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The Ubyssey Oct 7, 1958

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 I
BE
GLAD
THE UBYSSEY
YOU
CAN
BLEED
VOL. XLI
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY;, OCTOBER 7, lt»;>8
No. 8
Leaders    Favor
Student   Senate
AuAiJNhT BOTH representative government and the general meeting is Dean G. C.
Andrew, Deputy to the President. He favored a stronger students' council, in discussions
at Leadership Conference. Majority of delegates however favored new representative
government system. — Photo by Mike Sone
Manitoba Backs Connaghan s
Pledge Of Aid To Quebecers
Elphinstone
Retreat For
Eager Frosh
A discussion group on Student
Apathy led by John Goodwin of
the Thunderbirds Booster Club
decided that apathy among the
students in general could be prevented by educating the Frosh
in the workings of the AMS and
its subsidiary organizations.
A weekend frosh retreat early
in   the   term,   styled   along  the
lines of Leadership Conference
was   proposed   by   the    group.
Frosh leaders  would  be  selected   from   a   group   of   student
leaders    of    the    various    high
schools.   These   leaders    would
attend discussions led by campus |
student   leaders   and   would   in j
turn    report   their   findings   to |
their   fellow  frosh  either  at  ai
mass rally on campus or possib-1
ly in English Lectures. This ed-j
ly in English Lectures. This "education" of frosh, it was decided,
would   make   them   feel  a   pari.
of   the   A1VIS   and   would   be   a :
logical,    starting    point    in    the!
fight against apathy.
Mild   dissention    was   voiced |
by Professor Jan de Bduyn who;
epressecl  doubts   as  to   whether
there really was apathy amongst
UBC students.
Thc group concluded that the
Frosh Retreat, though similar to
the Leadership Confer e n c e,
would have to be modified
slightly to start the Frosh off
on the right foot and to avoid
making unfavourable impressions on innocent frosh.
AMS President Chuck Connaghan has received full support from the Universily of
Manitoba to cooks to the aid of,
Quebec students in their defence
of autonomy.
Connaghan   i.s  at   present  at-;
tending the NFCUS conference
in Ottawa,
Before leaving, Connaghan
wrote letters to all student
University presidents in western
Canada asking them to support
UBC's position that the Quebec
students be given support within the framework of NFCUS in
their effort to gain sudent autonomy.
The UBC motion, passed by
the student council one week
ago, gave Connaghan support
to "lend all possible support to
French C a n a d i a n students
through NFCUS."
The reply received Monday
from. Manitoba and signed by
Student Union president Brian
Knapheis pledged their support
of Connaghan's position.
"I am in complete agreement
wtith you that Quebec students
should receive the support of
students from other universities," said Knapheis.
"I assure you that my support
of your resolution will represent the official stand of our
Student Union," he said.
The Ubyssey was unable to
contact Connaghan in Ottawa
at press time for further developments.
PHOTOGRAPHERS
NEEDED NOW
Ubyssey Photographers and
everyone interested. Meeting
today at 12.30 in the Ubyssey
offices North Brock Basement. Important. Meeting is
to discuss organizational problems. Press equipment and
darkroom techniques will be
explained.
Student leaders at the annual
leadership conference were in
in favor of representative government for UBC.
Two hours' debate and several more hours' discussion ended in the general opinion that
representative government was
desirable for UBC.
Such a form of government
would involve a 250-member
"Student senate," representing
the whole student body and
eliminating the general meeting, according to Ben Trevino,
last year's AMS president.
The body would meet "four
times a year, and for Jess than
four hours at a time," stated
Trevino.
Two hours of debate between
Professor G. O. B. Davies and
Jim McFarlan and Mr. R. Ba
ker and Jack Giles brought out
several heated replies from the
delegates, showing the great interest in the subject.
STUDENT SENATE
Dean G. C. Andrew, a faculty
delegate, spoke in favour of
eliminating the general meeting
but not incorporating the proposed "student senate". He
pointed out that council would
have to spend more time than
they do now away from their
studies to make the system
"workable."
More   hours  of  discussion  of
the matter by all the delegates
j produced     the    same    opinion,
I tempered   with   a   lew  reservations.
MOST IMPORTANT
One menvber of the faculty
termed the proposal "The most
important thing ever to come
out of any leadership conference."
A student delegate thought
the majority of students would
be "for it in principle, but I
think they would like the proc-
tical problems worked out before endorsing it in  practice."
Another delegate said that he
would like to wait until the
whole system is well worked
out."
The general feeling of the
wtrole conference about bringing the matter up at the conference was that it was a good
idea,
Expressing the majority opinion was Ben Trevino:
"Everybody will be more
aware of the issue because we
brought it up here."
Tween Classes
Poetry Reading By
Marianne Moore
SPECIAL EVENTS — Mari-
anne Moore, famous American
poetess reading her own poetry
in Auditorium 12.30 noon Wednesday.
* *   *
EDUCATION UNDERGRAD.
UATE SOCIETY—is sponsoring
"Getting to Know You" at the
Arlington Hall at 1236 West
Broadway on Saturday, October
11th from 9 to 1. There will be
a 5-piece band, refreshments
and plenty of good fun. Girls
50c, boys 75c, couples $1.00.
Come!
* *   *
INDIA STUDENTS ASSOCIATION — Members and their
friends and others interested to
attend the General Meeting of
the Club on Tuesday, October
14th at 8.00 p.m. in 354 Brock
Extension. Do bring your
friends please.
* *   *
POLITICAL SCIENCE CLUB
—Organzation meeting in Buchanan 216, noon, Tuesday,
Oct. 7th. All those who signed
(Continued on Page 8)
See 'TWEEN CLASSES
YUGOSLAVIA DISCUSSED
WUSC Convenes Friday
The 13th national assembly
of the World University Service of Canada will open at
the University of B.C. Friday.
The four-day conference is
under the direction of Gordon Armstrong, UBC Law student.
More than sixty delegates
are expected to start arriving
Wednesday.
Registration will begin at
9 a.m. Friday.
Among delegates attending
the conference will be Lewis
Perinbam, WUSC general secretary and Miss Pat Robinson,
assistant secretary.
Dean and Mrs. James A.
Gibson, WUSC national chairman and Dr, Seiichi Sueoka
will also attend conference
sessions.
The opening plenary session will start at 11 a.m. in
Physics 201 Friday,
Group   discussion    in    the
afternoon will start at 4 p.m.
GORDON ARMSTRONG
. . . Campus wheel
in Buchanan 202, 203, 204
and 205 Friday.
Perinbam will report on the
seminar this summer in Yugoslavia at 7.30 p.m, in Buchanan 106 Friday.
For round table discussions
delegates will be divided into
four group;:
1. Maritime, Prince Edward
Island, Newfoundland, Nova
Scotia  and New  Brunswick,
2. Quebec,
3. Ontario.
4. Manitoba, Saskatchewan,
Alberta and British Columbia.
