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The Ubyssey Nov 25, 1920

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume III.
VANCOUVER, B. C, NOVEMBER 25, 1920
Number 7
Seniors Patronize
the Skid Road
'OTHERS  CLAIM   ORIGINALITY—
WE BOAST GENIUS"
_Some party!
As explained to us by a certain Science
man, Einstein's theory of relativity is
that time varies inversely with speed. .
The members of Arts '21 agree unanimously. The three hours between twelve
and nine on Friday were exactly thirty-
nine minutes, twelve and one-ninth seconds by Einstein. Speed? Figure it out
for yourself!
Other classes have boasted "originality"—we boast genius. Who but the
executive of Arts '21 could have organized such a skidroad? Millions of roubles, each of the value of a Scotch tinnck-
erzdhamme, changed hands hourly.
We had long known that Lacey's voice
was one of great power. Until Friday
we did not know he could drown an orchestra and take the sob out of Cyril's
saxaphone. He did it, none the less, and
at times the class were a'l one-stepping
to the staccato music of his outpouring
voice.
What really put the "pep'' in the party
was the medleys. For an honest-to-good-
ness, old-fashioned, good time, they
couldn't have been beaten. And for making  "superior"   seniors   act   like   freshies,
well	
Our greatest pleasure was making the
acquaintance of Mrs. Mack Eastman. As
for Mrs. Sedgewick and Dr. Boggs, our
honorary president, we had met before,
but all greatly enjoyed winning from
them their hard-earned roubles. Of
course, the honorary president made a
speech, which would no doubt have been
excellent had it been possible to silence
Micky and Lacey. What we did hear of
it was extremely flattering to Arts '21.
The prize for the accumulation of the
greatest  fortune   was  awarded  to   Gwyn
Lewis,  who by  successfully with  one
hundred and six thousand roubles in her
possession.    For this she received a
box  of  chocolates  valued  at  eight  hundred  and seven  millions.
The Strains of the home waltz died
away, and slowly and sadly the orchestra
broke into the opening bars of "God Save
the King," and Arts '21 went home to
dream of the most wonderful party of its
career.
Student Canteen
Next Session
The Leroy Memorial Scholarship drive
has been postponed until early in the
New Year, on account of the rush of
business falling in  the  Christmas season.
HOT LUNCH TO BE SERVED FOR
REASONABLE CHARGE
We have for a long time felt the need
of some place at the University where
we might have a hot lunch served at a
minimum cost and under comfortable
conditions. It has been practically impossible to have anything of a permanent
nature, and inadvisable to erect a temporary building for such a purpose.
It was hoped at the beginning of this
session that Laurel Tennis Club would
be secured for this purpose, but at the
last moment the transaction fell through.
This seemed to end our chances of having
a lunch-room, but another opportunity
has presented itself.
The Department of Soldiers Re-Establishment are vacating their premises at
the end of this month and we are offered
the choice of taking over the cafeteria
which has been operated for them by the
Daughters of the Empire. The University will buy outright the equipment used
by them and turn the whole thing over
to the students to be operated by them
as they see best.
The Students' Council have appointed
a committee, consisting of Art Lord, W.
O. Banfield and Miss G. Robson. This
committee has gone into the matter very
thoroughly, and it was decided that the
best method would be to let the operation of the cafeteria out by contract. To
this end, estimates have been invited, and
the best estimate was offered by "The
Tally-Ho" caterers. The process of
drawing up a contract is under way, and
we can expect to have a good cafeteria
operating immediately after the Christmas holidays. The reason for this delay
is that there will have to be some alterations made in the cooking equipment and
a few other minor improvements.
Any profits above those reserved for
the caterers will be turned over to the
Alma Mater funds.
UNIVERSITY WAR RECORDS
The task of completing the war records
of the students of the University has been
assumed by the Faculty Archives Committee. This work, begun three years
ago, has been hanging fire since the
Armistice. Prof. Sage has written to
Eastern universities for information as to
the most efficient way of gathering the
information.
'Varsity Women
Hold Contest
MISS   SMITH   WINS   HONORS   AT
ANNUAL EVENT
It must be admitted that, although the
oratorical contest was more popular this
year, it was not quite up to the standard.
There were too few entries, and they
were not sufficiently representative of
the years. Moreover, as Dr. Walker remarked, the speeches, on the whole, did
not show a sufficient amount of care and
thought.
The winner of the contest, Miss
Grace Smith, '23, chose the subject,
"Democracy." Miss Smith spoke in a s
deliberate fashion and made an impression on her audience. She brought her
subject to a focus in referring to women's
dress in the University. Many of her
remarks were pointed and seemed to
arouse enthusiasm. There was no doubt
in the minds of the judges as to Miss
Smith's  address  being the  best.
The second prize was awarded to Miss
Isabel Elliot, also of Arts '23, who
spoke on "Fa Lippo Lippi, the Florentine
Painter." Miss Elliot's manner was entertaining and artistically suited to her
subject. She pictured the painter's life
sympathetically and vividly, with frequent quotations from Browning.
Miss Susi Roberts, one of the two representatives of Arts '24, spoke, almost
extemporaneously, on "Humour and the
History of the Joke."
