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The Ubyssey Oct 22, 1959

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 yoL. LXVII
THE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1959
No. 15
Thomas'Mural
Graces Brock
UBC's first student-commissioned, home-executed work of
art is just being completed.
The mural, "Symbols from Education", executed by Architecture professor Lionel Thomas, and his wife, Patricia Thomas,
is now being constructed on the south wall of the Brock Extension. ■
Placing   of  the  giant   Italian %-—-— ——■<—   ..^-i." ;—'
glass   tile   and Horonze   mosaic  Graduating Class of 1958, is de-
marks the completion of nearly
three years of planning and work
by the Thomases. The work, first
commissioned by the Students'
Council at the prompting of the
Taking a hand in the placing of the giant "Symbols from  Education" mural,  now
being constructed on the South wall of Brock Extension, is pretty Irene Frazer  Arts 4.
Work on the mural is expected to continue through November, but not so noisily.
-■,.-.- —Photo: Roger MacAfee.
"Tureen ClaAAeA
JAZZ SOCIETY TALK
Jazzsoc is sponsoring a lecture
at 12:3 today in H-B 2, their
«lub room. Topic: "The Blues",
i *    *    *
SPORTS CAR CLUB
There will be a meeting at
12:30 today in Bu 202 when the
Totem Rally will be discussed.
Films to be shown: Film Festival Award Winner "Coups des
Alpes",  and    "Belgian     Grand
Prix".
* *    *
AQUA SOCIETY
There will be a meeting today
in Bu 217 for a Theory Lecture.
Pool Training will be held at
Empire Pool at 6:15 tonight. No
medicals today.
* *    *
BOOSTER CLUB
Pep Band practice Thursday,
12:20 in HUT L-G for the game
on October 31. Important.
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
A Hallowe'en Fiesta will be
held at the Dance Club in the
Brock Extension on Saturday,
October 31, at 8:30 p.m. Everyone welcome.
* *     *
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
A showing of "Burgeois Gen-
tilhomme",   with  the  Comedie
Francaise, at  the  Varsity  The-
" ater, 3:00 pm., on Sunday, October 25.
* *     *
DANCE CLUB
Girls are especially invited to
the Thursday Night Session to
be .held in the Dance Clubroom
from 8 to 10 p.m.
SOCCER
All teams to practice noon today on Mclnnes field.    .
* *     *
PRE-MED SOC. i
The Fall Term Mixer will be
held in the Brock Lounge on
Saturday, October 24, from 8
p.m. to midnight. Orchestra and
refreshments.
* *    *
CCF.
CCF. present a discussion
group on the "Individual and
Society" on Friday, October 23,
in Room 362 of the Brock Extension at 12:30 noon.
* *     *
NEWMAN CLUB
Day of Reflection, Sunday,
October 25, at St. Mark's College. Mass at 9:00 a.m., followed
by breakfast. Speaker: Father
Lealy, S.J.
* *     *
COMMONWEALTH CLUB
There will be speakers and
discussion on developments in
the Union of South Africa at
a meeting to be held on Friday,
October 23, 7:00 p.m., in Bu 202.
* *     *
ROD AND GUN
Meeting at Bu 203 today before going to the Range. Very
important.
* *     *
LIBERAL CLUB
Former B.C. Liberal leader
4rt Laing will chair a discussion group on "What is Liberalism?" in Bu 216 today at noon.
* *     *
DANCE CLUB
Today: 12:30 to-l:30 — Final
(Continued on Page 3)
NOTICE
TO  GRADS
For those of the Arts and
Science Graduating Class who
have not yet had their grad
picture taken, the photography salon in BU. 115 will
be open Thursday and Friday
from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Don't miss this last chance to
have your grad picture taken.
Convocation To
Open New Dorms
Three new men^s residences
will foe declared officially open
at UBC's Fall Convocation on
October 30th.
The graduation ceremony to
be held starting at 2:30 in the
Armouries will mark the degree
granting to some 400 students
from all parts of the province,
and a long-awaited addition to
student accommodation.;
The dormitories, located in a
quadrangle immediately west of
the West Mall, house over 160
mem Two are named "Kootenay"
and "Okanagan" House in recognition of the support given by
these areas to the UBC Development Fund Drive last year.
The third is Robson House,
named in honor of the late J. G.
Robson of New Westminster,
who donated $250,000 for student accommodation.
Members of the Robson family
and mayors and reeves from the
Kooteney and Okanagan districts
will be honored at the ceremony.
Students are invited to attend.
signed to depict, in symbolic
form, every phase of higher education.
Each symbol was only arrived
at by the Thomases after consultation mith members of the
faculty it was to represent.
The symbols are i arranged'i so>
that related disciplines appear in
the same panel, and the panels
are in turn laid out in such a
way as to suggest the; interrelationships of the many fields
of higher education.
It is expected that when it is
completed, the work will be one
of the most unusual and outstanding murals in North America. '}
Plans are also proceeding to
landscape the small court between the Brock itself and the
Extension, so as to provide suitable surroundings for study of
the work.
