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The Ubyssey Dec 9, 1920

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 CHRISTMAS NUMBER
Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume III.
VANCOUVER, B. C, DECEMBER 9, 1920
Number 9
Ladies Attend
Men's Lit.
SOAP-BOX   ORATORY   SWAYS
AUDIENCE
It is indeed delightful, in the busy rush
of modern life, to turn aside for a brief
space into some quiet backwater and refresh one's soul with wisdom. Such a
pleasure awaited all those who wended
their way to the Auditorium last Friday
evening. The ceremonies opened with a
speech by Mr. Rive, who is to be congratulated not only on his • power of
creating "dramatic suspense, ' but also on
his delivery, which gave an impression of
quiet strength and repose. Eager partisanship was awakened by the debate,
"Are Women a Nuisance?" conducted by
Messrs. Lord and Johnson. The negative, ably maintained by Mr. Lord, received the decision. Mr. McLeod, supported by Mr. Fisher (or should we say
Mr. Fisher, supported by Mr. McLeod?),
offered a speech which was an interesting
example of incoherency. The connection
between the fifteen starving children in
Russia, with whom we are sure he
started, and the final dissertation on how
93 per cent, of the heads of Vancouver's
homes smoke their after-dinner pipes, is
one for which many of us are still groping. Miss Murphy uttered platitudinous
pomposities and sonorous linguistic
sumptuosities entirely disassociated from
sequential or even intelligible radiocina-
tion. Mr. Hurst's soul-stirring message,
"Sell your hammer and buy a horn!" was
delivered in the speaker's best manner,
and  touched the  hearts of all.
At the conclusion of the contest, Mr.
MacDonald presented a "silver loving
cup ' to Miss Murphy. A tie, of an extremely exciting plaid, became the property of Mr. Fisher.
The entries for the Better Babies'
Contest were as follows: Miss Fulton,
Miss McKechnie, Miss Eveleigh, W.
Knowlton, H. Arkely, B. Cooke and W.
Mathers., Prizes were awarded by Mrs.
Clark to Miss Fulton and Mr. Arkley.
The rest of the evening was spent in
dancing. A quaint feature was the refreshments, which displayed a delightful
power of lasting through many dances
instead of vanishing in one intermission.
Altogether, it was a very successful
evening. Kla-how-ya! Who said College
spirit and talked about making things go?
WE'RE WITH YOU!
Say, boys, when you meet 'em
On  the coming Christmas  Day,
You'll see us in the grandstand
With our colors bright and gay.
With the gold of B. C.'s glory,
True blue our spirit is;
And though our vim's not hoary,
It's gonna do the "biz."
And though you'll see us hooting
Till    our    howling    throats    are
peeled,
We'll  everyone be booting
With our boys out on the field.
We re with you, boys,  behind you,
straining in the stiffest scrum;
We re  all  punting,  tackling,   sprinting;
All B. C. '11 show 'em some!
EXCELLENT DISPLAY OF
COLLEGE SPIRIT
Every student present at the meeting
on Friday came away with a different
attitude towards our Alma Mater. The
meeting may be considered one of the
best meetings that we have ever had. It
brought out the fact that we have here
a college spirit equal to that of any other
university, and that we have a student
body which is willing to do all within its
power to help our Alma Mater.
The speeches were all interesting, and
everybody seemed surprised that we had
not had such a meeting before. The reason for this is not very clear, but everybody is enthusiastic about the future of
our college spirit. On all sides you hear
suggestions and methods for developing
the ideas which were brought out at the
meeting. There is a committee at work
on a programme, and, although much
good work has been done, it is necessary
to keep it a secret'in order that it maybe effective when the time comes.
As much of the grandstand at Brockton Point as can be reserved is being
reserved for the students, one section for
the ladies and the other for the men.
Yell Wonder Meekison, assisted by two
Yell Marvels, will lead the yells. A sheet
of college yells is being prepared and
will be distributed before the game.
Learn these yells, and provide yourselves
with a box of throat tablets or cough-
drops.
The Women's Athletic Society is busy
and  will    conduct  a  tag  day  to-morrow.
(Continued on Page 8)
Musical Society
Entertains Students
CHRISTMAS   CONCERT   GIVEN   IN
AUDITORIUM
Judging from the large attendance at
its concert last Saturday night, the
Musical Society is as popular an organization as any in the University. The
Auditorium was comfortably filled with
an appreciative audience of students and
their friends.
"O Canada" was the opening number,
and was sung by the whole Musical Society, accompanied by the orchestra. The
next item was "Canzanetta," an orchestral selection, very ably rendered. Miss
Lila Coates played with her usual display
of talent and technique. The Women's
Glee Club sang "I Would That My
Love." Mr. Woodworth played "Calvary" on the trombone so excellently that
an encore was demanded. The men's
octette, in singing "Sweet and Low,"
seemed to show a slight lack of training,
but otherwise the selection was quite
good. "In a Pagoda" was the next selection by the orchestra. Mr. Clifford
Woodworth played "The Angel Song,"
by Braga, on the violin. The audience
gave him most enthusiastic applause.
After the first half of the programme
there was a short interval, during which
the Glee Clubs sang, very heartily, several of the usual  College  songs.
Miss Marion Wilcox, Miss Reid, Mr.
W. Stewart and Mr. Alan Hurst sang a
selection from Gilbert and Sullivan's light
opera, "Yeomen of the Guard. They
made a good quartette, but seemed to be
rather timid in exerting themselves. The
cornet solo by Emmons was very well
received, and the feature number of the
evening, the Concerto, in G minor, can
not have too much said in its praise.
Miss Edna Rogers and Mr. Tripp played
the piece as a duo, Miss Rogers playing
the first piano and Mr. Tripp the second.
The rendering was exquisite. Miss Reid
sang a solo, and then the men's octette
gave another song, entitled "Bottles."
The audience waxed quite enthusiastic at
its finish. The Musical Society was fortunate enough to secure Mr. Willson
Coates for part of their programme. Mr.
Coates, accompanied by Miss Lila
Coates, sang "Homing," and an encore.
After    one    more    selection,     "Serenade
(Continued on Page 8)
STANFORD  GAME —and then Victoria! THE   UBYSSEY
December 9, 1920
Clothes with
a "Rep"
for Style
and Pep
There's a certain unusual Class
in Semi-ready clothing that appeals
to the young men who strive for an
ultra-smart appearance.
THOMAS
& McBAIN
LIMITED
655 GRANVILLE ST.
The Palm Garden
Corner Tenth Ave. and Heather St.
Has changed hands. The new proprietors, Elder and Buttle, will be
pleased to welcome the students—old
customers and new ones.
CANDY AND TOBACCO
LUNCHES, TEAS, ICE CREAM
FINE FOOTWEAR
JxTBql.
Discriminating   citizens   of   Vancouver
buy  their  Footwear  at
C LUFF'S
649 HASTINGS STREET, W.
"The Home of Good Shoes"
THE COMING DEBATES
Three inter-collegiate debates are on
the programme of the debates committee. The first of these will be held on
January 21st,* when the annual dual debate with Washington will take place.
The following subject has been chosen:
"Resolved that the Anglo-Japanese
agreement is detrimental to Anglo-
American friendship." The second debate of the session will take place on
February 4th, when Oregon, Idaho and
B. C. will meet in the regular triangular
fixture. The subject is: "Resolved that
the general public should lend its support to the complete absorption by the
co-operative system of the function of
the middleman in the distribution of products."
The third debate will be that against
Alberta. This year a team will be sent
to Alberta, but no team will come here.
The following subject has been suggested: "Resolved that the highest court of
judicial appeal for this Dominion be the
Supreme Court of Canada, and that the
right of appeal to the King in Council be
abo'ished.' The debate will be held on
February 25th in Edmonton.
FAREWELL TO
WILLSON COATES
Last Thursday evening the class of
Arts '20 bade farewell to one of their
.members, Mr. Willson Coates, who is to
leave next week to take up residence at
Oxford. The occasion was an informal
dance at Killarney. Probably due to the
happy purpose for which old classmates
and their friends had gathered together,
every minute was filled with real pleasure. After all those present had partaken
of a sumptuous repast, such only as an
"original' class could provide, Mr. Wood,
honorary president, extended to Mr.
Coates the best wishes of his Alma Mater
and expressed the hope that he might
find happiness in the work upon which
he was about to enter.
SIGMA DELTA KAPPA
On Tuesday evening, November 30th,
the society met in the Auditorium, the
proceedings taking the form of a Mock
Parliament.
Mr. Cunningham, Arts '23, as Leader
of the Government Party, introduced a
resolution for a bill to bring about the
secession of Canada from the British Empire. In the course of a lengthy and
impassioned address, he outlined the
policy of his party for the coming session, closing with the reading of his resolution.
