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The Ubyssey Mar 19, 1959

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 QUORUM  NEEDED
BIG MEET TODAY
The annual spring A.M.S.
General meeting will be held
at noon today in the Armouries.
More than. 1,500 students, the
required quorum, are expected
to turn out to hear one of the
most eontroversal agendas in
years.
On schedule: possible motion
of censure against the Board of
Governors, - accusing them of
lack of leadership in the recent
.fight against a fee-increase.
Another possible motion calling for Greek fraternities to be
thrown off campus as organizations promoting "conformity"
and "bigotry."
An Engineer -sponsored
motion asking that 50 percent of
their Faculty be considered an
AMS General Meeting quorium.
A constitutional change calling for the substitution of the
going
| Co-ordinator     of     Publications
.> "2% for the Ubyssey editor on Council.
; A motion from the floor ask-
' ing that Student's Council members no longer be granted two
free tickets to every AMS event.
Other Constitutional changes
that will be discussed include
changes in the duties of the
Treasurer and the Secretary.
This year's Honorary Activity'
Award winners and a 1946 winner, Tony Greer, will be introduced to students.
Council President, Chuck Connaghan will make his annual report as will Treasurer, John Helliwell and M.A.D. Councillor,
Don Shore.
1958-59 Council members will
attend in full regalia to mark
their last official appearance on
campus.
coming
1959-60 members will take
over officially after the meeting.
The Ubyssey editorial board
are expected to attend in force
to prove they are a family newspaper.  .
The Engineering Faculty are
also' expected en mass. Engineers
have a long record of supporting
General Meetings.
The Greek fraternities and
sororities are expected to pack
the meeting in an effort to prevent passing of the eontroversal
"oust Greeks" motion from the
floor.
Most eontroversal motion of
all is expected to be the one calling for the removal of the Ubys*
sey editor from Council.
Following . the meeting old
Councillors are traditionally
washed in the lily-pond by well-
wishers. The bathing is carried
out ritually.
SMITH A GREAT
MAN' - ANDREW
"The death of Dr. Sidney
Smith removes a great Canadian, a great educator and a great
human being."
' Dean Geoffrey Andrew,
deputy to the President, said
Wednesday that Dr. Smith had
"a great human capacity for
friendship."
Dr. Smith died suddenly Tuesday at 2:50 p.m. EST at his
Ottawa apartment.
He was 62.
His death was apparently
caused by a heart attack. He had
been suffering from influenza
last week.
A coroner's report Wednesday
stated that Dr. Smith had been
"suffering from high blood pressure and had apparently been
working under high stress and
strain."
"Canada has lost a great man
and education a valued friend,"
Dean  Andrew commented.
jiidA state funeral has been planned for Thursday,
Dr. Simp's body will be flown
to his^native^AN'ova- Scotia and
touriafl there^Friday. -/^
Di/j Smith enroled -at, 14 „in'
Kingfc College'^: W&asor;, N.S.
and earned four college degrees.
There, at Dalhousie, and at Harvard Universities.
During the first World War
he served as a gunner at Vimy
Ridge and as a cadet in the
Royal Flying Corp.
He practised law briefly after
the war before becoming a
teacher and at 32, Dean of Dalhousie Law School.
Five* years later he became
President of the University of
Manitoba, the youngest University professor in Canada.
From there he moved to the
presidency of the University of
Toronto and two years ago entered the Diefenbaker cabinet as
External Affairs minister.
As an educator he played a
major role in developing the
idea of a system of Commonwealth exchange scholarships.
br. Smith had a flair for the
salty and unusual phrase.
He once descrbied the function of a university as that of
producing "the man or woman
wn^ has the capacity for dissent,
who qets up a resistance to mass
(Opniinued on Page 3)
S&   SMITH A GREAT
™ UBYSSEY
Vol. XLI
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 1959
No. 55
EDITORIAL BOARD
APPLICATIONS DUE
Applications for the following positions on the 1959-60
Ubyssey Editorial Board must
be submitted to Barb Biely
by 12:30 Monday, March 23.
Managing Editor,' City Editor, Copy Editor, Sports Editor, Critics Editor, Features
Editor, CUP Editor, Senior
Editor, Chief Photographer,
Cartoonist and Columnists.
