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The Ubyssey Mar 24, 1921

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume III.
VANCOUVER, B.C., MARCH 24, 1921
Number 19
'Varsity Defeats
Elks; Close Game
•SOCCER TEAM QUALIFIES FOR
SEMI-FINALS
'Varsity broke the jinx that has been
hovering over them for some time, when
they turned the tables on the Elks, beating them by the narrow margin of 1-0.
The game was played at King Edward
High School, and a fine brand of football
was dished up. 'Varsity lost the toss, and
during the first half had the disadvantage
of having the sun in their eyes. In spite
of this the 'Varsity went away vviih a
rush, and for the first fifteen minutes
pressed the clubmen. But luck was
against us, for during this time, on one
of the several fine crosses from Cameron,
Rushbury sent in a low one that had the
misfortune to strike the goal post and
bound out again. The rest of the first
half was fairly even, each team striving
to obtain an advantage, but the defence
of each team proved too strong for the
opposing forwards to pierce. The 'Varsity half-backs were playing a fine game
at this period, and Stan Say showed up
well in his new position at centre-half.
The second half started with 'Varsity
kicking down hill. For the first few minutes our boys held the advantage, but the
Elks came back strong, and for a time the
'Varsity's defence had a busy time, being
forced to concede several corner kicks.
Crow, playing in goal, made some fine
saves during this time, and much of the
credit of victory was due to his efforts.
Near the end of the game 'Varsity carried the ball into the Elks' territory, and
on a pass from McLeod from the left
wing, H. Cant put the ball past the opposing goal-keeper for the only goal of
the game. For the rest of the game the
Elks tried hard to recover, but the final
whistle blew with 'Varsity one goal to the
good.
As usual 'Varsity supporters were sadly lacking, only a few faithful followers
being on hand. Next week 'Varsity plays
St. Andrew's in the semi-final of the
Mainland Challenge Cup, at Athletic
Park. St. Andrew's are figured to be the
best team in B. C. It is hoped that the
'Varsity will rally round the team and
support them next week.
Line-up—Crute, Gwyther, J. Cant, Say,
Mitchell, Cameron, H. Cant, Markle,
Rushbury, McLeod.
Close Voting for
Council Positions
"WOBBY"   BANFIELD   RETURNED
TO TREASURY
At the elections, on Monday, Miss
Marjorie Agnew, Arts '22, was chosen
secretary of the Alma Mater Society
for the session 1921-22. Miss Agnew has
been very active this year in dramatic,
undergraduate and publication circles, and
is well fitted by temperament and training to fulfill the duties of this high office.
The student body again chose W. O.
Banfield, Sc. '22, treasurer for the next
session. "Wobby" has done exceptionally efficient work this year, and the students did well to re-elect him to this
responsible position.
SENIORS ENTERTAINED
The members of Arts '21 were the
guests of honor at the home of Dean and
Mrs. H. T. J. Coleman, Kerrisdale, on
Saturday afternoon last, when1 Mrs. Coleman gave a pleasing reception for the
near-grads. Practically all members of
the class were present, as well as a large
number of Faculty. Mrs. R. E. McKechnie
and Mrs. L. S. Klinck assisted in receiving, and Mrs. James Henderson assisted
in the drawing-room. Mrs. R. W. Brock
and Mrs. L. F. Robertson assisted in
serving tea. A pleasant afternoon was
spent.
PUBLICATIONS   APPOINTMENTS
The remaining appointments have been
made for next year s Publications Board.
At a meeting of the Council last week
Mr. J. Walker, Sc. '22, was appointed
business manager, and Mr. A. L. Stevenson, Arts '22, senior editor of the "Ubyssey." Both men have been connected
with the board in the past year—Mr.
Walker as editor of the Annual, and
Mr. Stevenson as editor of the literary
supplement.
Propaganda Work
Planned by A. M.S.
MOTION RELATING TO FRATS.
ALSO PASSED
The auditorium was filled to overflowing on Tuesday, at noon, when the
question of the influence of the frats..
again came up for an airing. A motion
stating that the student body of. the
University express itself as opposed to
the principle of the organization of secret societies within the student body,
and recommending that the constitution
of the Alma Mater Society be so amended as to allow for the incorporation of
fraternities and sororities under the Alma
Mater, was introduced and ■ passed by a
large majority. -    '
This resolution was introduced in an
able manner by Mr. W. B. Willan, Arts
'23, who showed that the fundamental
trouble was in the secrecy and mystery
which surrounds the frats. arid sororities.
It calls for the amending of the Alma *
Mater constitution in order to allow these
societies the opportunity to prove that
they are in the best interests of the
college as a whole. Such amendment,
according to the resolution, should provide that the society should place before
the Students' Council, within three weeks
of the commencement of the fall term, a
statement showing the name, the objects,
the qualifications for membership, and a
list of the members and officers.
Mr. S. M'. Scott, Arts '21, seconded the
motion, and it was ably supported by
many speakers. Only two men came to
the defence of the frats., Mr. G. H. Scott,
Arts '23, and Mr. A. E. Lord, who left
the chair to protest against the slurs cast
on the members of the Students' Council
by Mr. C. A. F. Clark, Arts '22. Clark
expressed himself more clearly on the
issue, and things were again smoothed
out.
It would seem that the general opinion
was strongly in favor of clearing the
matter up by some sort of action such as
suggested. Among the speakers who
advanced the plea of "the University before the frat." were Mr. A. Rive, Mr.
