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The Ubyssey Oct 28, 1938

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 DEBATE
ARTS 100
TONIGHT
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
VARSITY TIME
CJOR
TONIGHT
Vol. XXI.
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1938
No. 11
HEADLINE
From Canadian
University Press
FEATURES
By David R. Fraser
A Canadian University Press Feature.
(Ed. Note—This letter was written
by  David  R. Fraser,  McOlll  University   Student,   who   last   year   won  a
scholarship to study In Paris.)
FRANCE LOOKS ON EUROPE.
PARIS, October 10 — Just a short
time ago Europe was on the verge
of what would unquestionably have
been the most disastrous war of all
time, and a war ln which no one
could have been victorious. During
the crisis it was interesting ot watch
the situation unravel itself from hour
to hour, and to observe the reactions
of the citizens of Paris. They, of
course, did not look at the crisis in
thte same light as we Canadians did.
To them, war would not have been
ln a distant land across some 2,000
miles of ocean. It would have been
right at hand, and would have Immediately imperilled all that they
had ever lived for. Men were not going ta the eastern frontier ready to
die gloriously that their homes and
country might be spared, for their
homes and families would also be ln
the zone ravaged by modern warfare.
It presented a ghastly outlook for
all!
In this city the bright lights were
a thing of the past. Even the street
lights were shaded by metal covers
so that only a small ray of light could
be seen. Day and night heavy army
transport trucks lumbered along the
"boulevards" ln a dull undertone. The
sidewalk cafes were almost deserted,
as people were home awaiting news
broadcasts. Trenches were being dug
In the parks to be used as air-raid
shelters, and sand was distributed
around the city to put out fires ln
case incendiary bombs were used.
■ ■      ■
COUNTRY  UNITED.
The Louvre was closed and many
of its masterpieces were hurried
away to some less vulnerable hiding
place, valuable books were taken ln
truckloads from the libraries. Women
and children were evacuated from
the city In large numbers. It was not
the same Paris at all I
Just then a grim determination
seemed to permeate all France, as
young and old alike were summoned
under the various mobilization orders. Everyone was aware of the consequences.
Mr. Daladier. who had previously
been finding it difficult to consolidate
his position of Prime Minister, suddenly found that the opposition had
rallied behind him. They all realized
that if there was to be a war with
Oermany lt was no time to squabble
among themselves.
■ ■      ■
POPULATION HILARIOUS.
Pro-English feeling became stronger, and for a time all eyes were fo-
cussed on Downing street. It is astounding how fraternally the French
people looked to the initiative ot the
British Prime Minister. They knew
that his diplomatic struggle was
theirs and that the destinies of both
(Continued on Page 2)
See  C.U.P.
MORE CASH
FOR MINOR
ACTIVITIES
PROFIT FROM RUGBY
AND BASKETBALL
Students'     Council     reapportioned
the    Alma    Mater    Society    budgets
Monday   night   in   order   to   provide
financial assistance for a number of
small clubs under the  Literary and
Scientific    Executive    whose   growth
was being retarded by lack of funds.
The athletlo representatives voluntarily cut their expense* 18%  in
order that the Literary and Scientific  cluba might  be  given  double
their usual funds.
Men's   Athletics   Is   still   the    most
extensively      financed      department
with a total expenditure of $3,380 per
year.       During     the     past     several
terms,  however,  the  Basketball  and
Rugby Clubs have, turned   ln  a  profit  rather  than  spending  their  allotments.
RESERVE FUND
Throughout a period of a few years
a supplementary reserve fund has
been built up In the athletics department in order to meet deficits which
might occur on Inter-unlversity
tours. The fund, at present stands
at $300.
The Publications Board receives
the next highest allotment of $8,-
290.     This   includes   2,113    student
subscriptions to the Ubyssey,   the
Totem  subsidies,  and  $290  appropriated   from   the  pass  system  to
pay for Freshman Handbooks.
The Literary and Scientific Executive budget was to have been doubled
this year but a cut of  14%   was necessary ln  order that  the  total  budget might balance.
WOMEN'S   ATHLETICS
Women's athletics requested a total of $878 but this department, too,
had to be lowered by 13%. The cut
meant the sacrifice of coaches ln a
number of cases. Administration,
even had to be cut ln order that the
total would come within the available funds.
"Women's and Men's Undergraduate Societies were apportioned several hundred dollars each.
FALL CONGREGATION
J.A. IRVING ON
'COMMUNISM'
AT INSTITUTE
"The Philosophy of Communism"
will be the subject of Prof. J. A.
Irving, of the Department of Philosophy at the Institute lecture Saturday evening In the University Auditorium at 8.10.
Dr. Irving is a graduate of _ Toronto, Cambridge and Paris, and until accepting appointment In British
Columbia was on the staff of Princeton. He is a member of many societies, a contributor to Important Journals of discussion, widely travelled,
original in viewpoint, and cosmopolitan In outlook.
The B. C. Electric Railway provides buses at Sasamat Street, which
go directly to the University and
wait there until the close of the lecture. All Institute lectures are free
to  the  public.
CHANCELLOR  R.  E.  McKECHNIE   and  PRESIDENT   L.   S.  KLINCK.
on the air. *.
. by w.i.e.
"Varsity Time" at 8.15 tonight over
CJOR again presents the inimitable
Doris.
Program  includes:
1. Interview    with    Carson     McGulre.
2. "Conqui's.." a college  skit.
3. "Front   Page   Features."
4. Campus  sport news.
5. Vocal  sections  by  Lewis Freeman.
■The areen-oyed Dragon," one
sons to br presented by Lewis, ls
particularly in'.erestlng but "Old Man
Kiver" i.s probably the best vehicle
for the type cf voice which ls Freeman's.
Victor Freeman (no relation as far
as we know) will be the official announcer.
Basil Robinson and Van Perry
will continue wtth their excellent
work of presenting news flashes.
"Conquest," . another Bob Thompson script, is probably the most versatile yet and ls well dramatized by
Irene Stevens, Pauline Scott, and
Garth  Allen.
We are still wondering what
Doris will sell to aid the Brock
Memorial Fund—the script-writer
didn't know himself the last time
we saw him.
CHANCELLOR CONFERS
DEGREES ON GRADS AT
FALL   CONGREGATION
"l admit you," magic words in tho life of every senior, were
uttered by Chancellor R. K. McKechnie over the bowed hends of
fifty-six graduating students nt the Full Congregation held in the
University Auditorium, Wednesday afternoon.
Degrees 'in abscntiac' were granted to twenty-one students
who  were  unable to  be  present.
  --  ^PROPORTION.
Value of research in education was
outlined by the Chancellor. All onesided culture ls to be avoided and
thus exclude narrowness. In short,
there must be proportion ln all
teachings.
Continuing ln his advice to the
graduating body. Dr. McKechnie,
urged them to remember that even
after they graduate, they will still
play an Important part ln the success of their University.
"Its aims are your alms, Its successes  are  your   successes,  and   its
prestige is your prestige," stated the
Chancellor.
VISITING  PROF.  SPEAKS.
Congregation speaker, Dr. Ivor
Jennings is a visiting professor from
England and ls ln the department of
economic and political sciences.
Dr. Jennings particularly stressed
the value of the university aa a
means of providing trained men for
administrative posts In the Public
Services.