UBYSSEY
PRAISED
The Ubyssey lias received congratulatory telegrams from
across the world following their
record-breaking telephone booth
triumph.
"It is a pleasure to see students in a big squeeze," commented Premier Bennett in a
wire received Wednesday.
This is an indication of the
strength of union which cannot
be broken, stated a IWA official
in a telephone interview.
Premier Smallwood - stated
that all of Canada rejoices in
the B.C.  triumph.
The Ubyssey was unable to
learn if he meant the new record or B.C.'s proposed labor
legislation.
Praise . was also received at
home.
"This sort of thing takes practice and UBC students have been
practicing the techniques of
over-crowding for years" stated
one university official."
Premier Manning announced
that the well-known "Solidarity
Forever" will be sung throughout Alberta Sunday in honor of
Ubyssey's triumph.
"Americans will long remember the Booth incident", said
President Eisenhower.
CONNAGHAN
REJECTED
Chuck Connaghan, retiring AMS president, has been
refused entry before the Bar of the House to congratulate
and criticize the provincial government.
Connaghan had requested permission to speak before
the Legislature' on the financial problems facing UBC
students.
He had also planned to congratulate the government for
instigating "a money for,marks" program which will go into
effect next year.
He made formal application March 9 for a hearing.
The Socred Cabinet rejected his request, stating that
the matters Which would be discussed had been fully covered during regular house debates.
"The government feels that, by virtue of the fact that
this Session will likely prorogue this week, plus the fact
that the major debates of the session have been concluded
at which time the subject matter of your petition was
thoroughly debated, your petition cannot be granted.    «s
The statement was contained in a letter from the provincial secretary, dated March 17.
The letter said the office of the Minister of Education
"is open to you at all times to make any presentations you
may deem advisable."
". . . the Executive Council will be pleased to receive
you should you desire such a meeting," the letter concluded.
WILL EDITOR
BE ON OR OFF
A constitutional change will be presented today that
could change a decades-old tradition.
The AMS constitutional change calls for the substitution of the Co-ordinator of Publications for the Editor-in-
Chief of The Ubyssey on Students' Council.
The Ubyssey editor has been sitting on Council since
the 1930's.       ■ .
The Co-ordinator of Publications is a new Council appointed position started last year.
The present AMS constitutional clause states that the
Editor-in-Chief is an ex-officio, non-voting member of the
Students' Council. PAGE TWO
THE     UBYSSEY
Thdrlrdsy, rMferch T», iWb
TVff UBYSSEY
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
•Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
„. Published three times a. week throughout the University year
iff Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
University of B,C. Editorial opinions expressed are those of the
Eflithi'ial'Board of The Ubyssey arid not necessarily those of the
Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
-•   Telephones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 and 14;
Business offices, AL. 4404; Local 15.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF,    ALAN FORREST
Managing Editor  Judy Frain
Shorts Editor  Bob Bush
Chief Photographer  C. Landie
Critics Editor  David Bromige
CUP Editor .7. Judy Harker
Associate Editors .... Rupert Buchanan, Rosemary Kent-Barber
sFight on agaiiist the fee hike at the General Meeting
today.
To Hell with" tne student councillor who feels this way
I about sttiiient enthiMasm.
sgivings Persist For
Cottege Of Education
By Prof. Malcolm F. McGregor
(Part  I)
There is' no doubt that .the
establishment of the College of
Education on the campus of
The University o f British
Columbia was greeted with
certain misgivings.
It may be that here and
there these misgivings persist.
That they existed in the first
instance can be explained quite
simply.
Many members of the Faculty of the University did graduate work or held teaching appointments at Universities in
the United States, where, at
least in the Faculties of Arts
and Science, Teachers' Colleges on the whole do not enjoy a high repute. This has
come about because so many
of them have been slaves to
progressive education, Have
carried method (the jargon is
"methodology") to excessive
lengths in opposition to knowledge, have developed a special
language ("pedagese") that is
unintelligible to the educated,
and have provided a haven for
mediocre teachers, weak students and professional football-
players. In a word, they earned
the reputation of being anti-
intellectual. These factors, I am
convinced, explain the attitude
of some members of the Faculty ouf our own College of Education.