A. A. Webster, Mr. A. MacKay, Agric.
'24, Mr. R. Hodson, Science '23, and Mr.
C. Barr, Science '24. Mr. Hurst, Arts
'22, introduced a resolution calling for the
appointment of a committee of three to
secure data on the influence of frats. in
other colleges. This was accepted as another resolution, ; but not as an amendment to the main resolutioti as proposed. THE   UBYSSEY
March 24, 1921
*
Clothes with
a "Rep"
for Style
and Pep
There's a certain unusual Class
in Semi-ready clothing that appeals
to the young men who strive for an
ultra-smart appearance.
THOMAS
& McBAIN
LIMITED
655 GRANVILLE ST.
The Palm Garden
LIGHT LUNCHES
Try our Lobster Salad, our Sundaes and specials. You will find
they are unsurpassed.
Corner Tenth and Heather.
Young Men's
Smart Shoes
Black and several shades of Brown
Calfskin, on the latest popular lasts
—perfect fitting—maximum service.
Price $10.00
Cluff Shoe Co.
Limited
649 HASTINGS STREET, W.
THE HOME OF-GOOD SHOES
S.D.K.  PRESIDENT  ELECTED
The last meeting of the society, on
March 15th, took the form of an entertainment. At 8:30 a short business session took place for the election of officers.
Mr. William McKee is the president for
next year; Miss Dorothy Walsh, vice-
president, and W. Black, secretary. In
conjunction with these a new office was
created. Mr. Bloomfield was elected for
this.
At 9 o'clock the fun began. Whilst
several of us were preparing the eats the
assembly was divided into groups to perform stunts—each group in competition.
The winners received a prize. Earl and
Jimmie and Cyril arrived at the end of
the first half of the evening to provide
the music for the second half. Although
there was not a large crowd present, all
who  came  enjoyed themselves.
SUGGESTION FOR A COLLEGE
SONG
One of the lions woke up one day;
He yawned and winked his eye,
And then he cried, "Why, bless my beard,
What is this that I spy? '
Chorus:
They're moving them out to Point Grey;
They're moving them out to Point Grey;
O!  mountains  and  rocks
Prepare- for some shocks;
They're moving at last to Point Grey.
The  Sleeping Beauty gave a start,
Her eyes she opened wide;
She  shimmied  in astonishment,
And swayed from side to side.
Chorus:
They're moving them out to Point Grey;
They're moving them out to Point Grey;
O!  ocean  arise
And get a surprise;
They're moving at last to Point Grey.
The ocean rose in all his might;
His waves he dashed on high,
And truly it was sad to see
From shock the fishes die.
Chorus:
They're moving them out to Point Grey;
They're moving them out to Point Grey;
The world's at an end,
And judgments impend;
They're moving at last to Point Grey.
And now, perchance, you'd like to know
When all things happened thus;
When ocean, lions and sleeping maids
Raised such an awful fuss.
When they moved them at last to Point
Grey;
When they moved them at last to Point
Grey;
'Twas three thousand and three,
Thirty hundred and three,
When they moved them at last to Point
Grey. —S. M.
Scene-—Lecture room.
Time—11:58 a.m.
(Shuffling of feet, rattle of coppers,
audible sighs of "Let's go.")
Professor (wearily)—Just a moment,
gentlemen, I have yet a few pearls to
cast.—Toronto  Goblin.
IRELAND    &    ALLAN
BOOKSELLERS AND
STATIONERS
Depot for
FOUNTAIN  PENS
and
LOOSE-LEAF   NOTE   BOOKS
Phone,  Seymour 602
649 GRANVILLE STREET
Wi.WLWroTOW8WWmtV».OTV;W,W::.V
AFTER THE SHOW '
Try the
JL)eln\oi>*co Oajfe
704 ROBSON STREET
PHONE ggon Day and Night
Seymour'
SERVICE
BIG TAX I  SIX
Ask  for
V. YOUNG or FRED
Office:   725  Dunsmuir Street
Evans & Hayings
PRINTERS
-of —
"The Ubyssey"
for  1920-1921
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY  OF
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., etc.
578 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
High-Grade Work and Quick
Service characterize our up-to-date
establishment. March 24, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
INTERVIEWS WITH THE CAST OF
"SWEET LAVENDER"
"Well, good-bye, old dear,' said Wally
Reid, as I left his rooms to execute my
next assignment, the interviewing of the
cast of "Sweet Lavender."
, I saw Miss Evans first. She was sitting in her sitting-room, daintily eating
one of Purdy's concoctions, and gently
sniffing a rose,  a violet and a daffodil.
"Pardon me," I said.   "I'm a reporter."
"Oh, don't apologize," she said sweetly,
"I thought as much."
Somewhat abashed, I just asked for her
views on love. "It's all nonsense," she
declared. "Think how serious and foolish
it causes people to be, and fancy being
tied to one man for life; why—!' Here
words failed her, and I slipped a diamond
ring back into my pocket. "And now," I
said, "I would like your bad habits, if any
—the public must be satisfied, you
know," I explained.    "Do you smoke?"
"Well, hardly—yet. However, I do
sometimes skip a lecture and go to the
Orpheum—but then, you know, I'm awfully young yet," she smiled at me, "and
learning things is such a bore." I agreed
with her and left to call on Miss Adams.
She was packing up when I arrived, but
stopped to talk to me. "How do you like
our city?" was my first question.
"Your city is wonderful, and I dote on
Vancouver audiences," she replied; "and
when I return South I will carry with me
the most fascinating memories of my visit
here."