Delegates will be taken on
a lour of Vancouver Saturday by sightseeing bus and
will be entertained that night
at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
F. Ronald Graham, 6101
North West Marine Drive.
Delegates will be housed in
the four theological colleges
at UBC during the conference. PAGE TWO
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 7, 1953
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Student subscriptions $1.20 per year (included in AMS fees). Mall
subscript ons $2.50 per year. Published'" three times a week
in Vancouver throughout the University year by the Student
Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of
Britisn Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed herein are those
of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of
the Alma Mater Society or the University. Letters to the Editor
shou.j not be more than 150 words. The Ubyssey reserves the
riglv to cut letters, and cannot guarantee publication of all letters
received. ._,«, ^.^..j
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF,   DAVE ROBERTSON
Managing Editor, Barrie Cook        City   Editor,   Barbara   Bourne
Chief Photographer, Mike Sone        Features Editor, Mary Wilkins
Editor, Special Editions —Rosemary Kent-Barber
Assistant City Editor, Kerry Feltham
SENIOR EDITOR, JUDY IIARKER
Reporters and Desk:—Pat MacGregor, Ann Gordon, Judy
Frain, Coralyn Kerr, Irene Foerster, Robert Sterling and Bryan
Carson.
Are We Clods?
Ours, we are told, is one of the most beautiful campuses
in the world.
This being so, we are disturbed to see the campus desecrated with litter, as it has been this term.
Especially disgraceful is the area in front of the library,
which every noon hour is besmirched with milk cartons,
lunch papers and used kleenex.
We do not object, of course, to people discarding milk
cartons, lunch papers, and used kleenex. There is certainly
no point in keeping them.
However, the university administration has cannily
foreseen that people will want to discard their milk cartons, etc.
This is why they have placed waste receptacles in various places about the campus, including two very large ones
directly in front of the library.
Their assumption was that those who use this campus
rubbish will place this rubbish in the rubbish containers.
Their assumpeion was that those who use this campus
will desire to preserve its natural beauty.
Their assumption was that students are not clods.
These are not unreasonable assumptions.
Parasitic
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Recently I had the pleasure
of writing you a letter of
thanks that you duly printed in
your issue of October 2. It is
now my duty to point out to
you that in the printed version
there exists a serious blunder:
my surname has been given a
parasitic "a".
We "Mcs" and "Macs" boast
proud names; we are sensitive
about their spelling. I am a
"Mc". I always spell my own
name correctly and I assume
that others will clo me the courtesy of writing it correctly.
So far this term, I have no
major criticisms to make of the
content of The Ubyssey. But
you still need a competent
proof-reader.
Very truly yours,
Malcolm  F.   McGregor
look as if they had been dragged through the bush backwards, but that is their problem. Better to have an occasional Frump or Hick, than
Regimentation.
Even if 1 have to be the only
individual in the whole ten
thousand, no second rate fashion tout is going to panick me
into the uncomfortable, unpractical, archaic, ugly and expensive ^attire worn by our dowdy
European counterparts,
Yours truly,
JUAN JOSE FULFORD
Regimentation
EditoV, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Jackets and ties indeed! in
the name of freedom and nonconformity let's kill this clothes
argument once and for all.
The majority of male students on this campus have to
work hard all summer to support themselves, whilst many
female students are supported
by their parents. After this
disastrous summer some of lis
are lucky to have the price of
a haircut,
Next year the fees will go up.
The price of books rises hourly
and spare-time jobs are nonexistent.
If I had any money to spare
it certainly wouldn't go on draperies.
Sure, there are many undergrade (male and female), who
Courageous
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
May I record my appreciation of the wise and courageous
article by Watson Thompson in
your last issue, and of The
Ubyssey for getting discussions
as important as this into the
paper,
I'd also like to say that I
found The Ubyssey more valuable than the local newspapers
in giving an account of the
universily sympos ium
speakers—some of whom were
hopelessly muffled by microphones.
I wonder if everybody realized how much more important The Ubyssey is becoming?
Now that, along with our other
educational trials, the need for
communication   witness the
Jubilee    Jumble -— is    greater
than ever.
This doesn't just mean efficient communication, however
(a la Organization Man): we
need vigorous debate.
The Ubyssey can be one of
our most valuable aids to educational health.
LEONARD MARSH,
School of Social Work
Critics' Critic
Is Criticized
By  IAN  McNAIRN
Professor of Fine Arts
A letter in last week's Ubyssey pointed out the weaknesses
and shortcomings of art criticism. Although this was directed particularly to the page
of Criticism and Reviews of
The Ubyssey the letter might
have been equally pertinent if
applied to any periodical in this
country,
Contemporary art is exciting,
stimulating, confusing, full of
variety and the exposition of
originality, but those who write
on the subject are seldom capable of conveying any of this
through their language. They
end up with mild cliches or
wild vituperations which are
tedious and meaningless. In
general they are unable to illuminate, chiefly, interest, or excite.
Art critics are faced with a
real challenge and responsibility in our time and as yet there
are few who have proved
themselves equal to this challenge.
Mr. Shiletto is disturbed by
what he has read about art exhibitions and states that writing
on the subject takes two forms
—review and criticism.
Possibly this should be increased to three.
First of all is the report — a
straight-forward and brief description of the exhibition without personal interpretation.
Secondly is the review which
would include in addition to
the report some personal comments on the part of the reviewer which would relate the
exhibition to other works or
shows or might clarify the purpose of the exhibition. In this
case   the   reviewer   would   re
quire a knowledge of all art
activities in the community and
would require a good background for his subject.
Thirdly, is the criticism
where the critic must interpret,
judge and evaluate what he
sees for a broader understanding by the public and by the
artist, This would require a
much more intimate knowledge and experience as well as
the poetic sense referred to by
Mr. Shiletto, I interpret this
poetic sense as the ability to
translate the aesthetic sensitivity into the restrictions of the
written word. The good critic
should have the uncanny nack
of revealing an essential meaning or value which the public
had missed.
I would take exception, however, to Mr. Shiletto's suggestion that criticism should not
be attempted in this paper.
Student publications are the
best training ground in this
country for professional journalism, including criticism.
If we want to see standards
raised we must begin right here
and now. Avoidance of criticism will contribute nothing.
Surely the understanding and
broad-mindedness which belong
to university life will accept
and forgive the shortcomings
of student criticism as much as
they should refuse to accept
and forgive the shortcomings
of professional criticism.
How can a critic learn his
trade without practicing it?
Practice of any kind requires
perseverence in the practitioner and patience in the audience. Let's have more practice, perseverence and patience.
Let's have more criticism.
Let me thank you for your
patience in listening to a critic
of the critic of the critic.
