For
Aptitude Tests
If you are intending to apply
for admission to a medical college you should take the Medical College Admission Test.
This was the statement of Dr. W,
G. Black, head of the UBC Counselling Bureau.
The tests given by the Educational
Testing Service of Princeton are general aptitude tests to measure mental
ability related to the practice of
medicine, dentistry and pharmacy.
Most medical schools require., this
test be taken when making application for admission.
The tests will be given twice during this term. First is on October
30 and later on February 7.
Applications for the October 30
writing must be in Princeton not
later than October 16.
Students intending to take the
tests should obtain application forma
and further information from ;D|,
Black at once. Forms should be airmailed to Princeton.
Late applications will not be considered.
Loudspeakers Axed:
Noon-Hours Only
Faculty Council in a recent meeting decided to limit use of loudspeakers on the campus to the noon
hour only. 	
Hardest hit. by the decree is the
Radsoc sound truck which hag been
active in publicizing club activities,
for the past week.
Decision has been reserved for
further consideration on the question
of total prohibition of loudspeakers.
Nurses Lead Red Cross
Blood Drive; 110% Sign
UBC's Florence Nightingale's*^
are leading the parade of blood
giving as 110 percent of them
signed up to date—almost more
than double any other faculty.
The muscle men,**who led the
field yesterday slipped behind
today with final results tabulated at 56 percent.
Behind them came the Arts-
men of whom 36 percent had
signed up at press time last
night.
Complete results are as follows:
Faculty
Quota Registered
Percent
Nurses
24
26
110
Phys, Ed.
34
19
56
Arts
940
339
36
Teachers
36
10
31
Homo E.
50
15
30
Law
112
25
22
Commerce
144
25
18
Pharmacy
47
7
14
SCM  Leader Speaks
Reverend Gerald Hutchinson, Nat-
onal Secretary of the Canadian Student Christian Movement will arrive
at  UBC,  Thursday,  October  14.
Known familliarly as "Gerry" to
thousands of student Christians he
will discuss the "liberal arts and education."
(S»
«
memo
'OPERATION RIPDOWN'
TO CLEAR NOTICE BOARDS
'Operation Ripdown' will commence tomorrow.
Mammooks announced Thursday that all unauthorized
notices will be torn down front caf, quad, and bus stop
notice hoards.
At same time Mammooks announced they will make
no more signs for meetings except for clubs having no designated signboard space. All privately made signs must bear
Mammooks signature. Page 2
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Friday,      October      8,      1948
""Mc'ftber'Ca'nadian University Press
Authorized as  Second  Class Mail,  Post Office Dept., Ottawa, Mail Subscriptions—$2.50 per year
Published throughout the university -year by  the Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society of the
h -,    u\-X . University of BVitish Columbia.
.y. *{•        .",'»
Editorial opinions expressed herein aro thw-.o of the edit »ri;.l stuff 0f The Daily Ubyssey and not necessarily tnose
of the Alma Mater Society nor of the University.
# tf tf
Offices in Brock Hall. Phone ALma  1C24 For  display  advertising' phone  ALma 3253
JPWTOK-IN-CIHEF   -   -   -   -   HON  HAGGART
MANAGING EDITOR   -   -   -   -   VAL SEARS
GENERAL STAFF: News Editor, Bob Cave, Chuck Marshall; Features Editor, Ray Baines; Photography Director,
Ellanor  Hall)  Sports  Editor,  Jack   Wasserman}   Womens'    Editor,    Loni    Francis*.
Senior Editor This Issue - JIM BANIIAM
Associate Editor ■•*- LES ARMOUR
Pie Ir The Sky
a »,   1«   ~ ft i »'•     -1   < AT
There's pie in the sky for a small band
of enthusiastic young optimists at UBC.
^ohieday, they !say, the university will
have it's own airport nestled in the vast bush-
lands of Point Grey where students and other
flying1 enthusiasts riiay park their small aircraft.
"'"'The plan is past the dreaming stage,
thej* tfelFtiSj dnd Will fill the needs of the
oMfte^s of small aircraft who now are virtually croWded out ; of Vancouver Intcr-
national'Ai?p&i-t at Sea Island.
'"!''"R&:ehfTy a' Department of Transport Inspector surveyed the UBC area and stated
that an ideal light piano field which would
Warrant a permanent licensing, could be
deveolped on'the South-west corner of the
agrteulttwe and farm lands.
'""'"To jftftne bf the more backward factions,
such! a plan sounds entirely unfeasible. To
the farsighted ones, it is an excellent plan.