"Have  you  any  hobbies?'   I   enquired.
"Of course I have," was the answer. "I
love Boston Bulls and Oscar Wilde, and
I can make the most wonderful chocolate
cake you ever ate. I don't like dancing
and never go to the Barron. I think the
Ford is the best car, and I do think Englishmen are so funny."
"Thank you," I said, and left to inter
view Mr. Lord. As a starter I asked him
to express his views on prohibition.
"Words fail me, sir; words fail me," he
spluttered indignantly. "You couldn't
print it anyway."
"What was that stuff in the decanter
you had on the stage?" I then enquired.
"S-s-s-h," he said.
"What do you think of the effect of the
movies on the minds of the younger generation?"
"Well," he replied, "I think that anything that can possibly have any effect on
the minds of the present younger generation is wonderful, simply wonderful, me
boy." I offered him a cigar on parting,
but he refused, saying that smoking was
a very bad habit, and that he had given
up many friends on account of it.
I found Mr. Lacey Fisher writing poetry under a pleasant tree. "Nice day," I
said. He gazed up at me. "Listen,' he
murmured.
"The day is warm with spring-time "sun,
The wind is rustling in the trees,
The pipes of Pan say, 'Dance and run,'
But I just sit here as I please."
I humored him by saying it was good.
"Who is your favorite poet?" I enquired,
engagingly. "Fisher first," he answered,
modestly, "and then Woolworth."
"What do you think of the present
market conditions?"  I  then asked.
"Well, eggs should be lower in Westminster next month, but I fear the worst
for butter and cheese.'
"And what do you think of the present
trend of the drama, Mr. Fisher?" was my
next.
"Ah, yes, it is trending, isn't it?" he
replied sadly. "But if it isn t overdone
I have hopes, I have hopes."
This was enough interviewing for one
week. I decided to see the others later,
and then retraced my steps to Wally
Reid's suite, where I spent a pleasant
hour discussing the high cost of living
when there is a rival.
DECIDEDLY   ANONYMOUS.
Phone, Seymour 7853
C. HERMANN, Proprietor
'•>!A
U.B.C. Students Should Patronize
HERMANN'S    BARBER    SHOP
ROGERS BLOCK, 464 GRANVILLE STREET
BASEBALL TENNIS LACROSSE GOLF
PISHING TACKLE
EVERYTHING FOR ATHLETES,  SPORTSMEN  AND
OUTDOOR PEOPLE
TISDALLS   LIMITED
The Complete Sporting Goods Store
618 HASTINGS STREET, WEST Phone, Seymour 152
SCIENCE '22 PARTY
A most successful class party was held
last Tuesday night at the home of Prof,5
and Mrs. Matheson, when they entertained the members of Science '22 an<f
their friends. Even the near approach of
exams, could not keep us away, and the
gaiety of the evening banished entirely-
even the thought of them. The heartfelt
thanks and deep appreciation of the class
is extended to Mr. and Mrs. Matheson for
their kindness in giving us an evening of
unalloyed pleasure.
'VARSITY HOCKEY TEAM ENJOY
"SWEETS" OF VICTORY !
The 'Varsity hockey sextette, after
winning the Godfrey Cup, emblematic of
the City Senior Amateur Championship;
and the Savage Cup, symbolical of the
British Columbia Championship, are now
enjoying a well-earned rest. _ Mr. Johnson, of the Mission Confectionery, Limited, has given forty-seven pounds of
chocolates in all to the 'Varsity speedsters. After winning the city championship, each member of the squad was
given a two-pound box of dainties. This
act of kindness was repeated by Mr.
Johnson when 'Varsity defeated the Victoria Senators for the B. C. championship. Mr. Johnson has shown a great interest in the 'Varsity hockey team
throughout the season, and University
students should remember his kindness.
Dr. Sedgewick, who was throughout
the season a staunch supporter of the
hockey team, entertained the boys at dinner on Monday night, March 21. An effort was made to make the trip east in
quest of the Allan Cup, but owing to the
proximity of the examinations, the plan
was abandoned.
MCDONALD'S
eHoeeuvrES
Have you had a box of Chocolates
yet from McDonald's new store?
Gee!  it's a lovely place!
888 Granville Street
(One block south of old store,  corner
Robson Street)
PREPARE
for the world, of
BUSINESS
by taking a short course In the
Sprott-Shaw School
of Commerce and Telegraphy
Day and Evening Classes
Phone, Seymour 1810
R.  J.  SPROTT,  B.A.,  Manager. THE   UBYSSEY
March 24, 1921
PURDY'S ARE
PURE
Mr. Purdy did not follow the
routine of candymakers' recipes
when he started making candy.
He broke new ground all the
way. That is why Purdy's are
so original in every way—and
they're absolutely pure.
$1.25 pound
P'uvby[s
Maker of Purdy's Chocolates
675       GRANVILLE    . ST.
AVENUE THEATRE
FRI. AND   SAT.,  MARCH  25-26
The Victoria Dramatic and
Operatic Society
Presenting
"A Message From Mars"
Prices: $1.10, 85c, 55c.