Keep   Red   China
Out   Of   the   UN
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
In the September 30th issue
of The Ubyssey, I read that the
Student Christian Movement
National Council have passed
a resolution asking the Canadian Government to recognize
Communist China.
I feel I have to elucidate this
question from its different but
I think, more Christian-like
side, all the more because the
thirteenth session of the U.N. is
now holding a meeting about
this matter.
While Communist China is
sending a message by cannonade to the U.N. for a recognition we are passing a resolution
to our government supporting
lhe attacker in the name of the
peace.
When the U.N. was established the founders, the victor
great power, got permanent
seals in the Security Council
which have the privilege of decisions Nationalist China was
one of the victors, in the second
World War, but not Communist
China.
I wonder whether it would
be rightful to expel the representative of a country, which
was fighting for us, from the
Security   Council  and   put  an
aggressor in it instead of him.
But if we don't look at the
matter whether it it legal or
not to overshadow a country
which is a member of the Great
Power, I put a question: may
a Government represent a nation which oppresses it? The
answer is simple: without election no representation.
The democratic principle
and the Christian spirit must
not agree with the idea that a
despot would represent a people without having behalf of
them by an election. I mean
by a right election not by a
you-nuist-vote election in a
communist   one-party  system.
What an odd thing when a
government claims for a free
representation without permit-
ling the name to the people
whom it wants to represent.
It's true that there are some
representatives in the U.N.
who are in the same boat, but
we are not supposed to help to
continue this immoral situation
until despots become a majority,
It is anyway necessary to
unbutton the U.N. waistcoat
and button it up again but well.
Yours sincerely,
Somebody who lived
ten years in a country
under communist regime
Campus
Beat
By AL FORREST
thing
for   bull-
"Ya-hi!    Torn!
I've   got   a
fights.
Ever since I saw the movie
"Torero!" and read the novel
"Moment of Truth" I was hot
for the taurine spectacle.
So I took off for Mexico to'
become a genuine pseudo aficionado.
At San Diego I ran into a
tiny group of intellectuals and
Mexican expatriates who formed a Bull Club. They started
a publication with a rather unfortunate name.
I was walking down a side
street and a man came up to
me. "Senor," he said, pushing
the publication in my face,
"have you read the latest Bull
Sheet?"
Needless to say I hadn't.
He told me he was a real
aficionado and that he had
even been in a ring with a bull.
It was a very brief encounter
however, and he described how
he jumped out of the ring shaky
of legs, pale of face and wet of
pants.
"You have no idea," he said,
"how great the pleasure is to
see the bulls down in the ring.
I go all the time."
He told me that in the corrida a bull is never hurt except
in self defense. In placing the
two banderillas the matador
profiles his body trying to excite the bull to attack. When
the bull gets too close the matador jabs with the banderillas.
Then the matador profiles
again, enticing the bull.
I knew a girl at high school
they should have named "Matador."
I arrived in Mexico in the
"off" season, as I didn't get to
see a corrida. Maybe it was
just as well. I could have spent
my summer's savings. Average price is about four dollars,
but good fights will cost twenty
dollars, and for one special affair they charged seventy-five
dollars a seat. That event inspired the book debt in the
afternoon.
.Since I got back I have been
wrinng letters trying to get
someone to promote a bullfight
in B.C. I'm sure bulls would
draw thousands to Empire Stadium — people as well as flies,
I'm still working on it.
I'm sure every student at
UBC is eager to see some gigantic bull — so keep watching
this column.
CLASSIFIEDS
~PRIVATE LESSONS and coa-
ching for examinations in English, French and German. Phone
BA. 8783.
WANTED—Ride for 2 girls
from 4th Ave. and Larch to UBC.
Call Ailsa, CH. 0846.
WANTED — Ride for 9.30's
Monday through Saturday. Ph.
KE. 3508-M.
WANTED -Ride tn OHmvn or
nmm jn the last week of October.
Willing to share exocrines and
driving. Contact Chandra Dent,
of Chem. Eng, or phone ALma
0727-M.
WTLJ, the owner of the Ik-ht-
green Chev. who gave me a lift
out from the campus Monday at
3.30, please phone Jim at ALma
027-Y re umbrella. Tuesday, October 7, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
CLUB NOTES
CCF Speaker
Here Wednesday
The campus CCF Club is pr
National Secretary of the CCF,
8, in Buchanan 104.
Hamilton was born at Brin-
ston. near Ottawa, Ontario, in
1928, and received his early
education there. He later studied at the University of Saskatchewan where he received a B.A.
and B.Sc. in Agriculture.
Hamilton received his M.A.
from Queen's University.
He has had wide experience
in the CCF party, both in the
youth and adult movements. He
was president of the National
CCF youth movement for four
years, and has been a member of
the party's National Council
since 1952.
In 1951, he represented the
party at the founding conference
of the 60 million-member Socialist International at Frankfurt,
Germany.
PHILOSOPHY CLUB
The Philosophy Club of the
University is providing a series
of lectures to be held in Buchanan 106 on Thursday noons.
This lecture series, starting
this week, will try to demonstrate the pertinence of Philosophy to other fields of study.
The first lecture will be given
by Mr. J. Zilber, of the English j
Department,  and Dr. A. Stroll,
of the Philosophy Department.
Both Mr. Zilber and Dr. Stroll
are well-known lecturers on
campus.
Topic is ''Philosophy and Poetry — the Statement of Existence," Thursday, October 9, at
12.30 in Buchanan Building,
Room 106.
EL CIRCULO
El Circulo is sponsoring iheir
annual "Spanish Weekend" from
Saturday morning to Monday
noon.
It will be held at the UBC
Forestry Lodge on Loon Lake,
near Haney.
Everything will be in Spanish
style — the conversation, the
meals, the dancing, the entertainment and the skits.
There will be games, singing,
fireside and rowing on the lake.
Faculty members will attend
to see that things are properly
supervised.
El Circulo hopes this weekend
will be a great success, for they
are having a fine Peruvian accor-
dianist,   and  possibly  a   profes-
B. C. VARSITY -
RIP!   RIP!   RIP!
As another of its manifold services, your friendly Ubyssey
herewith presents a traditional
UBC cheer, which was revived
at Leadership Conference:
Kitsilano, Capilano, Siwash
Rock;
Kla-how-ya Tillicum, Skoo-
kum Walk;
Hi ya Mamook, Mucka,
Mucka zip;
B.C. Varsity, rip, rip, rip!
V-A-R-S-I-T-Y!    Varsity!
Clever, what?
Organization    Explained
Canadian    Government
LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS
F Jflfc LUSH-wuve jew
UA6 SINCE YOUVE 0EEM
^T IN THIS CLASS.
by Dick Bibler
esenting Mr. Carl Hamilton, the \
at 12.30 on Wednesday, October j
sional Mexican  "Mariachi"  singer.
The attendance is limited to
fifty.