Carefully avoiding any analogies to
Canadian Oovernment or Canadian
universities, Dr. Jennings told of the
complicated governmental system in
England ln regard to the administration  of  the  civil services.
"Although in Canada you have
ten governments and each public
man who gets up to speak at a service club Is likely to complain of
over-government, yet in England
there Is much more government
control under a single system, a
fact due to the development of
public services."
In introducing the speaker for the
occasion. President L. S. Klinck
stated that it was the first time ln
the history of the University of British Columbia that the convocation
speaker was a member of the professorial staff.
UNIVERSITY PUBLIC SERVANTS.
"In England we place more emphasis upon administrative offices than
ln Canada, and English universities
a-e today doing their best to train
men for the public services," he continued.
"In addition, such technical developments, as ln the British War Offlce. are being placed under civilian
control, since we believe that technical experts such as air force officers and  admirals should assist gen-
Madame Bovary
Monday Film
Newest presentation of the National Film Society on the campus will
be the adaptation of Flaubert's great
novel "Madame Bovary," to be shown
in the auditorium on Monday evening, at 8 o'clock.
Thla   colourful   and   tragic   story
has been proved to have a basis in
fact.   The   beautiful,   extravagant,
despised and adored Madame actually   did   exist,   and   she   has   been
brought   true   to   life   In   thla,   the
best of Flaubert's great stories.
The  screen  version  Is  said  by  the
critics to be a worthy counterpart of
the  famous  original.
The play deals with the life of a
country doctor in a sleepy town ln
rural Normandy, and the loves and
hatreds of the doctor's capricious
wife are woven into this contrasting
background.
COLEMAN ILL WITH
BRONCHIAL COLD
Dr. Coleman Is ill with a bronchial cold and will not meet his
classes tor the remainder of the
week.
At present no definite information as to his return can be given
by the department.
BASIL ROBINSON IS
ELECTED PRESIDENT
OF JUNIOR  CLASS
Basil Robinson was elected president of the Junior Class when elections were held by Arts '40 last Wednesday. Dr. William Ure was unanimously re-elected as honorary president of the class.
Members of the executive are as
follows: vice-president, Pauline Scott;
secretary. Rosemary CoHins; treasurer, Lee straight; women's athletic
representative. Nell Trapp; men's
athletic representative. Orme Dier;
L.S.E. representative, Dick Montgomery,
(Continued on  Page 2)
See   JENNINGS
KLINCK TO PRESENT A.M.S.
PROPOSALS TO GOVERNORS
ALMA MATER SOCIETY REQUESTS CONTROL
OF BROCK MEMORIAL FUND
Plans proposed by the student body for consideration at the
next Hoard of Governors meeting on Monday evening, were presented to President Tj. S. Klinck on Thursday morning by Carson
McGuire und Bob Smith.
As well us nn nnnunl grant for the Brock Memorial Fund,
request of which was made in view of the fact that the twenty-
five dollar surplus from fees has not been assigned, apparently,
for any other cause, and A.M.S. control of the building funds,
ure included in the student brief.
DEBATE ON
CANADIAN
NEUTRALITY
U.B.C.  MEETS K. OF C.
TONIGHT
The University's flrst debate ln the
Vancouver Debating League wUl be
heard ln Arte 100 tonight at 8.15
o'clock against a team from the
Knights of Columbus.
Paul Volpe and Darrell Braldwood,
two of the parliamentary Forum's
able speakers, will uphold the affirmative on the subject 'Resolved that
Canada should adopt a poUcy of
strict neutrality in the case of European conflict.'
Speaking for the Knights of Columbus   will   be   James   Muirhead
and Alfred  Holmes.
BRAIDWOOD-VOLPE   TEAM.
Braldwood has many years of debating behind him, both in the Parliamentary Forum and in the Inter-
High Schools Debating League. Recently he was elected speaker of the
Political Discussions Club and president of the A.M.U.S.
Volpe ls one of the older members
of the Forum with a great reputation
as a speaker and debater. He ls also
connected with the Political Discussions Club.
The   debate   tonight   Is   the   flrst
step  of  U.B.C.   to  field  a  team  of
men, Interested in public questions
and  public  life.
Professor J. Friend Day will act as
chairman. The debate ls open to the
public.
DAVIS-STORDY DEVISE
NEW SOCIAL SCHEME
Working in co-operation, Jean
Stordy and Jack Davis, presidents
of the W.U.S. and M.U.S., respectively, have devised a new scheme to
avoid the clashes of social functions
on   the  campus.
The rules which they have drawn
up are designed to do away with
the unsatisfactory situation at present where many a student la torn
between loyalty for two groups
who may he having their major
social function of the year on the
same date.
Following are the rules—all executives please take note:
(1) Prospective dates for all social
functions for which tickets and invitations have been printed must be
recorded with Jean or Jack. Dates
set must be observed to avoid
clashes.
(2) No function concerning undergraduates or graduates may be conducted on the same date as a major
University function.
(3) Thursday of each week is reserved for major University functions, clasa parties, etc. Tuesdays
and Fridays are days on which other
functions may be held.
(4) The Student Council requests
that the location of all the above
mentioned functions be recorded at
the  A.M.S.   offlce.
(5) All the rules outlined under
the head of Social Functions ln the
Constitution and By-Laws of the
U.B.C. Alma Mater Coclety muat be
observed.
COMING   SOCIAL   EVENTS
Nov.  8—Science  Class  Party.
Nov.  7—Education Class Party.
Nov,   10—Phrateres Dance.
Nov.   17—Arts-Aggie  Hall.
Nov.   24-a—Christmas    Plays.
HISTORY OF UNION FUND
In the meeting .with President
Kllnck, Carson McOulre and Bob
Smith, treasurer of the Students'
Council, discussed the students' request to the Board of Oovernora
concerning the yearly Brock Memorial Building grants.
This Interview waa preparatory
to the Board of Governors' meet*
Ing October 81.
President Klinck had drawn up a
history of the Brook Memorial explaining the constitution of the
Board of Trustees. H. assured that
he would present to the Board the
students' request as given by the
Council.
NON-COMMITAL
He did not discourage the Council's
optimism with regard to the possibility of an annual grant but did not
commit the Board in any way.
Carson McOulre and Evan ap Roberts have been asked to attend the
meeting of the Brock Memorial Com-
mitten. The date for this is still to
be announeed.
POWER TO PROCEED?
At the last semi-annual meeting of
the A.M.S. four motions were passed
which gave Students' Council and
their committee on the matter, power
to proceed in their attempts to bring
about immediate action on the construction of the Brock Memorial
Union Building.
The flrst motion waa a requeet
to the Board of Oovernora for the
sum of $2,600 per annum for a
period of ten years to repay a portion of a loan guaranteed by the
AJM.S. to facilitate the Immediate
erection of the Union Building.
The second motion was a request
for a complete accounting of the
Brock Memorial funds.
The third motion asked further
that  all   funds  Intended   for    the
Union  Building  be transferred  to
the AJM.S. for the purpose of erecting the flrst unit of the building.
By the fourth motion students authorised  Council  to  raise  funds  for
the   building   by   a   bond    Issue,    the
floating of which was authorized two
years ago.