The Leader of the Opposition, Mr.
Black, Arts '22, spoke in terms of extreme bitterness against the adoption of
the measure by the House, and urged the
members not to allow themselves to go
on  record  as  approving  such  legislation.
After an interesting debate, a vote was
taken, which gave an overwhelming majority  to the  Opposition.
IRELAND    &    ALLAN
BOOKSELLERS AND
STATIONERS
Depot for
FOUNTAIN   PENS
and
LOOSE-LEAF   NOTE   BOOKS
Phone,  Seymour 602
649 GRANVILLE STREET
WHY GO TO
CHINATOWN?
WE   ARE   NOW   SERVING
CHINESE   DISHES  UPSTAIRS
6 to 3 A.M.
DELMONIOO CAFE
704 ROBSON STREET
Phone,   Fairmont 722
THE REX CAFE
TEA ROOM BAKERY   ICE CREAM
Confectionery Tobacco and Cigars
692  BROADWAY,  WEST
Follow the Crowd
■TO —
Ben Petch
LIMITED
898 Granville Street
— FOR —
BARGAINS  IN
HATS
Stetsons, values to $11.00;
Sale Price   $7.00
NO TAX
Cor. Smythe and Granville December 9, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
LEAGUE BASKETBALL
The 'Varsity senior basketball team
lost to the Y.M.C.A. Reds in a fast game
at the Y.M.C.A. on Saturday evening in
a regular City League fixture. The
seniors were away off form, and the
18-10 loss came as a setback, after the
good start which they made by winning
their first league game. If the forwards
had put in more consistent work under
the basket, rather than confined their
attention to long-range fancy shots, the
score might have been better. Owing to
a slight falling off in the form of the
Reds, our squad were able to hold their
own in the second half.
The team: Forwards, Lacey Fisher
and J. P. McLeod; centre, Cliffe Mathers;  guards,  G.   Raley and  K.  Carlyle.
On Thursday last Science '23 added
another win in the Inter-Class League
when they won from Arts '23, 39-9. The
score at half time was 9-3, so the surveyors did some tall shooting in the last half.
The teams:
Science '23—Gross (9), Cameron (6),
McVittie (8), Mathers (10), and Ternan
(6).
Arts '23—Saunders (2), A. Hunter (5),
Wallace, R.  Hunter, and Roberts  (2).
This evening the seniors and the intermediates will play regular City League
fixtures at the Normal gym. The intermediates will meet the Kitsilano Community Club in the first game, and the
seniors will clash with the ex-Normals in
the second game. Rooters are urgently
needed to lend their  support.
TO  BEAT  STANFORD
Take a liberal dose of HUSTLE,
A shot or two of PEP,
A half a glass of GINGER,
Come out and get in step.
B. C. CAN DO IT!
'VARSITY  VS.  B.C.E.R.
In order to show the B.C.E.R. soccer
team that their reverse of the week before was not a fluke, our boys again
trimmed them last Saturday, this time by
the score of two to one.
The first half opened with the B.C.E.R.
pressing hard. Aided by a strong wind,
and the sun at their backs, the Electrics
tried hard to score, and had our defence
working overtime. It was not long, however, before our forwards began an attack which ended in Lundie placing a
shot through their goal. The car men
started pressing again, and shortly afterwards evened the score on a shot which
our goalkeeper had no chance of saving.
Play swung up and down the field for
the remainder of the half, with no further
score, though McLeod put in a shot
which, with any luck at all, should have
counted.
In the second half play started off more
evenly, both sides giving the opposing
defence plenty to do. Then 'Varsity
gradually pulled away, and, before time
was up, were shooting at will, and, had
it not been for the splendid work of their
goalie, the score would have been much
larger. One of these shots, however,
went .through for a count, McLeod scoring on one of his many tries.
The line-up was as follows: Henderson, Wolverton, Crute, G. Vant, Jackson,
Mitchell, Markle, H. Cant, McLeod, Lundie,  Rushbury.
Next Saturday we are scheduled to
play the Elks at Athletic Park. This is
an important game, and the Elks are one
of the hardest teams we have to play. As
there is no 'Varsity Rugby game next
Saturday, why can't the Rooters' Club
turn out in force. Remember, this means
vou!
He—I  press my  suit on bended knee.
She—Haven't    you    got    an    ironing-
board?
Phone, Seymour 7853
C.  HERMANN, Proprietor
U.B.C. Students Should Patronize
HERMANN'S    BARBER    SHOP
ROGERS BLOCK, 464 GRANVILLE STREET
FOOTBALL EQUIPMENT
Rugby and Soccer teams will find that this store has the largest and best assorted
stock of Football equipment in Western Canada.
Jerseys, in all color combinations, in pure wool and cotton, priced from $2.50 to
$10.00 each.
Footballs, for Soccer and Rugby, priced from $3.50 to $11.00 each.
Boots, $9.00 to $12.00 per pair.
Pants, $1.50 to $3.50 per pair.
Leg Guards, 75c to $3.25 per pair.
"Special Discounts to Clubs."
TISDALLS   LIMITED
The Complete Sporting Goods Store
618 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Phone, Seymour 152
'VARSITY GIRLS OVERWHELM
NORMAL
On Friday afternoon the senior girls'
basketball team inflicted a crushing defeat upon the Normalites. The first five
minutes saw quite even play, but soon
'Varsity began to display its superior
combination, and the first half ended with
the score 24-3 in our favor. In the second half we added twenty points to our
total, while Normal succeeded in obtaining three more points, thus making the
final score 44-6.
The team: E. Eveleigh (24), B. Pearce
(12), C. Weld (8), M. Gordon, D. Gillespie.
In their first appearance, the junior
girls played a hard game against the
Normal juniors. They led all the way
through until their opponents tied the
score by putting in a basket near the end
of the game.    The final count was 9-9.
The team: G. Smith, N. Griffiths, J.
Russell, D. Lee, H. Kloepfer.
SENIOR GIRLS—SECOND GAME
The girls' basketball team defeated the
Royal Bank girls in a hard-fought game
on Monday evening by a score of 32-8.
Owing to the narrowness of the gym.,
the passing was not as good as usual,
and the playing was more scrappy.
BADMINTON
Prof. Mercer is endeavoring to stimulate interest in Badminton amongst University students. He already has a large
following in all the years, especially
amongst the men. On Wednesday, Nov.
24th, an exhibition given by some of the
leading players in the Province was given
in K. E. gym., some of the students who
had played before also joining in. The
chief difficulty at present seems to be the
lack of a building in which to play, but
this may be remedied in the near future.
PITMAN BUSINESS
COLLEGE
Established 1898
INDIVIDUAL     INSTRUCTION
Day and Evening Classes
422 Richards Street
Corner Hastings Street
Phone, Sey. 9135
HARRY    CARTER
Bicycles and Accessories
General  Repairs
Cab,   Buggy  and  Invalid   Chairs
Re-tired
Charges Moderate
C.C.M.
Agent for
"RAMBLER"   BICYCLES
632 Broadway, West
Phone,   Fairmont   1386 THE   UBYSSEY
December 9, 1920
THE CANDY
TO TAKE
On an evening call, if Candy
accompanies the young man—
honestly, wouldn't you prefer
Purdy's to any other kind
made?
purbys
Maker of Purdy's Chocolates
675       GRANVILLE       ST.
THE GREAT-WEST
LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
Head   Office,   Winnipeg,   Manitoba
Result of a 20-year endowment
which   matured   October   1st,   1920.
Name, Gilbert Inkster, Lady-
smith. Premium, $102.30. Amount,
$2,000.
In 20 years he paid $2,004.60.
The cash value of his policy was
$3,070, being the face of the policy
$2,000 and a dividend of $1,070.
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Vancouver Branch  Office
SEE   OUR   SELECTION   OF
Private Greeting Cards
and   Christmas   Gifts
They   will  please   you
the Uancottver Stationers Ltd
SOCIETY STATIONERS AND
PRINTERS
683 Granville St.    Phone, Sey. 5119
AVENUE THEATRE
Coming  Dec. 27, 28, 29, 30.    Mat. Wed.
"The Maid of the
Mountains"
With complete English cast and
chorus. Direct from Daly's Theatre,
London, England, where it ran for
five years.
City and out-of-town mail orders
will be accepted now, if accompanied
by cheque or money order and self-
addressed, stamped envelope for safe
return of tickets. Make cheques payable  to  AVENUE  THEATRE.
Prices: Lower Floor, $3.30; Balcony,
$2.75 and $2.20; Gallery, $1.65 and $1.10.
Box Office  Sale,   December  23rd.
