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The Daily Ubyssey Mar 9, 1949

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 The Daily Ubyssey
Vol. XXXI
VANCOUVER, B. C, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 1949.
No. 79
REMOVE RISKS
FROM GOVT
The four dollars which Paul Plant says must bc added
to student fees will not be used to patch up mistakes of the
past.
If students approve the increase today, the extra money
will go directly to campus activities, not to the dead scrap
heap of UBC's war memorial gymnasium debt.
This is the most important single factor to be considered
during the heat of today's referendum which will decide
whether student fees are to be fifteen, sixteen or twenty
dollars.
The extra four dollars to be added to the present sixteen dollar fee will not be used to mend the mistakes of the
past, but it will ensure that such mistakes do not happen
again.
Were there no other benefits at all, the prospect of
future stability for the Alma Mater Society would be sufficient to commend the fee increase to all students. It must
be obvious by now that student government should be a
government and not a risk-taking business enterprise. And
as a government, the Alma Mater Society is deserting its
duty by venturing into the field of risk-taking private
business.
Bleachers which were built for the UBC football
stadium some years ago were to be paid for out of increased
gate receipts at football games. The increased receipts didn't
materialize, and the $8000 bleachers have added to the dead
weight debt «f the society.
A subsidized yearbook will save money even for students who buy only one Totem in four years at university.
Subsidization means that the book can be sold for half its
present price and with an assured income from student
funds the book can be payed from the financial losses which
burdened the society this year.
Rejection of the four dollar increase can mean only
that all student activity will be crimped. Approval, on the
other hand, will benefit all activities, symphony concerts,
undergraduate parties and clubs.
Final UBC Symphony
In Anditorium Tonight
Today marks the final Spring Concert and the coming ot
age of the University Symphony Orchestra.
The concert, which will be thcvor-@> —
chestra's  first  formal,   full-tlress   af
fair, is to be presented in the auditorium at 8:15.
HOPE FOR TOP
Founded two years ago, the symphony orchestra has been restricted
to noon hour concerts; the spring
concert, fourth and final concert, will
place the club in the ranks ot the
Players Club, Mussoc and Radio Society, the fifty members say,
The program the orchestra will present, under the direction of conductor
Colin Slim is:      <
Toccata, L'Arlessienne Suite 2, Fin-
landia, The King's Fanfare by the
sixteenth century musician Josquin
Des Pres; Aequale by Anton Bruckner, and Sinfonia by Banchieri. These
last three are quartettes for brass
and are being performed for thc first
time in Canada.
HUGE SUCCESS
The concert presented by the symphony orchestra to the Open House
audience was a resounding success,
playing to a packed audience.
The entire program was surprisingly even, revealing a great deal of
hard work by both the conductor and
the orchestra. At the end of the Polka
and Bycycle Parade from Ballet excursion, the composer, Jean Coult-
hard Adams who is a member of the
University Music Department was
presented to the audience.
An exceptional performance was
given of Toccata by Frescobaldi, with
bouquets going also to the first flutist,
Stuart Todd, who carries the minuet
movement of L'Arlessienne by Bizet.
"Finlandia," while lacking the
smoothness of Singer's symphony.
showed a decided improvement in the
orchestra. The "Bycycle Parade" however, did not receive such an enthusiastic reception, .seeming to contuse the
audience.
Admission to the final and evening
concert will be by free tickets which
will be given out on the quad today.
University Forum
Looks Af Modern
Women
"Is modern woman losing her femininity? -
Four UBC student-,—two of them
modern women—will debate this tofaic
in the auditorium Thursday noon, in
a discussion sponsored by Radio Society's "University Forum."
Claire Green and Shirley Manning
will take the negative in the discussion, opposed by Roger Bibace and
Bill Hill.
"Live'1 audience participation at
UBC radio shows has helped to raise
radio rating of "University Forum"
to the point where it now competes
with leading Pacific Coast programs,
states  Ray   Fraser,  Radsoc  producer.
"The rating of our program has gone
up with each broadcast over CJOR"
Fraser  asserts.
Final Vancouver
Symphony Friday
Final symphony concert of tho season by the Vancouver Symphon.s
Orchestra under the direction of
Jacques Singer will be presented
Friday. March   1.1   in   tin-  Armoi ie .
Programme for the performance is,
a.-:  follows:
Beethoven        Overture to Prometheus
Beethoven Symphom    1.   \'   Major
Kleinsinger The   Slory   of   Ceiesle
will)   frank   Vivian   narratim;.
Rogers- Beimel Seleei mus    from
Press Officer
Dead Line
March 19
Applications for public relations officer, a position now held by Harry
Curran, must be submitted by March
19.
Public relations officer holds an ex-
officio position on council but. i.s entitled   to  attend  all   meetings.
Assets of the position include attending councils' free dinners and obtaining a blazer and crest at the end
of  tlie  year.
Tories And Commies
Make Some Debate
"Resolved that Communists in Canada constitute a filth column" will be
the subject of a heated debate between Pro-Con Marshall Bray and
f.rP'er .John Howard at tomorrow's
Parliamentary   Forum   debate.
Bray is president of Ihe campus
Progressive-Conservative Club while
Howard is 1.aider of Sludenl Labor
Ptae..;rea  ive   Parts-.
Tin- debate will be held in Arts
10(1 al   IL'ail' as  pari  of the  regular pro-
Students To Decide On AMS
Fee Increase In Vote Today
POLLING BOOTHS OPEN AT
10 A.M. FOR AMS FEE VOTE
Polling booths will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. for
today's referendum on Alma Mater Society fees.
Polling booths will be located at the same places a.s
they were for general elections last month.
Three questions on the ballot ask students to choose
a $20 fee as recommended by retiring treasurer Paul Plant,
a $16 fee which would include $1 for European scholarships,
or a $15 fee which would eliminate lhe scholarship plan
which was approved by students this fall.