NOON HOUR LECTURES
Because of student dissatisfaction with present timetables
a committee has been formed
to investigate noon hour lectures and late Wednesday afternoon lab periods at present
being given on the campus.
Members of the committee are:
Jack Davis, Rann Matthison,
Peggy  McLeod.
When timetables were revised the faculty adopted the ruling that there should be no
12.30 lectures In view of the
fact that the noon lunch period was cut down to one hour.
Likewise no labs were to be
taken after 3.30 Wednesday ln
order to leave this time free for
athletic   practices.
Despite their obvious necessity these rulings have not
been   obeyed.
SOPH   ELECTIONS
Joe Pearce, retiring president, announces that the Arts '41 class elections will be held In Arts 100 at 12.30
today. Two
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday. October 28, 1938
THE  UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Office: 206 Auditorium Building ...
Oampus Subscriptions, $1.50
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Dorothy Cummings
SENIOR EDITORS
Tuesday
Phone Point Orey 206
Mall Subscriptions, $2.00
Friday
Robert King
Irene Eedy
Joyce Cooper
Rosemary Collins
Jack Mair
ASSOCIATE   EDITORS
James Macfarlane
ASSISTANT  EDITORS
Ozzy Durkin Jack Mercer
Van Perry Lester Pronger
SPORTS EDITOR
Orme Dier
ASSOCIATE  SPORTS  EDITORS
Basil Robinson Myrne Nevison
C.  U.   P.   STAFF
Editor
James Macfarlane
Assistants
Van Perry Ann Jeremy Joyce Cooper
PUB. SECRETARY CIRCULATION  MOR.
Virginia Galloway Harry Campbell
REPORTORIAL   STAFF
Jack Margeson, Helen Harm, Pat Keatley, Joan Thompson. Bill Backman
Joan  Haslam,  Ted  Underhiil,  Jack  Metford,  Ruth  Millar,   Janet  Walker
Brita Vesterback, Bob Martson, Florence Hurndall. Bill Osborne, Ken Vernon
A. Spencer, Doreen Henderson.
Advertising Office
Standard Publishing Co., 1037 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone:  SEYMOUR 4484
All advertising handled exclusively by Standard Publishing Co.
CORRESPONDENCE
The Editor.
Madam:
We believe lt only Just that the
student body should be Informed of
the amount of time and energy expended by the Pep Olub ln helping
to make the Homecoming celebrations a success:
Man
Hours
Decorating Crystal Ballroom... IS
Decorating  U.B.C.  Cafeteria ...   S
Football Rally       *V.
Saturday, Sept. 32:
Decorating  Stadium 18
Decorating Gymnasium      1
Pep-Meeting   5
Stadium  Ushering ,    24
Yell-Leaders      4
Tea  Dance  3
Cleaning Gym Floor 15
Basketball  Game     3W
Yet in his ignorance columnist
"Proxy" berates the Pep Club for
their lack of Initiative and the small-
ness  of  their  organization!
When an organization such as the
Pep Club loses a large number of its
members, and then ln an attempt to
defend Itself against various charges,
is Ignored, something should be done.
The great majority of the students
seem to believe that the Pep Club's
work consists of leading yells and
making Cafeteria announcements. A
study of the above timetable should
give everyone some idea as to the
Importance of the work done by this
group of Unlverslty-mlnded students.
ORCHIDS   AND   SAUERKRAUT.
Since everyone seems to be handing out bouquets I would like to send
orchids to the three or four men
forming the active body of the Pep
Club, who, despite adverse student
opinion, are carrying on with their
excellent work, and making a success
of all OUR functions.
At the same time may I suggest
sauerkraut for those students who
sit back ln all dignity and aloofness
and moan about the lack of student
enthusiasm regarding student functions.
The Pep Club does a lot of valuable work.
The   Pep   Club   wants   more   men
willing  to show more Initiative.
And we need the Pep Club.
• Signed)   G. E. RYAN.
JOHN  M.  MACKENZIE.
LEE  STRAIGHT   .
ALEX   MACDONALD.
tllllllllMIMMMIIHIIIIIIMtlllllMlllllllllMIIIIKIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMM
|   H. Jessie How, B.A.  |
f PUBLIC   STKNOORAPHER        1
| POPULAR   LIBRARY j
|      4451 W. 10th Ave. |
Tllllll,Illllll 11,111 , ,ll Mil 11 M.t,,11 III Illllll
The Editor.
Madam:
The Pep Club deserves some
praise for Homecoming work—remember there are two sides to
everything!
(Signed)  CARSON McOUIRE.
G.U.P.
(Continued from Page 1)
$4-
Shoes thut cum take
It! Di'Hlguea specially for Vancouver's   Voting   Fellows! |
aor.n   exct.tjsively  at      j
COPP*S
.1.10  West  Hastings  St.
countries would  be  painted  with the
same brush.
Chamberlain was the man of the
hour! When pictures of him appeared
ln news reels, we could almost describe as sentimental the way the theatre audiences ln Paris cheered, clapped and shrieked their approval.
That seemed to be the one bright
thing ln a French metropolis that
had so recently lost its glamour and
gaiety.
As days wore on, the tension Increased, until the news of the Munich
Four-Power Agreement hit Paris like
a bombshell! People crowded the
streets laughing and shouting hilariously. Bright lights were again seen
on the "boulevards." The whole atmosphere of "gay Paree" seemed
gayer than ever, after three weeks
of   nerve-wracking   tension.
■       ■       ■
WHAT   IS   THE   NEXT   STEP?
Now that the main drama is over,
the French look rather portentously
on what is to follow. There is a feeling here that the Chamberlain-Hitler
peace pact was a splendid thing, but
that France was left out in the cold.
They seem to think that Hitler succeeded in getting Mr. Chamberlain
tc sign a pact that will assure Germany that she will not have England
to contend with if war should break
out in the future. In addition, what
would England do now, if war broke
out between Frap"e and Germany?
Britain's hands ai _  tied!
France feels that her position ls
greatly weakened as she cannot count
on Britain to help her to defend the
rights of small European countries
against the aggression of a great
power. One Parisian editor went so
far as to say that France's one "real"
ally was Czechoslovakia, and that the
latter country was now being torn to
shreds while France was forced to
"look on."
The feeling of uneasiness still prevails! What will be Hitlers next step?
How will Britain react to it? To what
extent can we count on Russia's aid?
What would be Italy's course? These
are the new questions that haunt the
Frenchman's   mind.
eral   administration   but   not   control
lt."
"For instance, war ls too serious
an affair to be left to admirals and
generals. They may conduct it. but
should not decide the policy for war."
he  said.
"Experts   should   be   on   tap,   not
on    top,"   said   Dr.   Jennings.    "The
essential  principle of our  system   Is
that  we  do  not  want  technical   experts  but   Intelligent  administrators
possessed  of  energy,  initiative,  and
general   Intellectual   capacity."
In     conclusion,     "The     educational
system   in   England   presents   persons
of  intellectual  capacity, and  the  civil
service   is   graded   according   to   educational   standards."
UBYSSEY EXPLORES
CURIOSITIES AND
HORRORS OF MUSEUM
By TED UNDERHILL
Have you ever visited the University Ethnographical Museum In the
Library  building?
If you are a freshman, you probably haven't, tf you are a soph, you
may have. If you are a Junior, you
should have, and if you are a senior
and haven't seen the Museum, then
you had better hurry up, because
you've only got another six months
here.