*  Judging from the response of UBC students last' spring when the flying group was
oKganiied, hundreds of students and alumni
inn     on-...     V I-'      ■■■ 	
jumped at thc. chance to learn to fly in 4heir
own co-operative plane at a fraction of cost
(lie commercial operators ait the Airport are
charging.
A visit lo thc airport on any Sunday
will prove the point. CF-FTQ, the club's aircraft, is booked solidly from morn to night,
by eager sludents who are "taking whigS."
Thc club al the present moment, has two
aircraft. One Piper Super cruiser, a three
place cross-country craft, and'a Piper Cub
special, all belong to the club.
The club president, Jim Harty, hopes and
plans that the club will bo the instigator of
future related curricular courses like Aeronautical Engineering, Meterology and Navigation on the campus.
Full cooperation and agreement with the
club's plans have been given by Col. G. M.
Shrum and Dr. N.A.M. MacKenzie.
Years, ago, such radical planning would
have been considered far-fetched. Today, its
a step in the right direction.  '
e
ditor
Sir:
The proposals of Cliff Grccr and
Belkov arg a fi°°d ■*c'ea to a certain
point. If we do establish four scholarships, why give them to Germans?
Wlty choose a German University?'
If .Jtrtajrc be* interesting to note that
there are oVher countries in Europe.
Lately I" #ave" been  noticing  that
peoplfc are beginning to pity the Gorillas, Do the, Germans deserve pity?
Why ■ feed   them -better,   give   them
geejrter, attention   than   the  rest   of
^France? France has much to learn
,$?#? Why-not choose <a university
'-Canada and vice versa. Or what'
I a Slavonic state. Believe it or
i'.'hot only the Russians are stuh-
|*h^aded, we are too. Unless both
'sftftlS -reach a compromise, I'ninjjs ure
':jp$jftJ£ ~io   get   drastic    (they   are   al-
relaa'y). Since we are not able- to <l<.
anything else about  it, why  nol  try
to  Secure  the future by  giving  tho
scholarship's-  to   a   university    in   a
Communist country. If other universities would follow suit and if an increase'  lh   fctudent   exchange   would
secure  peace  fimqngst  the  youth   of
be' attained, at least we will al least.
the world and  in this way  a  corn-
promise-amongst the future  generates is assured. The foreign student:;
wSuld see our advantages,  our  stu -
jjjtijs abroad  would have  much  to
leBttit  <rivOTv.there   (surprising   as   it
i|ij#aS0Uftd.) I'don't know what UBC
V0J.1 think of my last proposal. Lot us\
ejji- :;<-,"->	
Alma Mater Society
however, show the democrai'ic youth
of Europe that at least UBC, if nobody else realizes what they t have
suffered under tlie "Hitler jugend,"
menibc.'S whom Cliff Greer and
Gregory Belkov want to present with
the scholarship. Remember — the
Germans have always boon brutal,
their policy aggressive; it ir, their
character. Give the .scholarships to
another   university.
Yours sincerely
Pessioptimist
Deer Sir:
Charges hnvo beta made reeently
areine-'t religion:, club:-' on the campus. Wc would like lo point c\\[ some
wayr; m which the Sludent '"'!."'stia:i
IMdvei'K m'. ,",:: i :u> (Xi lh< " - cups.
r!i (■■, i -.nl ril .lite I , the ;'(■'. i v.vl-
l.'ii a   of   tlie   ii'',':-,■< vX' y.
One < r the a;c.'.r, < !>f.r a  . i,.':-
tuiies is tlie seiUu'.v of our geiii ' ,! e"v-
l'oU i;e, Frank Pattcrsi.n, who ia a.ail-
able for coun.vclling .stu e'en i.s, bbtii
within and out'e;ic!e cur greup, en
pergonal problem:;. The fiC.VI also
rays the .'-alary of Mi.es Betty Booth,
a f.'oc'.ul n'l'vicc worker at Little
Mountain Camp. M::--s Booth has
made lu'!"sctf indijpcn.siblo to the
v.'idfea-o of stud-out voi'oran families
throiffd) such work as: organizing a
nursery school,^ library, elementary
school, medical centre, church services, land  Sunday School,
With regard to other activities, the
essential parts of the SCM program
are fifteen study groups, faking in
cloaC to 250 students, for studying
tho Christian faith, and its applications to personal and social life; and
weekly noon hour speakers, speaking on subjects of wide interest. The
SIM is interdenominational, with no
church affiliation and hence is no
"church fraternity."