Four Thousand Expected To
Cast Ballots In Referendum
UBCs already tightly crimped student activity will be
drastically curtailed next year if students fail to approve
a S4 increase in Alma Mater Society fees, Treasurer - elect
Walt Ewing warned Tuesday.
Open House Biggest
In History Of UBC
50,000 Persons Show Great
Interest In Campus Activities
Campus  sod   quivered   Saturday   to   the   steady   beat   of
100,000 feet as their owners came and saw Open House.
Long  snake  chains  of  cars  moved* — 	
inexorably toward the university,
buses and street cars panted up and
disgorged thousands of people. Fenders crunched and feet ached as the
long trek arrived at Point Grey.
OVER 18,000
E'. C. Electric officials estimated an
all-time high of 18,000 people transported out to the campus. That left
i lot of people lo come by car from
•he 50,000 who came out and parking
lots were jammed as harassed policemen directed the waves of traffic.
Thousands of feet descended on tho
campus accustomed only to saddle
'hoes and loafers.
The feet marched purposefully or
strolled dazedly as the day and the
wonders of thc university wore on.
Engineers with slide-rule brains,
balls floating in the air, Vandcrgraph
Generators and mechanical cows gas'"
bemused taxpayers cause for reflection on higher education,
(iflll GUIDES WORKING
Tim .shroud of mystery surroundii' '
"collitch" was torn aside by liOi'
guides rind sons and daughter escorting their parents. But. the sight of a
dripping tap suspended in mid air wiia
never completely reconciled with the
sightseers'   credulity.
The crowd of spectators, numbering
at least 50,000, were of all shapes and
ages from small charges left in th"
care of the nurses baby sitting service
to visiting firemen from the City Hall
and  Victoria.
Students worked nervously as the
sightseers crowded into lecture hall
and lab, peering interestedly at chem
students whose only privacy was a
dun chain separating them from tl;.»
crowd.
In the Armouries, cabinet ministcs
vied with each other in their plaudit*
h.o the university. Premier Johns.>n
oaid tribute to his predecessor Join.
Hart for his support of the unive'sity.
A.EVIS president Brousson and Open
Mouse chairman Bob Currie welcomed
.he official part. Later Opposition
Leader Winch also made a speech but
by  then  the  mike  had  gone dead.
Freshmen To
Sponsor
Nigh(fg>49
Klondike Night
Topped By Chords
PAGE THREE OF THIS
ISSUE PRODUCED
BY PHARMACY
Page 3 of this edition of The Daily
Ubyssey has been produced by
pharmacy students, UBC's youngest
facility. Their building now under
construction on thc university Boulevard is the next step in the university's expanding program.
Tween Classes;
Forest Club Holds
lursdai
Open forum and annual banquet of the Forest club will bc
held in the Georgia Banquet
Room tomorrow.
Guest speakers include F. D, Mul-
hnliand. Canadian Western, Erie
Druee, B.C. Forest Service, and Dr,
L, G. Troivy, photographic surveys.
About 250 prominent Foresters, representatives of the forest industries
in the province, UE'C graduates and
undergraduates will attend.
1ZFA branch of Hillel will sponsor
two films, "Birthday of a Prophecy"
and "A State Is Born". E'oih the
films depict the typical life in the
'end of Israel. The films will be
shown in Physics 200, on Thursday.
March 11 at 12:30 noon.
Dean Sage has released a list of prize
essay topic from the United Empire
Loyalists Association.
Essay subjects are posted on the
Notice Board outside of Dean Sage's
office,  room  S  in   the  Arts  building.
Mr. W. MeFarlano. formerly missionary to the Hottentots, will speak
at a meeting of the VCF today in
Arts 204.
Decrease in enrollment of probably
500 students, a less of $5000 in revenue,
together with thc necessity of providing a $2000 to $1000 salary for a new
business manager will lead to lessened
activity if the measure fails lo pass,
Ew'.n» said.
PLANTS PROPOSAL
Students are voting today on a proposal fri.ni Treasurer Paul Plant to
raise the society's fee lo S20 per student.
The ballot asks; students to choose
between a  $15. SIG and S3) levy.
Effects of the three measures, if
liaised  would be:
1. A S15 fee would eliminate the $1
European .scholarship fund which was
set up at a general student meeting
early this fal^
2. A $lfi fee would leave the AMS
head tax unchanged, but watild lead,
Ewing says, to curtailed student activity.
3. A $20 fee would lower admissions
to ail athletic events, subsidize symphonies i'o reduce danger of losses
and also subsidize undergraduate par-
tics and club activities.
ALL CURTAILED
If the S20 fee proposal is not ap-
i.imi'd. Ewing said, probably only tw>
'.•ainphany concerts would be held
during the year and athletics would
I ■? cut by about S20UO frcm this year'.,
curtailed   budget.
Undergraduate balls would have to
he completely self-sustaining, Ew'ui;,"
.a.i'd. which might price them com-
r.lele'y out  of the- ni'irkec.
'•It would he a toss-up whether we
should eliminate Ihe class balls altogether." ho said.
'la.1 I reas-ai er-elecl V.ild students on
Tuesday lhal  ho vvi'idd carry through
ny • ne of the three proposals when
apoae\-ad hy s.Lldanis and sairi I. *
hat !-• e !  none af  them  specifically.
Tail .-h add fee %2'.\ inc. e.ise he p-
; ra-.-(.h lie s.od. "if will he fit:, i
over oyciy .ne so that everyone wo i
i art.cip.:les iu campus aelivuies will
hcno''it."
Summer Employment
Registration Today
Last minute registration for summer employment will be today.
Those who wish to register mas
do so in Physics 200, There will be
two sessions—one at 12:30 and one
at 1:00 p.m.
Grad Fee Due Now
Grad students are urged to pay the
$3.00 Grad Class Fee as soon as possible. Fees will bc received at thc
AMS office anvlimc this week.