(Member  Pacific  Inter-Collegiate  Press
Association)
Issued  every Thursday by the Publications Board
of the  University of British   Columbia.
Extra   mural   subscriptions,   $2.00   per   session.
For advertising  rates,  apply Advertising  Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief P.   N.   Whitley
Senior   Editor A.   A.   Webster
i-A.  H.  Imlah
Associate Editors   { S.  M. Scott
I Miss R.  E.  Verchere
Chief   Reporter A.   F.   Roberts
fMiss  A.   Anderson
J.   C.   Clyne
Reporters < Bert  Sweeting
Cliffe   Mathers
I Miss P. Stewart
Exchange    Editor	
r -^            r,., t A.  L.  Stevenson
Literary Editors ]G   G   Coope
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager L.   T.   Fournier
Advertising  Manager H.   M.   Cassidy
in.   A.   Wallace
.... I W:n.  McKee
Asslstants ]P.  V.  McLane
1 H.  G. Scott
Circulation   Manager R.   C.    Palmer
Editor for the Week Miss  R.   E.  Verchere
HOLIDAYS
Announcement should be made earlier
from the administration offices as to the
observance of holidays by the University.
The day the provincial plebiscite was
taken having been observed as a holiday,
it was natural to suppose that the precedent would be followed on election
day. Announcement that this was not
going to be done shouldi have been posted
some days in advance. Two days before
Armistice Day it was impossible to obtain from the Registrar a decision as to
whether lectures would be held on that
day or not. Such uncertainties are vexing, especially to students who take advantage of such holidays to add to their
incomes.
ANNUAL CRUSADE TO VICTORIA
"HAMMERS OR HORNS"
The other evening, at a "Lit." meeting,
we were advised to "sell your hammer
and buy a horn." Now we wish to pass
on the advice to all those who read this
column before next Saturday. On that
day the 'Varsity soccer team will play
the Elks in the second round for the Iroquois Cup. These men have been playing excellent football all season, but have
received very little support from the sidelines. The game this week will be held
at Athletic Park. According to the
officials, this is undoubtedly one of the
most crucial contests of the season. The
fellows deserve the encouragement of the
student body. Rooters Club, here is an
opportunity to be of some real service.
The "Ubyssey" wishes all of its readers
a Very Merry Christmas.
Owing to Christmas Day being on a
Saturday, the annual trip to Victoria has
been postponed until January 7th. We
want this trip to be a bigger success than
ever; and every student who wishes to
have a good time, and also support the
University, should come along. Four
basketball games will be played on Friday night, January 7th, and the Rugby,
soccer and ladies' grass hockey games
will be played on Saturday, leaving the
evening free for the dance that will be
given in our honor. The senior Rugby
team will defend the Brown Cup, which
has been in our possession for the past
year.
Those who go over on Friday morning
will receive a reduced rate of $3.75 for
the round trip, while those travelling on
the night boat will have to pay the full
fare; so everybody who can, should try
and make it Friday morning. University
and Science orchestras, bring along your
instruments, and help to make the trip
lively.
BY THE WAY
Freshman   eliminations   will   begin   on
Monday,  December  14th.
Let's all be at the big game on Christmas  Day.
Any student who is in the city on that
day, and is not at the game, should be
fined umpteen dollars for the common
treasury.
Word has just been received that
Sherwood Lett, B.A., Arts '16, who is
attending Oxford as a B. C. Rhodes
scholar, was awarded the £10 book prize
for the highest standing in the tutorial
examinations  in jurisprudence.
Varsity girls are showing a real interest in the Stanford game which will
be played here during the holidays. The
punishment for non-attendance, according to one of their number, will far exceed in severity any previous initiation
scramble. Sign your name on the list
upstairs, and watch the notice-boards for
instructions.
Can we have a University reception
and entertainment for the Stanford team?
After all, they are University men, and
would appreciate a University welcome.
How about it?
Do you know that the University staff
now numbers about 100?
The     "Ubyssey"     sends    out    42    exchanges.
Queen's University carries out an attractive programme of musical events
during its college year. This year the
Arts Committee has arranged a programme of five classical concerts. The
first of these took place recently, when
Mark Hambourg gave a recital. CHRISTMAS,  1920
LITERARY SUPPLEMENT
THE BALLAD OF BUNGALEE BOO
' King Boria Bungalee Boo
Once set up a hullaballoo;
He wanted to wive
With  105,
And he'd only 102.
Said his Vizier, "Boo Bungalee,
Of course, it don't matter to me:
But of wives you have plenty,
From  15  to 20.—
I  know,—I've  103."
"That's it," retorted King Boo;
"Of course, it don't matter to you.
You've enough, it mav be,
With   103,
While I've but 102.
It's awfully infra dig.
For you to be getting so big:
You  certainly oughtn't,
You're far too important;
Your head is too big for your wig.
"I've a very good mind, by heck!
Your  silly  ambition  to  check.
Come here while I hold yer,"
And he called to a soldier,
Who snicked him in two at the neck.
And so  I've but this to relate:
By the law of his Church and his State,
The  king  who   would  wive
With  105
Contracted 208.
But here is a fact to deplore:
In a week he'd 304;
Nor was  it  denied
On  the day that he died
His wives were 1,000, and more.
Moreover, it seems to be true,
As  older  and  older  he grew,
Were he living to-day,
His wives, they do say,
Would consume an entire "Who's Who."
When dying he said to his son,
Who asked if he did it for fun,
"Far better,"  said he,
"Such a number for me
Than be bullied and badgered by 1."
Oh, wise old Bungalee Boo,
Philosopher sound and true!
But the moral is grim:
What was lovely in him
Would only be awful for you.
To all those who have helped, by
contribution or otherwise, to make
these pages a possibility, the editors
extend their grateful recognition of
a service for the common good;
and ask them to bear in mind a
repetition of this experiment next
spring.
EDITORIAL
If any of our readers become
insufferably bored with perusing
these columns (though we hope
that something can be found which
appeals to every taste), let us
suggest an entertaining pastime to
be derived from this experimental
publication. First, however, the
object of the Literary Supplement
must be explained. It is an effort
to capture anything of interest or
literary value that may be produced
at the University in the intervals of
theme writing and other soul-
destroying exercises. A genius is
notoriously a shy and diffident
creature; but it would be a serious
accusation against the University,
in the future, if a genius should be
allowed to pass through it without
an attempt being made to discover
him. We do not claim that all or
any of the contributors to this issue
are persons thus gifted: that would
spoil the game, which may be
called, "Pick the genius." In other
words, study the contributions and
decide which ones give promise of
talent. If you do not consider any
worthy of this appellation, pray for
the soul of U.B.C. — and send in
something better for the spring
number.
A. L. STEVENSON.
G. G. COOPE.
A WORK OF VANITY
Scene—A bookseller's stall at Oxenford.
Time, 1390.
Persons—Peter Gambis, the bookseller,
and Johannes, a clerk of the University.
PETER: Come into the shade; thou
wilt suffer a distemper from the noonday
sun. Where is thy hood, good master
clerk?
JOHANNES: Hood? What meanest
thou? Oh, aye! Epomis mea, my hood.
As thou sayest, where IS my hood? ,
PETER: Didst have it when thou
fared forth?
JOHANNES: In sooth, I wot not. I
do in some sort recall—-nay, 'twas my
shoon that I did on.
PETER: Yet enter. Hast found again
the coin that dropped from thy pouch
where a stitch did lack?
JOHANNES: Nay. But my ill-chance
may point a lesson. Do thou think on it
if thou art like to be blinded by love of
earthly riches, for they are but passing	
(Continued on Page 2)
THE MOTH
Deftly, on damask wing
Cleaving the night,
Through the soft shadowing
Seeking the light;
One wind-blown candle flame
Beckon'd and swayed;
Life was a joyous game
Joyously played.
Dark, with soft shimmerings,
Fire-flecked  with  gold,
Fluttered the fragile wings
Ever more  bold.
No instinct urged escape
To  the  drunk  brain,—
Only the golden shape
Beckon'd, again.
One final flameward sweep.
—Lo, where it lies!
A black and tortured heap
With   living   eyes.
Gone  was  the  plumage  gay,
Velvet and gold;
Slowly it crept away
Shrivell'd and old.
One yellow candle flame
Sputter'd and swayed;
Life was a soulless game
Soullessly played.
G. B.
THE OASIS
The solitary figures of Bou-Djema and
his camel appeared over the crest! of a
sand-dune of the desert, many days from
the city of Ahaggar. Master and beast, •
they had been without water and food
for so long that their tracks were but
crazy lines traced over the sand. The
man leaned heavily on his camel and
drew a hand to shade his eyes as he
gazed southward over the interminable
sand hills. Below him rolled another
wave of the desert, endless, pitiless; but
far down in the hollow he could just perceive a dark patch, where a few palm
trees rose up, motionless, into the heavy,
silent atmosphere.