Those interested may register
at the Fall General Meeting of
El Circulo, to be held in Buchanan 205 today at noon.
TO PRESENT FILM
On Thursday next, the UBC
Sports Car Club will present a
film of the 1957 Mille Miglia.
Preceding this film will be
the first business meeting of the
current year. The meeting will
serve to introduce the executive
to the new members and to outline the activities to be included
in the Club agenda.
Films in the near future will
include an excellent account of
a tour to Moscow undertaken by
a Hillman Sedan a year ago.
All new and prospective members arc urged to turn out to this
— the introductory meeting of
this interesting campus organization,
FINE ARTS
The first event of this season's
Fine Arts Committee and the
Student's Special Events Committee program will be a poetry
reading by Marianne Moore.
She will give a reading of her
own work on Wednesday, October 8, at 12.30 in the Auditorium.
Anthony Nutting will be the
second figure to be presented.
Mr. Nutting, who resigned
from the British Cabinet during
lhe Suez Canal Crisis, will speak
Dii October 17.
Drips Frosh Included
Nurses Awaiting Bloody
squcamishness and not lack of
numbers that cause their poor
showing.
The blood drive continues all
this  week,  go  to  the Armoury
any day from 9.30 a.m. to 4.30
! p.m.
Can You Face
An Audience
by Ubyssey Staff Reporter
Drive for blood is on its way
for 1958. By 4 p.m. Monday
afternoon 256 pints had been
donated.
There's still a long way to
go for that objective of 3000
pints, but officials hope the response will be greater than in
past years. Objective for the
'57 drive was 2000 pints, of
which only 1462 pints were realized. This year they want lo
go over the top.
The high donors in the inter-s     A    public    speaking    course,
faculty   competition   last   year   sponsored by the UBC Debating
were the Aggies, closely follow-   Union,    begins   this   week   foi
ed by the Pharmacies, Foresters   UBC students,
and Engineers. Instructing the course will bi
Competition is expected to be   Dr. Reid Campbell,
more   fierce   with   Faculty   par-       There   will   be   two   sections
ticipating. one   on   Mondays   from  3.30  to
But there are always a few 4.30 in Hut L2, and the other or
yellow-blooded types in the. Wednesdays from 3.30 to 4.30
crowd. s in Hut L2.
The responsibility for thc lack ! The course will be run for
of response to the call for blood ten weeks; and the cost for the
seems to lie largely with the , full course is five dollars, plus
body of wonderful and weird , the fifty cent membership fee
students called the frosh, ; in the Debating Union.
Another   section   of   the   stu-       Individual   attention   will   be
dent body lhat doesn't seem in-
given,   and   all   aspects   of  pre-
terested   is   the   feminine   part, j paring and giving speeches will
For every part of blood donat-: be discussed.
ed by the girls, five are donated j     Those interested in taking the
by the men.
Sure, the girls are outnumber-
course   should   attend   the   Debating Union's general  meeting
ed   3   to    1,   but   it's   usually' today at 12.30 in Buchanan 202
A new Government booklet,
"Organization .of the Government of Canada" published by
the authority of the Secretary
of State, is now available at $2
a  copy,
This information is not new,
but for the first lime i.s available issued in comparatively
short form, documented and indexed.
"Organization of the Government of Canada" deals with the
entire governmental structure—
th.e Parliament of Canada, the
Judiciary and the Executive,
beginning with the office of |
Governor-General, Senate, Com-!
mons and Public Service, with
definite synopses of their functions and power.
Dealt with, as well as the 22:
branches of Canadian govern-!
ment, are the crown corpora-1
tions, boards and commissions, j
from the CNR and CBC to the.
Historic Sites Commission. !
HUNGRY RAVEN
CROWS AGAIN
The Raven's editor, Desmond Fitzgerald, today announced that contributions
arc needed. All items should
be taken to the Publications
Office, North Brock. The
deadline is October 20th.
U.B.C. Film Society Tuesday Noon Series
Season Passes available at the clour, $1.00.
TO-DAY'S PROGRAMME, 15c or by pass.
MAGOO'S MASTERPIECE —
"The Roadrunner";     Pepe le Pew,
JAZZ DANCE --
Introduction to Jazz,
Tuesday Feature ,:$.:J0 and 8.15
BREAD, LOVE and DREAMS
Starring GINA LOLLOBRIGIDA and co-
starring Vitlorio de Siea, Comedy-Drama
awarded the Italian Oscar.
Thursday, October !),  12.30
Josef von  Sternberg's
THE BLUE ANGEL
Marlene Dietrich and Emit Jannings
Filmsoc General Meeting Wed. Noon
Six Honored
By Mens Frat
Six students were elected to
membership in Sigma Tau Chi,
the Men's Honorary Fraternity,
Wednesday.
They are Rod Dobell, Arts IV;
John Helliwell, Commerce IV;'
John Davidson, Graduate Studies in forestry; Grant Macdonald, Law III; Don Shore,
Physical Education IV; Rod
Smith, Medicine II.
Present members are Gordon
Armstrong, president, Bill Ballentine, Marc Bell, Charlie Connaghan, Brad Crawford, Ted
Hunt, Mike Jeffery, Don McCallum, Jim McFarlan and Ben
Trevino,
OHWHERE, OHWHERE
DID ASIAN FLU GO?
No cases of Asian flu have
been reported at Wesbrook
this term.
UBC   was   hard   hit   by   this
type of flu in October, 1957.
In The Dark?
We Were Too
The power failure which
blacked out part of the campus
Thursday was caused by construction work in a ditch opposite the Wesbrook building.
A construction worker ripped
out a section of main cable by
mistake, according to a Buildings and Grounds official.
Areas affected were the
library, physics building, AMS
office, home economics, Wat-
Memorial Gymnasium and the
Brock.
Power was restored in under
Iwo hours.
DOUG'S
On-ZOO
fnctcnU
FREDDY the FOX
Who says:
A fox is so smart he has to
be careful not to outsmart-
himself. I'm being smart and
extra careful when I say . . .
For your Fall Wardrobe
drop in and see our new,
exciting, bulky knit ",'-
shirts at the . . .
shirt 'n
tie bar
592 SEYMOUR
(at Dunsmuir)
Qomsb hv muL Ik PAGE FOUR
THE   UBYSSEY
m\
Tuesday, October 7, 1958
Watch Our Budget Grow!
WORLD UNIVERSITY
SERVICE
WOMEN'S  ATHLETIC
CLUBS
DEVELOPMENT FUND
(For  Student Residences)
o o
UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETIES
ADMINISTRATION
CLASSIFIEDS
LOST — Black ring binder
with notes, Please leave at Lost
and Found in Brock Store.
LOST — Gold wrist watch.
Finder please return to AMS
office or to Hul 34, Room 3, in
Acadia Camp.