Easter Hosiery
Fine Grade Pure Silk Hose, well reinforced at heel and toe, and with
good garter top; in black, white, silver, mid and dark grey, brown, nigger,
navy and taupe.    Special $2.00
Very  fine   Pure   Silk  Hose,   with   high
spliced   heel   and   double   toe;    black,
white,   navy,   brown,   grey   or   green;
finished with black or white
clox       $2.75
High-grade Pure Silk Hose, full fashioned apd with neat fitting ankle, extra   wide   tops,   ;n   shades   of   black,
white, brown,  navy and
dove grey     $3.50
LIMITED
575 GRANVILLE STREET
Q§£ lb|JB0£lJ
(Member Pacific Inter-Collegiate Press
Association)
Issued every Thursday by the Publications Board
of the University of British Columbia.
Extra  mural  subscriptions,  $2.00  per  session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief P.   N.   Whitley
Senior   Editor A.   A.   Webster
j-A. H. Imlah
Associate'Editors { S.  M. Scott
I Miss R. E. Verchere
Chief  Reporter A.   F.   Roberts
/"Miss A. Anderson
J.  C.   Clyne
Reporters < Bert   Sweeting
Cliffe Mathers
V Miss  P.  Stewart
Exchange Editor Miss  P.  I.   Mackay
t •.             c-j'* t A.   L.   Stevenson
L.terary   Ed.tors ] G    G    Coop(,
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager L.   T.   Fournier
Asst. Business  Manager. .J.   E.   Matheson, Arts '23
Advertising  Manager H.   M.   Cassidy
I D. A. Wallace
Assistants J H.   G.   Scott
I M.  A.   Dyce
Circulation  Manager R.   C.   Palmer
Editor for the  Week A.   H.   Imlah
FRATERNITIES
As a result of the Alma Mater meeting, which was held on Tuesday, there
can be no doubt as to the opinion of
the student body with regard to secret
societies within the University. The
general feeling is that fraternities, as
organized at present, are a detriment to
the best interests of the University. The
Alma Mater Society has spoken, and
every loyal member should respect that
decision.
We have nothing but contempt for the
men who boast that secret "frats." will
carry on, „as before, regardless of the
wishes of the great majority of their
fellow-students. Such an attitude brings
shame upon every one who concurs in it.
It is an open admission that fraternity
considerations are placed above the
Alma. Mater. Every organization which
endorses such a view stands self-condemned. The "Ubyssey," however, has
more faith in the fraternity members of
our University than to believe that they
will persist, against all odds, in thwarting
the desires of the student body. Many
men of high character and outstanding
ability may be found in their ranks. Upon
the shoulders of these leaders rests the
responsibility of adjusting their organizations in such a manner as to retain the
commendable features, while discarding
those which have proved such serious
opposition.
The resolution which was passed at
the meeting contained the suggestion
that the constitution of the Alma Mater
Society be amended, to the effect that
recognition be granted to fraternal societies on the condition that they submit
to the Students' Council a full list of
members and officers and a statement of
the requirements for membership and of
the aims and objects of the society. We
urge that this amendment be given united
support. It is a sound remedy, which
should appeal to the good judgment of
every   student.     If. it  be   sustained,   the
"frats." may reorganize, as they please,
to preserve their precious mysteries and
to promote good-fellowship among their
members; they will have become a recognized and accepted feature of college life,
and, as such, may carry on their legitimate activities without arousing the suspicion of the uninitiated.
In the meantime'we would exhort both
parties to the controversy to be more
temperate in their utterances. Many wild
statements have been made, which do
credit to nobody, but rather redound to
the discredit of the University. May we
be broad enough to consider the views of
others, and honest enough to avoid
spreading ridiculous charges and veiled
insinuations, which do no good and may
do harm. Let the spirit which won the
Stanford game and which brought the
hockey championship to our halls guide
us at this time. What is best for the
U.B.C. is the vital consideration.
"Tuum Est."
OUR HONOR ROLL
Last term the Students' Council undertook to appoint a committee to complete
the honor roll of the University, and to
collect the war records of those who were
on active service. On the suggestion of
the Faculty Archives Committee, the affair was left to that committee, which
was understood to be about to take active
steps in the matter. Since then nothing
has been done. If the Faculty Committee are not going to do anything about it,
it might be as well for them to say so.
It may not be too late even now for the
Council to plan some scheme for next
year.
POINTS
It has been evident that this year the
point system of limiting the number of
offices any one student may hold has
not been enforced. Any departure from
this regulation results in threefold harm;
first, to the student who undertakes so
much responsibility that his class-work
suffers; second, to the societies which
receive only a small share of their officers' attentions; third, and most important, to those more retiring and untried
students who would be given an opportunity of gaining executive ' experience
were the offices more freely distributed.
Below is a summary of the point system;
it should not be necessary for the Council to enforce its observance; it is up to
the individual undergraduate to see that
he does not exceed the limit set:
Class "A"—The president, secretary
and treasurer of the Students' Council,
and the editor-in-chief and business
manager of the Publications Department,
shall hold only one office.
Class "B"—The presidents of the Undergraduate Societies, the Literary and
Scientific Department, the Athletic Associations, the Women's Literary and
Men's Literary Societies, the Players'
Club; chief reporter, associate editors,
and advertising manager of the Publications Department, shall hold only two
offices, and one of these must be Class
"C."
Class "C"—No other person may hold
more than three offices. March 24, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
THE CIRCULAR LETTER
You are already acquainted with the
letter which appears on the loose leaf of
this issue. It is unnecessary to say anything more than to remind you that there
is no time to be lost in sending this letter
to your parents or other person interested
in the welfare of the future of the University. Along with this letter to your
parents, or interested friend, send a request, asking them to please sign in the
space for that purpose—that is, if they
are in accord with the sentiments expressed in the letter—and forward it to
the member for their district. If you
desire extra copies (that may be obtained,
upon request, from any member of the
Students' Council), and also if you know
of anyone to whom we could send one,
please notify the secretary of the Council.