"Great is Allah," he said wearily; for
his mind was becoming clouded from the
strain of thirst and bodily fatigue.
"Now, Bukra," he added, addressing
the tired beast beside him; "now we
shall drink and be refreshed. Perhaps
there are dates, and we shall eat of them
and be strengthened, please Allah." They
proceeded down the slope.
"I must not eat nor drink too heavily,"
thought the Arab; "'twould be fatal if it
(Continued on Page 3) LITERARY  SUPPLEMENT
Christmas, 1920
A WORK OF VANITY
(Continued from Page 1)
PETER: Behold, good my master,
this new volume, wrought by that most
famous scribe of Bendelham.
JOHANNES: Quick—show me! Is't
that rare volume of the learned Aquinas,
that thou seekest for me? Alack, I cannot see clear in this dim light.
PETER:. Nay, 'tis the work of an
Englishman, in praise of St. Thomas, his
shrine at Canterbury.
JOHANNES: A worthy theme ....
This capital is fetisly illuminated. "W
H A—whan that Aprille—" How! This
is in the vulgar tongue. 'Tis blasphemy
to our blessed Thomas; doth he not
merit the purest Latin, that he may be
honoured   by   the  future   ages?
PETER: Cast not the book aside; it
is bound with curious craft.
JOHANNES: "Longen folk to go—
hm, hm—" By the sacred fingers and
toes of—a—h—er—by Saint Eligius, 'tis
in rhyme, man; in this new lewd meter
that paceth not estately, but doth rattle
on at a very Canterbury gallop. (He
throws down the book.) I will not profane my reason with such unholy matter.
PETER: Yet is it not a seemly volume ?
JOHANNES: In sooth, 'tis such a
binding as I shall dream of, for my battered Austin. Is it not scathe to waste
the fair red leather on this base book?
(He caresses the binding.)
PETER: See, on this page there is
-not an erasure.
JOHANNES (holding the book close
to his eyes): "This worthy limitour was
cleped Huberd." Surely I have known
such an one. "Knew the taverns well in
every town—" why, he was of the party
when I wended to Canterbury, seven
year agone. "Of yeddinges he bare utterly the prize." To be sure, I recall to
have snibben him for his wanton songs;
and yet, in sooth, he had much melody
in's voice: it accorded well with my
meditations and the merry striking of
the horses' feet. But this cannot be the
same. (He turns the pages.) What is
here? "A Prioresse"—indeed, 'tis won-
derly strange .... That lady had a most
gentle glance. How kindly she warned
me lest my shoon should become wet.
None other woman has spoken to me so,
save my mother—requiescat in pace.
(He is sitting down now, lost in
reminiscence.) "She would weep — a
mouse—" soothly, soothly, how well I
remember. (He reads intently, sometimes mumbling. Then suddenly laughs.)
Heh—he—he—heh! Listen: "Well could
he stelen corn and tolen thrice, and yet
he had a thumb of gold, pardee!" Is not
that a merry jest, friend Peter? In faith,
that miller was a lusty carl. Thou
should'st have seen the sun shining
through his red beard that wagged while
he told his tale. We all told tales, good
Peter, such tales as never did I hear before. • Truly, I did rebuke them somewhat, for I was younger then: and anon
I did feign not to listen. But, by the
holy Saints, they were mirthful tales. I
did both weep and laugh, such power
they won over my reason.
PETER:    Dids't tell one thyself?
JOHANNES:   Aye, that I did.   'Twas
ta'en   from   the   most   noble   rhetoric   of
Messer    Francis    Petrarch,    the    laureate
poet,  as  told me  in  Padua.    Thou  shalt
hear it some day, for soothly it moved
all in that company to admire it. Never
till that day did I know what skill of
tale-craft lay in me .... "Full longe
were his legges—" (He resumes reading. A customer comes in and Peter
stirs uneasily.)
PETER: Is it not a work of vanity,
friend clerk?
JOHANNES (rising): Yet I must
have the book. 'Tis my duty to glance
through it—lest the writer has fallen into
some error. (Whispers.) Besides, this
meter is a delight when I am wearied
from my studies. I can pay thee but
four crowns now, good Peter, which was
to purchase my Aquinas. Thou'lt have
more anon.
PETER:    Wilt carrv it with thee?
JOHANNES: Coulds't wrap it so
that my fellows may not discern what it
be? I had never thought to buy a book
that dealt not with philosophy nor devotion. But .... Heaven assail me, I could
not deny me that binding.
THE NEW POETRY
THE WEAVER
You tumbled from a sunbeam,
Or from a sunset bar;
You, vagrant little day-dream,
Have travelled from afar.
So  busy with  your  weaving,
With   heart-strings   for  your   loom,
You rob the hours of grieving—
With  light  replace  their  gloom.
With golden thread of feigning
For warp, and woof of dreams,
You  weave  where  love  is reigning,
A web of magic gleams.
And now the task is over,
I see with joy you've left
A  wondrous thing,  O rover!
I take the magic weft
And, vfrapped in its dim gleaming,
Leave carking pain and care
For that bright land a-dreaming
'Neath  skies forever fair.
A.  M. A.
VERS TRES LIBRE
All verdant things, or delicate or splendid,
Gorgeous of dye or gentle,
Proclaim the pomp and mystery of
green:
Emeralds,  and the  dainty  tint
Of celery tops, the  heart-rejoicing hue
Of dollar bills new-issued from the bank:
The   enfranchised
Waters of mid-ocean, street-car tickets,
The voice of vernal frogs, the immature
Unlessoned freshman,
The accepted color of window-blinds, a
certain
Sulphate (iron, I think,
Or copper?
Anyhow a very charming chemical). The
covers
Of Hall and Knight (I mean their Algebra),
Oh, and the aesthetic shade of one-cent
Stamps:
All verdant things, or delicate or splendid,
Et cetera down to "mystery of green."
K. M. P.
The literary movement which has
produced the "new poetry" is a part of
the general aesthetic revolt or reaction
which has been instituted against all the
artistic achievements of the nineteenth
century. But, as practised by its serious
exponents, it has a more definite cause
and development than "futurism" in
painting or "ragtime ' in music.
In the decadent period at the close of
the century, the direct influence of the
Romantic Revival finally expired. That
influence had been paramount during the
Victorian period, following four distinct
lines which had their source in four of
the principal Romantic poets, Byron,
Keats, Wordsworth, and Coleridge. The
style of Wordsworth and of Keats had
the strongest influence, the chief disciple
of the latter being Tennyson, who is the
especial anathema to the modern poets.
Among the host of lesser versifiers the
original force became so debased that a
completely new departure was felt to be
necessary. For this movement the impetus was derived, strangely enough,
from Coleridge, least important of the
Romantics during the Victorian age in
England. He had influenced Poe, and,
through him,- Mallarme and the Symbol-
iste movement in France. From the
latter the new poets, principally in the
United States, gained the chief qualities
of their form, often called "free verse.'
This term is inexact, and practically
meaningless, being an erroneous translation of the French "vers libre." The real
meaning is "free line," that is, a line not
obliged to contain a given number of feet.
The French term is now generally accepted as the most accurate, though some
people prefer "cadenced verse." As a
matter of fact, the form is not new, having been used by Milton, Blake, and
Matthew Arnold, but the French were
the first to win, it recognition as a separate form. In principle it is non-syllabic.
It is based entirely upon accent, and the .
beat is from one chief accent to another,
irrespective of the number of syllables
between. It is a' remarkable fact that
this is a return to the purely English
prosody in which all our poetry was
written until Chaucer introduced — also
from France — the classical principle of
equal syllabic feet. This admits of an
attractive theory that vers libre is best
suited to the true genius of the language,
and will be recognized as such as soon
as the public realizes that syllabic metre
is a monotonous and arbitrary restriction
upon English poetry. Whether there is
any basis of fact in this argument depends largely on whether vers libre has
a sufficiently definite construction to
replace that of metrical lines.
Its essential character is a pulse or
rhythm, determined within the line by the
accented words, and it is immaterial if
there be one syllable or four to a single
beat, provided the number fall naturally
into the word grouping of the line. The
larger rhythm, of the whole stanza or
poem is of great importance in vers
libre, and it is to this general effect of a
unified work of art that the varying
rhythms of the separate lines are subservient.