The next subject was "The Call of
Nature,'' by Miss Elaine Griffiths, '23.
Her manner, though full of feeling, was
inclined to be rhetorical. Miss Griffith
paid more attention to her delivery and
style than to subject matter and arrangement.
Miss Morden's conservative style of
speech and interesting conversational
manner was most enjoyable. She talked
quietly and convincingly on the subject,
"The Advantages of a Classical Education."
Miss Armond, of '24, spoke on "Cigarette Smoking by Women." Her opinions on the subject were emphatically
expressed, and we wonder how many of
her audience agreed with her?
The judges were Mrs. Clark, Miss Mc-
Innis and Dr. Walker. Dr. Walker was
the speaker for the judges, and his remarks, although not too flattering, commended certain features of the speeches.
Miss Edna Rogies rendered a piano solo
while the judges were deliberating.
At the close of the contest refreshments were served, and the rest of the
evening was passed in dancing. THE   UBYSSEY
XOVEMISER  2."),   1!)"-20
Clothes with
a "Rep"
for Style
and Pep
There's a certain unusual Class
in Semi-ready clothing that appeals
to the young men who strive for an
ultra-smart appearance.
THOMAS
& McBAIN
LIMITED
655 GRANVILLE ST.
The Palm Garden
Corner Tenth Ave. and Heather St.
Where  you   meet  your College  friends
at lunch or tea time
LUNCHES, TEAS, ICE CREAM
CANDY AND TOBACCO
FINE FOOTWEAR
J&TBell.
uniTt»
Discriminating   citizens   of   Vancouver
buy   their   Footwear   at
C LUFF'S
649 HASTINGS STREET, W.
"The Home of Good Shoes"
NATIONAL SECRETARY HERE
Mr. Ernest Clarke, student secretary
for the Dominion of Canada, was a visitor
at the University last week. During the
week he spent considerable time in consultation with the executive of the Student Y.M.C.A. The question of policy
which the 'Varsity "Y" should adopt was
discussed, and the relation of the organization  to the  S.C.M. was considered.
During the summer several active
members of the Y.M.C.A. attended the
summer conference at Lumsden Beach.
At that conference steps were taken to
formulate a Canadian Student Christian
Movement, and there is a feeling that
the "Y ' should become part of this organization. An all-Canadian conference
will be held in Guelph during the Christmas holidays, and U.B.C. has been invited to send three delegates—one from
the Y.W.C.A., another from the Y.M.C.A.
and  the  third a member of  Faculty.
The formation of the S. C. M. in
Canada will have the effect of binding
the colleges of the Dominion closer together in this work. It will remove the
Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A. from leadership
in this matter, and will give the Canadian
students a movement of their own.
An executive meeting of the Y.M.C.A.
will be held this week to decide whether
it is advisable for the University of B. C.
to be represented at Guelph. Railway
fares will be pooled, so that the cost will
be about sixty-five dollars for each delegate.
During the week Miss Lowe was also
a visitor. She conferred with the Y. W.
C. A. leaders and outlined the aims of
the  S.C.M.
DRAMA
The stage is all »set for the annual
Christmas plays which will be presented
in the auditorium this evening, to-morrow evening and Saturday evening. Students and friends are requested to note
especially that no person will be admitted
without an invitation or a ticket, and no
students will be admitted on Friday evening. The door will be opened at 7.45,
and the curtain will rise at 8.15.
The plays will be presented in the following order: "Trifles," "The Tents of
the Arabs," "The Second Lie ' and "The
Florist Shop." The University orchestra,
organized under S. Goldstein, have kindly
offered their services for the three evenings.
Local theatre-goers will be pleased to
learn that a number of especially fine
plays are coming to the Avenue Theatre
this season. Among those coming before
Christmas is "Experience, ' to be presented by F. Ray Comstock and Morris
Gest about the middle of December. In
this play, said to be the most wonderful
in America, there are eighty-two characters, twenty of them beautiful young women, and ten scenes big with meaning
and human reality. Modern music plays
a fascinating and delightful part in the
play.
IRELAND    &    ALLAN
BOOKSELLERS AND
STATIONERS
Depot for
FOUNTAIN  PENS
and
LOOSE-LEAF   NOTE   BOOKS
Phone,   Seymour 602
649 GRANVILLE STREET
WHY GO TO
CHINATOWN?
WE   ARE   NOW   SERVING
CHINESE   DISHES   UPSTAIRS
6  to 3 A.M.
DELMONICO CAFE
704 ROBSON STREET
Phone,  Fairmont 722
THE REX CAFE
TEA   ROOM   BAKERY        ICE  CREAM
Confectionery Tobacco and Cigars
692  BROADWAY,  WEST
Follow the Crowd
Petch
Ben
LIMITED
898 Granville Street
FOR
BARGAINS IN
HATS
Stetsons, values to $11.00;
Sale Price     $7.09
Cor. Smythe and Granville X'OVE
MDEK
um*
THE   UBYSSEY
SECONDS   DRAW  WITH
CENTRALS,
0-0
In a most strenuous and gruelling-
battle, 'Varsity II. Rugby team earned a
scoreless draw with the Central Intermediates. The game was keenly and
even bitterly contested throughout, and
was replete with accidents. All the casualties  were  'Varsity  men.