There were, and there are,
others, who looked upon the
appearance of the College of
Education as a superlative opportunity to provide first-rate
education and training for
potential teachers of Canadian
children, an education free
from the charlatanry that is
associated all too often with
Teachers Colleges to the south.
No sensible man denies that
potential teachers of children
need training as well as education; no sensible man denies
that the course leading to the
Bachelor of Education must
therefore be Slighly different,
frbm that leading to the' Bachelor of Arts.
My own view is that the Col- .
lege has made a splendid start.
The curriculum of the future
secondary teacher includes a
large proportion of work that
is acceptable for the B.A.; I
continue to believe, on the
other hand, that all such students should be required to
study a foreign language, at
least one foreign language, at
the university - level, because
this kind of study is one of the
best broadening influences
that I know.
Ideals in the College of
Education are high. The Dean,
for example, constantly argues
that the key to sound education
is excellent teaching; efforjts
are made, I am told, to divert
the incompetent fro careers in
teaching; and I know that our
colleagues in Education are
making a vigorous contribution
to the current debate concerning the schools and education.
It may be said that practice
does not always conform to
principle; it has been my observation, nevertheless, that
high ideals are hotly pursued
by practice. The higher the
ideals, the more likely is the
practice to be close behind.
Teachersovithout ideals ought
to leave the profession; students without ideals should
never enter it.
LITTLE MAN ON^CAMPUS
'••IN ADPlTlON TO nmM TgACHfNS A<S^i<?MMertT£ ^MU
FACULTY MEMO'S ftpe gXtfECtEP TD'9FCtieOZ A CLU0.",
LETTERS to the EDITOR
Feeble, Gutless
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
To the students of University of B.C. I say this abqut the
$100 increase—"It's your Own
damned fault!"
Certainly I am very upset at
the prospect of paying an extra
$100 when I so firmly believe
in free education but I also
realize that nothing else could
be expected in view of the
feeble, whimpering, gutless
campaign carried out.
Just ask yourself if you really went to any great efforts to
fight against the increase. At
most, 70 per cent wrote jellylike little letters of disagreement—mild disagreement to
MLA's. The others didn't even
bother. Is this supposed to
educate the government and
public to our cause?
Don't dare blame the government, they only pay out where
necesafy. There are many pullers on the purse strings and
only those who pull hard get.
We didn't pull hard enough.
Speaking personally, I wrote
a 2000 word letter on the need
of free education, I wrote
another 2000 word letter criticising^ the financial allocations,
and finally I wrote petitioning
letters to cabinet ministers and
MLA's. Further, the two long
letters were mimeographed and
circulated to over 30 individuals and organizations in B.C.
soliciting support. All this at
my own time and expense.
I received three replys—one
from Robert Strachan, another
from the B.C. Federation of
Labour and the third was a
well presented personal letter
from Education Minister Peterson in which he enclosed an 80
paged copy of his budget
speech for my reference. All
replys were courteous and personally written.
On the other hand I did not
receive any word from people
like Arthur Laing, Deane Fin-
laysbh, Alma Mater Society,
Board of Governors, etc.
It must be entirely obvious
that if everyone had taken the
effort I had to spread the university word to the public and
government, we would have
stood a far better chance to win
the battle.
The Student Council has led
a very tender campaign followed by one of the world's
largest crying demonstrations
ever seen. Where the blazes
are their guts? Why quit now?
No, I shall continue to support Social Credit. As for the
rest of the students, I feel no
pity for you. I only pity the
small minority willing to act
but who are unable, you well-
to-do students remember this—
you have by your indifference
sold your hardworking mates
down the river, and you prospective bortus-babies who don't
have to worry—there will be
more fee increases yet.
I sincerely hope that future
generations will recover some
of the guts supposedly found in
the free thinking, independent
mind.
Thanks for nothing "classmates."
Jerry   Divine,
Arts   Sc.   3.
Armpits
Editor, The  Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
At the General Meeting we
will see if the engineers are
going to behave as mature
students or whether they will
once again prove, by setting
off firecrackers, and throwing
people into the lilypond, that
they are just a bunch of "armpits."
Stanley  de  Mann,
Commerce 2.