The members of the SCM are contributing $1150 to its program, including  socials,   camps,  and  conferences.
We think that the foregoing shows
that any AMS grant to the SCM
would not be used to support a "tea-
time  social club."
Tcm Waldon
AMSBUDGET
Dear  Sir:
On behalf of thc Student.;' Council,
I would like to thank the members
of the Alma Mater Society for their
co-operation with regard to the budget. The students showed their willingness, both as individuals and as
organizations, to accept their reduced budgets in an effort to improve
the financial position of the Society.
We feel that this is evidence of a definite college spirit and I can assure
you that we of the Students' Council
will do all in our power to see that
the Society is put back on a sound |
financial basis.
Yours truly
Nancy   M.   Davidson,   Secretary
NOTICES
For Sgle
1947     VELOCETTE    MOTORCYCLE
like new. 6,000 miles, $450. Phone ltE
2909-L after 5:00 p.m.
1928    CHEV    COACH    EXCELLENT
condition.   New   paint  job  and   new
upholstering, $225.  Phone Ed.  at FA
8130-L.
BULOVA WATCH IN PERFECT
running order, $15. Phone N.W. 817-
M2.
CASE   AND   BERGSMARK   GEOG-
rap'hy 102 text. Phone k£ 0797-L.
Transportation
ANYONE WANTING ^O GET INTO
a cir pool for 8:30's around Kerrisdale phone KE 2931-L.
TRANSPORTATION FROM V1C1N-
ity of Knight Road and Kingsway
for 8:30 lectures Mon. Wed. and Fri.
and 8:30 lectures Tuesi. Thurs. add
Sal. Phone Sadie Norton FA 4229-L.
ANYONE MOTORING TO NORTH
Okanagan this 'weekend with robm
for paying passenger please contact
C. Breen immediately or phone BA
5585-L.
WANTED RIDE FROM UBC TO 1G
and Granville Mon. Wed. and Fri.
Phone New West. 534-L collect Saturday and Sunday morning.
Accommodation
COZV BUITB SUITABLE FOR TWO
students, consisting of quiet study
room with fireplace and bedroom
with twin beds. $35 per month per
student including breakfast. ALma 1
1562-Y
Lost
ONE ORGANIC CHEMISTRY TEXT,
Gattermari. Phone Bob at KE 0138-R.
WOULD HECTOR ROBEfcSHAW
please phone DE 0602 re personal leV-
lers.
8 CENTS A PAGE TYPES YOUR
essay, thesis, notes or reports, Phone
ICE 3776.
IN CAFETERIA, SMALL BROWN
change purse containing considerable
sum of money, street car and bus
tickets. Urgently needed. Reward. HA.
2909-L.
A TEXT BOOK "TISSUES OF THE
Body" lost September 30. Reward.
FR 8148.
LOST IN LIBRARY OR VICINITY,
light tan wallet, contains credentials
and approx, $5.00 Owner is Claudine
Richmond. Please return to Lost and
Found. «
ANYONE FINDING A BLUE WAT-
erman's fountain pen lost in the Armouries on Club Registration Day
please call Anne at AL 2999-R.
WILL PERSON WHO PICKED UP
John Ise, SP-C 200 text in HL-2 please^
return to Lost and Found.
Meetings
THE BEGINNER'S CLASS OF THE
Parliamentary Forum's Speakers
Workshop will meet in Arts 104 on
Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. The radio
speaking class will meet in Arts 105
on Wednesday at 12:30 p.m.
THE UBC JAZZ SOCIETY WILL
hold its regular meeting this Tuesday
at 12:30 in its <jlub room behind the
Brock. The election of executives
will be held. It is hoped that all
people will turn out.
"THE POSITION' OF THE ENGIN-
cering undergraduate in the professional societies," will be the topic
of Professor F. Forward, president
of the B.C. Association of Professional Engineers, in Applied Science
100, Tuesday at 12:30 p.m.
These smartly styled
Challenger  Watches  arc
famous for accuracy of
performance and dcpcn«ablHy
A wide choice iof models
priced from
35.00 to 90.00.
Tax extra
,i*iue *•
VANCOUVER
Your Blood Is Needed
/4n*md,tfa (^mfua
wttA, Sft^,^**
en**"
'^JS********
t   THOSE   INTERESTED   IN    A
Ussion.grout> involving world goV-
§jlinient   and   the   problems   of   tho
t. today nieet in Arte 102 Wed. Oct.
it 12:30. .
tCHE-RY   CLUB  MEETING   ARTS
Wed. lOef, 13 at 12:30.