FOR SALE — Portable Typewriter (German make), good
condition, $40.00. Telephone
AL 3172-Y after 5 p.m.
LOST—One hammer on Clubs
Day. Telephone KE 3774-R.
This page is yet another graphic illustration for those who
cannot read.
It clearly points up the spiralling inflation facing the campus.
These cartoons depict the proportion of this year's budget
spent on each major campus
activity.
Especially challenging to the
student mind is the 7% increase
in activities labelled "OTHER".
m
OTHER
ACCIDENT. BENEFIT FUND
A.M.S.   BUDGET   1957 - 1958
Brock Hall Extension    $43,577.50
Men's Athletic Committee  37,130.50
World University Service Committee  9,715.50
Accident Benefit Fund  5,765.50
Undergraduate Societies   6,180.00
Brock Art Fund  1,293.90
Brock Management Fund  4,317.50
NFCUS     2,933.75
Women's Athletics     5,260.89
Registration  Photos  ._   2,622.69
Publication  Board       17,429.35
University Clubs Committee   5,533.00
Administrative and General Expenses   22,451.58
Net Expenditure  $164,211.66
BROCK MANAGEMENT
A.M.S.   BUDGET   1958-1959
Development fund (for student residences)  $47,300
Brock Extension Payments   46,000
Men's Athletics  39,100
Administration   (Schedule   1;      _. 22,000
Publications  12,500
World University Service  9,200
Accident Benefit Fund  6,200
Undergraduate Societies  _, 6,200
Women's Athletics  5,500
Clubs    5,000
Brock Management     4,550
NFCUS    3,150
Conferences (inc. WUSC Assembly)  3,100
Campus Events (Schedule 2)  2,750
Registration Photos and Cards  2,100
Art Fund      1,400
Radio Society     950
Margin       11.000
$228,000
PUBLICATIONS
MEN'S  ATHLETICS
BROCK   EXTENSION
PAYMENTS
LOST —  Urgently  required,
one file folder and two binders
containing Lab. work for essay :
on  Electronic Synthesis of Mu-'
sic.   Anyone   with   information
contact Murray Thorn, KE 0576-1
M or Electrical Engineering De
partment.
**  Sit4    Watcher
There'll Be Some Red Faces At Noon
Full time member of the literati Desmond Fitzgerald and
Pro-Con  boss Brian Smith  had
a slight tiff on Clubs days as a
result of an argument about
Membership for Fitzgerald.
Neither would speak to the
other for days. Communication
between them was facilitatd by
Jack Giles, who repeated messages back and forth.
* *   *
A.s a result, we have a duel
on our main mall tomorrow at
noon. The principals: D, Fitzgerald and B. Smith.
The Seconds: Jack Giles and
Terry O'Brian. The Judge: lawyer Graham Moseley. The weapons: Twenty aged tomatoes at
five places. Fitzgerald will be
wearing his goulashes, and his
beautiful straw boater. Do go
and see it. You can call Smith
a Red when it's over.
And see Fitzgerald's tomato
goulashes.
* *   *
. . , Some of the Alpha Delts
at the AD housewarming have
been wondering where the girl
in the red slip and potato sack
got to. They've got some potatoes and no place to put them.
. . . Probies    at    St.    Paul's
hospitals can't go on any more
exchange parties this year. I
wonder why . . ,
Somebody tells me that the
boys at Union College have had
some very interesting nights
out lately—in the vicinity of
Mary Bollert.  .  .
■k    *k    *k
About the two busiest people
over the weekand were Leadership Conference chairman Peter
Meekison and K. P. girl Cheryl
White. Two hard workers who
deserve a good big thank you.
■k    *    *
Who was it we saw Saturday
night taking an axe to the dinner gong, a la J. Arthur Rank?
Hmm? Oh well, they can patch
it up.
The weekend uncovered a
couple of ukelele wizards, one
Larry Burr and the other MAD-
man Don Shore . . . We were
regaled with your giddy persiflage, boys .  .  .
•k    -k    *k
Lawyers Mike Jefferies and
Sallye Delhridge just about
didn't go to the Leadership conference Friday night. The boat
just left the dock when Mike
and Sally appeared on the float.
So   the   boat   came   back   and
£?
Mike,   Sally   and   little   Elderberry jumped on . . .
A little organizion called the
Blue Cow held their first regular meeting this Saturday
night . . .I'm told their slogan
is "help stamp out the WCTU"
is it true, Bob?
•k    -k    *k
In any case, about the truest thing I've heard today is
how soft and fuzzy the crew
neck sweaters from Scotland
being sold in the Cavalier
Shop are. (Shetland wool, yet.
and in all sorts lovely colors).
Feel the material. They're
terrific. Cavalier Shop is right
on Forty-first near Dunbar.
So near, and yet some of those
far-out clothes! Tuesday, October 7, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE FIVE
SEVERAL DISCUSSION GROUPS at the annual leadership
conference were held outside. These student leaders do not
appear to be affected by the beauty of their surroundings as
they busily make notes. This is the fourth year the conference has been held.   Both faculty and students attended.
p
1
z
z
A
at the SNACKERY Granv
Heat 15th
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fioidJL
BARBARA
Gain Confidence,   Savoir-Faire
By Better Grooming, Speech, Personality and the many other
Factors lo Improve Yourself.
BE 50% MORE BEAUTIFUL — Make your University claim
the most attractive girls in Canada. Remember your future
is being molded now. We are starting a special course at a
nominal fee for University students only.
r
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EARN A $1000 NEW YORK SCHOLARSHIP
Top fashion model will win a trip to New York for three
fabulous weeks, two of which will be spent al the famous
Powers' School. Complete new wardrobe supplied by one
of Vancouver's leading fashion houses,   It could be YOU.
2431 Granville   (ar Broadway)   BA. 9333
DAY, EVENING OR SATURDAY CLASSES
10.30 a.m. to 9.30 p.m.
Tree' Totems
A-Cards For
Higher Fees
AMS treasurer John Helliwell
proposed at the Leadership Conference an inclusive fee programme to enable every student
to receive his Totem, Handbook
and A card "free".
The plan would add five dollars to the 246-dollar fee already
charged but would enable the
student body to buy the totem
and A card at about half price.
"The students are already paying for most of the athletics but
do not have the right to see the
games free. For another ten percent they'll be able to go to all
the games."
"This system will also eliminate the long line of high-
pressure salesmen in the Armouries at Registration," added
Helliwell.
Motz and Wozny
548 Howe St.       MU.3-4715
Custom  Tailored   Suits
for  Ladies  and  Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted suits
modernized in the new
single    breasted    styles.
Special   Student   Rates
MODERN
JAZZ
QUARTET
GEORGIA
AUDITORIUM
Fri., October 10
at 8.30 p.m.
Tickets:    Modern Music
$1.75,   $2.25,  $2.50  and
$3.00 inc. Tax.