You  don't  need  to   be  a  student
of subjects ethnographical in order
io   enjoy   a   visit   to   U.B.C.'s   own
museum.
All that one needs is a fairly good
imagination.
FOLLOW   THE   INDEX.
Just walk half way down the east
side of the Library of Congress card
Index, 'till you And a door bearing
the Inscription: "Ethnographical Museum of the University of B.C.". then
step Inside, and let the curator, Mr.
Tansley,  do  the rest.
You will see things which are
unbelievably beautiful, and you will
see things whieh are ugly, so horribly ugly that they will make your
blood run cold.
CANNIBAL VICTIM.
You will see in one case delicate
embroidery of pure silver, while in
another you will see the head of an
unfortunate cannibal  victim.
If you have any Imagination at
all you will be transported to distant lands.
To the South Sea Islands as they
were ln past days: native deities,
with crocodile heads—death-dealing
magic wands—blowpipes, with their
deadly darts—necklaces of human
teeth—spears and knives of human
bones—skulls from head-hunting
raids—jujus and fetishes. Or to the
land of the Eskimos, with Its kayaks
and parkas—carved walrus tusks,
and strange flsh spears.
WELL,  WELL!*
The historic and educational value
of the Museum was estimated by a
member of the Smithsonian Institute
to be over half a million dollars, but
the value to U.B.C. of a museum
which so few people visit ls mighty
small.
Why not go over to the library
and see  these  things  for yourself?
CORRESPONDENCE
The  Edjitor.
Madam:
I wish lo make reply on behalf of
the University Olee Club to the story
headed: "Struan Aids Infant Industry"  in   the  Ubyssey of  October  21.
It seems that application was made
by the University of Washington
Olee Club to present a concert on
this  campus.
The University of B.C.  Glee Club
was never approached on this matter  so  that   the  article   referred   to
above  does   not  in  any   way   represent the feeling of the Olee Club.
The Club does not wish to prevent
any such organization coming to this
campus. Rather lt would Welcome the
opportunity   of   hearing   a   first   rate
body   such   as   the   Washington   Club
and of enabling  the student body to
understand  Just  what  are  the possibilities  along   this  line.
The Olee Club therefore wishes to
Inform you that lt ls unanimously In
*&}
*»**
*>*%
It ls astonishing how dull a column can become, if lt turns Into a
running comment-
OF FINANCE ary upon the af-
MINISTRY fairs  of  state.  But
we still feel that
perhaps it Is a good thing for us to
include in our inches a few remarks
about the multitude of budgets that
sneaked through the Council sentries
on Monday  nglht.
How many students are there who
realize that the L.S.E. appropriations
were doubled over those of last
year? How many are fully aware
that the Athletic budgets were cut
by some 13% in order to provide the
funds for the apparently impecunious L. S. E.?—without a murmur
from the willing Athletes, incident-
all*/.
You see! such a lot of things go
on behind our backs as It were. It
is so difficult to keep oneself fully
acquainted with all the slimming
and fattening processes that Council
Is practising this session. But of
course It's all our fault. Isn't It? It
we live ln a democracy we should
be so Interested ln all the business
of government that we can tell these
things are happening before they
have come to pass, or what have
you!
But, to drop the facetlousness
again, this move, although radical, Is
undoubtedly ln the best Interests of
the dear old University. And there ls
less doubt that there was too much
money poured out on the production
of prize circus bulls before now. At
last the cultural and Intellectual aspects, of student life—without any
snobbishness accompanying — have
been recognized, and are to be fostered.
We haven't been able to find out
whether the blame, fault, or credit
for this change
HAVE A HART! in     policy     was
due entirely to
the efforts of one person or not.
Perhaps the dynamic President of
the L. S. Executive ran the bill
through the Campus Congress as
skillfully as President Roosevelt
squeezed through his rearmament
bill! Certainly very few people seem
to have been cognizant of the situation.
The next problem that rears its
ugly head is on what is this money
being spent? Apparently it is Council Policy this year to try to inspire the small man' of the Campus:
to give the minor clubs an opportunity to express themselves In tremendous and productive enterprises.
Every Club on the Campus was
given a chance to submit a budget
.... big or small. The Council then
considered these and gave assistance
to  those clubs  that  warranted  same.
And so for the first time in the
history of the Alma Mater Society
the small clubs have been given a
break.    Will the future give birth to
favour of bringing the University of
Washington Olee Club to the U.B.C.
campus.
(Signed)   DOUGLAS  FORD.
President.
"Ths purstt form
In which tobacco
can be wnoked."
SWEET CAPORAL
CIGARETTES .
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BIRKS CHALLENGER WATCH
Majors in good time for every busy man
and woman.
Appearance   plus   performance   at   Prices
Hanging from $25.00.
SILVKRSMITHS
GOLDSMITHS
BIRKS
DIAMOND
MERCHANTS
VANCOUVER, B.C.
MIIIIHIIMIIIIIIM.IItlMMMIIMMIHtltlltlllMllltltMllllllllllllllttlllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIHI
Diamonds, Watches* Personal Gifts
FIRBANK and LANGE
USE OUR CREDIT PLAN
Seymour and Dunsmuir Opp. the Bus Depot
something new,  something  better as
a  result?
Having put our pro-
VANCOUVER verbial foot ln lt
PATRIOTS when we remarked
on the horribly noble
game of Canadian football some
weeks ago, we decided to try the
game again! We visited the great
Homecoming struggle.
The game we concluded was very
good, although to us unutterably
dull. The point that fascinated us,
however, was to see the number of
so called Canadian citizens who deliberately cheated our poor Alma
Mater Society out of perfectly good
sheckles. Not only was the practice
of leaping over the fence ln Its well
concealed portions rampant, but the
habit of wriggling through the gates
unbeknown to the bewildered minion
protecting the entrance—became almost immoral!
But this was not all. On the upper
field were parked about so many
large luxurious cars. The owners
must have been well out of the artisan class ln business, yet they
begrudged the . University the price
of a ticket to the game. Nice people,
all of them! They probably criticized the Society for not arranging
for a parking lot that did not force
them' to look Into the dazzling rays
of the setting sun!
HOME GAS
Here's Double Value—
You get quality in Home
Products that is second
to none—You are helping yourself and fellow
citizens by patronizing
a 100% British Columbia Company.
HOME OIL
DISTRIBUTORS LTD.
The  Independent   100%
fl. C. Company
WE'RE IN SEW BUSINESS!
Wherever you see Tip Top Clothes they're giving a masterly performance. On the college campus they get cheers. In business
offices, clubs, restaurants, they get dignified applause. Like an
actor who's grown up in show business and knows his stuff, we've
been in sew business for 28 years and an audience of over four
million buyers will tell you "Tip Tdp rates 4 Stars all the way".
Why not catch the next performance?   Order your reservation now!
HAND-CUT   AND   TAILORED   TO   YOUR   PERSONAL   MEASUREMENTS Friday, October 28, 1938
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
HOPPING
with
MARY ANN
Glamourous hankies and those special even-glo hosiery . . . the
smart evening stockings . . . add that little touch to the dance ensemble
. . . Phoebe Hosiery Shop ... 713 Dunsmuir Street has just received
some of these very newest and smartest in evening accessories. . . .