*- a __,	
SIGNBOARD
GLIDER CLUB CENE'ML MEET-
ine{ hut 0-[() Tue-. Oct. XI at !2:,'it).
Tho::e interested in joining plcaae alii rid.
GENERAL MEETING
the Golden "E." Friday
intend   to  .slip,  phono  N.F.O.
VOICE STUDENTS INTERESTED
in joining small group studying operatic  roles,   phene  Mary  KE 3776.
ORDER    OF J URGENT:    LOST,    A    PAIR   BLUE
Oct, 8. If you   nlastic-rirnmed  glasses.  Please phone
I Bill at T3A 4051-M.
BACH CHOIR
Vacancies in All Sections
Join for the season or help
with "The Messiah'' Christmas concert with Vancouver
Symphony Orchestra. Apply
641 Granville St., Mondays,
October 11, 18 or 25 at 7:30
p.m.
0 0 "Well, they said^
had rooms to rent". i x
■ '  '''-'•I ''-.'"
When it comes to finding a glace! tp
stay, Egbert is finding out that "thingsJfe
tough all over" ... all because bf'.tdb
much demand and no supply — exactly
the way things can get with Egb:i:t'f
pocket-book.
That's why he's decided to start accumulating a reserve at "MY BANK". Why not
try Egbert's recipe and start cooking with
gas. Open your BofM account today —
be another, start accMnulatin' brother.
Bank^of Montreal
IKINGiWITHtCANADlANS
YjWA I Kf O FJJFU F EJ8.SINC6,   .11'l 9
fin This  Corner,
<' Alexander   Korda's   production   of
"Anna   Karenirta,"   which   played   in
Vancouver
C«me off.
this   week   doosn't   quite
"Those who have read the novel by
ofte of the greatest of them all, Leo To'l-
styoy,' will come away feeling a lit lie
Unsatisfied with what the directors
have done with it.
''Most prominent i.s the (earing away
of-'theainternal battle that Anna Karen-
itia must have gone through to Ira user her love to another man and face
the social disgrace that, finally engulfs
her in St. Petersburg. Tbe picture
faces'this' problem as 1hou,L;l] it were
tin everyday occurrence and the .sharp
transition becomes entirely unbelievable.
(j.me t-)o are ihe subplots and Tolstoy's magnificent cliaracleri/nlion and
a good deal of it re.;orl.s In out and mil
tc0p4erkinq\
I lie role of Anna and Kicron Moore as
V I'onsky has been terribly miscast.
Everyone suffers when you compare
theta to Sir Ralph Richardson who does
seme of the freshest, realistic acting as
Anna's husband that the screen has
dec!', privileged to see in a longtime.
'I h^ companion piece on the same
bill was a thing called "Wallflower"
and Ihe only thing it proves is that
: ..me persons will prostitute their ar-
1'i'li.' smils for almost any price.
WO R
EVER
fj
»*»*
^
Your Bank On The Campus — In The Auditorium Building
Merle C. Kirby, Officer-in-charge
<&Kfrta& ^faeces cvffi dru S
rihe
-iisiers
litem
klSL  .';(
lure s
picture.' revolves around two
attempls to get a man to take
lo a dance--as (hough it was tho
'I I hoy were lo commit. Tlie pic-
I'.ruble; over such cheap laughs
s'.esal Arnold trying to make a
1 wh'!" very (hunk and tho boy
a'h r having (heir clothes
beach  having
'rl
, i
Vivien   1, 'Peli   is eerlainlv   nol
up
tiii ail   \m
h'ive home naked and subsequently
■\'\ ari'ca'led hy the police,
■''■ '   i.ee.-i" going  public  thai   has to
a' ■<:   \) line e.oi'l of I rash should sue,
by jim banham
*      •      •
I was flattered at Wednesday's AMS
meeting when an engineer got up and
asked the audience why the Ubyssey
printed such stuff as appears in this
spot every week. I was flattered to
think that someone read it at least.
To the person in question, who I
heartily disagree ■ with, I would say
this. If yqit are reading it, it's fairly safe
to say that others are doing the same
Ihing, and we would ask you to realize
that there are some persons who are not
entirely immersed in Archimedes Principle and the maximum stress that can
be put on girders and beams.
This column is not an attempt to
satisfy everyone. That would be impossible.