In the first half Russell received a kick
on the ligament of his foot and was
forced to retire. Taking the field with
fourteen men in the second half, 'Varsity
began to make things uncomfortable for
the Centrals until Arkley was forced to
retire with a dislocated arm. Soon afterwards Palmer was led off with a wicked
cut over his eye. Outnumbered by three
men. the Seconds pitched in and played
a forward game, trying to keep the ball
from the Central backs. For the last ten
minutes play was nearly always in the
'Varsity territory, and it was only by
some desperate fighting that scoring was
prevented.
Line-up: Anderson, Palmer, Wooten,
Solloway, Peter, Arkley, Purdy, Russell,
Wallace, Plummer, Swanson, Barnwell,
McVety,  Gregg, Hatch.
INTER-CLASS  BASKETBALL
'VARSITY TIES WITH BRITANNIA
The first grass hockey game of the
season was played on Wednesday. Nov.
22nd. when the 'Varsity girls encountered
the Britannia High School girls on their
grounds. Though the teams were fairly
evenly matched, Britannia's strong defence prevented our girls from scoring,
until, within the last three minutes. Miss
Mary Bryer succeeded in scoring twice,
making the  final count 2-2.
Line-up: Forwards, Misses Fitch,
Brycr, Turner, Scharp and Jackson; halfbacks, Misses Crawford. Walker, Robson; full-backs, Misses Jackson and Horner;  goal.  Miss  Mary  Chapman.
Arts '23. Arts '24 and Science '23 added
a win each to their list on Thursday evening when they played in regular inter-
class fixtures. Arts '23 surprised Science
'22 by defeating the surveyors 19-17 in
a close and interesting game. Saunders
and the two Hunters, Al and Bob, played
an excellent game for the Sophs., while
Bob Anderson, Bill Scott and S. Peck-
starred for  the  Science  men.
Arts '24 had no difficulty in winning
from Agriculture 28-4 in the second game
of the evening. Pug Grcggor led the
Freshie forces to victory, while Ernie
Clark and Ab Richards tried in vain to
rally  the  Aggie  forces.
Science '23 won by default from Arts
'22.
The standing in the league is now as
follows:
Won      Lost      Pts.
Arts   '23     3 0 6
Science   '23     3 0 6
Science   '24     2 0 4
Arts  '21      1 0 2
Arts   '24     1 2 2
Science    22     1 3 2
Arts  '22     0 3 0
Agriculture      0 3 0
LADIES START WELL
The Senior girls' basketball team
started the season well last Wednesday
afternoon when they defeated the King
Edward team by a score of 24-5. The
team had splendid combination, and
showed great promise for the future
games. Another feature of the contest
was  Miss  Evelcigh's  shooting.
'Varsity lined up as follows: Gladys
Weld, Evelyn Eveleigh, Beatrice Pearce,
Marguerite Gordon, Eloise Angell and
Dorothy  Gillespie.
U.B.C.   STUDENTS
U.B.C. students will find this store carries the largest stocks of Guns, Rifles,
Ammunition, Fishing Tackle, Golf, Hockey, Soccer, Rugby, Basketball and
Athletic equipment in B. C.—and most moderately priced.
We give special discounts to Clubs.
TISDALLS   LIMITED
The Complete Sporting Goods Store
618 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Phone, Seymour 152
Phone, Seymour 7853
C.  HERMANN,  Proprietor
t,"  <~ >f„
*•-—*<*-«»*»«•:
fe^SiP^ip1^
U.B.C. Students Should Patronize
HERMANN'S    BARBER    SHOP
ROGERS BLOCK, 454 GRANVILLE STREET
LOSE SOCCER GAME
'Varsity met a reverse at the hands of
the Great War Veterans, in a game in
which the latter ploughed their way-
through the sand to the tune of four
goals to two. On account of the- condition of the False Creek flats, neither
team was able to play football, and, from
the spectators' point of view, the ball and
players were often buried in the sand
dunes. In the last half of the game the
referee displayed, much to the amusement of the spectators, his lack of
knowledge of the game and his general
inefficiency as an arbiter of a football
game. Bobby Jackson drew his wrath,
and was suspended, and the defence was
badly weakened by the loss of Crute, who
strained the ligaments of his leg. As a
result. 'Varsity played a nine-men game
during the major part of the' second half.
At the end of the game it was agreed
that, as the grounds are unfit for use,
'Varsity would not field a team there
again, despite the fact that they arc
scheduled to play there next week.
Line-up: Henderson, Mark. Crute,
Cant, Jackson, Mitchell, Cameron.
Markle,   McLeod,   Rushburry,  Lundie.
SIGMA DELTA KAPPA
"Resolved that the yellow race should
be excluded from Canada" was the subject for debate at the meeting of the
Sigma Delta Kappa on Tuesday, Nov.
16th. All the members were not present,
but quite a satisfactory group listened to
Messrs. Webster, McLeod and Dyce on
the affirmative, opposed by Misses Han-
ford, G. Smith and Stewart on the negative. The judges—Prof. Angus. Mr. Rive
and Mr. Peardon—were unanimously in
favor of the affirmative.
