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The Ubyssey Feb 5, 1920

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 Issued  Weekly  by  the  Publications  Board of the University of .British Columbia
Volume II.
VANCOUVER, B. C, FEBRUARY 5, 1920
Number 15
'Varsity Wins
Again—15-0
FIREMEN   EASILY   DEFEATED   IN
SATURDAY'S RUGBY
Last Saturday's Rugby game was another decisive victory for the blue and
gold. The 'Varsity started things with
a rush and almost scored; but the Firemen came back hard, pushed the play
right up to the 'Varsity line, and forced
them to save behind their own line. A
few minutes later Cameron, of the Firemen, almost caused a riot among the
fans when he got the ball from the
scrum and tried a drop-kick. Luckily
for 'Varsity, the ball hit the under-side
of the bar.
During the rest of the period the play
ranged up and down the field, with the
advantage decidedly in favor of the Firemen. The period ended scoreless, with
the 'Varsity hard-pressed. The superior
weight of the Firemen forwards was noticeable during the first half. They succeeded in getting the ball out of the
scrum much better than did the Blue
and Gold. But in the second period the
'Varsity forwards seemed to wake up.
Their scrum gained superiority and gave
the speedy three-quarters the chance for
which they were waiting.
Lou Hunter started the scoring by
touching down between the posts after
a nice run of about fifty yards. Harold
Gwyther easily converted, and the 'Varsity supporters went wild. Gwyther
soon made.the score 9-0 with a beautiful
drop-kick.
About the middle of the period a mob
of 'Varsity players fell over the line and
Ternan was awarded the touch. A few
minutes later Hunter made another
spectacular run and touched down at
the corner of the field. Neither of these
last two were converted, and the game
ended with 'Varsity on the long end of
a 15-0 score.
Honeyman, Bickle and Plummer
showed grea,t improvement over the last
game, and should cause the Centrals a
lot of trouble next Saturday. Hunter
seems to have found the position where
his speed can be used to best advantage.
Harvey, on the other wing, showed up
well. In fact, during the second period
the three-quarter line worked with machine-like precision, and it was largely
due to that and their superior staying-
power that they were able to pile up the
score against the  Firemen.
The 'Varsity lineup was: II. Gwyther,
Harvey, Morrison, Ross, Hunter, Ternan, Tofte, Honeyman, Gross, Bickle,
Plummer, James, Rolston, Carlisle and
Swanson.
Seniors Plan
Final Fortnight
ARTS 'TWENTY
The enthusiasm was fairly bubbling
over when Arts '20 met on Wednesday
for their annual class meeting. Precedents were again thrown to the winds,
and Mr. F. G. C. Woods, three times
honorary president, was unanimously
elected to till the position of permanent
honorary president. Mr. Swencisky, the
president for the past year, had made
such a success of his duties that he also
was returned to office without dissent.
The other members of the executive
were: First vice-president, Miss G.
Gilley; second vice-president, W. H.
Coates; secretary, Miss E. Abernethy;
treasurer, Mr. Allon Peebles.
All the recommendations re the graduation festivities were passed with enthusiasm. The determination of the
members to enjoy themselves was plainly evinced by the enthusiasm which
greeted the plans prefaced by the executive. A "memorial row" of elms is to
be planted at Point Grey, to form a living monument to the graduating class
of this year.
(Continued on Page 8)
MORE ABOUT THE AGGIE DANCE
On Friday evening, January 30th, the
third annual Agriculture dance was held
in the Auditorium of the University, and
more than sustained the precedent already established by this Faculty for
giving dances that are "different." The
patronesses for the evening were Mrs.
Klinck. Mrs. Clement, Mrs. Boving and
Mrs. McLean.
Shortly before nine o'clock the guests
assembled in a ballroom which bore little resemblance to the prosaic X, Y and
Z of lecture hours. Here softly-shaded
lights cast a golden glow over swaying
balloons and streamers of blue and
maize. The stage was banked with
palms; even the floor gleamed from
much polishing. On the walls large
crepe-paper fans in the University colors proved a novel and effective decoration. Various parts of the hall, labeled
as the departments of Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Dairying, Horticulture
and Poultry, were designed to be used
as rendezvous, although most of the
dancers preferred to search for their
partners in the usual way. The Poultry
department, however, seemed popular.