If you think that you could contact
a   larger   audience   by   discussing   the t   .... ,
> o   i   i  in       » u ,     a          .    „_,,    , »,'  ony- Usellus nuturul dressing for your haiV
bolubdily of Hexacosane m 2 Ethyl N ■ ...    °    ; \
Butyric Acid, Propionic Acid and Ace-'
tic Acid", or some such topic, then
come ahead, we'll bo only too happy to
have v,'ii.
"'i
SYMPTOMSilje
lleta jr feeling,. ll»»- ••
rfruff; dry, brittle
hair; Iuom haln am
comb or bruih, Vi-
Ism checked mar
uum baldiieti.
Give yourself a head-start
with good-looking hair
Throughout  the  workl  "Vaseline" jjair
Tonic ia used hy more men than any other
bnir preparation ... to keep Scalp in c|on-
. hair neat and well-groomed Kill
dition
Vaseline HAiRTQNIC
TRADE  MAf)K
\ Friday,     .October     8,     1948
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
'age 9
■it.
Eushees   Now
dties
Solemn pledging services closed
a hectic three weeks.
Sorority members welcomed the
following pledges to their groups.
Alpha Delta Pi: Shirley May Air-
fey, Dolores Branca, Diannne Carr,
Shirley Anne Crist, Shirley Cros-
ey, Delores Branca, Dianne Carr,
HarVeir; Gerry Kebfch, Arlene
non, Daphne Livingstone,
in Lough, Lorna Loveridge,
3&jf Lowry, Marylin McLean,
Gloria Newell, Hue Thomson,
Dbrbthy Wills.
Alpha Omicron PI: Gwen Brad-
, \0f' Marjorie Grant, Eleanor
Home, -Alma Philioh, Dorothea
Powell, 'fieryl Shankland, Janet
Watson, Christine Windebank, Lillian Woodcock.
Gamma Phi Beta: Jane Atkin-
" Friesen, Lois Anne Gunn, Janis
qroft, Genevieve Baone, Jean
Cockrane, Diane Elworthy, Dorr
een Fetherstonhaugh, Gloria
Friesen, Lois Anne Gunn, Jane
Ingledew, Joyce Leith, Jan 'Mc-
Coll, Margaret MacCofkindale,
Doreen Rutledge", Clare Shanahan,
rttin, Verna Martinson, Lucille
Peggy McGregor, Dorothy O'Brien,
Alpha Gamma Delta: Anne Ab-
ernethy, Barbara Adams, Lyla
Butterworth, Shirley Coltman,
Joan'Weeden.
Elaine Drage, Marilyn Fredrick-
son, Rae Gardner, Anita Hender-
kis, Kathie Howard, Christina,
Johnltdri, BeWrly McCtfsham,
Joan MaeKeracher, Mikki McLen-
Mehmel, Gerry Nesbit, Marjorie
Perry, ' Vivian iScahlon, Shirley
Selman, Shirley Mae Welsh, Dorothy Wright.
Delta Gamma: Shirley Anderson, Gwen Eades, Anne ■ Ewing,
Pamela Fraser, Theo Gyles, Mary
Leiterman, Margaret Low Beer,
Eleanor Mathekon, Janet Meneely,
Kappa Alpha theta: Elspeth
Taylor, Beryl Blandy, Mildred
Cox, Jean Long, Kathryn Murphy,
Grloria Phillips, Louise Sieburth.
Alpha Phi: Averil Blatchford,
Margaret Braim, Jo Jean Johnston, Pai' Millard, Frances Nelson,
Joan Nichols, Betty Reid, Jeanne
Sinclair, Aldeane Snyder, Anne
Spenser..
Kappa Kappa Gamma: Barbara
Black, Helen Blois, Barbara Anne
ijirfiWn, Doreen ' -Clarke, Verity
jf$(|e$ Combe. Jacqueline Davies,
B^Verly Dixon, Barbara Ef finger,
S^lfley Finch, Athalie Frasier, El-
laafjeth Grant, Dorothy Neard, Jean
$oc?gson, Bernice Laird, Rosemary
Ulji(§la^ham, June Mclntyre, Ruth
llte^'avish, Gerry Mitchell, Marjorie
Anihe Munnis, Helen Nobinson, Joan
Sdoby, Beverly Urquhart, Carolyn
Wright.
g
Friday, October 8:
HUS Meetlftg: Aggie 100, 12:30
Newman  Club Dance,  Brock,  p.m.
Saturday, October 9:
Pdotball Dartce, Crock,  evening
Monday, October 11:
Pre-Med Stag.
Mussoc  Get  Together  Banquet,
Brock, evening.
Tuesday, October 12.