MCDONALD'S
eH©eouvrES
Have you had a box of Chocolates
yet from McDonald's new store?
Gee!   it's  a  lovely place!
888 Granville Street
(One  block  south  of old   store,   corner
Robson  Street)
PITMAN BUSINESS
COLLEGE
Established 1898
INDIVIDUAL     INSTRUCTION
Day and  Evening Classes
422 Richards Street
Corner Hastings Street
Phone, Sey. 9135 THE   UBYSSEY
November 25, 1920
GIVE HER
PURDY'S
If a young man packs a box of
candy under his arm when he
makes the usual call, it must
be Purdy's, mustn't it?
purbys
Maker of Purdy's Chocolates
675       GRANVILLE       ST.
THE GREAT-WEST
LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
Head   Office,   Winnipeg,   Manitoba
Result of a 20-year endowment
which   matured   October   1st,   1920.
Name, Gilbert Inkster, Lady-
smith. Premium, $102.30. Amount,
$2,000.
In 20 years he paid $2,004.60.
The cash value of his policy was
$3,070, being the face of the policy
$2,000 and a dividend of $1,070.
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Vancouver Branch  Office
COMOSTOCK & GEST
Present
"EXPERIENCE'
UNIVERSITY  STUDENTS
We carry a large assortment of
Loose-Leaf Note Books, Fillers, Waterman Fountain Pens, and all requisites to complete your records in your
studies.
the Uancouver stationers Ctd.
society stationers and
printers
683 Granville St.    Phone, Sey. 5119
AVENUE THEATRE
Dec.   15,   16,   IT,   18.    Matinee   Saturday
The   One   Big   Dramatic   Sensation   of
This   Day   and   Generation
9 months in New York
7 months in Chicago
5 months in Boston
10 Big Scenes and Company of 40
Endorsed   unanimously   by   the   united
clergy   of   these   great   cities
3Hfp Ibijaaeij
(Member  Pacific   Inter-Collegiate  Press
Association)
Issued every Thursday by the Publications Board
of the University of British Columbia.
Extra   mural   subscriptions,   $2.00   per   session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief P.   N.   Whitley
Senior   Editor A.   A.   Webster
j-A.  H.  Imlah
Associate Editors ^ S.  M. Scott
V Miss R.  E.  Verchere
Chief  Reporter A.   F.   Roberts
fMiss A.  Anderson
J.   C.   Clyne
Reporters - Bert  Sweeting
Cliffe  Mathers
I Miss P. Stewart
Exchange    Editor	
Literary   Editors ! £■   ]i   Stevenson
i d.  Ci.   t oope
BUSINESS  STAFF:
Business   Manager L.   T.   Fournier
Advertising   Manager H.   M.   Cassidy
ID.  A.  Wallace
Assistants J Wm; "f^ee
1 P. V. McLane
I H.  G. Scott
Circulation   Manager R.   C.   Palmer
Editor   for   the   Week \.   II.   1 mlah
THE ARTS MEN'S ISSUE
If you have not read the letter from
the A.M.U.S. in the correspondence column, well, read it.
How well it refers to the last issue of
the "Ubyssey" as "a so-called Arts Men's
number!" It was intended to be an example of what the Arts men could do in
the way of getting out an edition of our
weekly; but after setting up the "dummy '—that is, the skeleton paper—before
finally going to press, we did not feel
that it was worthy of the title, so omitted
heading it the Arts  Men's  Number.
The material to be published was left
entirely, in the hands of the A.M.U.S.,
with the added suggestion printed in the
instructions. The society chose to leave
the reporting of most of the college
events to our chief reporter, and he
brought in the write-ups.
"The material .... arbitrarily discarded without their opinion being consulted." The A.M.U.S. executive was invited to be present at the regular meeting
of the Editorial Board, and they came.
The chairman of the meeting found great
difficulty in confining the conversation to
the subject in hand, the "Ubyssey." The
questions, "What do you want on the
front page?" and "Who is writing your
editorials?" were drowned in the discussion of the Arts dance. The desire was
later expressed to have a two-column
head-line on the front page, but this was
not thought advisable owing to the
nature of the subject to be featured.
This matter would probably have been
better settled had the A.M.U.S. accepted
our invitation to have a representative
present at the setting up of the "dummy" on Tuesday preceding the date of
publication.
In the last analysis the full responsibility for the success of the issue was
left to the Publications Board. True,
there was much material handed in. Four
accounts of the dance were offered.   One
letter which we did not publish probably
should have been published, but in the
opinion of the editor of the week it was
discarded. Two articles, including "A
Romance of a Professor" and "Evening,"
also were not published.
"MY SHARE"
A model attitude! Unthinkable, you
may say. It is true that we seldom receive a communication that produces
such exultation. This week, however, a
contribution of verse was left at our
office. Attached to it was a note: "Should
you find a use for either of the specimens
of verse which I submit, I would naturally be delighted; but, .realizing your
limited space and (I hope) prolific correspondents, I am prepared to seek my
reward in the sense of having done my
share.' Those who read these lines will
join in applauding the spirit which
prompted the one who penned them. But
don't stop there. Think it over. Are we
prepared "to seek my reward in the sense
of having done my share"?