©
orrespo
t>det>
ce
Editor  "Ubyssey."
Just what is back of all this agitation regarding Frats? I think the reason for such
a popular outcry against these secret societies, for such they are, is the fact that their
actions are shrouded in mystery. You and I
are kept in ignorance of their objects, their
constitution, and their membership; therefore, our curiosity is excited; we grow suspicious; we speculate! Some say their
purpose is purely social. Even so, is it
likely that the social life of the college as a
whole will be benefited by such societies?
Some boast that they were formed to kindle
college spirit in a dead university. A truly
laudable object; but why smother the spirit-
lamp under a blanket of secrecy? Others
suggest that they have a more sinister motive—political domination. While there is
probably small foundation for such an accusation, nevertheless, suspicion is contagious, and a feeling of doubt and distrust is
spreading rapidly both within and without
the college walls. No one has proved that
these so-called Frats are guilty of treason
against the college. Neither has it been
shown that they, serve any useful purpose,
which cannot be effected equally well by
more open and straight-forward means. It
is doubtful whether they accomplish any
material good, while they may possibly do
considerable harm, both directly and indirectly, in that they tend to destroy the confidence   of  the   students  in   their   leaders.
Therefore, since secrecy breeds suspicion,
let us consider how this source of dissention
and misunderstanding can best be removed
from our midst. The logical move should
come from the members of the Frats. If
they are the public-spirited men we believe
them to be, they will be only too anxious to
dispel this cloud which threatens to disunite
the student, body, so recently cemented together by the Kla-How-Ya spirit of fellowship and co-operation. They can publish a
frank statement of the objects, constitution
and membership of the Frats. If their mo-
, fives are as praiseworthy as they would
have us believe, such action would command
the respect of even their most active opponents. If their aims are such that they can-
not withstand the search light of publicity,
then the sooner they dissolve their association the better for all concerned. To continue to maintain a policy of secrecy is to
admit that there is. something to hide—to
admit that they place the welfare of their
Frats above that of their Alma Mater. If
such is the case it is up to the student body
to show disapproval of such conduct by
passing a resolution to amend the constitution to read, "that no member of a secret
society or so-called Frat be permitted to
hold office in the University." In any
event let us conduct our college affairs
openly and above board.
R.  C.  PALMER.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear   Sir:—Every   spring    the   Geological
Survey of Canada field parties have the ut-
. most difficulty in securing decent, clean,
, reliable,  sober,   sane and capable cooks.    At
the   same  period  of  the  year  thousands  of
students are flung out of college; most of
them want to get employment, and few can
find work in their own chosen profession.
The majority, perhaps, have not even entered any particular line and are willing to
take any. job. Such students will be welcomed, I am sure, as applicants for the post
of cook to the field parties. I have spoken
to several of the chiefs, all*of whom express
approbation of the scheme. There are, of
course, a limited number only of field parties; but it is presumed that only a limited
number of students will be found capable of
cooking, -and on no account should an incapable person offer himself, especially to
my chief. A first-class cook is, however,
cerlainly not required. All the field cook
needs is to be able to prepare ordinary camp
meals, make bread, pastry and cakes, and
to be sufficiently able-bodied to sleep in a
tent and cut firewood. Surely this is not
severe. I might add that the pay is about
?120 a month, with board and lodging, and
travelling expenses to, and from the field.
I  deeply  regret  to  state   that  this  opportunity is,  as yet,   open  to men only.
Yours very truly,
C.   H.   CRICKMAY,
Arts  '22.
Editor   "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—I am not an "anti-frat"; I am
simply a University student, and as such
desire reconstruction in student government
to eradicate obvious existing evils. But before constructing we must discover what is
fundamentally  wrong.
First, let us consider the Frat itself. The
majority of the individual members are "social lions" in the University. They are
bound together by common secretness, sympathy, feelings of superiority, vows. So
when an "ordinary" personage is pulled into
the Frat, he enters such an atmosphere that
ARROW
SHIRTS and COLLARS
Follow the
ARROW
and you follow
the Style
E. SCOTT EATON, B.A.,
Principal
Success Business
College, Ltd.
The School of Certainties
Phone, Fairmont 2075
ON MAIN AT TENTH
VANCOUVER, B. C.
©RPHEUM
Week Commencing
MondaV, March 21, 1921
FRANKLYN ARDELL
In
KING SOLOMON, JR.
A Farcical Comedy of 1950
With   RUTH   WARREN,    HELEN
GOODHUE   and   GRACE   WHITE
Presented by Daniel Kusell
The Famous, International Clown
BERT MELROSE
Featuring his original Melrose Fall
EDITH CLIFFORD
Comedienne
Pleasing  to   the   Eye  and   Ear
ROY INGRAHAM at the Piano
TOM SMITH
ALL, FUN
EVANGELINE-^     —KATHLEEN
MURRAY SISTERS
SONGS AND DANCES
DELMAR & KOLB
Present
"ONE SUMMER  DAY" '
A Novelty in Pantomime
The Famous Comedian
JAMES C. MORTON
Assisted by
MAMIE EDNA & ALFRED MORTON-
 In a Comedy Travesty
I      British Weekly Concert Orchestra
STUDENTS WILL FIND IT
INTERESTING TO VISIT
OUR UP-TO-DATE STORE.