Aggie Barn Dance
Wednesday,  October 13:
"WVS Fashion Show, Brock, 4 p.m.
Science Banquet
Thursday, October 14:
Commerce   Women's   Tea,
(Brock, aiternoon.
EXPORT
C a N A D AS   FINEST
CIGARETTE
\
>ni f
rancis women s e
ditor
*>>>mm<>m*+(>*mn^m>t)*m>t>mB>ommo*mn>mmtK*)
Annual WUS Show
Given Wednesday
Annual Women's.Undergraduate Society fashion show will
be presented in the Brock Lounge Wednesday, October 13, at
4 p.m. All the creations to be shown are from Woodward's
department store. '$^$\'.
Models were selected last week 3>
arid those chosen to wear the new
fall fashions are Joan Vivian, Sheila
Wolstehcroft, Kay McDonald, Joanne
Bowell, Joan Taylor, Joyce Fawcii't,
Freida Kelly, Margaret Braim, Gloria
Phillips, Lcrrainc Robson, Shirley
Finch, Barbara Seymour, Mary Leiterman, Marg Hodson, Ilace Ross
Kelly, Denise Pierce, Del Stockslead,
Shirley Selman, Sharon West, and
Nancy Pattison.
Esme MacDonal will bo the commentator.
Popular Vancouver singer, Juliette
will sing during the intermission.
Price of admission is thirty-five
cents. Tickets are obtainable at the
door.
Home Ec Elections
Election for the Home Economics
Society vice-president and year representatives will be held today. Election pplls for each year are as
follows:
First year — HS4
Second year — HS5
Third year - HS6
Fourth year — HS9
UBC Setting
For Musical
Fashion Musical "College Da2e"
will be presented by the Thetis Club
November 4 and 5 in the Hotel Vancouver Ballroom.
ft ^.*i^*r~.!i*.*e.,iv '>-.<■.«;/.'
^i*""''
#
By LONI FRANCIS
*#*^^MW>HSA^*.^'^V^'W.'»Siat*l6#*\S*^(.»1t*«
into!
With a UBC setting and Theatre
Under the Stars and UBC Jokefrs
Club cast the story revolves around
a contest to discover the most popular girl on the campus, which iriti*o-
duccs the clothes interest. Models
move through tho different sequences
dressed in everything fromi campus
to formal attire.
Some fifteen songs and routines
under the baton of Ricky Hyslbp Will
carry through the production wtilcn
is produced by Jack McRae arid directed by Margaret i3rihkwater.
All proceeds will be donated to the
Crippled Children's .Hospital (Queen
Alexandra Solarium). Tickets may be
obtained from Thetis Club members.
Caf hounds proved Wednesday
that they can remove that coating or lethargy oh occasion when
tfte^ turned out eri riraSse to the
AMS meeting. And what is more
amazing — they enjoyed it. It
quite warmed Council's hearts to
see a Show of spirit.
Speaking of spirit, I hope every
ofie Svho can' spsjre a pint' of bldod
is sluing up as a d(mdi\ if is
reality heeded. With sfiich pretty
ybtifcg nurses riiSrFran. Tdrhbull
d61tt£ the* asking1 trfe'bbys shouldn't
find it hard to1 donate their bit,
Over 150 graduates, undergraduate's and freshettes attended the'
Home Econdrrtics reception tea last
Friday in the Brock. Dean Dorothy Mawdsley, Miss Charfottte
Black and other members of the
faculty  were  present.
Presiding at the tea urns were
Miss Margaret MacMillan, Home
fednorhles ' graduate from MacDonald College, who is taking
techers training her, and and Miss
Jean McQueen, a UBC graduate
also continuing in teachers training. They were assisted by Miss
Kay Lonng and Miss Mary Harvey
Of interest to any enterprising
young ladies is the Hudsons Bay
Co. essay cm college fashions. It is
sponsored by the College shops so
that they may cater more profitably to the co-eds. The contest
closes October 23.
Of cours*, it's Ills own fault.
He should have known you have to keep
handsome Arrow shirts under lock aftd key.
Consider the temptation ... perfect-fitting
Arrow collar . . . dashing Arrow pattern . *.
flattering Arrow fit.
And Arrow shirts keep on fitting, because
they're ^SANFORIZED labelled ... guaran-
teed never to shrink out of fit.
See your Arrow dealer. And while you're
there, select several matching Arrow ties
.. . smooth-tying every time.