PUBLIC SPEAKING
The Women's Literary Society is to
be congratulated on its second annual
public-speaking contest. Although many
unkind criticisms have been made of the
speakers, the "Ubyssey" prefers to commend those who, by their efforts, made
the event possible. They have no cause
to feel discouraged. If the Junior and
Senior girls had shown the same spirit,
the competition would have been keener
and the results, undoubtedly, more satisfactory to the society. We would suggest that, next year, an earnest attempt
should be made to have all classes represented. Every credit is due the present
executive, as well as their immediate
predecessors, for their adherence to the
belief that a desire for public speaking
should be fostered among University
women. An encouraging beginning has
been made. Greater success will be
found in the future.
The men's contest will be held some
time in January. No one will be prevented from entering because of his
studies at such an early date. Since there
are many men in College who have had
platform experience, it is hoped that they
will contribute cheerfully to the success
of the event. Entries should be handed
to the secretary before December 3rd.
Do it now.
AN AMBITIOUS PROGRAMME
The debating plans for this session are
more extensive than ever before. The
triangular series with Oregon and Idaho
will be continued, the debate being held
about the middle of January. The annual
contest between B. C. and Washington
has been arranged for February. In spite
of the Rocky Mountains, the Literary
Department purposes sending a team to
Alberta early next spring. This is indeed an ambitious programme for a
young University, and reflects great
credit upon our Alma Mater.
Although several of our ablest debaters
graduated last year, there is no cause for
alarm. There are many men who have
the ability to bear our colors into foreign
lands; and if they are sufficiently keen to
manifest the same enthusiasm which was November 25, 1920
THE    UBYSSEY
evinced last year, there is every reason
to anticipate that the U.B.C. will be well
represented on all platforms. If you are
willing to debate, do not hesitate to make
the first step. If you are merely interested, grasp every opportunity of encouraging others to participate. There is,
perhaps, a more practical and permanent
benefit to be derived from debating than
from any one of the other activities in
the University.
The debates are open to all undergraduate students. A short try-out will
be held several weeks before the contest
to select the team. Any one who is interested should confer at once with any
member of the Debates Committee — A.
Richards (convener), A. Rive, A. Hurst,
J. Kirby, C. Traves and Miss Coates.
BY THE WAY
Do your Christmas studying early.
Our Rooters' Club editorial had an almost immediate effect. Good-luck to the
rooters!
On request from the Daughters of the
Empire, the University dance orchestra
last Wednesday night played for the returned soldiers in the Hospital Annex.
One international university is in
formation at Brussels, where the International Association of Learning has its
headquarters. The object of the new
university is to unite in a movement for
higher learning and culture, the International Universities Association.
A man who describes himself as the
secretary of the Victoria Rugby Union
said to one of the Vancouver Rep. players on Saturday, "Don't you know me? I
am the man who put the boracic powder
in the punch last year."
.What about it, gang?
Most of the points scored in the game
on Saturday at Victoria were scored by
'Varsity players.
Articles    for    the    literary    supplement
should be in before Thursday,  Dec. 2nd.
Next week the regular issue of the
"Ubyssey" will be the Science Undergraduate number.
Mr. Whitley presented a detailed report to the Council, Monday evening, on
the recent conference of college papers
at the University of Oregon. Any one
who is interested may peruse this precious document at the Publications office
any hour between 8 a.m. and 10 p.m.
How many freshmen own a University
Song Book? There is a large surplus
stock in the  Council-room.
A morning paper would be appreciated
by the Arts men in the common room.
Keep your eye on the new notice board
at the east end of the Chemistry building.
©
crre8poi>dei)ce
r\d<
Editor  "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—T read in a booklet issued by
the McGill University, in its appeal for
$5,000,000, a statement which might have
been made by the Church in the 15th century, or the court of L.ouis XIV., or the
English nobles of the 18th century. Is that
where "Old McGill" is? It was, in effect,
that the low salaries had caused a few of
the professors to become obsessed with the
"Heresies" of socialism and kindred movements. This statement may succeed in
frightening- the capitalist to subscribe to the
fund. But does K not show that there is
something- vital in these "heresies," that,
when privileges of wealth are taken away,
even professors are made to sympathize
with the awful struggle for existence waged
by the lower (?) classes? Of course, all
new movements are "heresies"; does not
Old McGill know thaf ? Has she no solution
for our problem but greater privileges?
Must we wait until these "heresies" have
permeated the lower classes, so that we
must go through the gamut of a French
Revolution, with our Mirabeaus and Robes-
pierres and possibly Lenines? Tf the above
is her solution, then the warning of the
Winnipeg strike has been in vain.
Yours,   etc.,
R.   E.   C.
Editor   "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—The last issue of the "Ubyssey"
was a. so-called Arts Men's issue, and, according to your circular instructions (par. i>>
to the different undergraduate societies, the
nature of the material was "to be left entirely in their own hands." Such was not
the case. Material which the executive of
the A.M.U.S. had gone to some difficulty in
collecting, and which they considered Suitable for their issue, was arbitrarily discarded, without their opinion having been
consulted. Moreover, material of doubtful
interest to the student body as a whob> was
inserted in its place. The latter material
would    be   more   appropriate   in   one   of   the
NEXT TIME
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For     Light     Refreshments
Ice  Cream  and  Candies at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
Umbrellas
Of Excellent Appearance
and Quality
At $5.50 Each
A moderate price to pay for good
Umbrellas, with fine gloria tape edge
covering and good, substantial steel
frames. These have various style
handles in the popular short lengths,
with cord strap or ring. Some are
silver-mounted. All are provided with
cases.     See   these.