(Continued on Page 7)
W.L.S. Contest
Proves Popular
FRESHETTE CARRIES  OFF FIRST
PRIZE
"Most men speak because they want
to, but a woman does so because she
feels it to be her duty." Tn these words
Miss Janet Gilley, who occupied the
chair, described the Women's First
Oratorical Contest, which took place on
Monday evening in the Auditorium. The
judges were Dr. Sedgwick, Mr. Elliott
and Mr. Sage. The first prize was
awarded to Miss Dorothy Walsh, of
Arts '23; and the second to Miss Norah
Willis, Arts '22.
Miss Walsh took for her topic, "The
Literature of Nonsense," which she declared to be one of the purest forms of
art. Since Nonsense is difficult to define, although easy to recognize, she illustrated her remarks with a number of
extracts, both from the writers of absolute nonsense, Lear and Lewis Carroll,
and from more serious writers, like Lord
Dunsany and Kipling. Its chief quality,
she said, was imagination, 'which seeks
escape from this dull and sordid world;
its second quality, laughter of a pure and
joyous type.
Miss Willis, speaking on "Ragtime,"
argued against the modern idea that this
syncopated music is the true expression
of the American people, and their original folk-music. The latter Miss Willis
considers to be the old negro melodies
as developed by Coleridge-Taylor, and
not the lazz, which was invented by an
inebriated musician in Chicago. She
pointed out the importance of music in
moulding character, and deprecated the
idea that America's national music
should be totally uninfluenced by Eur,-
opean standards. In reply to the objection that ragtime must have vitality
because it is so widely popular, the
speaker classed it with chewing-gum and
the comic supplement.
Miss Lillian Cowdell, Arts '22 on the
subject of "Social Insurance," showed
the benefits of State control in four departments of insurance, as it affects the
masses. She attributed the necessity for
it to the complexity of modern industry,
which prevents personal contact of laborer and employer. Accident insurance
is already in force here, and national
health insurance has been successful in
Great Britain. The need of insurance
for old age and unemployment was also
demonstrated.
Miss Roberts, Arts '23, entitled her
speech   "Tuum   Est,"   and    showed   the
(Continued on Page 3) THE   UBYSSEY
February 5, 1920
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SIGMA DELTA KAPPA
The first meeting of the Sigma Delta
Kappa after the reorganization of the
society was held at the University on
January 28th. The greater part of the
evening was devoted to a debate on
the subject: "Resolved that the system
of government of the United States is
preferable to that of Canada."
The leader of the affirmative, Mr.
MacKinnon, contended that the American system of government is superior
to the Canadian both in principle and in
method of administration. It is more
democratic in spirit; for the residue of
power is left to the States—that is, in
the hands of the individual; whereas in
Canada the residual power rests with
the Federal Government. It is more
efficient in administration, because of
the clear division between the powers of
State and Federal governments, and because of the development of the committee  system.
Miss Stirk, for the negative, objected
to the American system on the ground
that the President is too much of an
autocrat. When once elected, he is out
of the control of the people; whereas
the Canadian Premier may be removed
from office at any time. Again, the
American Cabinet is responsible only to
the President and not to the representatives of the people. The speaker also
said that the committee system gives
opportunity for political "log-rolling"
and lessens the responsibility of the
House for legislation.
Arguing for the affirmative, Miss Ver-
chere pointed out that the Senate of the
United States is more democratic than
that of Canada, in the qualifications required and in the method of appointment. It is elected by the people, and
takes an active part in the government;
whereas the Canadian Senate is merely
"a refuge for superannuated politicians."
The second speaker for the negative,
Mr. Peebles, stated that the American
Government is controlled not by the
people, but by a rigid and somewhat tin-
progressive constitution. Again, the
fact that residuary power is left with the
States makes comprehensive legislation
impossible.
The leader of each side was then given
time for rebuttal. The judges awarded
the decision to the negative, commenting on the closeness of the contest. The
debate was followed by impromptu
speaking by members of the club.
At this meeting Mr. Kirby was elected
to the office of secretary-treasurer, left
vacant by the resignation of Mr. Peardon.
YELLS FOR SATURDAY
Revolution!   Riot!   Blood and Gore!
Down "with   the   Centrals   evermore!
Who are we?    Who are we?
'Varsity!
'Varsity—Rah!   'Varsity—Rah!
Give 'em HELL with a sis-boom-bah!
Soak   'em,   croak   'em,   cover   'em   with
gore-
Sweep 'em away with a rush and a roar!
Hold    'em,    hold    'em!      Don't    let    'em
through!
Win that. Cud for the B.C.U.!