UBC Grads Present
Opereffp Tonight
Two UBC grads have turned their
hands to music; and Bohemian music
at that.
Mr. J. S. Donaldson and Mr. H. F.
A. King have written an operetta
on the life of Dvorak. Tlie operetta.
'The Lite of Dvorak" will be staged
at Magee High on March 0, 10, 11,
with   an   all   Vancouver  cast,
MacKenzie
Opens
Museum
Mrs. Hawthorne
Praised For Work
Dr. N. A. M. Mackenzie officially opened the UBC Anthropological Museum, housed in
the New Library Wing, at 11:30
on Open House Day.
Fresent  at the opening ceremonies
were   members   of  the   cabinet,   Professor and Mrs. Harry Hawthorne and
the Reverend G. H. Raley.
FiNAL RESTING
A large number of collection pieces
in thc museum were collected by the
Rev. Raley from the Coast Indians
during ins many years among them.
For years the collection has been
h .used in the City Hall. Now they
have found their final resting place
at UBC.
The collection will augment the proposed Totem Park lo be established
at  UBC.
Both Dr. MacKenzie and Professor
Hawthorne lauded the work of Mrs.
Hav.-thornp in her capacity as. honorary curator in establishing the museum.
Mrs. Hawthorne is a professional
anthropologist. She has done research
work in anthropology at Yale and was
a member of a Yale expedition to
U-..iivia in a socio-anthropoligcal study.
KiMII.Ait
Gu:lined for tlie museum are courses
■iniilar to those given at the Victoria
I'rovincial Museum. Study groups in
wild life. priniiu\e people, movies
and lectures form part of the plans.
"J hey will include students up to and
including  university level.
Other pieces in the museum include
. xhibits from Esikmos, Polynesians
and  oilier primitive peoples.
Parkinson
Elected Head
Of Pre-Med
Ray Parkinson was elected president for the 1949-50 term of the Pre-
Miedical Undergraduate Society.
Other executive officers elected
were: Ralph Chrislensen, vice-president: Dick Piercy, recording secretary;
Dorothy Chave, corresponding secretary; Tom Burgess, fourth year rep;
John Alexander, third year rep; John
Wong,  second  year  rep.
Klondike queens arid belles of tlv
Yukon will appear on Thursday nigh1
at the Frosh dance in the Brock Mail.
Sponsored by the Frosh Class,
"Klondike Night." is open to all Freshmen and any other students who
want  to  hop on the Trail  of '4fl.
Entertainment I'or lhe gold-diggers
will lie supplied by the Frosh chorus
line and  vocalist  Dick   Garden.
Dancing is from 9 till 1. Tickets
per couple are $1.50.
Master of ceremonies I'or the occasion  will  bc  congenial   li..d  Film- | MVIKIJN'fi OF SKIIO'S an:! tilt- ample e 1,sp 1;,\
uho i.s more than capable of hundliur, , u.j||  |H, ,„„, (l|  (|,,. |',,..,( uivs (h   ill.- 1'Y t:,!i-s| >s Ol-,. ua
lhe   acliviti
Dress   up   for   Iho oveninc,  and   ma
Oklahoma  «   ei-,-,,,,   „|   (|,,.   p;o-|
Mioenlai'V   I'oinm.
i    n iia, hi    of
illllalls,    lo    h
Wi
1 V I I I 1 I I .;     11	
1 j'MTlv   1 lull    J li!lr-'(l;i\    ('Willi
Kuiilt.T, Murk \   !\1-    .n-\\- ,
Nil 11 It 'V  I In it.
j'irmi'i-l  hf   I  .
/;     i li i > iti
'if bi'i'ul ies above
li'l-;  place   in  the
■'.;!ly I hurl, .PoL'«;y
lit..i.i.  Joan  Oli,
1 Page 2
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Wednesday, March 9, 1949.
The Daily Ubyssey
Member Canadian University press
Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscriptions—f 2,50 per year.
Published throughout the university year by the Student Publications Board of the Alma
Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
•Tr V •!*
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of The Daily Ubyssey and
not necessarily those ol the Alma Mator Society nor of the University.
*r n* v
Offices in Brock Hall. Phone ALma 1624 For display advertising phone ALma 3253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF .... RON HAGGART
MANAGING EDITOR .... VAL SEARS
GENERAL STAFF: Copy Editor, Laura Haahti; News Editor, Bob Cave and Novia Hebert;
Features Editor, Ray Baines; CUP Editor, Jack Wasserman; Photography Director, Ellanor Hall;
Sports Editor, Chuck Marshall; Women's Editor, Loni Francis.
Editor This Issue-HUGH CAMERON
ii»-aa.„i.i,..,>...,,.,.,,,,,ai,wum4ia<u,WiiimmuBw^ i—■—f**"'
Currie Was Hot
It looks like Open House committee chairman feob Currie is going to have to get him-
it
self al larger size hat—and no one is going to
denyjjhim the right to wear it,
Uii work for Open House deserves a pat
on the back, a bouquet of orchids, a big hand
and £<!1 the rest of the cliches that go with a
tough joe-job well done. The 50,000 people
who came out to see what was happening
to their money and their daughters at UBC
must have gone home well content on both
score!.
The months of committee conferences in
their • smoke-filled closet in Brock Hall, the
miles of pavement pounded arranging the
exhibits and the reams of paper work that
went»to make up the most successful "visitors day" in UBC's history were anything but
fun for Currie and his harrassed staff. Coun-
UBC SIDESHOW
by gordie shrum
cillor's snapped at them for disrupting schedules, tempers frayed over speech cancellations
and mocking charges of "czar" were hurled
at the chairman. But it was worth it.
The hundreds of "little people," guides, subcommittee heads and attendants must have received their share of the "thank you's" from
visitors like the elderly gentleman who remarked "This is the sort of thing we want to
see, the work you actually do presented in a
professional manner by efficient students.