Each       $5.50
—Main  Floor
575 GRANVILLE STREET
©RPHEUM
Week Commencing
Monday,  November 29, 1920
FLORENZ AMES AND
ADELAIDE
WINTHROP
[n   an   Up-To-Date  Thumbnail   Revue
"ALICE IN BLUNDERLAND"
EDITH CLASPER
In "LOVE STEPS"
Assisted by
Nelson   Snow   and   Charles   Columbus
HERBERT CLIFTON
Famous  Female  Impersonator
BARNES AND FREEMAN
In    "A    PRESSING    ENGAGEMENT"
A   Light  Conversational   Comedy
PISTEL AND  JOHNSON
THK   STRANDED   MINSTRELS
A  Touch of Old-Time Minstrelsy
WALTER WARD  AND
ETHEL DOOLEY
In   a   Versatile   Programme   Called
"What We Can Do"
BERT AND  LOTTY  WALTON
The  Sun   Shine  Pair,   in   Modern
Dances   and   Clever   Songs
British Weekly
Concert Orchestra
EDUCATIONAL
STATIONERY
STUDENTS WILL FIND IT
INTERESTING TO VISIT
OUR UP-TO-DATE STORE.
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS
FOR EDUCATIONAL STATIONERY — CHAPMAN'S
LOOSE-LEAF    BOOKS,    Etc.
aitjp
(Elarkr & Stuart <£n.
LIMITED
Wholesale and Commercial
Stationers
550 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
Tel. Ex., Seymour 3 THE   UBYSSEY
November ->o. 1U20
Finest Showing
OF
CHRISTMAS
TOYS
In the Province at
SPENCER'S
FOURTH FLOOR
David  Spencer
LIMITED
Evans & Hastings
PRINTERS
— of -
"The Ubyssey"
for  1920-1921
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY  OF
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., etc.
578 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
High-Grade Work and Quick
Service characterize our up-to-date
establishment.
ordinary editions of the "Ubyssey," ami
there is no apparent reason why it could
not be held over, at  least, a  week.
In the opinion of the A.M.U.S. executive,
the final decision as to material (as your
circular would also suggest > should be left
to the executive of the undergraduate society producing that edition. In the last
analysis the full responsibility for the success of the issue would rest on the undergraduate  societies.
Under     no    other    conditions     would     the
present executive of the A.M.U.S.  accept,  in
future,   the  offer  of   the   "Ubyssey"   staff   to
produce   an   Arts   Men's   issue.
Sincerely yours.
For  Arts  Men':
H.   W.   McLKAX,
Secretary.
Undergraduate   Society.
Kditor "Ubyssey."
Oear Sir:—Inspired by the example of "A
Mere Man." who drew so much profit from
the study of a certain advertisement, I, too,
set out on a career of exploration. While
journeying down the long, long trail which
winds between my humble cottage and the
U.B.C, I concentrated on the signs surrounding- me. and by the time I left the
street car I had acquired a mass of startling
information. With a light step and beaming
eye I entered the portals of the Arts building, little dreaming that a few hours later
I was to creep forth from its shadow, a
crushed and broken thing. Rushing to a
lecture-room. I sank into a seat, and looked
about me with eager, expectant eyes. I had
discovered exactly how to catalogue men:
First—their hair! For an instant my gaze
rested on the prof.: then swept hastily on.
No, no! Not there would [ find those
smoothly-brushed locks which adorned the
head of every Arrow collar man. I turned
my eyes to the benches with smiling hopefulness. What! Not one? Hastily my glance
dropped to their boots. Where, oh! where
were the gleaming rays whicli dart from
the feet of those who operate the Fit-
Reform posters. "Far. far away!" was
evidently all the students knew. Stay! At
tne end of a bench I saw a glowing, dazzling
light. With beating heart I bent forward.
Alas! It was not his shoe shine—it was his
tie! But still I persevered. "No." I said.
"I will not give up hope. I will wait tili
lunch time. Surely when they appear in
the head gear of Richardson & Potts, their
faces wreathed with the smiles of the Gillette safety razor (razors—ah! this word recalls a vista of countenances almost too
painful to contemplate), all will vet be
well!" How can I write the horrible" truMV
They wore no hats at all!
Sadly, with a heart as heavy as that of
the man who backed the Rowing Club, or
the Freshette who has just heard "Richarn
Barthelmess is married." with eyes as
downcast as those of the man who sat beneath the Cumfy Way advertisement should
have been, I turned away. Life had deceived
me! Nowhere, neither in Arts nor in Science, nor in the Aggies, apart from either
were the men of my dreams, the men of
the billboards,   to  be  found!
ONE OF THE SEX THAT  IS NEVER
"MERE."