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THE   UBYSSEY
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U.B.C. GIRLS LOSE ICE HOCKEY
GAME
Last Saturday the 'Varsity girls' septette lost to the Amazons by a score of
3 to 1. If it had not been for the sensational "Hughie Legman" goal-tending
of Miss Norma Cordingley, the 'Varsity
team would have suffered a heavier defeat. Miss Beatrice Garlick, the aggressive centre, starred for U.B.C., and was
everywhere at once, playing her usual
good game. Team-play and combination
work, however, was what the 'Varsity
team lacked most.
Half-way through the first period,
after several unsuccessful 'attempts, one
of the Amazons shot the puck past the
'Varsity goal-tender for the first point.
A few minutes later another Amazon
repeated the feat. Things- were looking
blue for 'Varsity, when Miss Garlick got
the puck, and, successfully evading half
the Amazon team, passed it back to Miss
Gladys Weld, who slipped it in the nets
for 'Varsity's  only goal.
In the course of the game the referee
twice repremanded the Amazons for
their unfair tactics, threatening to bench
them if they kept them up.
'Varsity lined up as follows: Goal,
Miss N. Cordingley; defense, Miss D.
Nichol; centre, Miss B. Garlick; forwards, Miss R. Fulton, Miss M. Lawrence. Substitutes: Miss G. Weld and
Miss  G.  Robson.
Remember to sign your letters to the
Correspondence Column if you want
^them published.
PHYSICAL TRAINING CLASS
The class in Swedish drill, under the
able leadership of Mr. George Boving,
is now well organized. It meets Tuesday evenings from 6.30 to 7.30, and
Thursday evenings from 6 to 7, in Chal-
mer's gym. During these hours not a
moment is wasted, the time being devoted to coaxing action out of muscles
which, in some cases, had apparently
been discarded by their owners, or, in
other cases, allowed to hibernate owing
to excessive mental activity.
There is no question as to the benefits of physical drill, and the Swedish
method is perhaps the best. A healthy
body is necessary to a vigorous, healthy
mind. It seems a pity that so few of
our student body are able to take advantage of Mr. Boving's knowledge of this
science, owing to lack of gymnasium
accommodation. Perhaps when we move
to Point Grey  ?
(Continued from Page 1)
need of efficient citizens  for Vancouver,
for  Canada,   and  for  the   world,   where
the watchword of the new day is service
to our fellow-men.
Miss Mary Munro, Arts '22, gave a
vivid picture of "A Passing People"—
the American Indians, contrasting their
former freedom and simple existence
with the present state of subjugation and
poverty which is destroying the race.
During the judges' deliberation Miss
Willis supported her argument by presenting the charm of "real" music. Dr.
Sedgwick, in announcing the decision,
objected to the use of the word "oratorical," which he considers to be out of
date, since a modern audience does not
want elocution, but persuasion, to be
"talked to." He congratulated the
Women's Lit. on having established a
tradition.
If there are any subjects
in which you need special
coaching, try the new
SPROTT-SHAW
ACADEMIC
DEPARTMENT
All our teachers are highly
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Special  Evening  Classes
This   department,   as   well   as   our
Business   Department,   bears   that
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Phone, Sey. 1810
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Issued every  Thursday by the   Publications   Board
of the  University  of British  Columbia.
Extra mural subscriptions, $3.00 per session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief A.   A.   Webster
Senior   Editor Patricia   H.   Smith
{Lillian  Cowdell
A.   H.   Imlah
C. D. Taylor
Chief   Reporter A.   Evans   Boss
Exchange   Editor G.   G.   Coope
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager J.   N.   Weld
Advertising   Manager L.   Fournier
.     . ( D. A.  Wallace       D.  Mclntyre
Assistants -[ ...   _, T, _   „    x
^ W.  McKec J. Berto
Circulation   Manager A.   Crawford
Editor for  the   Week Miss   L.   Cowdell
THE ISSUE RAISED
With the circulation by the Men's Lit.
of a petition calling for faculty recognition of the educational value of the
work done in preparation for the various
inter-collegiate debates being held this
year, U.B.C. sees the first definite crystallization of opinion with regard to the
granting of credits for activity along
lines of work not intimately connected
with lectures. The petition asks that
allowances be made for hours missed by
the speakers while actively engaged with
the debates, and also that credit be given
them for the information gathered in the
course most nearly allied to the subject.
The matter is of importance in bringing
to a head the oft-repeated question of
whether work of such value as debating
is to be accepted as supplementing the
more formal learning of the lecture-
room.
We have all heard the familiar jingle:
"Don't let your studies interfere with
your education." And more than once
we have wondered—with more or less
earnestness, according to our various
temperaments—just what may be considered as comprizing the various ingredients of that much-abused term,
education. The general concensus of
opinion seems to point inore and more
towards agreement that a student shall
not live by books alone, but that a
knowledge of executive work, of the
practical problems of leadership, ability
to overcome stage fright, or excessive
bashfulness when in possession of "the
floor," the power of self-expression and
ability "to think on one's feet," are of
considerable weight in the scales of success.