The other leading form with which
modern poets are experimenting is "polyphonic prose," which is more questionable  both  in  style and  development.     It Christmas, 1920
LITERARY  SUPPLEMENT
can be traced no farther than "Le Peler-
inage de Saint Anne," the work of a
French writer who used the name Saint
Pol-Roux. Then Paul Fort took it up,
writing some sixteen volumes in it, and
Miss Amy Lowell introduced it into
English. She explains that she adopted
it as having much the freedom of vers
libre, yet lending itself to a greater
breadth of treatment, as vers libre she
considered too delicate in rhythm for
long poems or subjects which need large
and violent treatment. It depended too
much on the single effect, and did not
have such binding power on the mind as
has metrical verse with its recurring
rhythmic pulse.
The name "polyphonic prose," invented
by John Gould: Fletcher, is also a misnomer. The form resembles prose only
in typographical arrangement, which was
adopted, says Miss Lowell, because the
rhythms are so various that it would be
almost impossible to indicate them by
changes of line. It seemed better, therefore, to leave them unmarked to the
visual sense, and merely let them be
brought out to the ear in reading. Miss
Lowell now considers "contrapuntal
verse" the most fitting name for the
form. Her remarks on its distinctive
characteristics may also be quoted. "Polyphonic prose is the freest, the most
elastic, of all forms, for it follows at will
any, and all, of the rules which guide
other forms. Metrical verse has one set
of laws, cadenced verse another; polyphonic prose can go from the one to the
other in the same poem with no sense
of incongruity. With no fixed law except the taste and feeling of its author,
with no tape measure of feet or cadence
to act as guide, it lays a heavy responsibility on the poet. -He has nothing
with which to gauge his success but his
ear. Not only may the poet use metre
or cadence, he may, rather he must, employ rhyme. But not always, and, for
the most part, not regularly. In other
words, the rhymes should seldom come
at the ends of the cadences, unless such
an effect be especially desired. We see,
therefore, that metre, cadence and rhyme
are some of the many 'voices' employed
in polyphonic prose. Others are assonance, alliteration and return. Return in
this form is. usually achieved by the recurrence of a dominant thought or image,
coming in irregularly and in varying
words, but still giving  the   spherical   effect
that   is   imperative   in   all   poetry	
Charm in polyphonic prose is entirely a
question of shading. One type of verse
fades imperceptibly into another, and so
closely should this follow the emotion of
the poem that one is conscious of no distinct change, merely realizing with a
flattered and satisfied ear the suitability
of the manner to the feeling."
The exponents of these new verse
forms insist on the fact that poetry is
essentially a spoken, rather than a written literary form. They claim that vers
libre and polyphonic prose abundantly
justify themselves if they are intelligently read aloud, and that the bulk of* adverse criticism and public misapprehension is due merely to the typographical
arrangement on the page. It remains to
be seen whether a school of free verse
readers will arise which will understand,
and give proper value to, the new forms;
and if this occurs, the public taste regarding the work of modern poets may
be finally fixed.
NOTE:—In general, these remarks
have been founded on an unpublished
article by Miss Amy Lowell, which she
has graciously placed at the disposal of
the "Ubyssey." It was found that this
was, in its entirety, too long for the
Literary Supplement, but the original
copy has been placed in the Library and
may be consulted there by any who are
interested.
IN THE RAIN
I love the Rain
Upon the city streets
In Autumn  evenings,
Quietly falling through darkness
Into the light of the street lamps.
I love the Fairy Folk
That dance in shallow pools,
Clapping their tiny hands
To an unheard tune.
I  love the polished blackness
Of the Asphalt,
The gleam of softened light
Upon the car-tracks.
I love the silent hurrying
Of the water in 'the road-trough,
The gurgling maelstrom at a grating,
The musical fall of hidden waters
To hollow depths.
But oh, I  love the  Rain upon my face
And the peace it brings me.
D. E.
THE BASKET OF WARES
(A Fable)
Amid a multitude of people outside the
gates of a city, Life stood blindfold with
a basket of wares. To each who passed
by, Life gave of the contents of the
basket—much or little, as chance directed. So that when those with the little
saw the good fortune of those with the
much, they rose up wrathfully against
the giver and demanded that a more
equal distribution be made. Life said,
"Ye shall all be equal when the gates at
the other end of the city be reached, and
ye shall dwell beyond in ease and plenty
through all time." And, being reassured
by this, they fared forth into the city.
As they entered within they were
greeted with loud cries of welcome, and,
these having subsided as quickly as they
arose, they began to make their way
through the city. And those with the
much were able to hire carriages and
equippage, and were driven in comfort
and splendor through the broad thoroughfares, past the market-places and
into the sweet-smelling lanes beyond.
And so they went, seeking eagerly for
glimpses of the outer wall, until, one by
one, they sank easefully by the roadside
and perished. And those with the little
were forced on foot through the narrow
alleys and byways, which wound about
in a maze without coming to an open
space; but these too perished, overcome
with hunger and the cold, or with fatigue
and illness.
Outside the city Life still stood, giving
out his wares to those who were waiting
eagerly to enter. But no one ever
reached the promised gates.
THE OASIS
(Continued from Page 1)
should happen so. And—supposing—•
supposing, it should be evil water that the
devil has made poisonous. It was near
these places that they found El Anteouen
and his camels, dead from the poison
water. And Bukra—could I hold him so
that, he should not drink? My strength
is but little for so great a beast; and
without him should I be lost and never
reach the tents of my fathers by the city
walls. I remember how I saw with mine
own eyes when I was a boy, in the city,
a camel lying dead from the poison. And
his master—I remember it well—crying
out   for   Allah   to   spare   him,   who   was
writhing  with  pain Supposing—If
I should .... Ah!"
The two passed out of the merciless
glare of the sun, beneath the small
palms, and by a crumbled dwelling long
since forsaken. The trees stood silent
and motionless. Supposing, after all, it
should be the evil water. Bou-Djema
shuddered at the notion. He lead his
camel to the well, a little depression in
the bank where the caravans drew their
water. Great cracks showed in the
muddy bottom where the sun had parched
it.
"Allah be praised!" said the Arab, fervently, setting his face over the sands
towards the city.
GREY MARBLE
It was one of those cold, damp mornings in early November, that foretell the
approach of winter, yet promise a warm
day when the sun shall have ascended
into the heavens. A thin blue mist hung
in the air, causing nearby objects to take
on a size and appearance strange to them,
and reducing the distance to a dull
monochrome. In Chester Road a milkman rattled noisily by. From odd chimneys smoke was ascending in unbroken
columns, merging itself with a stratum
of mist that hung listlessly overhead.
Gradually the grey morning light took
on a warmer hue. Like great fingers,
long rays of orange light stretched forth
through the mist, touching the housetops, so that the terra cotta chimney-pots
became quite red, and even the slate roof
took on a ruddy tinge. With almost visible motion the light crept down the
front of Marion Villas, bringing into relief the stone work, that but a moment
before had been flat and dead, that in the
bright glare of noonday would look cheap
and ugly, but that in this light was softened and enriched. Slowly and steadily
this sunlit portion increased until the sun
touched the great front door of Number
Seven, and there flared forth the golden
glow of the polished brass knocker.
As though this were the signal for the
bringing to life of those within, the door
was slowdy opened, the knocker withdrawn into the darkness. The sun shone1
instead on the face and shoulders of a
woman who stood in the doorway, but
here it had no softening effect. The 'ich
warm light flooding one side of the face
served but to intensify the cold grey
shadows that filled the hollows of her
eyes and the drawn lines about her
mouth. The lines on her forehead stood
out like Chinese characters on old parchment.   Her thin, colorless hair was drawn LITERARY  SUPPLEMENT
Christmas, 1920
tightly back from her face. A drab-
colored flannel blouse revealed her withered neck, and the rolled sleeves showed
her arms to be thin and unshaptly, as the
arms of a man, now past his prime, who
has spent his life in hard manual labor.
In her hand she carried the badges of
her servitude, a scrubbing brush and a
pail of steaming water. Setting these
down and adjusting a piece of canvas
matting to protect her knees from the
cold stone, she began her task of scrubbing the flight of steps leading to the
doorway.
They were steps such as will be found
before almost any London villa, marble
treads, sometime white, and a cast-iron
rail. But the treads were worn into deep
hollows, were cracked and chipped, and
their whiteness turned to grey. The woman who now tended them had been the
first to scrub their white marble after
they had been built. She was young and
pretty then, when her firm flushed hands
washed from them the marks of the masons' feet and left them shining and new
to the world. Gently, almost caressingly,
she wiped about the crevices and corners,
and felt out every chip and crack. These
steps had become part of her; in them lay
the record of her life history. That
chipped corner marked the fall of her
life's idol, this crack was that of a broken
heart. Every scratch and crevice, she
knew them all, their appearance and how
they felt to her fingers. She could trace
them out at night in the darkness.