INCORPORATED   Z***   MAY   1670,
Shop daily 9 to 5:30 Phone MU. 1-6211
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* r SIAM
WORLD
IMPORT
r Alrv
From over 40 different countries of the World, East to West, North to South,
thousands of exciting, interesting, exotic or useful items have been brought
in for HBC's gala World Import Fair.
Hy Land and Sea and Canadian Pacific Airlinees Craftsmen, Artisans and
Artists have arried in Vancouver to show you how people in other lands live
and   work.
Be sure to visit HBC and see this wonderful 9-day World Import Fair! PAGE SIX
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 7, 1958
SPORTS SHORTS
In soccer action over the weekend  the Varsity eleven  of the |
Second Division dropped a  4-1 ,
verdict to Columbus, while the
UBC squad of the Third Division
lost 3-1 to the Bob Lee crew,
* *   *
Swimming workouts are being j
held at 12.30 to 1.30 and 4.30. j
There are still many openings ,
left on the Varsity Swimming
squad. Interested swimmers are
requested to contact Mr, Pete;
Lusztig or to turn out at the pool ]
any week-day during the above j
mentioned hours,
* *   *
The regular meeting of the
M.A.A. will be held, tomorrow
at 12.30 p.m. All team managers
are reminded that they are to
attend these meetings.
* *   *
Play in the Senior Women's
Grass Hockey League saw Varsity whitewash North Vancouver 3-0. However Ex-Tech stopped the UBC aggregation by an
identical   3-0   score  in   another ' Deskmen and Reporters: Audery Ede, Elaine Spurrill, Irene
game, ! Frazer, Flora MacLeod, Tony Morisson, Alan Dafoe, John Barker.
Cavaliers
Down JV's
Ian MacDonald scored the
lone UBC Jayvee touchdown as
the JV's went down to a 30-6
defeat.
Sunday, the UBC team met
the Seattle Cavaliers in an unscheduled football match.
The much heavier and experienced Seattle crew had little
trouble in disposing of the smaller UBC team.
The UBC squad is coached by
Dick Millar and has played various games todate and have many
more scheduled contests. This
year, the JV's will be able to
play Junior teams from the different American colleges in the
Evergreen Conference.
TRACK AND FIELD members and all others interested in training and competing in track
are asked to attend a meeting in the War Memorial Gym, Thursday, October 9, at 12.45 p.m.
An outline of proposed meets, training schedules and methods will be given.       Photo by Sone
SPORTS EDITOR, BOB BUSH
JIM MOORE FIRST
IN RECORD RACE
Wiry and strong UBC Cross-Country ace, Jim Moore,
showed tremendous endurance on Saturday as he took first
place honors in a four point 2-mile course ran at Stanley Park.
Moore's fast  time
*<£>*:
y*
ANNOUNCEMENT
m
ne?
ffcs
by the
ROYAL   CANADIAN
►:»J
of 21.54
minutes was 12 seconds faster
than the new record set on the
course only one week before.
The record set last week was
22.06 minutes.
ALSO UNDER
Paul Henclen of the Vancouver
Olympic Club, who had set the
previous record, placed second
in Saturday's race. Henden Was
also under the time set last week.
AVY
OFFICER   CAREERS   FOR  UNIVERSITY   MEN - IMMEDIATE  OPENINGS
You con complete your present Universily course with subsidization, summer employment
and other benefits—and begin your career as a professional naval officer NOW:
10
The naval officer is a member of a challenging
and highly progressive profession. A wide
range of opportunity is open to university
undergraduates who can qualify for naval
cadetships today. There are two plans leading
to commissioned rank in the Navy about which
every undergraduate should know.
ROTP
The Regular Officer Training Plan, as it applies
in the Navy, is now open not only to those in
science and engineering faculties, but also to
those in other baccalaureate courses with at
least two years physics, and mathematics in- |
eluding calculus. It leads to a permanent commission in the regular force. Those accepted
receive basic naval training; pay and allow
ances during the university year of $128
monthly plus tuition fees, and a further allowance for books and instruments. Uniforms are
furnished by the Navy. Full-time annual training includes foreign cruises. Thirty days annua!
leave is granted with full pay.
UNTD
The University Naval Training Divisions (open
to students in any faculty) provide basic naval
training, including assured summer employment, and lead to commissions in the Royal
Canadian Navy (Reserve).
Cadets in the UNTD in acceptable courses may
transfer NOW to ROTP. Former cadots now
holding commissions in the RCN(R) are also
eligible for transfer to ROTP.
r
i.
Full information on officer careers
in the Royal Canadian Navy, and
service in the Royal Canadian
Navy (Reserve} can he obtained
horn the tri-service Resident Staff
Officer on the campus, or by forwarding the coupon to Officer Careers, Naval Headquarters, Ottawa.
J OFFICER   CAREERS, •
I NAVAL  HEADQUARTERS, \
• OTTAWA,   CANAOA, I
• Please  mail  me,  wlhoul olili()alion, luilhcr ir.loi motion on  Qffxer •
I Caieeis   in   /lie   Royal   Canadian   Navy. J
• Name , , , ,  '
• Pivsenl Mailing Address , ,,, „„„,,.,.„ I
 Telephone ,.,....., ,.,.,
.... '    facully	
II!: v.--..---"'
 Year ,  ;
ROYAL   CANADIAN
AVY
JIM MOORE
. . . sets record
UBC's Jack Burnett was third.
Other UBC runners competing
in the field of twenty-four athletes were Mike May, eighth,
and Bernie Barton, ninth,
Doug Van Ness, Stan Joughin
and Gorden AVilkio al-;o ran for
the UBC team.
UBC SECOND
On a tea.-a slanding the UBC
contingent placed second to Vancouver Olympic Club. Using
Ihe reverse scoring .system, VOC
won 18 to 21.
The UBC athletes are conditioning for the forthcoming B.C,
Cross - Country Championships
which are to be held, later this
month.
Double-B roasted Suits
CSONYKKTI-UI   INTO    NKW
inglc-Brcastcd Models
UNITED   TAIIORS
549   Granville     MU.   1-4649
J Tuesday, October 7, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE SEVEN
JACK HENWOOD evades the outstretched hands of a determined Seattle Rambler player. The
game was played wide open with clean and even playing. Seattle outscored UBC by two points
to win the game 27-25. The game was noted as one of the best contest played on campus for
some years. — Photo by J. F. Townesend
UBC BIRDS BEATEN 27-25
IN ACTION FILLED GAME
By BOB BUSH
Saturday, the Birds came
within two points of the Seattle
Ramblers in a wide-open, thrill-
packed football game, with the
Ramblers edging the UBC squad
27-25.
'BIRDS ARE GOOD
UBC Thunderbirds of 1958 are
good.
The 'Birds displayed outstanding ability both on offense
and defence.