Council meeting last Monday wa- very seriously delayed. . . . Council
women were busy leaning out the window, giving their phone numbers
to the Huskies from Saskatchewan. . . . Just appear nonchalant ... a
very difficult task . . yet not so arduous if one is carrying that filmy
note of color in the wisp of chiffon hankie. . . .
(S       ts       ts
Pea-soup fogs . . . and scotch mists are not the most comfortable
of climates . . . then is the time that one likes to don a warm tweed
coat . . . especially from Great Britain where the finest of tweeds are
manufactured . . . and think how smart you'll feel strolling over to
the Library with your books tucked under your tweed clad arm.
Fred Holmes has such a marvellous group of these for both
co-eds and sciencemen . . . not to mention the artsmen . . . we
had to tell you about them. ... A very lucky lad is the social service
worker who took his non-Varsity girl friend to the football rally . . .
and didn't meet his Varsity brunette . . . but he wasn't nearly so
lucky when he proceeded to University Hill school dance and walked
right into his U.B.C. girl. ... If you're feeling chilly, gather around
you a snug smart F.red Holmes (284J Granville St.)  tweed coat. . . .
(S      ts      ts
Gold sequin jacket with evening bag to match is the perfect
accessory ensemble for the sophistocated evening gown . . . especially
with the smart plain black gown whose accordian pleated skirt sweeps
the ground . . . full sleeves enhance this Lora Lee Dress which is at
the Shop at 2814 Granville Street. ... It is a very wise idea to get
your coat check from the boy friend, particularly if you decide to
change escorts during the home waltz. ... So one little lass found
out. . . . Homecoming was a big week-end for her. . . . Phi Kap friend
escorted her to the football game, tea dance, supper, theatre program,
basketball game . . . and the after dancing in the Palomar . . . when
escort found she preferred the much intriguing Fiji ... he tore her
coat check up . . . and she went home coatless. . .
(S IS tS
Tripping in fantastic swirls, promenading in assumed dignity . . .
one is always conscious of the feeling of delight when wearing Raeson's
super evening sandals . . , toes open and also heel . . . thick soft velvet
... in contrasting colors with black, rose, exotic blue, wine, emerald
. . . heels of medium and high . . . the delight of every willowy blonde
and petite brunette. . . Hostess for one of the prairie linesmen is still
wondering . . . they drove up Little Mountain to see the lights. . . . He
thought the view was beautiful. . . . Arts-aggie isn't very far distant
... so the A.M.U.S. president says . . and he wants all the co-eds to
appear their very best for this gala occasion ... so complete your
select attire by a dainty pair of velvet sandals . . . just for you at
Raeson's Shoe Store . . . 644 Granville Street. . .
(S        tS        IS
Floral taffeta in gayest of colors . . . reminicent of sunny southern France . . . zippered fronts . . . for the daintiest of house-coats . . .
the ideal thing for travelling . . . one can really relax in the stateroom
suite . . . when one goes to visit one's parents over the week-end . . .
slip into these convenient and dressy garments . . . with their close
fitting bodice . . . and full skirts. . . Have you heard? . . One limelight-loving campus male of musical qualities . . . boasts that he has a
certain freshette dated up for every other night from now until the
end of November . . he hopes . . if you are looking around for a special
gift for your sorority sister, nothing is more delightful for her than
a demure satin housecoat, or dignified white corded velvet. . . Incidentally wc were told the other day that it was only eight weeks till
Christmas ... so happy new year.
MARY  ANN
SOWARD TO ADDRESS
PAN-PACIFIC WOMEN
A meeting of the Pan-Paclflc Women's Association to be held next
Sunday, October 30, will be addressed  by Professor  Soward.
University women Interested ln
problems of the Pacific area who
would like to attend this meeting
are Invited to contact Kay Farquhar
through the Arta letter rack.
SOCIAL CLUB
Meeting   of   the    Social     Problems
Club In Arts 103, Friday, October 28.
FOUND
One eversharp pencil belonging to
J. E. Kloepfver, and one Parkette
mottled grey and green fountain
pen, owner unknown. Owners please
apply to Pub  Office,  for both.
NEWMAN  CLUB
Communion breakfast will be held
at Our Lady of Perpetual Help
Church. Sunday, Oct. 30, at 8.30
mass.  Come   If  possible.
FOUND
Found, fountain pen loser may
have same by giving description,
time and place lost. Apply to Ken
Uyenobu,   Aits   letter   rack.
ORIGINAL
For a new idea in a corsage
—one that will be the hit of
the party—phone
ROS.
& CO.LTD.
665 Oranville Street
LOST
Black leather pocket book, containing student pass, driver's licence,
tnd about $3.00 was lost ln the Oym.
on Wedneaday p.m. Finder please
return to R. McMillan, Arts letter
rack.
LOST
Black fountain pen, with the name
T. E. Ramsay engraved up it, was
lost last Wednesday or Thursday.
Finder please return to T. E. Ramsay,   Arts  Women's  letter  rack.
LOST
Book entitled "Introduction to
Education," by Fraser, was lost In
the Caf. Finder please return to the
Library.
OERMAN COMPOSITION
Wanted Immediately — Advanced
German Composition by Whitney
and  Stroebe. Fair. 4912-L.
STUDENT   DIRECTORV
Will all students who did not know
their Vancouver addresses at time of
registering please leave them ln the
Publications Offlce today or Saturday. A sheet will be provided on
the  counter.
All undergraduates — make appointments for your Totem picture
now.
Get one of those smart all-wool
sweaters at the Esquire Men's Ap-
purel.
llll,MII,IIIIIIIIIMIMI,*lll,lll,IIIIIIIMII*MIIMIII,lllllllllllltttlll
f VARSITY SERVICE I
1 STATION 1
I "AT   THE   GATES" |
I "OUR   SERVICE   MEANS I
1 HAPPY MOTORING" I
I 3
linMIIIIIIMMHMMMIIIIMMIMIIIIIMMIIItll II, 1111,11, (Illllll, Ml 7,
llllllltllllHMIIIIIHIIHHHMIHIIIIHMimiltllllHHIHMHIItllH
HERE
AND
THERE
HHHIHHHHHHHIMHHHHIMMHMMMMMHHIHHHIHHHlHH?.
By J.  D.  MACFARLANE
A word about football games,
budgets,   and   chtselers.
We are reliably Informed that
some heels on this oampus did a
splendid Job of cheating the Alma
Mater Sooiety and themselves Wedneaday by either lending their
passes to outside people, or by
using their passes to eraah the
gate before ticket collectors could
get organised enough to combat
the rush.
PASS SYSTEM OAMES?
In the first place the games were
not actually on the pass system but
students were given a cut rate, the
only qualification being their Identification by means of a pass, so that
they would not be unnecessarily
handicapped In seeing their own
football game.
BUT, THE OBJECT OP THE
OATE RECEIPTS WAS TO MAKE
A CLEAR PROFIT OF $200.00 SO
THAT THE BUDGET COULD BE
PROPERLY BALANCED—AND IF
THAT BUDGET IS NOT BALANCED EVERY STUDENT ON
THE CAMPUS SUFFERS BY REDUCED FUNDS AVAILABLE FOR
CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS.