Word From Tokyo
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I am the exchange student to
Keio University from U.B.C.
and am quite sorry that I did
not take an earlier opportunity
to write to you.
"Stanley T. Fukawa,
Yours very truly,
Tokoyo, Japan. Ihursd^.-MarcK 19, i$50
THE   Vb^Y^SEY
'ftilS fefed feC^-ED,: denuded and penniless, is the victim
of tray^as-"y6U^gd edufcat'ion. Watch for her story in the
next issue'of The Ubyssey.
Returns For
^Adfrniies Pin Today
A 1946'Honorary Activities
t>irt today,' alolftg with this year';
Tony Greer, the president of
'the Legion Club   in' 1946,  and
now a second-year law student,
will foe honored with the award.
Greer,  a  Kamloops   resident,
is now married and a father.
He has been active in the Real
-Estate business with his father.
He and his wife are staying in
"West Vancouver.
Award winner will receive his
s winners.
^Witrtesses
Needed
Witnesses of a motor-vehicle
accident late Wednesday afternoon have been asked to contact
one of the participants in an effort  to settle insurance  claims.
The accident occured at 4:30
p.m. just outside the University
gates  at   10th and  Blanca.
No one was injured.
Anyone witnessing a collision
between a 1959 Chev four-door
sedan and a  1951 green Buick
four-door sedan is asked to call
Jack Eliot at ALma 1724.
CLASSIFIED ADS
LOST — One briefcase containing two textbooks and a book
of irreplaceable notes. Phone
Fiji House, Alma 1724~
LOST — In bus stop cafe, English , riding coat. Please call
Chris at AM. 6-8471.
LOST — Black purse and pair
of brown hornrimmed glasses.
Anyone finding these please
phone RE. 8-2586.
LOST — Grey Parker 51 pen,
inscribed 'K. Jang'. Reward.
Please phone RE. 3-3285.
LOST — Fri., Mar. 13, girl's
gold ring with pearl and two
diamonds. Phone Dianne AM.
1-8406.
WANTED — Ride to Winnipeg
after exams on April 28. Can
help with gas costs. Phone
AL. 0188-M.
Students Should
Be Paid To Learn
"Universify students should not only be given a^free education, they should also be paid while attending," according to
Michael Chartrend, leader of the Parti Social Democratique de
Quebec (CCF). He   spoke  to   UBC   students,
Wednesday in Buchanan 104.
Hungarians
Celebrate
The Sopron Hungarian . students are holding special ceremonies tonight to celebrate 150
years of University forestry education in Hungary.
The 8:15 Brock' Hall .ceremonies willsee speeches by Dean
G. F. Curtis of Law,'Dean G. S.
Allen, of Forestry, Mr. H. S.
Foley, Board Chairman of the
Powell River Company, and
Dean K. J.' Roller, Dean of the
Sopron division of the Forestry
Faculty.
Hungarian national.songs and
dances will be presented by Sopron division students".
Hungarian artists will present
vdcal and musical selections.
UBC'Sopron fencers will hold
a tournament March 20 and' 21
at the Alma Auditorium, Broadway and Alma' in conjunction
with tiie anniversary ~cel'e6r&-
tions.
SMITH   A   GREAT
(Continued from Page 1)
movements and mass ideas."
"A University President," he
once said, "must be a ball of fire
by day. and a bag of gas by
night." .      .
As an exponent of the liberal
arts he criticized science faculties
for producing "a nation of jobbers" and demanded that universities teach students to 'live and
think" as well as earn a living.
Observers in Ottawa felt that
Smith was having trouble -in his
early days as External Affairs
Minister.
But the Berlin crisis seemed
to bring out clear qualities -of
policy leadership from Dr.
Smith.
Smith felt that a compromise
could be found for Berlin and
stated that warfare could be no
solution.
Dr. Smith is survived by his
widow, the former Harriet Rand
of Canning, N.S. and three
daughters, Shelia, Moyra and
Heather.
FILTER TIP
CIGARETTES
Youth Needed
Mr. Chartrend believes that
the youth' will have to build a
new democratic society in Canada.
"Experience is not needed,"
he continued, we just get weaker
and more tolerent with age.