Yet she hated them. They had taken
on the personality of the cruel fate that
governed her life. She was but the slave
of the stone. To-day she tended them
for the last time. The house was to be
renovated: their time had come. When
the world had a little more awakened, a
group of workmen would appear, and
tear them up and carry them off. Their
place was to be taken by new, handsome,
concrete steps, white and glaring as had
been these in their first days. But never
would she tend the new gods. For them
would be found a younger and a fresher
slave. The rulers of her destiny were
doomed, and she must go with them.
Tenderly she added a few finishing
touches and wiped the edge of the last
step. The sun, gaining on her, touched
her hair, her blouse, her slow-moving
hand,' and sent a long, dark shadow of
her across the pavement—she, an old
woman washing steps. Slowly she lifted
her pail and matting, painfully climbed
the newly-washed steps and entered the
house. The door closed behind her and
again the knocker flared forth. Alone,
the steps awaited destruction.
D. E.
ON NOT LISTENING TO SERMONS
It is really better at the evening service. Then most of the lights are put
out, which helps the illusion of complete
aloofness from the rest of the congregation. I shall outline the process, step by
step, of achieving this blissful state.
First, squirm into a corner—that is, if
you are lucky enough to be sitting at an
end of the pew; if not, slouching down
onto the middle of your spine, feet on
the kneeling-stool, is nearly as good.
Then,  fix: your  eyes  on  the  darkest and
loftiest beam in the ceiling. The third
and most important step is that of blotting out of your mind all impression of
the surroundings — hard wooden pews,
memorial tablets, wriggling choir-boys,
clergyman in the pulpit. (You will find
that his voice makes rather a pleasant
accompaniment to your thoughts — a
vague, distant droning, while they soar.)
Sermons treated thus have a most
salutary effect. They soothe modern
nerves, which the rest of the service does
not always succeed in doing. "Bright
little services" are "de rigueur" now. The
organ peals, the choir makes an enthusiastic noise. Then—O haven of rest!
—the sermon comes, and, with it, not
soul-searchings, nor a relentless dissection of the Thirty-nine Articles,1 but a
delicious blahkness, like a blue summer
day. Little haphazard clouds float by
now and then—musings about that motor
drive yesterday, the book now being
read, or the dance next week. Perhaps
some strangers in the church seem interesting. Romances may be woven
around them. Take care, however, in
doing this, lest actual surroundings leap
back and obliterate the blue sky.
Imagine being annoyed because a sermon has stopped! But I take my oath
that this is possible!. Once I was planning the perfect country home. I had
decided on the view, the garden, front,
side and back elevations, the hall and the
drawing-room. I was just going to
grant myself the rapture of buying
Wedgwood china for the dining-room—
when the lights came on, and everybody
stood up. In a crash of organ-music, the
dinner-set  was  shattered.
PRISCILLA PURE.
BOOKS DO NOT TELL
"Books do not tell everything ....
What you want to know they never
tell."—Story of an African  Farm.
When Actium was lost, and Anthony
Thought Egypt had betrayed him, did
the  shame
Torment   him   long,   ere   he   resolved   to
die,
And save a Roman's name?
Did   Joan   vex   the   brooding   hours    of
sleep
With  futile  blows  upon  the  senseless
stone?
What were her weary thoughts in Rouen
Keep
That last long night, alone?
Or Alexander's, when the insult hurl'd
Drove him to answer  Clitus with the
spear?
Thought he of this, and all his conquer'd
world,
When Death to him drew near?
Or did the din of those ambitious years
Grow dull and distant, while his dying
eyes
Sought, behind Babylon's imposing tiers,
The Macedonian skies?
G. B.
AD IVLIAM
nox   vbi.   taetris   redimita
'nimbis.
mersit aervmnis animam mi-
SELLAM.
PVRIOR    DEMVM    VELVT    ORBIS
•     ASTRO
PARVIT ILLA.
TRAMITEM    PANDENS    PIETATIS
VNAM.
NE      MIHI      QVISQVAM      RAPIAT
CORONAM.
CASTA    LVX     INTER    TENEBRAS
PERAGRANTI
AD PARADISVM.
LVCIFER  CAELO  REDIT HESPER-
VSQUE:
LVX    MIHI    QVAMVIS   REDITVRA
NVMQVAM.
TE  TAMEN   CVNCTOS   SINE   FINE
IN ANNOS.
IVLIA.   CERNAM.
(With acknowledgments  to A.   N.   St.  J.  M.)
C.
A BOWL OF CROCUSES
A quaint old bowl of fresh-gathered
crocuses lies on my table. They flash
yellow through the pale, grey light of
early morning—yellow, yellow, like hidden treasure-heaps of beaten vases and
golden miodores of old-time Spanish or
Arabian  fable.
In the subdued glow of a cold March
morning they blaze out bravely as a
cluster of candles glimmering brightly
among the cathedral rafters. Their
curved, waxen petals glow—glow like the
breast of a perky goldfinch puffing himself out before his ladylove. They scream
yellow, yellow, where the first quivering
shaft of sunlight smites their hidden
bosoms; and beneath the polished surface of the mahogany table there are dim,
shadowy shapes of Chinese goldfish playing in a placid pool.
A quaint old bowl of fresh-gathered
crocuses lies on my table. Nearby there
is a tiny white card mercilessly scrawled
in pencil: "From your little daughter,
Mabel."
"Laugh  and be  merry, remember,  better
the world with a song,
Better the world with a blow in the teeth
of a wrong.
Laugh, for the time is brief, a thread the
length  of a span.
Laugh and be proud to belong to the old
proud pageant of man.
"Laugh and be merry together, like brothers akin.
Guesting awhile in the rooms of a beautiful  inn,
Glad till the dancing stops, and the lilt
of the music ends.
Laugh till the game "is played; and be
you merry, my friends. '
JOHN  MASEFIELD. December 9, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
©
orrespo
t\dei>
ce
A  CRITIC
Editor  "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir: I have no doubt that this legitimate criticism of the Students' Council
will find its way into your waste-paper
basket along with my other criticism of the
Frrshie reception. However, be that as it
may, I feel impelled to say a few things
about the gross mishandling of student
affairs.
In a University as young as U.B.C. there
is an excellent opportunity to inculcate all
that is new and good, learned from the experience of older universities. However,
that is nol our policy. No, we are content
with so-called student government by a
body of frank conservatKes, reactionaries,
whose chief aim in life seems to be to get
through their term of office with as little
noise as possible.
vVhy not turn student affairs over to
Faculty at once, and be done with the pretence? There are members of Faculty whose
views are much more liberal than the supposedly liberal-minded students who go to
make up the Council.
Witness the Student Council minutes.
They gi\e a garbled account of their meetings, and the motions and the withdrawal
of motions prove the inconsistency of their
policies. It is only necessary to mention the
canteen and the letter to the candidates for
tiie elections to see how litile is being done
and will be done by reactionaries dominated
by the fear of their own welfare and the
most conservative element of Faculty.
PERICLES  '22.
LETTERS CLUB
ANOTHER CRITIC
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—Your last edition of the paper
was a shock and surprise to all those readers who have any sense of decency. An
obscene picture on the front page of our
College paper, a picture of the kind seen
only in the lowest and most vulgar journals!
The men who edited the paper seem to forget that "College Name" is just as important as "College Spirit." Do they want our
College to obtain a name for obscenity and
\ulgarity? Do they think no parents or
outsiders see the "Ubyssey," or.ly students?
They are very much mistaken. Will it be
necessary for the students to establish a
censorship over the paper, in case any temporary editors should make a similar break
again? The insertion of that picture is an
insult to the readers of the paper. I observe
that the artist is a freshman, a member of
Science '24. I would like to inform him
that this institution is a University, not a
barroom or a roadhouse. If he wishes to
exercise his talents in a vulgar way he
should sign up with one of the movie companies operating down in Los Angeles. The
University does not exist to encourage and
draw out such talent. The picture would
be considered vulgar and out of place in the
newspaper of any men's college; how much
more so in the paper of a Co-Ed institution!
I am no prude, just a man with a common,
ordinary sense of decency, and with a little
respect for .womankind and for the good
name of our University.
W.   G.   B.,   Arts   '22.
Try-outs for the Idaho-Oregon-B. C.
debates will be held early in January.