P.S. The roomate hasn't a chance .",, our
football hero has more Arrow shirts! ^' '-_g
•Trade Mart
leek fer the Arrow Trade Mark
ARROW SHIRTS
3j_U —  '■     '■    " ''<  *     *'
- % s
TIES • HANDKERCHIEFS
____________it_t
of the week
■ '     '•. -V/..S."   -»;«.«."    %X   *' '
by   NANCY   ..   .   modelled   by   freshette   SUSAN   JAMES
Full flattering lines of the "three in one" coat offers college
wardrobe magic ... the detachable belt introduces three distinctive styles for casual or dress wear. Featuring modulated shoulders, a high rolled   collar   and   a   double-
breasted effect this coat is in  grey  or  autumn   rust
all-wool coating. (45.00)
Coats—Spencer's Fashion Fide*
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED ftfol
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Friday,     October " 8,     RIB
. SPORTS EDITOR THIS ISSUE:      RON PINCHIN
Hockey Aspirants
Out In Full Force
The recent, organizational meeting of the ice hockey team
uncovered some excellent new talent for this season. Over sixty
new enthusiasts turned out along with last year's crew. This
assures a spirited fight to gain the nod of coach Frapk Frederickson as no positions are assured on the team as yet.
Six aspirants for the goal-tending
job are headed by holdover Bill
House who will have to be sharp to
beat out Ken Torrence of Edmonton
Athletic Club and York Blayney, an
Alberta Intermediate star.
The battle for defense positions is
wide open as many likely prospects
have turned up. Five members are
returning from last season and at
least as m£>r.y newcomers will be on
hand.
More than a dozen new forward
prospects will contest with six returning lettermen for positions on
the attacking wall, Haas Young says
he has uncovered a capable replacement for Hugh Berry in Bill Dickie
of Edmonton, A left winger, Bill has
a reputation for speed and savvy.
Camroose Maroons who were Canadian Senior *'B" finalists last season
have lost "Gunnar" Bailey to UBC.
"Gunnar" is a right winger by trade
and should be a valuable asset to the
Thunderbirds. Another outstanding
prospect' is Bob Lindsay, a left winger, from Medicine Hat. He too has had
<$-
NOW THIS IS HOW IT'S DONE—Scenes like this will be repeated in many Yankee colleges
in the next few weeks as teams of the Pacific Northwest Intercollegiate Conference prepare to
meet the UBC Thunderbirds. The 'pirds are scheduled for five more home games starting
Saturday, October 16 with Willamette.
Soccerites
Open League
With tollies'
First division soccer hits the
cajnpus    Saturday    afternoon
when  Varsity   plays  host  to
Collingwood in a scheduled
Vancouver and District league
fixture.
Already tabbed as the team to
watch after their convincing 6-1 victory over South Hill last weekend,
Varsity will nevertheless be up against tough opposition, for the Collies are definite contenders too. The
game is a continuation of a bitter
three year rivalry between these two
clubs, in which honors have broken
just about even.
To the winner of Saturday's tussle
foes undisputed possession of first
place, which alone makes the game a
natural. With no football slated for
Saturday, campus fans will be free
to give the boys a little of the support they so richly deserve and so
seldom get. A further incentive to
would-be soccer enthusiasts is the
fact that there is no admission charge,
Scene of action is the South Field.
next the parking lot.
The same lineup that was so successful against South Hill last weekend will start again Saturday, Coach
Ivan Carr is confident that this potent aggregation will bring Varsity
the league leadership, but the boys
are not underrating the strength of
the Collingwood eleven.
The remaining first division schedule this weekend pits Norquay
against South Hill, wii'h North Burnaby facing Raniers, who won the
league title last year as Empire Hotel.
INTERMURAL VOLLEYBALL
All Games Played At 12:30 P.M.
Friday, October 8
1. Newman "A"'
2. Psi U. "A"
3. Phys. Ed. "A"
;■ •£
vs
vs
vs
Architects F.H
^lpha Tau Omega 'B' F.H,
Kappa Sig "B"
Senior "B" experience and should be
right in the battle for a position on
the roster, Returning forwards from
last season will have to hustle to
keep their positions from the many
recruit's who will be eager to make
the team. Haas Young, Bob Koch,
Fred Andrew, Bill Wagner, and Lloyd
Torfasson, holdovers, are all experienced and proven men who may well
form the nucleus of this University's
greatest hockey  squad.
"Mac" Porteus was returned a.s
team manager and Haas Young replaced Terrv Nelford who is retiring  as president.