,WE ARE HEADQUARTERS
FOR EDUCATIONAL STATIONERY - CHAPMAN'S
LOOSE-LEAF   BOOKS,   Etc.
8%
QUarfo Sc Stuart (Ha.
LIMITED
Wholesale arid Commercial
Stationers
550 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Tel. Ex,, Seymour 3 THE   UBYSSEY
March 24, 1921
Buy Your Notepaper
by the Pound
ENGLISH LINEN NOTE PAPER--A
good quality linen finish note paper,
put up in packets of 60 sheets (""S
quires),  at   30c
ENVELOPES TO MATCH — Are put
up in boxes of 60, for 30c
SCOTCH LINEN NOTE PAPER — A
very good grade of medium weight
linen finished writing paper, put up
in 1-lb. packets containing about 120
sheets   (5   quires) 35c
ENVELOPES TO MATCH—Put up in
boxes of 75, at, per box 35c
SILK VELVET  NOTE  PAPER—Good
quality pad finish note paper, put up
in packets of 60 sheets,
at,  per packet 40c
ENVELOPES TO MATCH—Put up in
boxes of 60, at, per box 40c
ENGLISH FABRIC NOTE PAPER—A
high-grade linen finish writing paper
in   a  plaid   effect,   put   up   in  pound
packets of about 100 sheets,
at,  per  lb.   ....- 75c
ENVELOPES TO MATCH—
Per packet of 25 20c
—Stationery Dept., Main Floor,
New Wing
David  Spencer
LIMITED
Phone,  Fairmont 722
THE REX CAFE
TEA ROOM BAKERY   ICE CREAM
Confectionery Tobacco and Cigars
692 BROADWAY, WEST
SAPP WANTS
A NEW NAME
I really don't like my name.
To be frank, it doesn't express
what a candy shop should be.
I am thinking seriously of
changing the name of the store
—and want some suggestions.
I'll let you know if I decide
definitely.
Robt. Sapp, Ltd.
Candymaker
814   ROBSON   STREET
he is imbued with this "particular" spirit;
this pervasive, psychological influence is
unavoidable—though often unnoticeable. And
the result is that the Frat is one big secret
—hence   undemocratic—"social   lion."
But what has this to do with student government? .lust this: Under present conditions, the members of the Students' Council
are also members of Frats. And as such
they tend to become less and less representatives of the student body, and more and
more representatives of the Frats. So the
"rabble" rumbles; it whispers very loudly
that the Council is in many ways biased,
undemocratic, less interested in our well-
being, less efficient; that in the end the
Frats virtually hold the reigns of government;   and   where   Is   our  representation?
Space forbids me from suggesting the
cure. We certainly have the power to enforce reconstruction; for before allowing
ourselves to be controlled by the Students'
Council, our representatives, we can make
certain that the Students' Council is controlled by us. Opposition forestalls corruption.
JACK WILCOX,   Arts   '23.
Editor   "Ubyssey."
Sir:—Our Alma Mater Society is about to
complete what has been undoubtedly the
most successful year of its existence, tn the
realm of sport our splendid athletes have
spread our name far and wide. Our various
societies have covered themselves with
glory. We have inaugurated important
changes in the direction and management of
our affairs, and we have carefully fostered
a "college spirit" which is second to none
in Canada, \erily, have we "sold our hammer  and   bought  a  horn."
That a discussion on fraternities should
come at this time is peculiarly fitting. It is
indeed proof of the fact that we are a live
University. Feverish agitation on the part
of a few misguided individuals has sent us
scurrying to one or the other of two banners.     We  are  not  a   "perfect  congress."
In reality, however, we are treading an already well-beaten path. The earliest fraternities, though buffeted by seemingly insurmountable obstacles, persevered, and are
to-day the most potent living force behind
student life in the universities of this continent. That they do occupy this enviable
position is unquestioned. The reasons, therefore, may be attributed to one general
thought— they have been actuated by the
principles underlying the word fraternity.
We have been accused of existing merely
as social organizations, without aims or objects. As fraternities we are unable to divulge our innermost secrets to the general
student' body. But we are able to outline
our general policy. We stand for the development of a true spirit of lasting comradeship and devotion to our fellowmen, and
closer co-operation and interest between our
Alumni, our out-of-town students, and ourselves. We stand for the encouragement of
all branches of sport and the development
of clean sportsmanship; for the fostering of
a true spirit of scholarly industry and research; for the enthusiastic and unselfish
devotion of mind and might and main to the
carrying out of an idea, be it for the moral
mental, physical or social well-being of our
Alma   Mater.
WELLS   COATES,   Sc.   '22.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—To correct any misunderstanding that might arise from the criticism of
the Students' Council, by G. S. W., for its
action in passing a resolution to not permit
Freshmen to wear letters, I here summarize
the clause concerned, and state the reasons
for its insertion in the Athletic Constitution:
A Freshman may win any distinction, but
he is not permitted to wear the same until
he has registered for his Sophomore year.
The  reasons  for  this  clause  are  as   follows:
First—To prevent a student from attending the University merely to participate in
athletics for the purpose of obtaining the
letters. (For this reason, in many of the
larger universities, Freshmen are not even
allowed  to  play on  the senior teams.)
Second—A letter-holder must be an all-
round man, and able, at least, to pass his
first year examinations.
Third—A student who has attended the
University for one session is not considered
entitled to wear the honors and distinctions
of the University.
J.  R.  KINGHAM,
President  Men's  Athletic  Association.