Thanks very much."
Not only the visitors were impressed by
the show. The hundreds of students who
trooped around to the exhibits getting schock-
ed, magnetized and photographed were just
as bug-eyed as their parents.
It's too bad we have to wait four years for
the next one.
Letter To The Editor
No Subsidy For Minorities
(In ^jictu of the roelter of controversy
over pie subject of a fee increase,
The Daily Ubyssey presents the following  letter  from   Mr.   Ron   Kelley
Thew case for an increase in fees
can pe summed up as follows:
" . . i. because of the heavy administrative costs of our Society and
because of the restricted income
. . ." the budget and presumably
all fmajnjping of student activities
becort|H,'.|a gamble. "The average
studejiltiillifthis Campus at the present time pays a disproportionate fee
in relation to the value »he receives
for his money".
On the assumption that no part
of the proposed four dollars would
be used in thc retirement of thc
Gym debt, it is not' clear how an
increase in fees would iron out the
disproportion in money paid to value
received. It would seem obvious
that an enlargement of student activities would not decrease administrative costs *in the least nor i.s
there the least assurance that the;,'
would net grow heavier. Specifically, in the costs, in a six months
period ending December 31st, 1948
AMS expenditures were $17,000, out
of which $11,000 went to administration. Part of the remedy would
seem to lie in an overhaul of thc
administrative system—a good task
lor the business manager. The arguments for an increase seems to he
based on the doubtful promise I'hat
administrative  costs  cannot  be  cut
down. Another matter that might
bear investigation is Student Council expenses (there is no suggestion
of responsibility or lack of integ-
rety intended by that statement-
economies should begin at home.)
Any argument I'aht we should increase fees merely to make administrative costs lower in proportion
is ridiculous. *
The net idea of the Plant proposal
is a subsidization scheme. To de
part from nebulous financial theories, the practical result can be seen
in thc following example, The En-
pincers' Ball of Fire, one of the few
functions where the support for it
comes mainly from thc students,
and, incidentally, one of the best
pau-cni/xd events of the year drew
in attendance of approximately 1200
from an eligible 2000—tickets were
limited. In other words 40 percent
el a I ni t. or could not attend. An
im >■<.'..ne cf subsidies-: to individual
Leahy groups would mean lhat -10
percent of that faculty would be
paying ;. higher pro rata share to
provide cheaper entertainment for
GI) percent.
Student activities should not be
heavily subsidized merely to make
it, easier fcr a treasurer to plan a
financial program. The question of
quality and merit of particular group
activities must be considered. The
t. ensurer under-rates student intelligence by assuming that a student
will attend a function because it is
free or inexpensive, rather than
it is meritorious. A less diversified
and more integrated program of student activities would lessen costs
and increase individual participation.
In Plant's breakdown of the 520
fee there is no provision for retiring
the Gym deficit. Presumably it
would have to come from the six
dollars allotted to administration,
clubs and the Publications Board.
At the same time the treasurer insists that no part of the four dollars
will be used to retire the debt. That
is a purely sophistical argument.
Somewhere out of 15, 16 or 20 dollars
the Gym debt must be paid. It is
expected that this year some $25,000
will be retired. A good deal of this '
money is a result of the 1948-49
austerity program—our just reward
for our happy, care-free, postwar
years. The Gym debt is a mcral
obligation which, we as students,
must meet: by another year of aus -
terity and economy. But, a §4 increase would ask a large number
of students who do not participate
in Campus functions to assume the
brunt of that obligation.
•In effect, we cannot see that the
proposed increase in the fees is justifiable in the least. Before students
cast their ballots they should consider the matter carefully. At any
rate, every student on this Campus
should make sure that he signifies
his opinion by casting his ballot.
SIGNBOARD
SIGNBOARD
Meetings
ALL VOC'ERS MEET THURSDAY,
March 10 at 12:30'in HB3. Don't forgot
to phone your partner for the Spring
Masquerade. See the list in the Quad
for party draw.
SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE CLUB
meeting- in Hut G4 Thursday at noon.
Ihinning shoes or stocking soles necessary-   All welcome.
UBC DANCE CLUB WEDNESDAY
noon HMG, waltz and foxtrot; Thurs ,
1:30—3:30, HG4 practice session; Friday noon, square dancing, HM6.
MONDAY, 14TH MARCH, I. R. C.
Kokleng Sehoe will speak on Malaya
in Hut Afi at 12:30.
MUSICAL SOCIETY ANNUAL GEN-.
oral  meeting Wednesday, March  9th,
in HM1.   Everyone out.
Miscellaneous
WANTED  TO  BUY  -  PORTABLE
typewriter.   Phone PA.  9974,
INTERESTED IN LIBRARY WORK?
The Daily Ubyssey needs a student to
organize   a   library   and   newspaper
morgue this year and to direct' it next
year.   See the Publications Board.
COMFORTABLE BED-SITTING RM,
with breakfast near Univeristy available  for   male   student.    Reasonable.
4000 W. 10th.   AL. 3459-L.
ROOM   AND   BOARD  WANTED   -
March   15th  to end  of  term.   Phone
Aileen.   KE. 1407-L.
WANTED-COPIES of Anthony and
Cleopatra Coriolanus.   Kittredge.   CE.
9875.  6—7 p.m.
NOTES, THESIS, ESSAYS TYPED
neatly, efficiently and quickly. Pick
up and delivery can be arranged.
Phone Helen Morgan at CH. 7384.
PROMPT, ACCURATE AND NEAT
work clone on your essays and theses
hy expert typist. Check on my reasonable rates. AL. 3240-M. Hut 51.
Acadia Camp.
WANTED - TUTOR FOR MATH 1
course. Must be willing to work hard.
Please  phene  Audrey.   CH. 6171.
Lost
RLUE PINT THERMOS FLASK ON
Friday, March 4th. Believe left in
car which picked me up at south
parking lot. AL. 0070. R. S. Thorpe.