Seven-minute speeches on the subject
will be delivered by all aspirants before
a selection committee. It is hoped that
a large number will accept this opportunity of making a contribution to the
mass of material which must be collected, even though everyone cannot expect
to be successful in securing a place on
the team. The Debates Committee request that names be handed to them before the end of the term.    Awake,  arise,
The novels of May Sinclair were discussed in a paper by Miss Patricia
Cowan at a meeting of the Letters Club
held on Tuesday evening, November 30,
at the home of Mr. Larsen. As Miss
Cowan was, unfortunately, suffering from
a cold, the paper was read by Miss Agnes
Ure, president of the club. The development of the novelist's genius was displayed by means of a careful analysis of
her successive books. Mr. A. H. Imlah
led the discussion which followed the
paper. Finally, the members enjoyed a
visit to Mr. Larsen's library and viewed
some of his rare books. This was the
concluding meeting of the club for the
current term.
ADDRESS BY DR. BRITTAIN
sign up!
Dr. Brittain, municipal taxation expert,
was the speaker at the last regular meeting of the Junior Economics Discussion
Club, which was held in Ye Little Browne
Inn. He outlined the functions of a
municipality, declaring that they were
chiefly as follows: Protection of life and
property, safeguarding of public health,
provision of education and recreation,
maintenance of highways, charities, and
public service institutions. He declared
that in those cases where the service
rendered could be measured, such as gas,
light and power, the taxation should be
on this basis. In those cases, however,
where the service could not be measured,
as, for example, police protection, the
taxation should be on the basis of ability
to pay.
NEXT TIME
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For     Light     Refreshments
Ice  Cream and  Candies at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
TREFOUSSE    GLOVES
Famous on account of their excellent
style, superior fit, finish and durability. The best of all Christmas Gloves,
in  kid  or suede.
—Trefousse Fine French Kid Gloves,
oversewn seams, two-dome style with
fine stitched points; shades of brown,
tan, grey, navy, beaver, green, champagne, and also black or white. Sizes
5V2  to 8, at $4.50 a pair.
—Trefousse Extra Quality Pique Sewn
Gloves with fine stitched points, perfect fitting; shown in brown, tan,
grey, navy, green, purple, wine, beaver, champagne, white or black. All
sizes,  $5.00 a pair.
—Trefousse Extra Quality Gloves,
pique sewn and having two pearl
dome clasps and heavy embroidered
points. These are finished with band
at wrist. Grey, navy, brown, tans,
champagne.    All sizes, at $5.50 a pair.
LIMITED
575 GRANVILLE STREET
0RPHEUM
Week Commencing
Monday,  December 13,  1920
JEANETTE
HACKETT
AND HARRY
DELMAR
Present  Their New  Offering
"THE DANCING SHOP"
With  a  Bevy  of Beautiful   Sales Girls
Marie  Cavanaugh,  Helene  Blaire,
Helen   Warren,   Estelle  Hadden
and   Wood   Sisters
JOE TOWLE
In   His   Own   Peculiar   Entertainment
DUNBAR'S   OLD-TIME
DARKIES
In  Southern  Harmony
FENTON  &  FIELD
"APPEARING   IN   PERSON"
THREE  ORIGINAL  REGALS
The  Village   Blacksmiths
LUCY GILLETT
The   Lady   from   Delft
STELLA— —CARL
TRACEY  &  McBRIDE
Musical  Comedy  Artists,  In
"Bits   of  Exclusiveness"
British   Weekly Concert  Orchestra
EDUCATIONAL
STATIONERY
STUDENTS WILL FIND IT
INTERESTING TO VISIT
OUR UP-TO-DATE STORE.
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS
FOR EDUCATIONAL STATIONERY — CHAPMAN'S
LOOSE-LEAF    BOOKS,    Etc.
.an?*.
0Uarki> Sc Stuart (Ed.
LIMITED
Wholesale and Commercial
Stationers
550 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
Tel. Ex., Seymour 3 THE   UBYSSEY
December 9, 1920
FRENCH IVORY
A
FEW   SUGGESTIONS
FRENCH
IVORY
MIRRORS,
 $3.75   to  $15.00
FRENCH
IVORY
HAIR BRUSHES,
FRENCH
IVORY
COMBS,
 35c   to  $2.00
FRENCH
IVORY
JEWEL CASES,
FRENCH
IVORY
CLOTH  BRUSHES,
 $2.00  to  $8.00
FRENCH   IVORY
FRAMES,   from
PICTURE
 $1.00   to  $3.75
FRENCH  IVORY
CLOCKS,  from.
BEDROOM
 $4.50  to $17.00
•   FRENCH
LAMPS
IVORY
BEDROOM
 $8.00  to  $19.00
FRENCH  IVORY  PERFUME
BOTTLES,   from $1.00  to  $5.00
FRENCH
complete
IVORY
,   from.
TOILET   SETS,
 $10.00  to $155.00
FRENCH   IVORY   TOILET   AND
MANICURE ROLLS,  from $4 to $35
FRENCH
IVORY
HAIR RECEIVERS.
 $2.00   to   $6.00
FRENCH
IVORY
PUFF   BOXES,
 $2.00   to  $6.00
FRENCH
IVORY  NAIL  BRUSHES.
 $2.00   to   $4.00
—Drug Dept.,  Main Floor
(See Our Window Display)
DAVID    SPENCER
LIMITED
Evans & Hastings
PRINTERS
-of-
"The Ubyssey"
for  1920-1921
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY  OF
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., etc.
578 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
High-Grade Work and Quick
Service characterize our up-to-date
establishment.
THE SPIRIT OF
NINETEEN TWENTY
You may  talk about  the  fashions of  the
maids of '69,
You   may   rave   about   the   modesty   that
from their eyes did shine;
You may crab,  and slam and knock us,
the girls of '20, yet
We really have some good points, and it
seems you  these  forget.
Of  course,  it  would  be  wonderful  to  be
so very  nice,
To never use a slang word and be always
scared of mice.
No danger then that any maid would love
her  spotless  rep.;
And yet  methinks   I've  heard  men  wail,
"Aw! let's go!   Have some pep!"
In    crinolines    they    stately   walked,    of
course,  with  swaying grace,
With never hook or button off and every
curl in place;
Just what legs  looked like in those days
no man had ever found,
But    could    they    win    at    basketball    in
skirts that swept the ground?
They wouldn't swear or call you names—
oh! what a shocking thought;
In compromising places these maids were
never caught.
Their   morals   were   most   perfect,   their
manners  never  crude;
But    they    wouldn't    cheer    at    Rugby—
they d  think you very  rude.
A  maideri  then   coquetted—and   she  was
very sweet;
Men   were   content   to   live   and   die  just
kneeling at  her  feet.
But   nowadays   the   men   don t   act   quite
that way, as a rule;
Would you rather be a "vampire," or "a
darn slow little fool"?
Suppose   the   college   maidens   put   their
dresses up and down,
And entirely did away with that thing—
the  evening gown,
And gave up rouge and powder and slang
and swearing, too—
Just listen while I prophesy what college
men  would  do:
They'd fly across to U.S.A. and cry, "We
have a  hunch
That Canada's too much for us—the girls
are one slow bunch."
We girls have noticed, don't you see the
maids who are just so,
Are   the   wallflowers   at   the   dances—and
that is how we know.
S. M.
A question for the Aggies:
When the wireless age reaches the
farm, how will the farmer mend his
harness?
Too much fun,
Too much  sport,
Nothing done,
A bum report!
Barber—Do you want a hair cut?
Stude—Naw!   cut  'em  all  while  you're
at it.-r-"Jack o' Lantern."
Vancouver
Citizens' Club
(Non-Membership)
UNDER  THE  BIG   CLOCK
We serve a 60-cent
MERCHANTS'   LUNCH
TABLE  D'HOTE  DINNERS,   $1.50
SUPPER  PARTIES  and  BANQUETS,
with   private   rooms,   our  specialty
SUPPER   DANSANT  Wednesday  and
Saturday evenings,  from 9 to 12,  $1.00
Phone,  Sey. 796
A. WATTS, Mgr.
PREPARE
for the world of
BUSINESS
by taking a short course  in  the
Sprott-Shaw School
of Commerce and Telegraphy
Day  and  Evening  Classes
Phone,  Seymour 1810
R.  J.   SPROTT,  B.A.,  Manager.
A   SAVINGS  ACCOUNT
By carrying money around
in your pocket you will
never learn the habit of
THRIFT. Deposit your
spare funds with this Bank
in a Savings account; interest will be paid, and you
can withdraw both principal and interest at any
time.
We welcome small accounts.
The Canadian
Bank of Commerce
PRIVATE
LETTERS
The personal correspondence
paper a young lady uses reflects
her taste — and something of her
character.
Kenmare Linen is a paper of
refinement   and   lovely   quality.
Smith, Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
Manufacturing   Stationers
VANCOUVER  AND   VICTORIA,   B. C. December 9, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450  Granville  Street
CLOTHES  FOR  YOUNG  MEN
Glad   to   show   the   new   models.