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Thursday, Nov. 25—Players' Club:
Christmas plays (students' niprht). Vancouver Institute: Dr. Buchanan. "Other
Worlds than Ours.' Senior Basketball-
'Varsity vs. Y.M.C.A. Ponies.
Friday,   Nov.   26—Players'   Club:
formance  for  invited  guests.
Saturday,     Nov.     17—Players'
Performance for students.
Tuesday, Nov. 30—Letters Club:
on "May Sinclair. '
Friday, Dec. 3—M.L.S.:    Ladies'
Saturday, Dec. 4—Musical Society concert.
Per-
Club:
Paper
night.
The Alumni dance will be held on December 9th. Those wishing tickets may
obtain them from Miss Bain, 1305 Barclay Street; Miss Gross, 1275 Twelfth
Avenue,  West.
Vancouver
Citizens' Club
(Non-Membership)
UNDER  THE BIG  CLOCK
We serve a 60-cent
MERCHANTS'   LUNCH
TABLE   D'HOTE   DINNERS,   $1.50
SUPPER PARTIES and  BANQUETS,
with   private   rooms,   our   specialty
SUPPER   DANSANT   Wednesday   and
Saturday evenings, from 9 to 12, $1.00
Phone, Sey. 796
A. WATTS, Mgr.
PREPARE
for the  world of
BUSINESS
by  taking a short  course   in  the
Sprott-Shaw School
of Commerce and Telegraphy
D(ay  and   Evening  Classes
Phone,  Seymour  1810
R.   J.   SPROTT,   B.A.,   Manager.
A Savings Account
By carrying money around
in your pocket you will
never learn the habit of
THRIFT. Deposit your
spare funds with this Bank
in a Savings account; interest will be paid, and you
can withdraw both principal and interest at any
time.
We    welcome    small    accounts.
The
Canadian Bank of Commerce
USE NICE
STATIONERY
Ken mare Linen is a paper of excellent appearance and good body.
It has that look of quiet refinement that young ladies are expected to have. .Stationers have
Kenmare, or they can get it if you
insist.
Smith, Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
Manufacturers and  Wholesale
Paper  Dealers
VANCOUVER   AND   VICTORIA,    B.C. .November 25, 1020
THE   UBYSSEY
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers  Bldg., 450  Granville  Street
CLOTHES  FOR  YOUNG  MEN
Glad   to   show   the   new   models.
Thev arc entirely different.
FIT REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, West
J. W. Fofter
Limited
WE SELL CLOTHES FOR YOUNG
MEN AND MEN WHO STAY YOUNG
When Wanting Nice
Things to Eat
C U S I C K
CAN   SUPPLY   YOUR   WANTS
From the very finest Chocolates,
Home-made Candy, Ice Cream and
Soft Drinks, Pastries, and such like,
to the daintiest little Dinner and
Light Lunch you ever ate.
Make  sure  you go  to Cusick.
Cor. Heather and Broadway, West
MIDWAY  PHARMACY
Phone,   Fair.  840
Cor.  Broadway and  Heather Street
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
PRESCRIPTIONS  A  SPECIALTY
We    carry    a    complete    stock    of
LOOSE-LEAF FOLDERS
LOOSE-LEAF REFILLS
EXERCISE BOOKS
WATERMAN PENS
We deliver anywhere, at any time.
GOOD DEBATE
Arts '23 won the first round of the
inter-class debates, promoted by the
Men's Literary Society, when they successfully upheld the cause of free trade
on Wednesday afternoon. The question
was: "Resolved that it would be to the
advantage of Canada to secure the joint
adoption by Canada and the United
States of the reciprocity arrangements of
1911." The judges were Dr. Boggs,
Prof. F. G. C. Wood and Dr. MacDonald.
The affirmative was supported by
Messrs. A. F. Roberts and W. R. Brown,
of Arts '23. The former outlined the
important facts about the agreement, and
showed that it would be applicable in
Canada to-day. Mr. Brown attacked the
principles of protection, showing that
many of the evils of the present system
are due to that tariff policy. He also explained why the 1911 arrangement was
not endorsed by the electors, claiming
that the issue had been confused and
that the monied interests had brought
about the defeat of the bill.
Mr. Don Baker was the first speaker
for the negative. He urged that Canada's
industrial progress would be endangered
by the throwing open of her markets to
the competition of the United States;
that Canada had made great strides under the present policy and that she would
continue to do so. Mr. L. T. Morgan
attacked the principles of free trade, and
answered the arguments of the affirmative speakers.   _
The judges commented on the excellent preparation shown by all speakers,
and complimented them on their able
presentation of the subject. Dr. Boggs
gave a few suggestions as to improvement in the economic reasoning of the
various speakers, and declared that the
debate was of a higher standard than the
usual  Freshman-Sophomore tilt.
THOMAS HARDY
At a meeting of the Letters Club, held
at the home of Dr. Sedgewick on Tuesday evening, November 16, an exhaustive
paper was read by Miss R. V. Grant,
B.A., on the poetry of Thomas Hardy.
The meeting developed into a battle
royal between the "Hardians" and the
optimists. After some discussion both
parties withdrew, each claiming the victory,  and the  club  dispersed.