Our universities are the great training
grounds for all walks of life, and are expected to supply the finished product,
ready to answer that call for leadership
of which we have heard so much. Within
the bounds of the University is an entire
world offering the much-needed practise
—in jest, perhaps—of what is to be the
work in earnest in later life. Part only
of that training is received in the lecture rooms; its unappreciated supplement is found in those activities necessary for the morale of the student body,
but of no account in the final test of the
examination.    With the opportunity for
training in that wider education of leadership and initiative comes the question
to most students: Can I spare the time
from regular studies? Under the present
system many fail to take advantage of
that opportunity, and—irreparable condition—many perform work of actual
service to the University, and serve their
apprenticeship in the ways of business
and command with only a negative
recognition of their work, with the result that they are often eclipsed in the
final standing by students lacking their
experience and training along non-
examination lines, but who have been
able to devote all their time to the process known by the appropriate, if hardly euphonious, name of "cramming."
How much benefit is derived from a
University course by those who take no
interest in the multifarious activities of
the University? And how much encouragement is offered us to take part in
them? These are the questions at issue.
Some colleges have taken up an extreme position in granting credits for
work outside of regular courses. U.B.C.
has as yet taken no action one way or
the other. Our boast it is that there are
no entangling alliances in the nature of
traditions to prevent free decision on
any such mattter. For the petition in
question we would venture to advance
the plea that debating is particularly
allied to lecture-work, and that the subjects dealt with are important funds of
information in Economics and History,
helping the students participating in
their attainment of a liberal education.
Surely there is some method of showing
recognition of the work done, while
avoiding charges of setting a premium
on neglect of regular studies. Our good
wishes go with any attempt to put into
practical usage the ideal that education
'is no longer a course in memorization,
but an honest endeavor at preparation
for real service to the world, to our
country and  to  ourselves.
■J" V *fr
STUDENT  REGULATIONS
Believing that they were acting in the
best interests of the University, the Students' Council recently passed a by-law
to the effect that all major college functions should close at one o'clock. Many
at once showed their disapproval of such
an action. An Alma Mater meeting was
called, with the result that the Council
was asked to rescind their by-law.
Regardless of the merits of the question, one point is evident. The student
mind appears to revel in a revolt against
regulations. At the meeting last week
there was not a single objection to the
principle of limiting University dances
to one o'clock. The only reasons advanced were that we were no longer in
a kindergarten, that college men were
old enough to .care for themselves, and
that democracy and common sense
alone should prevail. Such an attitude
is childish and ridiculous. Carried to its
logical conclusion, it would advise the
cancellation of all regulations and the
establishment of an era of individualism
in college affairs. The contention is
clearly untenable.
The Council is merely an executive
which is directly responsible for every
phase of University activity. And if the
Alma Mater Society adopts the attitude
of refusing to vest in them the right of
imposing certain  restrictions  upon  that February 5, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
body, then some other authority may
find it necessary to interfere. We do not
believe that many hold this view with
regard to student government in the
University; but there is too large a number who unconsciously allow themselves
to drift into that state of mind. We are
loathe to give sufficient and careful consideration to a question before voicing
an opinion, but are ready to respond to
every whim and fancy which may momentarily seize upon us. And until we
are prepared to think for ourselves, and
to consider all questions fairly on their
own merits, we shall never have stability and satisfaction in our Alma Mater
and in our Executive.
(£ovv?Bpanbpnt?
All correspondence must be written
legibly, on one side of the paper only, and
may be signed by a pen-name, but must
be accompanied by name and class of the
writer. Letters must not exceed 400 words
in  length.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—Sardonyx is evidently determined to reinstate once more an old issue to
a position of prominence. His reasons for
so doing are obscure, and I notice with
gratification that he has failed to strike a
chord of response among the student body.
Totally aside from the fact that it is in the
interests of the entire student body to keep
as secret as possible a trial of such a nature,
I heartily approve of the action of the Council, and hope that serenity will continue to
be undisturbed by this chimera of injustice
in the mind of Sardonyx. I repeat that I
fail to . appreciate the motives prompting
Sardonyx to agitate against the Council and
attempt to sully their untarnished record.
I should imagine that much more would be
accomplished if correspondents assumed a
less malignant attitude in attempted criticism of the executive.