SMALL ROUND GOLD PIN WITH
"M" set in pearls on Saturday, March
5. Please return to Lost and Found.
SATURDAY AFTERNOON, SINGLE
strand of pearls. Finder please phone
KE. 2320-L or leave at Lost and Found.
MQNQAX.JMJCAMEU8...JBANK, ONE
book, The Romantic Ballet. Finder
please return to A, W. Bell, Anglican
College.
WILL THE STUDENT WHO WALK-
ed away with "Maths, of Investment"
from the SnacJ^Shop Monday noon
pleaseJwrfn in to Lost and Found.
COACHING WANTED IN CHEM. 200.
Fhone Bob. AL. 1316-R.
TIE-X-CHANGE-HAVE YOU ANY
neckties you wish someone else had?
Send 5 to us with $1.00 and we will
send you 5 other ties, attractive, newly
dry cleaned. Pacific North West Enterprise Co.  3245 West 5th Ave.
MRS, FAIRBURN OF YMCA WISHES
to find a university student who Would
net as caretaker for a camp across
frcm Da op Cove. He would receive
living quarters in return for his residing or acting as caretaker, etc.
See YMCA.
cMilke* Attractions-
INTERNATIONAL   CINEMA
WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY at 8:30
Matinee Wednesday at 2:30
Margaret Webster's Shakespeare Co.
in
'MACBETH' and 'HAMLET'
Matinee: Wed., Wed. Evening, Thurs. Evening
"I    llUVa   s-a,   !!   I'Vc'I'V    Illlljn]-
(nn-   has   sui'iias-.-ail,   <ir   11
John   Mh.-'cin   lirinsii,   N'i
"t'lidai- Miii-piri'i   WVlist.-
Warily   aiW   rimiiil.uH •■
t h'-il l I'l -.'" --    1,'MllS      Klallahl
"ilaiiilai" .--laKi'il in this country, and not
i any ua-iy ii|>i>r<>aWn'il .Miss Webster's."
■\v   York   I'osi.
r's (liiaoiioii,  --.MaWiath" has meaning and
.'area,   a ml   i-onii's   HirutiKii    vigorously   as
rgi-r.   New   York   I'M.
SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS
l:i I ii m oi   Si ml.-in   I'a ui-l nil ion  ('aial,   s
ver organizer, will speakJ1,»W"***rhe
Marshall Plan an^,JkfC. Industry" on
Thursday.,„a*"l2*:30 in 'Arts 204 under
auspices of the student LPP Club,
MEETING OF FENCING CLUB IN
Arts   104   Wednesday,   March   9th
We Learn That We Must
Pay For What We Get
ALPHA   OMEGA   SOCIETY   MEET-
ing Thursday, Arts 101 at 12-30. Guest
speaker M. I   Kowaliw.
ELGIN   RUDDELL,   LPP  VANCOuJjWW^URSE IN  AUDITORIUM * ON
Monday.   Please phone Felicity.   AL.
0'654-R
For Sale
ONE PAIR PARIS CALKED BOOTS.
Size 7.   Phone Bob.   CH. 0235.
TUXEDO.   SIZE 38.   GOOD CONDI-
tion, $35.   Phono LAngara 0920-Y.
NE  SNIPE  SAILBOAT-HULL  O.K.
Sails and  rigging need  some repairs
and replacements.   Picture p. 116 194ti
Totem.   See  Lee.   HM 15A,
:i  tl
e!l\ ■■
Musi,
'ill io
liaise
Slal'l
hills will receive
irom  any  oilier
and (ieorgia Sts.
WE DO NOT LOOK FORWARD
to   the   proposed   four   dollar
increase   in   AMS With   any
great anticipation.
Indeed, when wc remember that
four dollars will st'dl buy 40 beers
(more, it will bc recalled, than
even an ciutinoer cm drink) we do
not  look  forward  to  it  at  all.
When we net.? the rocetil' financial
history of Ihe r; e'.aly. however, wo
realize thai there jual i-n't any oth'T
way out 'Units; \.'e want an austerity budget far nuiri. .severe than that
of Mr.  Paul   Planl
Mr. Pianl, in a .1' -poful moment.
l,ud..ete:l a Shi.hill) surplus to pay off
the \V 'i- '.Moaior'al ('>;, ir (loin, lie
Will    lio    111: kv    ii   111  '    bonks    b.lLlPa ''
wiihtuu   the  sill-phis.
Last    xx.rxxxxnxn    in    .a
si.item', in    winch    made   ir w.; ■
'       ) :aaa:      he.hMih  :,      aei'oss-,      the
eoiiiili;. ,    I h."    ■ ,K"i't,\ 's    nl'l'.ee. s    an
llalim ej,     I lla !     ,1     a k'.UU >    ilf''.( it.     <'\-
isied    in    the   War    Memorial    (1\ ai
fund.
Tension has eased somewhat since
Plant proclaimed that the debt has
been   reduced   to  $12,000,
But where did tho $30,000 paid into  the  fund  come  from?
Despite the austerity the books just
balanced. Next year the other $12,-
000 will have to be paid.
ULESS  THE  FEES  ARE  IN-
creased we will see austerity
where it, hurts most.
u
.Aim: si half of il had been in i'he
AMS ei I'foia : ince before the scare
h h.nl been Iw'l by the Harwood
.'Im n s;i anon lo pay off the gym
■ 'oh:. Th. oiher ball' was raised
'-::     i-'b    liii    sale   of   merchandise--
I - lis'i by ihe Il,u wood adini uisra-
l.  n
X .thim... then, was paid by this
:■ e .r's    administration.
We cannot, either, charge the present position of the AMS to inefficiency in past councils. Those whose
memories go back to September 1947
will remember Mr. Harwood's plea
IV r austerity then. A plea which
was largely ignored. Despite this
handicap Harwood left the society
in no worse position than he found
it. Only by judicious management
could even this have been achieved.