R. L. VOLLUM, WINNER OF
1921 RHODES SCHOLARSHIP
Roy came to U. B. C. in 1915 from
Britannia High School. For the first two
years he kept very much in the background (probably due to shyness); but in
his last two years oi undergraduate
studies he blossomed forth, taking a very
active part as president of the Chemistry
Society, and capturing the Frank Fair-
child Wesbrook Prize.
After graduating in 1919 he was
awarded a research problem under the
Advisory Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. His work on this
problem is not yet completed, but has
been  highly  commended.
Roy will take up residence at Oxford
next October, where he will study questions  on   Public  Health.
A girl slipped on a piece of ice the
other night. She fell, and, in her maidenly agitation, cried, "Help!   Help!"
"Oh, no!" quoth the Freshman, "I
never pick up girls on the street."
—From the Manitoban.
One Beauty of Our Shoes
Is their perfect comfort. Built, as they are, in the latest models, with every
attention to style detail; nevertheless, comfort has not been sacrificed in the
slightest degree.
Our new Winter  Footwear is smart, indeed, yet as comfortable and long-
wearing as shoes can be made.
Their prices represent the Biggest Shoe Values in Town.
THE INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
SIX-SIXTY-SIX GRANVILLE ST.
"Vancouver's Smartest Shoe Store" THE   UBYSSEY
November 25, 1920
A LAMENT
vr Come,  sing with  me of a  pest  of pests
■'$'.:?      th»t cumbereth the ground,
••  .-• For wherever I turn, to left or right, he's
,4 always standing 'round—
..-*;■.....  In  every  hall  and  stairway  the  creature
doth abound;
T-An^J. the he or the she of the species  is
jiown as the "corridor hound."
chatter and laugh and gossip—their
neighbors they astound;
What do they talk of as the hands of the
clock go 'round and 'round?
Lectures may come and lectures may go,
yet ever it is fotind,
Like the poor, we have always with us—
he or she, the "corridor hound."
They  are  worst  when   they  are  couples,
but in groups they make most sound;
When   they   strive   to   block   the   traffic
with success their efforts crowned:
Tt seems that, like Victrolas, these things
are always wound,
And  that they go on forever, he or  she,
the "corridor hound."
T fear that if the author of this wail were
ever found
Tt would be known that with untruths it
greatly doth abound,
For   I   too  am  a  sinner,   whose  voice  in
halls doth sound,
And  I  sign myself,  O  "Ubyssey,"  he or
she?
A CORRTDOR  HOUND.
IN  OTHER  UNIVERSITIES
P.I.P.A.
University of Washington, Seatt'e.—
Saturday. November 27th, the day Washington takes on Dartmouth in the onen-
incr game in Washington's new stadium,
will be a citv holidav, according to a
iT-oc'amation issued this week bv Mavor
Hugh  M. Caldwell.
The proclamation requests that "a'l
people of Seattle carry on during said
afternoon only the necessary business
that cannot be suspended, and that al!
employers excuse from work as many of
their employees as possible during said
afternoon, and that as many people as
can do so will attend dedication of the
stadium and the international football
contest."
Graduate Manager Darwin Meisnest is
nreparing for the largest crowd in the
history of Northwest athletics to attend
the game. Precautions to prevent ticket
scqloing are being taken by the student
officers. The sale of tickets is being
limited to six to each person.
Upper Classmen Advise Freshmen
The University of Michigan is trying
out a new advisory system for freshmen
this fall. Each member of the senior
class has been appointed advisor for three
freshmen. The upper classmen are to
help the new students get started in the
University. The initial enrolment at
Michigan indicates that the registration
will be more than 10,000.
;.-' ^ Columbia University holds an annual
try-out for cheer leaders. Three regular
cheer leaders are chosen and given their
C's for yelling.
THE FELLOWS ARE TALKING
ABOUT CLELLAND
Yes, Mr. Clelland says he's sure customers
are telling their friends about him, for he gets
quite a few orders from fellows who come in
and mention names. But it isn't any wonder,
is it?
Several days ago a young fellow, admiring
his new suit in front of the mirror, said it was
the first made-to-measure he'd had since coming to Vancouver eight years ago, and—"Great
Scot! after this," he said, "never a ready-made
again for me. '
There s a model to suit every figure and a
dandy range of patterns to select from, and it
costs no more than a ready-made.
In less 'n a minute you're up in Clelland's
room on  the  12th  floor—-five elevators.
Special reduction given on suits with extra
pants.
He stays open till 6 o'clock on Saturdays.
James Clelland
1225 Standard Bank Bldg.
510   Hastings  Street,   West Vancouver,  B. C.
Phone, Seymour 7280
The Barron Hotel
and
Restaurant
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
Phone, Seymour 2011
HAS IT OCCURRED
TO YOU
—that your Photograph as a Christmas gift would be highly appreciated
by your friends, especially the absent
ones?
Pictures are very easy to mail, very
inexpensive, and very appropriate.
You'll get the  quality kind at
Bridgman s Studio
413 GRANVILLE STREET
Vancouver,  B. C.
jffafltflon - (Craft
Quality Clothes
FOR YOUNG MEN
STYLISH
GUARANTEED
The Shop of Fashion-Craft
Thos. Fooler
& Co., Ltd.
ONE STORE ONLY
514 GRANVILLE ST.

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