(Editor's Note:—The same reasons apply
for the clause in the Lit. Dept. constitution.')
The
Students' Cafeteria
Do not forget when down town
to lunch at The Old Country Tea
Rooms,
641  Granville Street
Upstairs
Hall   to   rent   evenings,   accommodating 60  couples.
Banquets, dance suppers and refreshments of all kinds served anywhere in the city. Enquire the
Tally-Ho.
A.   WALTER,   Prop.   Phone   Sey.   2045
NEXT TIME
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For     Light    Refreshments
Ice  Cream and Candies at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
MIDWAY  PHARMACY
Phone,   Fair. 840
Cor. Broadway and Heather Street
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
WATERMAN'S PENS
EVERSHARP PENCILS
LOOSELEAF COVERS
AND REFILLS
NOTE BOOKS,  Etc.
We deliver anywhere, at any time.
BARRON
HOTEL
Restaurant
Two Blocks from Vancouver Hotel
When you. compare quality, service
and price, and consider the high
standard of the food we serve, you
will realize wherein it is to your advantage to come here.
A welcome awaits you.
BARRON
Corner Granville and  Nelson
Phone, Seymour 2011
Operated by W. D. Wood Limited
MAURICE PERRIN,   Manager March 24, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville  Street
CLOTHES  FOR  YOUNG  MEN
Glad   to   show   the   new   models.
They are entirely different.
FIT REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, West
J. W. Fofter
Limited
WE SELL CLOTHES FOR YOUNG
MEN AND MEN WHO STAY YOUNG
iAiGELLLNGRAYlNCCO:'
CUTS
For
Newspapers, Magazines, Catalogues
and  General  Advertising  Purposes
DESIGNING
Original and Distinctive
518 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
THE GREAT-WEST.
LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
Head   Office,   Winnipeg,   Manitoba
Result of a 20-year endowment
which   matured   October   1st,   1920.
Name, Gilbert Inkster, Lady-
smith. Premium, $102.30. Amount,
$2,000.
In 20 years he paid $2,004.60.
The cash value of his policy was
$3,070, being the face of the policy
$2,000 and a dividend of $1,070.
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Vancouver Branch Office
A  SAVINGS  ACCOUNT
By carrying money around
in your pocket you will
never learn the habit of
THRIFT. Deposit your
spare funds with this Bank
in a Savings account; interest will be paid, and you
can withdraw both principal and interest at any
time.
We welcome small accounts.
The Canadian
Bank of Commerce
MADE IN B. C.
SCHOOL SUPPLIES
Keystone Loose Leaf Books are
the simplest and best to use — at
least many students have said so.
Taking straight through the S. D.
& W. line of "Made In B. C."
School Supplies, we believe you
will find their use is logical from
the standpoint of both quality and
price.
i
Smith, Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
Manufacturers of School Supplies
VANCOUVER  AND  VICTORIA,   B.C.
HAGAR
SHOES
FOR
MEN
AND
WOMEN
As surely as there is a sun in the heavens, we can
satisfy any man or woman's Footwear desires in
"Hagar" Shoes.
We specialize in this brand and stand back of
every pair.
FOR QUALITY
FOR FIT
FOR STYLE
FOR VALUE
we earnestly commend the "Hagar" line.
INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
"Vancouver's Smartest Shoe Store"
666 GRANVILLE STREET
CHANCELLOR McKECHNIE
Dr. R. E. McKechnie has been elected
by acclamation as chancellor of the University of British Columbia for the next
three years, according to the anounce-
ment of the registrar, made on Saturday
morning. Dr. McKechnie succeeded the
Hon. H. F. Carter-Cotton as chancellor
in 1918, and after three years in that position, is again the choice for the next
term. He was a member of the Senate
before his first election to the position of
chancellor, and has proven to be popular
not only with Senate and Faculty members, but with the student body as well.
Marjorie Day—who doesn't remember
her? She's made a hit at Macdonald
College, all right. She's assistant editor
of the college magazine, and, in addition,
note this, from the last number:
"Miss D—You know, all the nice-looking girls come from Vancouver.
"Frank—Well, they don't send any of
them around here  (?)""
Colleges are raising the tuition rates to
meet the increased cost of teaching and
maintenance. That seems a good plan.
About as much money has been gathered
for endowment funds for colleges as can
be pried loose in the present state of fiscal
reluctance. Princeton has drawn the line
at two thousand students, and will not
provide for more than that. That also
seems a good idea.—"Life."
Aids to Bolshevism
Getting a bunch of 14J4 collars from
the laundry when your size is 17.
When you weren't at the dance, being
asked why.
Watching that pie disappear, piece by
piece, while you wait in line at the Cafeteria.
Living upstairs over a man learning to
play a violin.
Walking through, or even looking at,
the Science Building.
By P.I.N.S.
California is to have a University Day.
On April 9th the University will be
thrown open to the universities and colleges of the country, California playing
the host. The events of the day will be
chiefly athletic.