I feel sure, from my acquaintance with
the four men tried, that, being guilty of an
infraction of the rules established in our
University, they will, with me, resent the
perverse criticism addressed to the Council,
particularly    since     these     criticisms     have
arisen as a result of their knowing violation
of regulations stamped with the sanction of
the students.
SOPHES.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—It was with some amusement
that I perused in the columns of your last
issues two letters attached to the highly
suggestive pseudonym of "Sardonyx." I
would like to congratulate the editorial staff
upon the literary standard these create for
the correspondent columns of "The
Ubyssey." Although evidently the productions of a somewhat youthful intellect, these
letters exhibit many literary qualities, but
are permeated to a slight extent with a love
of words for their own sake. I would like
to point out to the writer that one of the
first standards of literature is the perfect
blending of form and content. It is in truth
of content that these effusions are pathetically lasking.
There is a strange tendency among the
very youthful to invoke upon all occasions
the name and principles of democracy. If
in the University of B. C. there is any stray
elements of democratic ideas, I would most
emphatically state that these are to be
found in the minds of the respected members  of  our   Students'   Council.
At the meeting of the Alma Mater Society,
at which the late amendments to the constitution were brought up for discussion and
decision, a clause relating to the Students'
Court was the centre of considerable argument. When the vote was taken, over fifty
per cent, of the students present voted for
the clause—that is, for the closed session;
but as a two-thirds majority is required,
the amendment Avas defeated. Consequently the Council is now working on the old
constitution, which states that the executive shall act as a court, but does not define
the nature of that court.
Therefore, in its wise decision to hold a
closed session in the recent case before the
court, the Council, in its executive capacity,
was obeying the will of the student body.
It is not a question of the closed versus open
session; it is not a question of democracy;
it is simply this: that the Students' Council,
in its decision, technically and morally, was
acting in accordance with the wishes of. the
students, as expressed by an enlightened
majority.
In conclusion, I would like to point out to
"Sardonyx" the advisability of basing the
magnificent structure of his crystallized
ideas of democracy upon "a firmer foundation.
X. Y. Z.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—Kindly permit me to voice an
opinion in connection with a letter which
appeared in your issue of January 22nd.
This letter dealt with the habit of "ignor-
antly" criticizing other people. Our cousins
to the South are obviously the object of
unjust criticism to which "Observer" took
exception. The criticism is presumably due
to  the  outcome of the  war.
Criticism has its place. If the Professors
in our University were to have no cause to
find fault with our efforts, I do not think
there would be much occasion for students
to  attend.
As Britishers, we have a national dignity
to uphold. We do not intend to be subjected
to injustice and ridicule at the hands of our
neighbors  without  caustic  comment.
AVe can not help remembering the criticism and ridicule hurled at Great Britain by
Americans in pre-war days, as well as in
the early days of the war. Our neighbors
used to tell us that Britain was behind the
times; that her politicians were "old
women." I think a certain republic might
do well to substitute a few such "old women" in place of her present representatives. We would then see "statesmanship"
playing its role in lieu of party politics.
Was such criticism of Britain justified? For
any who think so, I recommend an impartial
History of the War. They may be enlightened  as  to  Britain's  contributions.
Who are responsible for the slogan, "We
won the war"? General Pershing, through
one of our local newspapers, pointed out to
us not long ago how America won the war.
We are indebted to him for his "suggestions," but can only treat them as such. Thij
American press very often has inspirations
on the subject: they are, for the most part,
highly "volatile," and ascend beyond the
grasp of us poor mortals. American historians infer, even in one of our text-books,
that America really did win the war. Much
space is devoted in describing in detail the
two or three battles in which the U.S. troops
were   engaged.     The  mere  mention  of  other
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666 GRANVILLE STREET
"VANCOUVER'S    SMARTEST   SHOE    STORE" THE   UBYSSEY
February 5, 1920
T. SCOTT EATON, B.A., Principal
Success Business College
Limited
Corner Main Street and Tenth Avenue
VANCOUVER, B. C
Phone, Fairmont 2075
CUSICK
SERVES
HOT LUNCHES
692   BROADWAY, WEST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
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Same Address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
Insist on your Dealer supplying
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KEYSTONE
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No. 2768 Open Side size 9V4 x 7%
No. 2769  Open Side size lO1/^ x 8
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Stationers, and Paper Dealers.
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equally as great, if not greater, battles, that
were going on at the same time, suffices.
"Observer" states that "our whole authority" for criticizing our neighbor is based on
"our having met one or two objectionable
characters." . Are we to view General
Pershing, the American press, American
historians and a large number of American
people  as   "objectionable  characters"?