ROBBERY
The Alma Mater Society budgeted
to a surplus of $200.00 to be supplied
by profits from the gate receipts,
and Wednesday there were ample
people at the game to meet this figure. But, unfortunately some people
saw fit to rob themselves and their
fellow students by lending their
passes to other people and thus depriving themselves, In the end, of a
certain    amount   of   very   necessary
funds. IT IS DOUBTFUL NOW IF
IT WILL BE POSSIBLE TO MAKE
ENDS MEET AFTER THE INROADS MADE BY DISHONEST
STUDENTS ON  A.M.S.   FUNDS.
There Is an honour system ln
thla university, and If Wednesday
afternoons exhibition Is all that
can be done to uphold It, then we
aU might as well fold up and go
back to some more dictatorial and
unpleasantly efficient mode of control so that some morons on this
campus won't cut their noses off to
spite their faces.
MORE   CHISELERS.
It  has  been  observed,   by   the  general public  as well as by U.B.C. people, that some students in large and
luxurious   automobiles   had   the   unmitigated  gall  to  drive   up  onto  the
upper playing field and to watch the
game,   free  of  charge,  from  there.
People  who    can    afford    to  ride
around well cushioned, and who, no
doubt, can afford also,  to pay fees
to  their socially Inclined organizations,  might also have  the decency
to be honest and support their own
Alma Mater  Society.
From what we have seen, and discovered,   about  some   people  on   this
campus  ln  the  last  couple  of  years,
we begin  to doubt whether they  are
sufficiently   adult   enough   to   possess
Intelligence  sufficient  to see  a  plain
situation  straight.
In fact we doubt if they have any
true moral concepts at all other than
those which can easily be twisted, by
some modern quirk of the mind, to
fit the necessary situation.
PENNANT   STOLEN.
Also, some people, not satisfied
with crashing the gate, had the temerity to steal one of the pennants at
the stadium, the replacing of which
will further decrease the extra funds
available for student activities.
It might also be noted that this
year Athletics budget was cut, and
extra money transferred to L.S.E.
In addition to this football teams
are asked to put on a show to hand
still further money over to the Alma Mater  Society.
It ls understood from official
quarters that if such practices as
were evident Wednesday c anttnue,
then budgets of clubs under L.S.E.
will  have  to  be  cut  accordingly.
The   Hotel   Vancouver
presents
MART KENNY
tit   the   Spanish   Grill
I HUM II III....lllimHHIHHIHIIHHIIIHI.ll.il Illlll Illllll MM Ml M HIMIHMIHM H Mill I
I Pioneer Laundry & Drs' Cleaners
I Seymour 8334
A complete  Laundry and  Dry ClenniiiK Service I
Licensed Sanitone Dry Cleaner j
• MltMlltllHIMIlllllllMIHIirMIIIHI IHIMIHIII IIII IMIII MIIHIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIII II "
SNAPS OF TEA
DRINKERS TO
WIN  PRIZES
At last, a chance for those people
who sneak around corners with
cameras to click their way to dollars.
The Tea Market Expansion Bureau <s sponsoring a weekly contest
to run in the Ubyssey. T-shots are
pictures of people drinking tea. Not
necessarily on the campus but people
unywhere—up the mountain, down
on the beach, ln the lab, or ln Chang
Suey's Coffee Cavern.
First pictures will  be published
in the Friday, November 4 Issue of
the Ubyaaey.    Judged by a professor and a representative of the Tea
Bureau the winning snapshot will
earn a oaah prise of $2.A0.
The  contest   will   be   run   for   ten
weeks—with a weekly award of $2.00
for the winner.   Orand prizes of $28,
$10,   and   $0   for   first,   second    and
third best pictures of all entries will
be   awarded   at   the   end   of   the    ten
weeks.
Sponsored by the governments of
India and Ceylon, The Tea Market
Expansion Bureau ls definitely not a
commercial  organisation.
AU pleturea muat have your
name and addreaa on the back before they will be Judged. Bring
them to the pub office before noon
Friday, November 4.
The Nurses' Undergrad Society ls
holding Its annual tea on Saturday,
Ootober 29 from 4-6 p.m. In the  rotunda  of  the  nurses'  new   home   at
Vancouver Oeneral Hospital.
All members, nurses and prospective nurses, are urged to attend. This
ls our major social function for this
term so be sure you are among those
present.
THE BROWN DERBY
LANCE  HUDSON,  Prop.
Sandwiches,  Light  Lunches
South Oranville Street
I Cooking Bacfctuartisl
The traditional rivalry between
the Musical Society and the Player's
Club has reached such a height that
they have decided upon a fight to the
finish.
BEST MAN?
On Saturday they will meet in
deadly combat on the baseball field
and may the best man win.
This same Idea had suggested Itself to our student predecessors as a
means of wreaking their revenge on
the professors who had persecuted
them throughout the year.
SMART LADS
So they nominated the members
of the Student's Council to represent
them  ln  the  fray.
It waa a harrowing scene. Amid
the slaughter, Dr. Sedgewick as
faoulty rooter cheered on his men.
When flrst approached on the subject of the coming battle, he had refused, either from true modesty or
fear of the student onslaught, "to be
butchered to make a student holiday."
FACULTY CHANT
When life became too exciting, the
faculty would chant prayerfully , . .
"Matthew, Mark, Luke and John,
Help the brains to beat the brawn."
Unfortunately,      Dr.      Sedgewlck's
courage went without reward for his
team was defeated by two points.
IF YOU—DO  YOU?
"If  you  can   walk  with  Sophs,   and
keep your virtue,
Or   walk   with   Profs,   nor   lose   the
common touch,
If Fred's remarket on essays cannot
hurt you,
If Co-eda count with you but not too
much,
If you   can  lead   the   Lit,   edit  these
pages,
Play   rugger,   dance,   yet    get   your
classwork done—
You're what the world's been looking
for, for ages—■
You're   the   Nletschean   super   man,
my son'."
This is the standard of perfection
aimed   at   by   the   students   of   1919.
How do you rate?
POSITIONS OPEN TO
SCIENCE GRADUATES
Notice has been received from the
Department of National Defence
that a number of positions exist with
the Air Ministry, London, England,
for technical assistants, technical
officers and Junior sclentlflo officers.
The Air Ministry have advised the
Department of National Defence
that they will be willing to consider
applications from graduates of Canadian Universities with honours degrees ln Engineering or Physics or
equivalent, together with either research or practical engineering experience.
Further Information may be obtained from the Registrar's Office.
The Men's Wear Centre of Vancouver
COLLEGE
TOWN
SHIRTS
Destined for unprecedented popularity this fall on campus and at business,
Spencer's introduce "College Town" Shirts to U.B.C. men, to-morrow. When it
comes to quality broadcloth at a popular price, and smart patterns designed for
style leaders—"College Town"  Shirts are "Tops."
The fall call to color is answered with subdued fancy and woven stripes;
checks and stripes in greens, blues, browns and greys; and plain shades, collar
attached and  neckband styles  14  to   17.
—Men's Shops, Spencer's Main Floor.