TURN YOUR IDEAS
INTO DOLLARS
LEARN   HOW   TO   WRITE
SHORT STORIES
Short-Story Writing
Illustrating
Bookkeeping
Journalism
Cartooning
Accounting
Write for particulars
Shaw Correspondence
School
1401   Standard   Bank   Building
VANCOUVER,  B. C. THE   UBYSSEY
March 24, 1921
MERTEL AND JOE
Deer Mertel:
They is sumbuddy in this University
witch thinks they is smart, Mertel, and
witch rote a letter in this paper witch
wood make peeple think I had neglekted
you and witch sined your name to it and
tryed to fool me. The laff will be on the
other foot, as they say in this University,
wen he lerns that I found out your address and that I have ritten to you every
day for the past 3 monthes and that the
reeson I quit riteing in this paper was
becus they only publisshed once a wk.
witch was not offen enttf for me to rite
to you and Mr. Whitley wood not have
a paper everey day. I am glad I quit
riteing in this paper Mertel becus peeple was begineing to laff at my letters
and sayeing that all kinds of difrent fellos rote them.
I think it was a man witch rote that
letter becus no girl wood try to
play such a dirtey trik on a fello and I
think it was a Freshman Mertel becus
ennybuddy else wood be able to spell
better than he did. The spelleing was
rotten and I think the editor shood of
corekted it before he put it in the paper.
And if it was a Freshman Mertel I think
I no who it was becus one day I was
eateing my lunch in the cafaterea with a
bunch of other Sofamores and a Freshman came and sat down at our tabel and
not meening enny harm and to show him
he wasnt wanted I emteed a salt cellar
m his coughey. When he drank the'
coughey I laffed and he threw the coughey all over me and sed he wood get even
on me and went away and I was glad.
I think he must of new I was the Joe
witch rote to you and rote that letter to
get" even.
If I find out that he was the fello witch
rote that letter I will nok him for a goal,
as they say in Sience, or plow a furow
on the akerage of his bean, as the Aggies
say, or bash his can in, as we say in Arts.
He is a little fello Mertel and I think I
can handel him wen I am mad. You no
what I am wen Im mad Mertel. ■ I stop
at nothing. If he was bigger I mite just
tell him he shood of had more sents but
a Freshman must be kept in his place
Mertel.
They has been a hole lot of things
hapening in this University witch I mite
tell you about in this letter but I am so
mad Mertel I cant think but I am glad
you arnt in this University Mertel becus
you wood of been like all the other girls
here and gone crazey over a man with a
musical-name witch sed he was a Italian
but witch was a hole. lot different from
the fello witch shines my boots wen I
• get enuf money. His lecshuret, were
grate but I wood of been jelus if you had
of been here and you no what I am Mertel wen  Im jelus.
JOE.
CONGREGATIONAL DANCE
LETTERS  CLUB
At last week's meeting of the Letters
Club,, held at the home of Mr. F. G. C.
Wood, the works of John Galsworthy
were treated in a paper by Mr. Lacey
Fisher. The interest' awakened by the
subject was unusually acute, as the subsequent discussion showed, and the plays
of Galsworthy were especially the theme
of argument. >
The Congregation Dance will take
place on Thursday, May 12th. This dance
is given by "the Juniors of the three Faculties, in honor of the Graduating
Classes. As the last function of the year,
it should be supported by all University
students who will 'be in town on that
date. Students who desire invitations to
be sent to outside friends should hand
a list of those whom they wish invited to
their class presidents.
The tickets for this dance will be on
sale during the noon hour of Tuesday and
Wednesday, March 29th and 30th. This
will be the last opportunity of buying
tickets at the University. After that date
they will be put on sale at the Georgia
Pharmacy.
LAST OF SERIES
The last of a series of lectures under
the auspices of the Missionary Department of the Y. W. C. A., was held on
March 17th. Miss McGregor, national
secretary of the Women's Missionary Society, gave an interesting and instructive
address on "Conditions Among the Foreigners in Canada." She very vividly
pointed out the need of good and competent workers in our foreign settlements,
especially in the prairie provinces. With
a view to the future welfare of Canada,
she said that these foreigners must be
educated, and, above all, must be christianized.
The need which she most emphasized
was that of good public school teachers.
She also told of the work among the Indians, and its great possibilities. Under
her strong appeal all who were present
felt the wonderful opportunities of such
a  work.
HUDSON'S BAY RESEARCH
FELLOWSHIP
The appointment of the Hudson's Bay
Research Fellowship is to be made by the
University of Manitoba about May 1st.
The fellowship is open to graduates of
any Canadian university, and has an annual value of $1500. Further information
may be secured from the circular posted
in  the  Faculty  notice  board.
Last year Miss Irene Mounce, who
graduated with Arts 18, received the appointment.
'Varsity is threatened with the loss of
a portion of its next year's freshman
class, if a movement in favor of first year
University work being undertaken by the
Prince Rupert School Board is approved.
According to the Prince Rupert "News,"
a delegation pressing this action upon the
board was very favorably received. The
delegation pointed out that "children, if
they wish to get higher education, had to
be sent away from home at a tender age,
and the cost of living in Vancouver was
high," being at least $600 for the year's
expenses. The schol inspector thought
that some such opportunity of studying
science should be offered to students at
home. "Latin could well be allowed to
slide." Only five pupils would be affected
next year.
When Wanting Nice
Things to Eat
CUSICK
CAN   SUPPLY   YOUR  WANTS
From the very finest Chocolates,
Home-made Candy, Ice Cream and
Soft Drinks, Pastries, and such like,
to the daintiest little Dinner and
Light Lunch you ever ate.
Make sure you go to Cusick.
Cor. Heather and Broadway, West
SPECIAL
$25.00
Rough Blue
Serge
Norfolk Suits
REGULAR
$45.00
THE SHOP OF
jtofrtptt - (firaft
Thos. Foster
& Co., Ltd.
ONE STORE ONLY
514 GRANVILLE ST.

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