"Youth has the necessary
imagination and courage to see
that new developments are
made."
For the first time the CCF
is in power in Montreal's Mock
Parliament he said.
Lack Democracy
Mr. Chartrend compares B.C.
and Quebec. Neither of them
have economic democracy he
stated. The exclusion of Quebec
bill No. 5, similar to our bill 43,
caused much Controversy in his
province but the labour unions
marched in and took it back.
Spoilage
' The inability'of students to go
University bec'ause of a lack of
money1 is, says" Mr. Chartrend
spoilage of our best natural' resources.
Chartrend also' criticized the
government for their apparent
lack of interest' in uheihploy-
ment. Our unemployment he
said, is the worst scandal and
crime in Canada.
He added that labour costs, of
those who are employed, are de-.
creasing   in   relation   to   other
costs of production.
■     ' "  ' '- '■■■'   '-   -        -; - v' -■ -1- '- -.
ARTSMAN ASKID TO
GET ON THE STICK
All Artsmen are requested
to pick up free '.qofeSfionairs >
at   the   AMS   or  AUS   office
today, they must be returned
before W^8ne!*day.
ALMA     C A frS
ALma 4422
Affiliated with
YELLOW CAfc CO. LTD,'
MU! 1-3311 ""
: ®&X3S553®^^
m
mmmmmmmmi
William Caxton
Device used  by  Caxton,
T
1422-91,   printer   of   the
first book in English.
duthie books
901 Robson Street
Vancouver  - MU. 4-2718"
. . . math lecturer
Jolly
Numbers
Dr: Vaclav Hlavaty, professor
0$ mathematics at the'Graduate
Institute of Applied Mathematics at Indiana University, will,
give the concluding lecture of
the Vancouver Institute series
Saturday at 8.15, Buch. i06.     :
"The structure of our space*
or from-Euclid to Einstein" will
be the1-subject of Address by the
visiting mathematician who has
spent five years working on
Einstein's theory of relativity
before producing the first solutions which proved the theory
to be correct.
At a joint meeting of the University mathematics and physics departments on Friday at
4.15 p.m. in Physics 201, Dr.
Hlavaty will speak on "Einstein's unified field theory."
The 64-year-old scholar,
known as a "pure" mathematician who works With his mind
rather than with numbers, fled
his native Czechoslovakia to
escape' death at the hands of
'Communists.' He became a citizen of the United States last
year.
4375 West 10th
Phone ALma 0345
HELDOVER —
The picture everybody is
talking about
"Peyton Place"
Starring LANA TURNER
One complete show
commencing   at   7.30
—~5*r—
Monday, March 23
The inimitable
' AtEC GUINNESS in
"ALL AT SEA"
plus
"HELLDRIVERS" FOUR
PAGEEIOiBP
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 19, 195ft
'tween Glosses
, . . here Monday
Spender
Speaks
Stephen Spender; noted, English poet, political observer and
professor will read from his own
works in Brock Hall lounge at
the University of BC Monday,
at 12:30 p.m. v
He comes to the campus under
auspices of the Fine Arts and
Special Events committees after
lecturing for a semester at the
University of California at Berkeley under the Mrs. William
Beckman Professorship of English Language and Literature.
Of mixed German, Jewish and
English origins and the son of
Harold Spender, well-known
journalist, Stephen Spender was
born near London in 1909. Finding university training foreign
to his temperment he- traveled
abroad before returning to Oxford" were he graduated from
University College in 1931.
Discussed Friday
EL CIRCULO ■— A talk by
Prof. Macdonald, head of UBC
Spanish studies entitled "Canadians and Mexicans . — Some
Odious Comparisons" will be
given on Friday at noon in Bu.
217.
STUDENT CHRISTIAN Movement — "What the Cross Means
To Me", Dr. W. S. Taylor, Principal of Union College in Bu.
205, 12.30, Friday.
* *    *
LUTHERAN STUDENT Association — Rev. Meyer will speak
on "Albert Schweitzer: What
does he mean?" Friday noon in
HL-3.
* *    *
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE—
Demonstration of Japanese
Dancing. Members free, others
50c, on Friday at 12.30.
v v v
CCF CLUB — Discussion
meeting will be held Friday at
noon in the^ clubroom, Brock
Extension. Subject: Convention
Resolutions.