Students demanded that the money
he spent. It was spent. Tho debt
en the gym accrued because students in past years resisted austerity ■
It' we want AMS services it is
quite obvious that we must pay
for   them,
CAMPUS  POST  OFFICE
THE BOOK STORE TAKES PLEASURE IN
THE OPENING OF
The Campus Post Office
Stamps,  Money  Orders,  Registered  Letters,
Annuity Payments, Etc.
All your Postal requirements can be handled
conveniently on the Campus.
Mail Collected at the Following Times:
10:10 A.M.       2:40 P.M.       8:15 P.M.
euro0.
00^
prefer this
pure, clear
hair dressing
letters to the
editor
Editor, Daily Ubyssey, Dear Sir:
On behalf of the University Open
House Committee I would like to
offer our compliments and sincere
congratulations for the wonderful
job your editors and reporters did
on the Open House 1949 issue of
your paper.
Through your paper I would also
like to thank all the students, who
as individuals or groups, contributed to tlie success of Open House.
A letter in the paper 'can in no
way express our sincere thanks, and
there were so many participants
personal letter is impossible; but I
feel we can all be .satisfied that the
response to our Open House wa.s
satisfactory reward for all the extra
hard work.
Very Sincerely,
Bob   Currie,   Chairman
Open   House   1949,
ffOMUSS „
MtWSLWF
• "Vaseline" Hair Tonic does a
grand job on thc hair. Just a Jew
drops every morning before brushing or combing checks Dry Scalp,
keeps your hair naturally neat
without smear or smell. And this
clean, masculine hair dressing is
economical — your bottle of
"Vaseline" Hair Tonic lasts for a
long,  long  time.
♦ Symptoms:   Itchv feeling;   dan-
drill/; dry, brittle hair; lw,,e hairs
on comb nr bruJi. t n/esi checked
llliiy cuii\c baldness. Wednesday, March 9, 1949
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Page 9
From Hope To Reality
Pharmacy has finally come of age in Canada's youngest province. Today, with so many
new drugs being discovered and so much
knowledge being required to work with them,
the timing could not be better.
For many years progressively-minded'phar-
macists of the British Columbia Pharmaceutical Association worked for the establishment of a Department of Pharmacy at the
University of British Columbia. George T.
Cunningham of Cunningham Drug Stores was
one of the most active members in this respect.
The efforts of this group were rewarded in
September 1946 when the new Department
of Pharmacy was officially established and
the first class enrolled.
The future success of this new department
was assured when the university authorities
were able to persuade Professor E. L. Woods,
Dean of the College of Pharmacy of the University of Saskatchewan, to head the department. Dean Woods possesses an international
reputation in pharmaceutical fields and has
more than demonstrated his fine abilities as a
teacher and administrator. With an excellent
staff to assist him, the Dean has overcome the
many difficulties that have arisen and instituted a course designed to equip graduates
with the knowledge so necessary for a modern pharmacist. Today, British Columbia has
one of the highest standards of education for
pharmacists in Canada.
In May of this year, the university will
graduate its first class of pharmacists. Those
who choose to enter retail pharmacy will do
much to relieve the present critical shortage
of pharmacists in the Province. A few have
intentions of continuing their studies towards
a higher degree and eventually taking part
in research or teaching. Still others will
choose manufacturing or physician detailing
of drug preparations. Whatever field these
graduates choose, they hold one thing in
common—a desire to enhance and increase
the prestige now enjoyed by their profession.
The "corner drugstore" is in itself a Canadian institution and one of the foundation
stones of community life. Pharmacists recognize this and are proud of the confidence the
public has in their profession. Occupying as
they do, a position where they have daily contact with the public, pharmacists do much to
maintain and improve public health.
Dr. Norman Mackenzie in his congratulatory message to the British Columbia Pharmaceutical Association upon the opening of the
new Pharmacy Department in 1946 expressed
the hope "that before many months pass a
beginning can be made upon a permanent
building to house this department and to give
it the facilities which it will need in years to
come.
We shared that hope with Dr. Mackenzie.
Now in 1949 plans are going ahead for establishment of a permanent home for the
Department. Work has already begun on the
Biological Sciences-Pharmacy Building on the
campus in which Pharmacy will occupy one
wing. Our hopes are now being transmitted
into reality.
Outnumbered Lab Lassies
Prove As Good As Males
Thirty girls in a faculty of 200 men are proving that there
is a place for women in pharmacy.
They  feel   that  from   mixing  bowl •
to mortar and pestle is a short step.
Anyway, in pharmacy labs, fussiness
pays and that's where women exce'..
Organic chemistry, refractometers and
such were a little confusing at first,
of course, but the girls aren't scared
now—much. Anyway they are showing the men they can do as well as
anyone.
INTERESTING
Pharmacy can be a particularly interesting career for women Some of
the girls are interested in lab work
and research. Perhaps one of them
will follow in the footsteps of our
brilliant Dr. Phyllis Taylor whose
BS Ph Degree led to post-graduate
work in Minnesota, London and California. Straight dispensing has not the
appeal for some of the students. A few
are hoping for work in hospital dispensaries or strictly professional pharmacies.
The effect on the class of our very
charming Lucy Dexter has led some of
the girls to think they might like to
instruct.
Particularly suited to women phar-
lacists is thc cosmetic industry, selling
■and manufacturing. A truly fascinating
career of interest to all women and
one for which pharmacy training gives
a good background.
Most, however, are planning to enter
pharmacy where women can use theiv
own particular charm to contribute
to the success of a drugstore. Every
large, up-to-date drugstore needs a
woman pharmacist to cater to women
customers and a good looking blonde,
brunette or red-head can have quite
nn effect on men customers too!
DISADVANTAGE
There is one disadvantage to girls
entering pharmacy. They usually don't
use their coveted BS in Ph Degree for
long after graduating. About 90 percent many withm a year, So far none
of our engaged girls have left though
and all are determined to graduate
before marrying.