The British Empire lost in manpower, in
killed and wounded, 4.5 per cent, of its
white population; Prance, 4.3 per cent.; and
U.S., 0.22 per cent. In view of these figures
alone, I would like to suggest that the instigators of the bombastic slogan, "We won
the war," modify it by giving Britain and
France—not forgetting other countries—•
credit for "assisting" them in their task.
Our national dignity, and not our "ignorance," urges us to voice exception to America's present attitude. The hot air that
blows over the border must be condensed by
icy criticism ere it reaches those who are
not guided by their own convictions.
Thanking you for your valuable space,
I am,   Sir,  yours  truly,
J.  L.  HUGGETT.
GIRLS' BASKETBALL
675 GRANVILLE STREET
Do you read the notice boards? Well,
why weren't you at the basketball game
between King George High School and
'Varsity in the Normal gym. on Tuesday, January 27th? The game was one
of the best of the season, the final score
being 12-9.
At the end of the first half the score
was 10-4. The K. G. H. S. team worked
well together; but, owing to the good
work of the 'Varsity guards, Misses Kilpatrick and Gordon, and to the fact that
they did not take advantage of the several fouls called on 'Varsity, they were
not able to bring up their score. During
the second half 'Varsity played better
combination, but were only successful in
scoring one basket. Miss Stewart was
the star player on the 'Varsity team, and
Miss Angell  on  K.G.H.S.
'Varsity team consisted of Misses
Stewart and Eveleigh (forwards), Weld
(centre), Kilpatrick and Gordon
(guards).
The girls are practising hard, and
hope by the end of the week to have a
captain chosen and everything organized for a second team.
STUDENTS   OF   AGRICULTURE  '23
HAVE INTERESTING TIME
On Wednesday afternoon the students
of Agriculture '23, accompanied by Prof.
King, had an interesting demonstration
in meat-cutting. This trip was arranged
by the courtesy of the P. Burns Co. at
their store on Granville and Robson
Streets.
Mr. Gore, of the P. Burns Co., kindly
acted as demonstrator. He showed the
students through the large cold-storage
rooms, and pointed out the essential
points in the carcasses. He then selected a prime carcass and proceeded to cut
it up. As the instructor skilfully removed the various cuts, he weighed
them, gave their value, and pointed out
their desirable qualities, so as to give
the students a clear idea of their relative importance.
Art and Style Clothes Shop
Hose *i»i Everything
"DETTER DROP IN and get
acquainted with Ben Petch's
"Castle Hotel Shop." We believe
you'll find just the kind of togs
you've been wanting —■ the kind
that is just a little different from
what the other fellow shows. They
don't cost any more either.
Good   Silk   Hosiery   at   $1.50   or
more.
Wonderful  Shirt values  at $3.00
and up.
Pyjamas at 'most any price you
wish to pay.
Ben Petch
LIMITED
752 Granville Street
(Castle Hotel is next door)
Tr«b Cut flower*,     fmml Work a Specialty
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
florists, nurserymen, Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head Office:
48 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 9513
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For Light Refreshments
Ice  Cream  and   Candies
at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
U.Morimoto & Co.
JAPANESE FANCY GOODS
MAIN STORE:
673   Granville   Street      Phone, Sey. 6410
BRANCH STORES:
57 Hastings St., W.       Phone, Sey. 2313
932 Granville   St. Phone, Sey. 8733
VICTORIA BRANCH:
1235   Government   St. Phone 4742 February 5, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
THE SCIENCE BALL
Arrangements for the biggest social
function the Science men have ever
staged are now practically complete.
While not depreciating the efforts of the
Arts men and Aggies, the Engineers
declare that their dance will be "the best
yet." Since the music makes or mars a
dance nowadays, special attention is being paid to this nart of the arrangements. There will be one of the ever-
popular saxaphones all evening, a second one and a xylonhone arriving at 11
p.m. As at the Alumni dance, the svs-
tem of rendezvous will be adooted. The
ladies, unon entering the ballroom, are
requested to station themselves beneath
some letter. A, B, C. or D, and to meet
the'r respective partners there at the
beginning of each dance.
Y.M.C.A.  MEETING
On Thursday, at noon, Dr. Davidson
addressed the Y.M.C.A. of the University. His topic was, "Christianity as I
See It." The speaker stated that there
were three classes of people in the world
to-day. In the first class are those for
whom religion is centred around a God
who inspires fear. These are heathen.