UBC will compete in a strong senior "B" league formed of Nanaimo,
Vancouver, New Wesminster, and
UBC, All teams will be stronger this
season since this is the only Senior
Amateur league on the lower Mainland. It is rumored that Nanaimo has
imported Frank McCool of Toronto
Maple Leaf fame as coach. Similar
deals among the other teams give
promise of a tough loop. The Thunderbirds will have to be good in such
competition. Frank Frederickson says
they will and assures all prospects
that no position is taken and all who
turn out for practice will have an
equal chance of proving their worth.
F.H
American  Football
Oct. 16 Willamette University at UBC
(Willamette 33—UBC 0)
Oct. 23 Whitman College at UBC
(Whitman 7—UBC 6)
Oct. 30 College of Idaho (Homecoming)
at UBC
(Idaho 33—UBC 13)
Nov. 6 Lewis and Clarke College at UBC
(Lewis and Clarke 7—UBC 2G)
Nov. 13 Linfield College at UBC
(Linfield 21-UBC 0)
Nov. 25 Western Washington College of
Education at BeMingham*
♦Denotes non-conference games
Scores are from last year's games
Change Of Address
If you have changed your address or acquired a telephone number since registration, please notify the Pub
secretary in the Brock North Basement by Friday,
October 8, for correct listing in the
Student Directory
SPORTS WRITERS
and
PROSPECTIVE   WRITERS
Your presence is earnestly requested at Friday
noon (12:30) for an important meeting of
The Sports Desk Staff
See For
Yourself
Next time your car needs
attention, come around and
sec thc unique facilities here
at Ducck's. Our newly completed service and repair
shops set new standards of
efficiency unsurpassed anywhere. A quick look will
reveal these great new
developments — thc service
you get explains them.
DUECK
CHEVROLET OLDSMOBILE
C-INIKAL   MOTORS
WHOLtSALl PAKTS PISmBUJORS
1300 D10CK MflSI 8KMMAY   '   Clotit<Htt
Typewriting, Essays, Theses,
Notes, Manuscripts, Etc.
RATES MODERATE
Mrs. A. O. Robinson
4180 West 11th Ave.       AL. 091SR
(
... that for a mild, cool, sweet smoke ... there's nuthinf
to match a tobacco expertly blended from high grade
Burley leaf. He knows that Burley is a tobacco that
packs easily . . . burns slowly, leaving a clean whim
ash ... a tobacco that stays lit! He knows that it meets
the real test of mildness—he can smoke it all day long.
Isn't this just the tobacco you are looking for? Try a pip* *f
Picobac
■   The Pick of Pipe Tobaccos
Have a
Coke
5
A    Plus 2i
Y> Wartime taxtt
and orders.
Drink
(^'(wia
COCA-COLA, Vancouver.
Coke = Coca-Cola
''Coca-Cola" and its abbreviation "Coke'
ate the registered trade marks which
distinguish the product of Coca-Cola Ltd.
••
"Because you come to me", sings
Perry, and an old favorite makes its bid to top
the Hit Parade . . . again.
Suncjby PERRYCOMO
Also |F YOU HAD ALL THE WORLD AND ITS GOLD
Perry Como with The Mariners and with Russ Case
and his Orchestra
Both on RCA Victor Record 20-2653   .   ,   «    75c.
&:&
MORE  RCA VICTOR  RECORD  HITS
LOVE IS SO TERRIFIC
(Ouch I Terrific Thing)
A LITTLE CONSIDERATION
Helen Carroll anil the Saihfiers
RCA Victor Record 20-2672 75*
THE LAST POLKA
I LOVE YOU, YES I DO
Swing and Sway uilh Sammy Kaye
RCA  Victor Record  20-2674 7S*
LONE STAR MOON
(Gotta'Get To)
OKLAHOMA CITY
Tex Beiicke ami his Orchestra
RCA   Victor   Record  20-2566 75*
OH1 FLORENCE
(The  TUousiind  Islands  Souk)
(from "Angol in the Wings")
I'M LIVING A LIE
T.unis   I'rin/a (Hid  bis   Urtbestrtt
RCA  Victor Record  20-.I6I9 75*
Tho New RCA Victor Red Seal
Records for April out today
Visit your RCA Victor Record Dealer's
tomorrow and hear some of these
grand new recordings. Be sure to get
your Free copy of the RCA Victor
Record Supplement — listing all of
the new Classical and Hit Tune it-
leases for April.
v"irf" ***** ^"t
What-No Phonograph!
This RCA Victor Record Player
plays records through your
radio.  Only $21.30

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0125453/manifest

Comment

Related Items