V 3r *TT
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB presents Dr. W. G. Black, President
of the B. C. Psychology Associa-
tion, speaking on "Adjusting
Problems of Newcomers" on
Friday at 12.30 in HM-2.
CAMERA CLUB—Mr. Campbell will speak on the Commercial approach W portraiture and
wedding photography, on Friday at 12.30 in Bu. 203.
UNIVERSITY BOOR STORE
HOURS:     -
SATURDAY:
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
•   9 a.m. to Noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS
EXERCISE BOOKS  and SCRIBBLERS
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER,    BIOLOGY PAPER,
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS,   FOUNTAIN PENS and INK,
DRAWING PAPER
Owned and Operated by ...
THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C
1959
Conducted Tour Sailings
June 16, 19 and July 10
Ask for descriptive folder
UNIVERSITY     TRAVEL
pc./d.nf: G. H.LUCAS
57 Blew Si. W., Toronto, WAInul 4-9291
CLUB   LTD.
For reservations on these   STUDENT TOURS,   contact
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS,  4576 West  10th Avenue,
ALma 4511.
PLAYERS CLUB — General
meeting to elect    next   year's!
executive on Friday at 12.30 in
the Green Room.
Sft        »j*        2fi
EAST ASIAN & NISEI Varsity Club — Tev. Ikuta will give
a talk on "Buddhism and Existentialism" at 1?.30 Friday in
Bu. 102,
UNIVERSITY BAPTIST Club
annual business meeting to elect
officers and discuss plans for
the coming year, Friday noon,
in Phy. 302.
*T» V •¥*      •
SATURDAY
ACADIA CAMP UBC —. Fort
Acadia present Sa.lt-Petre Panic,
Brock Hall on Saturday at 8.30
to 12; 6-piece orchestra. Admission 50c each.
T* *F_       "fi
**•        V        •*•
FRIDAY,   APRIL   3
CLASSICS CLUB—The symposium scheduled for March 27
Speaking Cup Donated
For Annual Debate
Clips donated by the Journal of Commerce and " Eilers
Jewellers will be given winners of the annual Commerce Public
Speaking course contest.
The contest is on Monday at
12.30 in Buchanan 106.
Lawyers Jack Giles, Graham
Morseley and Dave Edgar give
the Commerce course which is
compulsary for all second-year
students.
Approximately nine students
will speak Monday on a variety
of topics, Giles said.
will be held at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. St. Clair-Sobell, 1795
Wesbrook Crescent, at 8 p.m. on
Friday, April 3. After the election of new executive, Miss Mar-
lene Hunt will read & paper entitled "From Ritual to Drama*."
Sasamat Cabs
— ALma   2400 —
Affiliated   with
Black Top Cab (1958) Ltd.
Phone M"U. 1-2181
Examiners hate Ball
Point Pens
Good writing brings good
marks, so see TIKU in the
University Bookstore Now
J
"Your Headquarters For Travel"
A complete service for travellers. Relax — let us make
all the arrangements. We represent all steamship companies, airlines, hotels and Greyhound buses. Book your
passage at our coonvenient office, only two blocks from
the University gates.
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
4576 West 10th Avenue
Phone ALma 4511
Frothy-light,
MOHAIR
Light as a handful of mist . . . colourful
as a sun-drenched garden, new Kitten deep-looped
mohair sweaters are creating fashion-excitement
everywhere! Illustrated: versatile
suburban beauty with collar and set-in
pockets. $15.95 ... at all good shops everywhere.
LooA; for the name Kitten!
929
Marz and Wozny
548 Howe St.       MU.3-4715
Custom  Tailored  Suits
Special   Student   Rates
for  Ladies  and  Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted suits
modernized in the new
single    breasted    styles.
GRADUATES
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NFCUS   LIFE
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CANADIAN
PREMIER LIFE
779 W. 9th EX. 2924
S. K. COLE, CLU
Branch Manager
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
• Full Dress
• Morning Coats
• White and Blue Coats
• Shirts and Accessories
• $1.00 discount to
UBC Students.
E. A. LEE Ltd.
523 HOWE,        MU. a-2457

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