They are entirely different.
FIT-REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, West
J. W. Fofter
Limited
WE SELL CLOTHES FOR YOUNG
MEN AND MEN WHO STAY YOUNG
When Wanting Nice
Things to Eat
CUSICK
CAN   SUPPLY   YOUR   WANTS
From the very finest Chocolates,
Home-made Candy, Ice Cream and
Soft Drinks, Pastries, and such like,
to the daintiest little Dinner and
Light Lunch you ever ate.
Make sure you go to Cuslck.
Cor. Heather and Broadway, West
MIDWAY  PHARMACY
Phone,   Fair. 840
Cor. Broadway and Heather Street
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
XMAS STATIONERY
FRENCH IVORY
WATERMAN'S PENS
TOILET ARTICLES
XMAS CHOCOLATES
We deliver anywhere, at any time.
CONFERENCE DELEGATES
Miss Isobel Miller, Arts '22, and
Mr. Harold W. McLean, Arts '21, have
been chosen by the executives of the
Y.W.C.A. and Y.M.C.A. in the College
to represent the University of British
Columbia at the Student Christian Movement conference at Guelph this month.
This is the first all-Canadian convention
that has been held in connection with
the Christian work of the colleges in
Canada, and is a direct outcome of the
DesMoines convention and the various
summer conferences which were held last
summer.
The conference meets in the Ontario
Agricultural College, Guelph, Ontario,
for four days, commencing on December
29th. Owing to the system of pooled
railway fares, the British Columbia representatives will be enabled to go and
return at a practically nominal cost. The
funds are being raised by subscription
among the members and friends of the
associations. A Faculty delegate will
probably be sent also.
It is expected that the College Y.W.
and Y.M.C.A.'s will enter as local
units in the Student Christian Movement, in which case it is likely that the
names of these associations will be"
changed. The proposed constitution of
the S.C.M. has been received and is being discussed by the executives of the
two associations, and the delegates will
be instructed to carry the University of
British Columbia's decision to the conference.
Both Miss Miller and Mr. McLean
have been actively connected with the
work of these two associations in the
College, and both are well able to represent the University of British Columbia
at   this   conference.
Y.M.C.A.
Mr. Willson Coates, ex-president of the
Alma Mater Society and Rhodes scholar,
was the speaker at the last meeting of
the Y.M.C.A. which will be held this
term. He received a hearty welcome
from the members of the "Y" when he
rose to speak of several aspects of the
religious side of life as it appears to the
college man. He expressed his belief
that the period of doubt through which
every thinking person must pass in regard to spiritual matters was a good
thing.    For it brought an open mind, and
renewed the spirit of youth. He spoke
of the "prodigality of youth" — the tendencies to new and sometimes radical
things which was always' its inheritance.
He urged the men of the "Y" to approach
their problems not only with the searching beams of reason, but to apply their
powers of imagination. Our fathers, he
thought, had had those same experiences,
yet we are not able to accept their faith
without this same period of doubt and
questioning.
The address was direct and earnest,
and Mr. Coates was warmly applauded
at its conclusion.
W.A.A. MAKE PLANS
A general meeting of the Women's
Athletic Association was held in Room 23
on Monday afternoon. Miss Gwen Robson, president, conducted the meeting.
The plans for the Stanford game were
discussed, and a call for volunteers to
help decorate the grandstand on Christmas morning was issued. Pennants will
be loaned by the girls, and these will be
used for decoration purposes. It was decided not to give any yells separately, but
that the girls should assist the Rooters'
Club in every way possible.
Discussion of the Victoria trip also
took place. Miss Robson stated that the
girls who made the trip this year must
see that their behavior was absolutely
model, for there were certain objections
from Faculty, and it is quite possible that
the trip will not be allowed again. She
urged the.m to think of the University
name, and declared that, on account of
the thoughtlessness of a few girls last
year, the whole University suffered. She
also urged more attention to the chaperones.
CLASSICS CLUB EXECUTIVE
Mr. C. A. F. Clark was elected president of the Classic Club at the organization meeting held on Wednesday last.
Other officers elected were: Hon. president, Prof. Robertson; vice-president,
Miss Ruth Craig; secretary-treasurer,
Miss Dorothy Bowes. The executive
was empowered to complete the constitution, and to report at a later meeting
of the club. No meetings, other than
business meetings, will he held until the
New Year.
One Beauty of Our Shoes
Is their perfect comfort. Built, as they are, in the latest models, with every
attention to style detail; nevertheless, comfort has not been sacrificed in the
slightest degree.
Our new Winter Footwear is smart, indeed, yet as comfortable and long-
wearing as shoes can be made.
Their prices represent the Biggest Shoe Values in Town.
THE INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
SIX-SIXTY-SIX GRANVILLE ST.
"Vancouver's Smartest Shoe Store" THE   UBYSSEY
December 9, 1920
OUR CELEBRITIES
There was a Hunter called Lou,
Who past Rugby opponents just flew;
He wore passionate socks,
Gave the Rowing Club shocks,
And affected maids' hearts that way too.
There is a young runner called Attic,
Who makes Arts '24 feel ecstatic:
If you ask them, "Now who
Is the champion of U?"
Their answer will be most emphatic.
The Players' Club has for its president
A maid in whom charm is a resident;
Leading ladv is she
In the U. of B. C,
And in praising her no one is hesitant.
In our midst a great council is meeting,
Which   to   everyone   offers   this   greeting:
"If you whisper, 'Come seven!'
Or shout, 'Come eleven!'
Your stay at the U. will be fleeting."
S.  M.
MUSICAL SOCIETY
(Continued from Page 1)
d'Amour," by the orchestra, the concert
was finished by the whole club singing
the chorus from "Aida," by Verdi. This
was extremely well rendered, and showed
splendid direction.
At the close of the concert Mrs. Klinck
was kind enough to invite the Musical
Society and Student Council and the
Publications Board to remain for refreshments.    Dancing followed until  1.30.
Those deserving special mention are
the members of the executive-, Miss Marion Atherton, Mr. "Spex' Mellville, Miss
Marion Wilcox, Miss M. Pittendrigh and
Miss Dorothy Blakey. Thanks are due
the Kent Piano Company for the use of
the concert grand  Steinway piano.
ALMA  MATER  MEETING
(Continued from Page 1)
The proceeds of the sale of tags will
constitute a fund which is to be used to
entertain the visitors from California.
We must beat them on the field; so, in
order to avoid any ill feeling, we must
also give them a good time.
The players are hard at work. They
are turning out for practise four nights
per week. The turnout includes all of
the men who have an interest in the
p'aying side of the game. They turn out
in order to provide some opposition for
the regular team, and to support them
in their efforts to be as fit as possible for
the game.
To-morrow, at noon, there will be a
short meeting of the student body. Au
interesting programme has been arranged, and there will be no speeches—
except, possibly, a brief announcement of
the final plans and the details of the
events surrounding the big game.
Do not  forget  the  tag day  to-morrow.
Bring your lunch, and be at the A'ma
Mater meeting.
Mr. J. F. Walker has been appointed
to edit the "Annual" this year. Miss M.
Agnew is to be the Arts editor, Mr. T.
D. Guernsey the Science editor, and Mr.
R. L. McLeod will be in charge of the
cuts and photographs. An Agriculture
editor, a Sports editor and a Society
editor are yet to be appointed.
WHAT YOU'RE  GONNA  BUY
FOR CHRISTMAS
Mr. Clelland says he's sure lots of his customers will buy Shirts, Ties, Mufflers, Hankies,
Socks, Braces, Arm Bands, Garters and things
like that for , Christmas, either for their own
use or to give away as presents.
And that's exactly why he has put in a nice
little stock of these lines for Christmas only.
There's a rare selection, and the prices are all
right; so you really should slip up and buy
something in time, before  they all go.
Express elevator takes you up to Clelland's
room in less   n a minute.
He stays open till 6 on Saturdays.
James Clelland
1225 Standard Bank Bldg.
510  Hastings Street,  West Vancouver,  B. C.
Phone, Seymour 7280
The Barron Hotel
and
Restaurant
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Phone, Seymour 2011
HAS IT OCCURRED
TO YOU
—that your Photograph as a Christmas gift would be highly appreciated
by your friends, especially the absent
ones?
Pictures are very easy to mail, very
inexpensive, and very appropriate.
You'll get the quality kind at
Bridgman's Studio
413 GRANVILLE STREET
Vancouver, B. C.
Quality Clothes
FOR YOUNG MEN
STYLISH
GUARANTEED
The Shop of Fashion-Craft
Thos. Foster
& Co., Ltd.
ONE STORE ONLY
514 GRANVILLE ST.
_

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