■ Anyway these that go on, before or
utter marriage, will find both success
t-ncl happiness in their chosen career;
as pharmacy definitely has a place
for women.
New Technique Effective
For Palpitation Of Ethyl
Period of Observation: 1912 to 1949
INTRODUCTION
Many methods may be found in
chemical books for making compounds
such as tetraethyl, ethyl, ethyl sulphate, ethyl acetate. There is one
chemical that is quite common, but
nevertheless, methods of preparation
have not been widely written, and
inexperienced operators have difficulty in making it. We are referring
to ways of making ethyl palpitate.
One process in particular is effective,
and a description thereof will bc
given; but the operation should first.
observe the prelminaries set forth below,
PRECAUTIONS
To begin with, the time and place
for making ethyl palpitate should bc
wisely chosen. Evenings are thc best
time, because sunlight inhibits the reaction. Weekend evenings are advisable for two reasons, one is that
the operator may have to stand by his
task until the early morning hours to
work on a slow reaction. The other
reason is that the palpitated ethyl
sometimes needs as long a.s the weekend to settle. Since there must be no
foreign influences such as light sources, other operators, and agitation, a
secluded place should be chosen. Care
should be taken that ethyl has not
been tampered with on the day preceding the experiment.
MATERIALS
The working material is usually the
most important consideration, although experienced operators can
handle almost anything. It lias boot)
said of chemical reactions in generjii
that no reactions occur between chemicals that are not, absolutely pure. In
making ethyl palpitate tins fact i.s
extremely important, because pure
ethyl wtTf'^ of "'react and the more
impure  the better.
After tnese precautions are taken,
the most common procedure is dissolving ethyl in alcohol, ninety proof,
and follow with gentle application of
heat. To hasten the temperature rise,
niany operators revert to jungle
voociooism by whispering magic words
and weird nothings. So mysterious is
the character of ethyl that it often
responds to such incantations.
One of thc usual faults is to try
to make ethyl palpitate too quickly.
Too much heat may result in disastrous internal forces which lead the
reactions in unpredictable directions.
From this fault, some operators have
been known to make ethyl ambulate.
VIOLINIST Nora Polsky is the
lliit'd of outstanding Vancouver
artists lo bo presented in .special
p. eilal series sponsored by Lit-
otvtiy anrl Scientific Executive.
She will be heard Friday at
8 p.m. in Brock Lounge.
FOR FAST
PRINTING
SERVICE
For Any Campus Activity
College
Printers
Printers of The Ubyssey
4436 W. 10th        ALma 3253
Half Block From Sasamat
Pharmacy Comes Of Age
Thi_ year Pharmacy reached its
full enrolment of three years and
now contains all of 193 students,
Tho' few in number, they still managed to select faculty colors and
pins, organize social functions and
generally participate in UBC life.
Soon now you'll be seeing another
different colored sweater on the
campus,    grey    with    maroon    arm
bands. These are the colors finally
chosen when the first choice—maroon and white—appeared on pre-
med students' shoulders the first of
the year. Pharmacy pins with a
grey m or tor and pestle superimposed
on them will appear this spring also.
Three successful dances were held
this year, a formal and two in-
formals.     The   formal,   an   annual
affair, was held at the Commodore
Cabaret in October together with
Vancouver druggists and under the
auspices of t'he Sea Qoings Hacks
(Drug House Travellers).
The fall informal at Alma Academy was a real student effort, with
students obtaining, preparing an.!
serving the food, taking tickets and
supplying the music
College beauty contests
May they continue until the Judgment Day! Everyone likes to look
at co-eds who have a little more
of this and a little less of that. And
in Canada's colleges, it's natural
to look to Player's Cigarettes for
fresh, cool smoking.
CORK TIP and PLAIN
REMEMBER
-   PLAYER'S    "MILD''   WITH      WETPROOIT    PAPfcR
DO   NOT   STICK   TO   YOUR   LIPS.
jf,   "^V
•■/
I* 1 *'
<**«'*
.v. j
-«»»w«w.«ri»MlH_M»K''
i VI. A
JJL.L     W /
luscious, brilliant pink tonic for that head-
in-the-clouds feeling. Wear Elizabeth
Arden's entire ensemble of matchless
Spring-keyed color.   At The  BAY now.
t    'p
Nail   Lacquer   .   .   .   lustrous,
wear-resistant jewel finish. $1.
Cream   Rouge   .   .   .   smooth
natural blushing color.        1,75
Lip Pencil . .  . intense, lonfi-
lastins color. 1.75
BAY Toilet lies   Main Floor
'^titt^vKtylpflg dTompanti.
INCORPORATED   2?? MAY 1670. Page 4
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Wednesday, March 9, 194?.
Thunderbirds Fly South
For Clash With Cal. Bears
Left This Morning For Sunshine
State; Face Tough Foe Thursday
UBC's ever-winning English rugby team flew down to
sunny California this morning, for the first two games of their
four-game series with Golden Bears.
Flying  by   transport  plane the  21 $>— 	
members   of   the   squad   along   with
WAD NOTICE
All applications for the position of
Intramural Manager on Women's Athletic Directorate must be in the hands
of Jackie Searman by noon today.
No other applications will be accepted
after the deadline.
coach Albert Laithwaite expect to he
in   the   sunshine   state   in   time   for
lunch,
BEARS PLAY HOST
First game of the traditional duel
between these two clubs takes place
on Thursday, March 10 in the Bear's
home grounds at 2 p.m.
By taking the plane, the 'Bird stalwarts ensure themselves of ample
time for practice but the flying trip
won't allow them to stiffen up as
would be the effect of a long bus
journey.
Three members of the squad left
Monday night by car, but one good
practice will iron out all the travel-
weary wrinkles.