In the second class are those who pursue religion for what they can get out
of it, for whom the promises of heaven,
of salvation, of personal blessings, are
the allurements. Their motives are selfish. They are pagan. To the third and
last class belong those who seek to help
their fellow-men; who work, not for the
good they may get, but for the good
they may do; who have the spirit of
service, as revealed in the Great Master, dominating their lives. These are
Christians.
The interest in the Thursday noon
meetings is growing. If the spirit of
Dr. Davidson's address could become
the spirit of all the men in U.B.C, we
would find every man in the college in
the Y.M.C.A.
MORE ABOUT THE AGGIE DANCE
(Continued from Page 1)
To those who had never heard Mar-
jorie Stevens' orchestra before, the
music proved another surprise. By the
time the strains of "Lonesome, That s
All," had been encored three times, the
success of the evening was assured. No
one wanted to stop for supper (except,
perhaps, two or three who had sampled
the Aggie brand of chicken sandwiches
earlier in the day). The demand for
these was so great, that the supply,
though ample under ordinary circumstances, was scarcely adequate. Coffee,
cake and ice-cream were ably served by
the agile Aggies, who successfully demonstrated that juggling trays of coffee-
cups is no trick at all after a summer s
practice with baskets of eggs or cans of
milk, and that white coats designed for
the dairy look equally well in a college
kitchen.
After supper the four-piece orchestra
was augmented by a zylophone and sax-
aphone, both of which were greatly enjoyed by the guests.
Under the spell of the moonlight, the
waltzes were especially dreamy. During
the   "Blowing    Bubbles"    waltz,    elusive
M. PERRIN, Manager — 20 years with the leading Hotels of Europe and America
BARRON HOTEL RESTAURANT
A   DIFFERENT  PLACE
Often you hear it said:  "The Barron is different!"
MAYBE it's the quality of the cuisine.    Perhaps it's the superiority of the music.
Again,  it  may  be  the  dance  floor—or  the  atmosphere  that  pervades—or  the
character of the people.
PERHAPS  it  is  all  three—for  the   BARRON  is  different,  and  that  is  why  this
expression has become so respected.
"More than a Restaurant — a Vancouver Institution"
Matinee  Luncheon,  11.30 to 2.30
FRENCH DINNER  Every Day,  including Sunday
5.30 to 9 p.m.
GRANVILLE AND NELSON STREETS Phone, Seymour 2011
balls of blue and maize floated over the
heads of the dancers, till, one by one,
they were caught and carried around as
tronhies for the rest of the evening.
The hard-working committees, who
stayed to replace benches, wash dishes
and tear down decorations, could not
help feeling well repaid by the general
enthusiasm still evident in the cold light
of the morning, when all the labs, and
even some lectures were resonant with
snatches of "The Vamp," "My Isle of
Golden Dreams," and "Let the Rest of
the World  Go  By."
EXCHANGES
What Other Colleges Are Doing
On account of the recent paper shortage in the East, and consequently a
stoppage of newspapers, the staff of the
"Manitoban" has undertaken to supply
the city of Winnipeg with a daily newspaper containing all the usual items,
even to "stocks and bonds" and weather
forecasts. News is being supplied
through the University's private wireless. We here congratulate the University of Manitoba on its splendid efforts
to fill the breach.
Signs of the times: "Buildings! Buildings! Buildings! So long as the University is crowded into buildings too small
for it, into buildings not built for it,
into buildings that are uninspiring, ugly,
and with unsightly environment, the
University of Manitoba cannot keep
pace with the growth of the province."
—"Manitoban."
Other students than those of U. B. C.
are forced to sit on radiators and kitchen
chairs.
Ignorance    is      The    following
item from the Michigan "Daily" is a
sample of the knowledge of U. S. colleges concerning those of her neighbor
to the North. Speaking of an address
delivered by Prof. Stephen Leacock to
Michigan students: "An interesting fact
in connection with Mr. Leacock is that
he is Professor of Political Economy in
McGill University  at Toronto,  Canada."
Such "accuracy" 'rouses in us mingled
feelings of sorrow and amusement—the
latter predominating.
We have received periodicals from the
following universities during the past
week: Manitoba, Queen's, Toronto, ana
McGill.
.. Cbe ..
Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial  Stationers and
Printers
Students' Loose-Leaf Binders
Educational Stationery
School Equipment
Drawing Instruments  and  Materials
320 SEYMOUR STREET
(Opposite C. P. R.  Depot)
VANCOUVER, B. C.
(3olo Seal
Chocolates
Unequalled Flavor
Unexcelled Quality
Gold Seal Candy Store
999 Granville St., cor. Nelson THE   UBYSSEY
February 5, 1920
Featuring Gracefulness in Modern Dancing
DANCE! The delight of social occasions is not complete without a thorough
schooling in the art. "The Wallflower" misses most of the pleasures of the ball.