The game, billed by many as
perhaps the best witnessed on
local gridirons to date this year
was played before a disappointingly small crowd of 1,000.
The Ramblers, an amateur
squad, was comprised of ex-
Evergreen and Coast Conference
players. A week before Saturday's game with UBC, the Ramblers defeated 1957 Evergreen
Conference runner-up, College
of Puget Sound, 27-7.
VASSOS OUTSTANDING
Principal ground gainer for
UBC was speedy Don Vassos.
Vassos also scored four touchdowns.
Vassos tallied 24 points on the
four touchdowns and picked up
46 yards while running and
caught passes for 76 yards. Vassos' first touchdown finished a
73-yard UBC march on the
Seattle goal line. UBC had been
held down to a scoreless first
quarter and were behind 14-0
before scoring their first, major.
UBC's Jim Beck recovered a
Seattle fumble on the Ramblers
five-yard line. With a three-
yard plunge, Vasso.s went over
for UBC's second T.D.
Jack Henwood converted,
leaving UBC one point from a
tie.
Ramblers went over for their
third touchdown, making the
score Seattle 20, UBC 13.
Running a ragged path through
attempting tacklers, Vassos carried the ball for 19 yards for his
third T.D. with the score standing at 20-19 in favor of the
Ramblers.
The convert attempt was unsuccessful.
SCORED WINNING T.D.
Seattle scored the winning
touchdown before the end of the
third quarter, but UBC was not
stopped in their attempts.
Early in the final quarter,
Henwood, beautifully protected
by a block by Roy Bianco, got
off a pass to Vassos. With a
Rambler player baering down on
the UBC carrier, Dave Barker-
stepped   in  with  a  clean  block
CHEERING NOT HELD
Due to unforseen difficulties, the Thunderbird Booster
Club was not able to hold the
Annual Frosh - E n gineers
Cheering contest. The contest
was to be held during the half-
time intermission at Saturday's football game.
that left Vassos in the open for
UBC's last touchdown.
UBC gathered more yardage
in the final count than did the
Ramblers as they gained 297
yards to 294.
HENWOQD-VASSOS GOOD
Tremendous       performances
were evident in most of the UBC
; squad, but both Jack Henwood
1 and Don Vassos stood out from
the  rest.    Henwood     was    the
actual  spark-plug of the  Birds,
| while   Vassos    performed    the
scoring chores.
Bill Crowford, Jim Beck, Roy
Jokanovich, and Roy Bianco
also did much in UBC's gallant
attempt for victory.
Follow the Birds to Rome
Now Is Rowers Slogan
By LORNE LOOMER
"Follow the Birds to Rome" is the ne\y slogan of the UBC
Rowing Crew. Training for the 1960 Olympic Games in Rome is
starting this fall for the crew.
European crews are already
working for the '60 Olympics,
many completely revising their
style through scientific research
and experiment.
The Russians, in particular,
are out to show the rowing world
that infinite training, research,
and conditioning, no matter what
the cost of such a programme is
the only way to athletic prominence and success.
DEVELOPED CREWS
Ten years ago, a Canadian,
Mr. Frank Read, single-handedly
took up the challenge that Canadians could compete successfully on an international athletic
level. Through a rigid Spartan
training program, Read develop-
WOMEN'S
SPORTS
NOTICES
SPEED    SWIMMING — The
first   practice   will   be   held   at
12.30   at   the   Empire   Pool   on
Thursday, October 9.
*   *   *
VOLLEYBALL — The orga-'
nizational meeting and first orac-
| tice of Women's Volleyball will
i be held at the Women's Gym on
j Thursday evening, October 9,
! from 6.30 till 8,00 p.m. Please
j bring strip.
YARDSTICK
Yardage
UBC
Seattle
Passes attempted
21
15
Passes   completed
11
12
Total yardage
297
294
Yards rushed
120
140
Yards passing
177
154
First downs
12
9
Converts attempted
4
4
Converts completed
1
3
ROME IN '60 is the hopes of these rowers as they start training now. A drive for prospective members and past crew
personnel will be held October 9 in the Brock Lounge at
8.00 p.m,
ed crews of world calibre.
In 1954 the UBC Thunder-
t)irds competed in the BEG on
the Vedder Canal, winning over
the traditionally superior English crew.
The following year, the Birds
travelled to the Royal Henley in
England to try for the Grand
Challenge Cup, symbolic of
world supremacy in rowing.
After defeating the Russians
in the semi-finals, UBC lost by
three feet to Pennsylvania.
WON GOLD MEDAL 1956
In 1956, found a group of UBC
oarsmen in Melbourne, Australia, for the 16th Olympiad. The
four-oared shell won a gold medal, the eight-oar won a silver
medal.
This summer, the crew participated in Wales at the British
Empire and Commonwealth
Games.
The largest contingent of oarsmen ever to leave UBC took part
in the British Empire and Commonwealth Games at Wales. The
eight-oared shell won a gold medal, while the two four-oared
shells won silver medals.
Now the oarsmen of this campus are facing a new and invigorating challenge — to compete
in Rome successfully, with new
members who probably have
never been in a shell before.
Successful UBC graduating
oarsmen have proved that it is
possible to attain International
athletic standards while gaining
a university education. Again
the challenge is put to men on
this campus, to show the world
that true amateurism still exists,
and thai, amateurs can compete
on the highest plateau possible.
Thursday, October 9, at 8 p.m.
the crew is holding its annual
recruiting drive in the Brock
Lounge, when the coming year's
program will be discussed. Seats
in the shells left vacant by graduating oarsmen must be filJed.
All prospective oarsmen are
welcome to meet, hear, and join
the present crew members who
want new buddies for Rome in
I960. PAGE EIGHT
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 7, 1958
"How They Went"
Ubyssey Tells All
Gee gang here it is.
The 1958 rushing list.
All  other line-ups appear on
the sports page.
ALPHA GAMMA DELTA
Jeannie Blackbourne, Marilyn
Buker, Donna Davidson, Mary-
Ann Elliott, Carol Haltalin, Al-
wynn McKay, Ann Martin, Jean
Mercer, Ellen Novosell, Marilyn
Peterson, Wendy Rosene, Jean
Shilvock, Sherry Sidenius, Pat
Valentine, Bonnie Vincent, Jackie Wilson.
ALPHA DELTA PI
Penny Bissell, Ruby Buick,
Susan Carey, Madeleine Carr,
Beverley Clarke, Karen Clark,
Elizabeth Cunliffe, Patti-Anne
Dunsmuir, Margaret Fitzgerald,
Bonnie Galloway, Ariel Gifford,
Marilyn Goodall, Annette Haw-
ryluk, Beverley Keuhl, Norma
Massey, Isobel Ogle, Gaetana
Robinson, Barbara Salonen,
Sharon Sutka,
ALPHA OMICRON PI
Karen Madore, Pat Roy, Joan
Sutton, Enid Underhill.