AFTER CROWN AGAIN
This year, the locals will be trying
to recapture once again the honor
of supremacy in West Coast rugger
circles. After having taken the laurels
in the last two years of competition
against the California crew, they will
be out to repeat the performance this
season.
But the Bruins will be no easy prey
for the locals. The entire team of last
year except Ed Welch, will be back
with the California team.
In his stead, Carl Van Heuit, star
of  the  Ramblers   American   Football
squad, will be in the lineup.
ROSE BOWL MATERIAL
Gridiron specialists Jim Cullom, Wilbur Lenz, and Bob Losey, all Rose
Bowl participants, are back in strip
for the Varsity English squad.
Cullom, 224 pound left tackle for
Bear's Senior grid, was one of the
defensive standouts for his team,
190 pound Wilbur Lenz played centre
for the same outfit' \\hile Bob Losey,
fast and shifty with his 182 pound
frame, filled the left halfback position
for the Rose Bowl losers.
In addition to those specialist's, eighi
of the rugger boys are in their third
year on the squad, four are serving
their second season, while only two
are holding down a spot for the first
time. Van Heuit being one of them.
COULD UPSET   BIRDS
With (his kind of talent, thoy might
well overpower the unbeaten Thunderbirds to sweep  the  four-game series.
With tho rather poor showing that
the 'Bird team made against Crimson
Tide last Saturday, the chances of
taking the two matches clown south
look slim.
Only an outbreak of good old-fashioned school spirit may save the locals
from severe trouncings in California.
But when the two teams play up
here on i'he campus for the remaining
tilts of the scheduled series, thc support of the entire school will be helping them along to victory.
SPORT EDITOR — RAY FROST
Opt
>tometmt
GORDON TELFORD, M.A.
410 Birks Bldg.      TA. 2913
Eye Examination    Visual Training
It Costs Nothing
To Find Out
Diagnosis is free at
Dueck's. We charge
only for authorized repairs—work completed,
parts installed. We invite comparison w i t h
any recognized service
center on any basis.
Every cent you spend
here goes for essential
work and guaranteed
workmanship . . , NOT
hocus pocus!
Men and Women
Sandy Robertson Takes
Over UBC Baseball Team
Sandy Robertson, still keeping up with campus activities, will return to the university this summer to take over
the coaching job for UBC's newly-formed baseball team.
Robertson, former pro baseballci <&
with the Vancouver Capilancfe and a
chattel of the Boston Red Sox, reappears in the athletic picture at the
university after *an absence since 1945
when he graduated in Civil Engineering.
Although the 'Bird baseballers won't
have much of a season since they
only play two conference tilt's to make
their position in the Evergreen loop
legal, they will certainly have able
teaching of the sport.
While at Varsity, Robertson participated in almost every sport including baseball, leadiqg his teammates
tc more than one championship in
'ntramural play.
Robertson will have Clovcrleaf oas-
ketball teammate Harry Franklin as
assistant coach, Franklin played baseball with the local senior amateur
league and with the San Diego State
team.
Swimmers Meet
Vic. Y Saturday
Men and women swimmers ol
the UJ3C team will compete in
their last contest of the season
this Saturday when they meet
Victoria Y at the Island City.
Coach Archie McKinnon's Y splashers will be the toughest competition
yet faced by the senior teams from
Varsity.
McKinnon has some well developed
swimmers in his team roster, but UBC
mentor Doug Whittle is sure that even
the highly-touted strength of the Victoria crew will bow to the capability
of the locals.
INTRAMURAL  BASKETBALL
Today Gym
1. Zebes "B" vs Phys Ed "C"
Thursday Ficldhouse
1. Dekes vs Teacher's Training
2. Phys Ed "A" vs Newman "A"
Gym at 4:30
1. Termites vs winner of Tuesday (Beta vs Psi U)
Gym at 5:1)0
1. Winner of Monday game v.s winner Wednesday game.
Friday. March 11 in the Gymnasium at 12:30
1. Phi Delt "A" v.s Kappa Sig "B"
White Dove Cleaners
Laundry & Cleaning Service
3-DAY SERVICE
4567 West 10th Avenue ALma 1G88
"<,
«>■
-4
COKE AND MUSIC
FOR HAPPY MOMENTS
.Is!: for it cil/i.r :;wv . . . both
!>,iXc-!/i,irr,s inc.;'i ;'■:(■ same t/i:iiir
O'
and orders.
COCA-COLA - VANCOUVER
Scoreless Tie Fate
Of Varsity Eleven
After Long Layoff
Showing the effects of a long
enforced layoff, Varsity and
Raniers went to a scoreless tie
on the campus Saturday, as the
Vancouver and District soccer
league swung back into action.
Varsity carried most of i'he play in
the ragged contest, but couldn't break
into the scoring column.
In an intermediate league fixture
en the campus on Sunday, a rejuvenated UBC eleven held their own for
the first time this season, battling
to a 1-1 draw with Woodland United.
It was the first game of the year that
has not ended in defeat for the locals.
Both campus teams have games
scheduled for this weekend. Varsity
meets South Hill at Memorial South
Park, starting at 2:45. It will be an
opportunity for Varsity to break their
current deadlock with Raniers in the
league standings. Raniers are up
against the undefeated Norquay elcv-
end on Saturday,
_______
There will be an important meeting of the UBC Golf Club on Wednesday, February 7, at thc south end of
the Brock, upstairs. All club members
are requested to attend.
'BIRD BEAR RUGGER DUEL
COVERED BY SPORTS EDITOR
On the spot coverage will be given to campus rugby
fans during the two-game series between the Thunderbirds
and the Golden Bears tomorrow and Saturday in Berkley,
California.
Ubyssey Sports Editor Chuck Marshall is travelling
south with the 'Birds and will be wiring back stories of the
series as it progresses.
The games being played in Berkley this week are the
first two in the four-game series played annually between
the 'Birds and the University of California Golden Bears.
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