DANCE, and learn to master the latest steps —• the Chicago Fox-Trot,
Aeroplane Glide, National Fox-Trot, Paris Waltz, the new Tango One-Step and
other graceful dances.
The   VAUGHN  MOORE   STUDIO
OF TERPSICHOREAN ART
PAVLOWA   COURT
Over Colonial  Theatre,  Granville  Street,  at corner  Dunsmuir
Classes open Tuesdays and Thursdays.    Enroll  now.
Telephone Seymour 2081 for an Appointment Terms to  U.B.C. Students
SENIORS  PLAN   FINAL
FORTNIGHT
(Continued from Page 1)
Mr. Swencisky, is the general supervisor for all festivities; and Mr. Keenleyside and Miss "Gilley will organize,
respectively, the first and second weeks.
The organizers for the individual events
are as follows:
Trip to Point Grey—Mr. Berto.
Theatre  Party—Miss  K.  H.  Pillsbury.
Trip to Pitt Lake—Mr. Peebles.
Tennis Luncheon — Miss Alexander
and Miss Walsh.
Trip to Whytecliffe—Mr. Coates.
Trip to Crescent—Miss Grant.
Valedictorian—Mr.  W. J.  Couper.
Baccalaureate Service — Rev. F. H.
Buck.
Trip to Bowen Island—Mr. MacKinnon.
Class Day—Miss H.  Matheson.
Class Prophesies — Miss Darner and
Mr. Weld.
Banquet — Miss Irvine and Mr. Sid-
dons.
The members of the year were glad
to notice that already two teams had
accepted the challenge for a cross-country relay. The belief was expressed that
this race would go far towards stirring
up interest in track work, and a good
race is fully expected.
PLAYERS' CLUB
The announcement has been made
that the dates of the three performances
of the Spring play will be Thursday,
Friday and Saturday, March 4, 5 and 6.
Tickets will be on sale next week.
'VARSITY VS. CENTRALS
Brockton    Point,    Saturday,    3.15.
Turn Out and Root!
"Judging from appearances, if what
the Freshies don't know won't hurt
them, they are immure from all harm,"
said a wise young Soph.—Exchange
Prof.—Gentlemen, I have boiled down
my lectures so much that I am beginning
to think there is something in them.—
Exchange.
SCIENCE NOTES
It is suggested that Science hold a
"Repair Fund Tag Day." The latest
items to an increasing list being a door,
in the draughting-room, and a few yards
of linoleum.
Last week Sivertz discovered a number of light rays "shimmying" in the
Mechanics' Lab. Upon investigation, it
was learned that the room had previously been occupied by an Arts Freshman
class. Beyond this, nothing has been
found to explain the phenomenon.
NEW SCIENCE YELL
The mystery has been explained. Now
we know why we haven't heard anything
from Science for such a long time. They
have been busy on a hard job. They have
produced a new yell, which, in our opinion, is a "humdinger."   Here it isr
Graphic   Statics,  Mathematics,   Kinematics  cam.
The boiler's going to bust, but we don't
give a  .
Methyl   ethyl,   Isopropyl,  Butyl   Hydrazine,
Engineers,     Engineers,     raise     a     little
steam:
B.T.U.'s, C.0.2's, Kilowatts and Volts,
B. C. 'Varsity, hand 'em out some jolts.
S - C - I - E -_N - C - E
'Varsity.
OVERHEARD IN SCIENCE
H b (explaining that things of different nature cannot be multiplied) —
What do you get when you multiply a
truck by a wagon?
Brick A—d—n:    A Ford!
EDWIN J. GALLOWAY
New  and  Second-Hand
Book  Shop
Specialists  in University Books
COACHING
in French, German and English
Composition,    Literature    and
Conversation.
MISS GREGG, GLENCOE LODGE
Phone, Seymour 9022
TO-DAY AND
TO-MORROW
You may not think it necessary
to save to-day, when you are
young and things are going well
with you. How about to morrow?
Life is not all sunshine, and you
should prepare for a rainy day by
opening an account in our Savings
Department.
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
A perfect fit guaranteed.
Where quality counts, we win.
The  "Combination"
€][ A Shoe made two sizes smaller
over instep, heel and ankle than the
regular size.
^ This insures that perfect glove fit
around the instep and ankle. The
maximum of comfort and sttyle.
Guff Shoe Co. Ltd.
649    HASTINGS    STREET,    WEST
Opposite  Bank  of  Commerce

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