ALPHA PHI
Liz Boyd, Mary Cameron,
Fran Caswell, Sandra Dunmore,
Roberta Ferris, Pat Gillespie,
Margaret - Ann Gourley, Ilga
Gulbis, Liz Halley, Susan Kel-
sey, Wendy Patterson, Loraine
Rook, Arlene Tilley, Rosemary
Vale, Betty Wellburn.
GAMMA PHI BETA
Tani Campbell, Valerie Cap-
stick, Elaine Collins, Mary-Ann
Duncan, Bonnie Englebeen,
Lynn LaFarge, Elaine George,
Beth Hobbs, Betty Jacobson,
Carol Lang, Deanna McColl,
Lois Miller, Valerie Noble, Susan Prettie, Mamie Rogers, Sandra Seed, Carolyn Wallace.
DELTA GAMMA
Gillian Beevor - Potts, Gail
Burt, Linda Clark, Carol Dougherty, Ann Gordon, Shirley
Myers, Sharon Nicholls, Joan
Raikes, Sandra Sheppard, Lev-
ona Sleen, Margo Swanson,
Judy Stevens Libby Stokes,
Judy Todd, Marie Watchorn, Pat
Young.
KAPPA ALPHA THETA
Tricia     Armstrong,     Eleanor
Barons, Jane Bean, Lynn Begg,
Joy Bradley, Susan Campbell,
Marilyn Dinsmore, Barbara
Jenkins, Donna McLeod, Margaret Peebles, Heather Ramage,
Robin Ransome, Penny Stamp.
KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA
Wendy Barr, Roberta Cummins, Gretchen Farris, Irene
Foerster, Enid Green, Martha
Hugh-Jones, Barbara Keatley,
Sally Lyle, Lynn Mercer, Bren-
da Merrett, Mary O'Hagan,
Marcia Rowland, Wendy Sanderson, Daphne Whitelaw.
OUR LEADERS NOW
MAY READ BOOKLET
If you're blessed with natural leadership ability, you
can learn how to fufil your
role in effective leadership
through a new booklet published by the Fitness and Recreation CServices of the Department of National Health
and Welfare.
PHARMACY
KBPORTBR
By J.& M. BURCHILL
QUESTION:—Ls it true that
the State of Nevada requires trains to carry castor
oil?
ANSWER:—In Nevada, a
state law was enacted requiring all passenger trains
to carry castor oil!
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY
Wi Blocks East of Pool
AL. 0339
'TWEEN CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
up on Clubs Day, please attend.
* *   *
C.C.F. CLUB —presents Carl
Hamilton, CCF National Secretary speaking in Buchanan 104
at 12.30 Wednesday, October
8th. All welcome.
C.C.F. CLUB — General
Meeting will be held on Tuesday 7th October in Buchanan
212 at 12.30. Election of President, everyone out.
* *   *
CHESS & BRIDGE CLUB —
General Meeting at 7.30 Wednesday in the Brock Card Room
(underneath the AMS office) to
elect the new executive.
* *   *
EL CIRCULO —Today, noon,
fall General Meeting in Buchanan 205 to discuss the year's programme and register those persons planning to attend the
"Spanish Week-end". Non-members welcome,
* *   *
CRITICS' CIRCLE — Organizational meeting will be held in
Brock Stage Room at 8.00 p.m.
on October 14th. Those who
signed on Clubs Day and any
others interested, please attend.
U.B.C. CREW — Recruiting
Drive, 8.00 p.m. Thursday, Oct.
9th, Brock Lounge. Talk on this
year's activities, slides, refreshments. All men. on campus welcome.
* *   *
DANCE CLUB — General
Meeting Thursday, Oct. 9th at
12.30 in Buchanan 100. Election
of officers to be held. All members please attend.
* *   *
ASUS — Artsmen, if you registered late you can pick up
your Asus membership card in
Buchanan    115   between   12.30
! and 2.30, Monday to Friday.
I H*       *v       *v
M.A.D. (Laithwaite & Rugger
Club)—Rugby Club meets tomorrow at noon in 211 Memorial Gym. All interested please
attend. Organization and rules
changes disc-used.
* *     *
ALPHA OMEGA—First meeting of the Alpha Omega Society
will be held Wednesday noon in
Arts 201, All welcome.
* *   *
U.B.C.   FENCING   CLUB   —
First training Wednesday, Oct.
8th at 5.30 p.m. in the Armouries.
* *     *
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE  —
General   Meeting   will  be   held
Wednesday  noon   in   Buchanan
212. Everybody out please.
* *     *
C.C.F. CLUB — Hear Carl
Hamilton, CCF National Secretary at noon in Buchanan 104.
* *     *
DANCE CLUB — Ballroom
instruction begins Wednesday,
October 8th at 12.30 in the Clubroom. Everyone welcome.
* *     *
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION — Important
Genral Meeting Thursday 9th
in Buchanan 102. Kindly make
special effort as highly important matters are to be discussed.
* *     *
CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION—
Organizations meeting of the
CLU will be held in Buchanan
Building Room 214 Wednesday
noon.
* *     *
SAILING — Will all those
interested in sailing please meet
in Arts 106 Thursday at 12.30.
* *     *
MAMOOKS -- General Meeting for all members this Wednesday noon to discuss party
and elect officers. Clubroom is
Room  355 Brock Extension.
TRAIL    B.C
University town!
Queen's, U.B.C, McGill, Saskatchewan, Daf-
tiousie — name the University and we'll find
you alumni at Trail, Kimberley or soma
other Cominco operation.
Ves, there are men from every major
Canadian University here at Cominco. We've
got B.Sc's, B.A.'s and B.Com.'s, M.A.'s and
Ph.D's. You'll find them in all phases of our
operations from the new grads in the mines,
plants, laboratories or offices to the most
6enior men in our organization.
At Cominco they've found interesting and
THE CONSOLIDATED MINING AND SMELTINC
COMPANY OF CANAOA LIMITED
rewarding careers in their chosen fields.
They live in pleasant communities in magni-.
ficent western scenery where opportunities
for sport and relaxation are unexcelled.
Perhaps some of the members of your class
will join us in the big job of running one of
the world's largest metal and chemical enterprises, In any event, we're looking forward
to years of close association with all of you ,..
because metals and chemical products from
Cominco enter almost every facet of business, industry and every day living.
Head Office and Safes Offices*  *1S St. June* Street, West, Montreal, Quebec: ©«neral Office: Trait, British ColumbfaT
TADANAC BRAND METALS  •  ELEPHANT BRAND FERTILIZERS
V-
|,H«   HMhf »*'-«!«,** t Cj I t^jJJ_T » • *J* OiVMII A M O *t ^A. f     < MT|NM *.»_•_».» • •

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