DAVID  SPENCER
LIMITED
" Always the Best At Spencer's " ENGLISH RUGBY
STADIUM—2.30
SHAWNIGAN va. SECONDS
VARSITY vs. BARBARIANS
W    «^__RI_.        1            1      fl      _^r               ^___        fl      fl                1
ENGLISH RUOBY
BROOKTON  POINT—2.30
U.B.O. vs. QRADS
^T
Four
THE    UBYSSEY
Friduy, October 28, 1938
'Birds Edge Out Huskies In Thriller
VARSITY MACHINE ROLLS
OVER SASKAT00NERS 16-13
The Varsity Thunderbirds, this year's Hardy Cup champions,
added another victory to their string when they defeated the Saskatchewan Huskies at the Stadium Wednesday 16-13.
The game was the best the fans have witnessed this season
and featured the running nnd plunging of the Vnrsity backs
against the stellar passing of tho Huskies.
HUSKIES  TAKE  LEAD.
The Huskies took an early lead in
the first quarter and held it until the
dying moments of the game when
Aub Oray plunged over for the 'Birds
with the winning points.
It   was   Varsity   all   the   way   on
ground gaining, the students making
eighteen    first    downs    against    the
visitor's eight, but lt wasn't until five
minutes  to go that the  'Birds could
take    the    lead    from    the    Huskies
whose brilliant passing attack paved
the way for most of their scores.
The game was wide open all the
way and the spectators saw many
players   being  carted  off  the  Held,
the result of the effective tackling
of   both   squads.   Finlay,   freshman
Varsity half, went out of the game
when he met a husky Husky head
on.
'BACKS STAR.
Again, lt was the backfleld combination of Williams and Gray that
showed the way In ground gaining.
Williams capitalized on a triple reverse to run forty yards to a touchdown, while Big Aub covered thirty-
four yards ln successive plays to
plunge over for the winning touch.
For the visitors, lt was the passing
combination of Plnder to Brent
rather than the running of Weaver
that proved to be the biggest threat
to the Varsity team. They completed
six passes all told.
The Huskies grabbed an early lead
when they blocked Aub Oray's kick
behind the line and forced Tommy
Williams to fall on the ball for a
safety touch. They went further ln
to the lead when a poor kick gave
them possession of the ball on the
Varsity seventeen yard line. Hlgglns
booted a perfect field goal.
LINEMEN  EFFECTIVE.
Varsity tied the game up when
Williams raced thirty-six yards to a
touchdown, through a hole opened
up by the Varsity line. All through
the game the line was making the
gaps for the backs to slip through,
and on the defensive they stopped
the Husky running attack cold.
The Saskatchewan squad took the
lead again late ln the second quarter
with a field goal from the fifteen,
Hlgglns  again doing  the booting.
Evan ap Roberts climaxed a Varsity goal-line move when he plunged
over from the three yard marker
with a touchdown that was converted by Oray, but the Huskies fought
back and Hall went over to give the
lead back to the Qreen and White.
Then, with but five minutes left to
go to full time, Aub Oray starting
from the Saskatchewan thirty-four
carried the ball on five plays down
to the twelve where on the next play
he carried lt over pay-line for the
winning points.
DOBBIE KIDS
PLAY SECONDS
Captain A. O. Dobbie, who is so
well known out Point Orey way on
account of his recent productions
In the form of Miracle Teams, will
conduct a little private homecoming all of his own next Saturday when he brings his Shawnlgan
Lake schoolboys to the Stadium for
a rugger battle with Varsity Seconds.
The game, which will be the opener of the flrst doubleheader to be
staged at the Stadium this year, will
likely be a close, hard-fought affair.
The Shawnlgan boys are noted for
their fast moving aggregations and
with Captain Dobbie in the driver's
neat they can be expected to be even
more dangerous. On the other hand,
Captain John Runkle and his Seconds have been turning in better
performances every week, and with
one or two profitable alterations ln
tlie team would seem to be favorites
over the Island lads.
ItMHIIIIIimMIMIMIIIIMMIMI.IIIMIIHHIIIMIMHIIIIHIIHHHIIII
CO-ED SPORTS
By MYRNE NEVISON
HtinilimHIHIimillllHHIIimiltllllHHMIIMIIIIIMIMtlllllMII
Varsity's Osborne-coaehed  Senior
"A"   cagettes  strut   their   stuff   for
the   flrst    time    this    season   next
Monday    night    when    they    meet
Cunninghams in the curtain raiser
of the new year at 8 p.m.
According to experienced observers,
the girls are really Justified ln calling
themselves a Senior entry  this year,
and are all set to win a few games,
an unimportant formality which they
failed  to observe last> season.
DEFENSE   STRONG.
Perhaps the chief reason for this
unbridled optimism ls Coach Osborne's dynamic defensive duo which
consists of Freshette Fay Burnham.
last year with Westerns, and Ruth
Wilson, who will be once more making her appearance ln a Blue and
Gold uniform after a year with
Spencer's.
SPORTS   GALLERY.
We give you Marjorie Lean . . .
President of Grass Hockey Club, outstanding goalie with U.B.C. team, Big
Blocker, and best campus archer for
the last two years and member of
the Pre-Med club—these are Just a
few of the Incidental occupation
which keep Marge from feeling bored
during  the winter evenings.
INTRA-MURALS.
New class reps have been elected
this week. Intra-murals are scheduled to take a new lease on life, for
the old score sheet used thus far ls
to be canned, and a knock-out series
Inaugurated, to be run off this coming month. Volley-ball will again be
played on Mondays, and basketball
on Tuesdays. So every class has an
opportunity for a new start. Take
advantage of it I
lnter-class archery ls being shot
all this week. As some of the teams
are still Incomplete, archers are asked to hop over to the gym and help
out a  worthy cause.
INTER-COLLEGIATE   ARCHERY.
The results of this meet have not
yet been received from the east. But
as far as our U.B.C. ls concerned,
the archers are satisfied that they've
done nobly. Their score this year ls
almost double that of last. Star of
the team is Marg. Lean, with Hortense Warne and Hilda MacLean
hard on her heels.
The powers that be are so proud
of the U.B.C. showing, that another
meet is afoot for the spring .this
time with colleges of the Pacific
Coast.
RED DEMON
FAVORITES ADVANCE IN
GOLFFLAY
There were no first round casualties among the favorites at the completion of the first round ln the
University golf match play championship.
Co-medalists, Mans Beach and Roy
Leckie both came through with convincing wins. Leckie blasted out
freshman Ormy Hall 3 and 1 while
Mans Beach took the measure of Des
Barrett by the Identical score. Roy
Leckie, the big favorite, was shaky
during the flrst nine of his match
with Hall but recovered with a steady
37 on the home nine to win out on
the 17th.
Young Billy Charlton, brother of
former Varsity champion, the well-
known Ted Charlton, putted well to
sink Doug Watt of West Van. 3 and
1. BUI Esson completed the march
of the favorites by overwhelming
hooper  Doug  Gross,  7 and  6.
Play advances into the seml-flnals
this week with Roy Leckie meeting
Bill Esson, while Bill Charlton plays
Mans Beach.
Norm Renwlck, the Red Orange of
the Varsity Thunderbirds is smiling
sweetly over the thrilling 16-13 victory of the B.C. team over the 8r»-
katchewan Huskies In the Stadium
Wednesday afternoon.
LINE-UPS CHANGED IN
TOMORROW'S RUGGER
Some very Important changes
were announced by the selection
committee at last night's meeting
for the rugger teams this Saturday. Big news of the week was the
inclusion of Jerry Mason and Basil
Robinson In the Varsity lineup,
while the scrum of the U.B.C.
squad will be strengthened by the
presence of Fraser Sheppard and
Evan  Davies.
Captain Stat Leggatt ls still out
with Injuries and Howie McPhee will
not be able to don the Blue and Gold
for the fixture against the Barbarians.
TEAMS
VARSITY—
Forwards: Vic Moore, Jim McCam-
mon, Noel Harrison, Allan Gardiner, Jerry Mason, Tommy Robson,
Jim Harmer, Ranjl Mattu.
Halves: Basil Robinson, Ted McPhee.
Threes: Ted McPhee, Tod Tremblay,
Will College, Lyman Day-Smith.
Fullback:  Harry Lumsden.
U.B.C—
Forwards: Fraser Sheppard, Evan
Davies, Fred Billings, Don Pyle,
Alec Urquart. Andy Jenkins, Fred
aTylor, Allan Wallace.
Halves: Sandy Lang, Waddy Robertson.
Threes: Ian Richards, Ormle Hall,
Bob  Smith,  Jeff  Mackle.
Fullback:   Bert  Hosklns.
STOP PRESS!
At a late hour last night it was
learned from the Vancouver Rugby
r ninn that the feature game between the Varsity side and the
West Vancouver Barbarians had
been switched to Brookton Point,
and that the U.B.C. side will play
on the campus in their stead.
No reason was given for the
change, the game having been
scheduled originally at Varsity aa
a gesture of appreciation to Captain Dobbie. The former coach of
Varsity wonder teams will be on
hand at the Stadium tomorrow
with his Shawnlgan Lake team In
the first came of the day. It Is
believed, however, that the Rugby
Union wanted the game played at
Brookton so it would be more convenient for the public and the
players.
The revised schedule for tomorrow, then, will be as follows:
Shawnlgan Lake vs. Varsity Seconds game at 2 o'clock, followed hy
the U.B.C. vs. Orad game at 3
o'clock   In   the   Stadium.
FIRST TEAM
RUGGERMEN
MEETJJARBS
VARSITY SQUAD PLAYS
WEST VANCOUVER
Tomorrow,     Varsity's     Thunderbirds will  entertain West Vancouver's  Barbarian   horde  at  the  stadium.    The   Varsily   boys   will   be
playing   under   the   critical   eye   of
their  former  coach  Captain  A.  O.
Dobbie,   who   is   now   mentoring   a
team on Vancouver Island.
The   West  Van.  entry,   playing   its
flrst year in senior company, proved
themselves worthy of their franchise
by   downing   the   strong   New   Westminster  club  ln   one   of   last  Saturday's  feature  exhibitions.  They  present  a   young  aggressive  squad   that
will fight to the last whistle.
Several Important changes have
been made In the Varsity side for
this game, Coach Carey taking no
chances of marring his team's unbeaten record.
RANJI   RETURNS.
Ranjl Mattu will make his first appearance on the B.C. club since
breaking a couple of ribs some weeks
ago. The Inclusion of the scrappy
forward will strengthen the pack no
end. Jerry Mason also makes his
debut with the scrum division, replacing Evan Davies. Jerry's added
poundage will be a boon to the none-
too-husky pack. Backfleld positions
are uncertain as yet, but 'tls rumoured that Howie McPhee will not
be among those present. It ls also
whispered that Carey Is toying with
the idea of switching either the
halves, or five-eighths positions with
ihe  U.B.C.  team.
U.B.C. RUGGERS
PLAY GRADS
AT BROCKTON
So well haa the U.B.C. rugby
fifteen showed up In their last
couple of games that on Saturday
two and possibly three of their
members will grace the Varsity
line-up. All of which-Is fine for the
Varsity but is Just so much sour
grapes to the U.B.C. who have an
assignment against the Orads at
the Brockton Oval which they are
very anxious to win.
LINEUPS   CHANOE.
However, It's all for the cause (or
something) and therefore Waddy
Robertson, spark of the U.B.C. back-
field, will step up Into the Varsity
three-line and Gerry Mason win
shift his 185 pounds Into the Thunderbird scrum. Waddy ls taking the
place of Howie McPhee who will be
working, while Gerry ls swapping
places with Evan Davies who will
slip Into a spot ln the second Varsity
pack.
There ls talk of switching scrum
halves but nothing will be known
about that until A. B. Carey announces the line-ups before game
time.
Regardless of the damage done by
the poaching of their ace players, the
U.B.C. are still favorites to take the
Grads as their play has been surprisingly good. Coupled with this ls
the report that the Grads are no
"wonder team" this year—or any
year, in fact—so lt looks like a double
win for first division Varsity rugby
teams   this   week-end.
R. H. Marlow, society photographer, for fine portraits, phone Trin.
2107.
llll>,IM,,,,,MII,,,,,,,,l,,llMMIMil*MM,ltlilli,lllt*lllllll>l
Just   about   all   you   could   ask
for .    .
ARISTOCRATIC
HAMBURGERS
Limited
10th and  Alma
TAKE    SOME    HOME
im(HM*HHHHM«M|||««lllt«,„M«ltMMtMM,IM*,«M,milH«tll*r
WI   OAXKY   A   aVI.Il If DID
TASUTY   OT   WOMINI
Vice   selection   of   Oent'a   Tur-
nla-.lng'a   at   reaaonable   prloea.
"Marguerite Shoppe
H.   Stolnliertc
3784  W.   10th  Avo. B»y.   7972
VARSITY SOCCERITES TO CLASH
WITH STRONG SEATTLE ALL STARS
Charlie Hltchens and his Varsity
Soccer   proteges   trip   blithely   Into
the Vancouver and District League
spotlight  Saturday   when   they   entertain    Seattle    All-stars    in    the
feature game of the week-end card
at Cambie Street Grounds.
The Sound City aggregation ls the
most   recent   addition   to   the   league
roster and so far this year has shown
surprisingly  promising  form.  But on
the  other  hand,  Coach  Charlie  Hltchens,   who  visited   the  campus   yesterday  for  a   Chalk  Talk   and  practice,   completely   ran   out  of  complimentary   superlatives   when   describing the performances of his men in
their flrst two games this year, and
feels that the Blue and Gold should
romp through to their flrst win. Last
week's game with St. Regis ls something which Mr. Hltchens and all his
boys   would   rather   everyone   forget
about.
RIGHT   BACK   RETURNS.
... Shaw Mlzuhara, last year's regular right back, will probably be back
In the lineup this Saturday after a
three weeks' layoff owing to Injury.
The rest of the team is in top shape
after two or three workouts this week
and there ls every Indication of a
Blue  and  Oold  victory.
JUNIOR FOOTBALL
After a week's lay-off the Varsity
Junior Gridders get back Into harness this week at the upper field
with a game against Vanoouver Oollege.
The last time they played the city
slickers they were edged out by a
very narrow margin but they promise
to turn the tables this time. A win
will put the blue and gold gridders
into third place.
Varsity still has a chance to win
the championship but must win all
their remaining games to do so.
Good eyesight it a preoious asset
through life... don't strain it by poor
lighting. Have your ohildren enough
light at home?   Get a oheok today.
Send for  the girl with the Sight-Savtng **
Kit.   Phone  B.C.  Electric,  Seymour 5151
L met-**

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