CORRECTION
In Tuesday's edition of the
Ubyssey, the Travel Headquarters advertisement contained
the wrong telephone number.
The number should have been
ALma 4511. The editor offers
his sincere apologies to anyone who may have been inconvenienced when trying1 lo contact the firm.
U.N. DELEGATE TO
DELIVER ADDRESS
Ambassador Guillaume Geor-
ges-Picot,  head of  the French
French Ambassador, Guillaume Georges-Picot, speaks today
in Brock Lounge. —MacAfee photo.
delegation to the UN, will speak
today at noon in the Brock
Lounge. (
His topic will be "The French
Revolution of May, 1958 and the
New Constitution."
The talk ■will also include a
discussion of the Algerian situation and General de Gaulle's accession of power, as well as discussion of the important fea*
tures of the new Constitution,
comparing it wih British and
American political  institutions.
The Ambassador is France's
highest ranking representative
to the U.N. and to the Security
Council today.
He served as Assistant Secretary-General under Trygve Lie
and Dag Hammarskjold from
1951 to 1957.
A veteran officer of the First
World War, Georges-Picbt has
received the War Cross with two
citations, and is now Commander of the Legion of Honour
and Grand Cross.
He will be sponsored by the
Special Events and Fine Arts
Committees. PAGE TWO
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 22, 195S
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Telephones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 and 14;
Business offices, AL. 4404; Local 15.
Editor-in-Chief: R. Kerry White
\ Associate Editor .. Elaine Bissett
1 Managing Editor Michael Sone
J Acting News Editor Bob Hendrickson
C.U.P. Editor - Irene Frazer
■ Club's Editor  Wendy Barr
[ Features Editor  Sandra Scott
Head Photographer . — Colin Landie
Why Russia is Ahead in Propaganda
NEWS PHOTOGRAPHY
"*>.... ■ fc      ■.
* Newspaper photography, with its limitless range, its time-
lessness.-'andits factual quality, ought to play a far greater
part in news coverage than it, at the moment, does. Certainly
4here is a tendency—I suppose that there always has been one
r-to use the photographer to illustrate the news story, rather
-than use the reporter to comment upon the news contained in
the photograph. Now, however, there are signs of change.
(Various of the more responsible papers are giving increasing
^ -space to sensitive and repertorial photographs that have often
dbeen taken under very difficult circumstances, and if one can
judge from the comments of interested readers, this is a wel-
ncome change.
One such paper is' the New York Times, which frequently
Incorporates large and informative photographs, where formerly
% hews story would have covered the incident with less clarity,
"arid less room, perhaps, for accuracy. Typical of their photographs is one that appeared recently in the Times Supplement,
' showing Chinese kindergarten children engaged in their daily
quota of military training, drilling with realistic toy guns, and
'singing the first song they learn,' "Socialism is Beautiful .
. Other photographs in this issue show women peasants at
bayonet practice, the militia engaged in backing up the People s
,Army, while they build a dam somewhere in China, and a
.party agitator setting up shop—attendance compulsory—in one
of those quaint Hollywood style villages.
Other magazines have recently included photographs of
American Southerners beating the daylights out of some negro
or other, French commandos interrogating Algerian prisoners,
and British native troops punishing their recancitrant fellow
"Africans who have refused to do what it did not seem like
common sense to do.
Yes, the day of photo-journalism is with us, I think, and
about time too. For it is very true that the camera does not
lie, and there is, now, a sort of crusading spirit amongst photographers, so that they will not let their pictures be tampered
•with. It is the sort of thing'that once made for good reportage,
ynfortunately, reporters, like all other writers, are a lazy breed,
and can be easily corrupted with a little more money, a little
more leisure time.
Newspaper publishers have noted that whenever they put
one or two,good photographers on their staff, give them permission to range far and wide, and at the same time offer them
*a limited expense account/ they end up with sending home
-pictures of the sort that I have mentioned. Obviously these
photographers become cynical, engage in their own private
War against humanity, and endeavour to corrupt all who look
at their work by depicting brutality and horror wherever they
can find it.
Strangest of all is that the public like being vicariously
brutalized, horrified and made cynical: And no doubt, some
doting John will come along ancV tell them that this is all
wrong, that they ought not to engage in such unpleasant pastimes. But until that day, perhaps, news photographers will
continue to send home photographs that tell the truth suc-
'cinctly, honestly, and uncontrovertibly.
—M.P.S.
Bl ffl [S3
Today (October 22)
AMBASSADOR GEORGES PICOT
Permanent French Delegate to the U.N.
Speaks on
"The Revolution of May 1958 and the
New Constitution"
Brock Lounge  -  12:30
OCTOBER 23—International Poets
CAROLYN KIZER and DAVID WAGNER
will discuss their work in Bu 106 - Noon Hour
By ROBERT STRAUSZ-HUPE
Premier Khrushchev's visit
to the United States and President Eisenhower's projected
return .visit to the Soviet Union
have been widely interpreted
as historic steps toward easing
the tensions of the cold war.
These personal exchanges may
well have far-reaching diplomatic consequences. High-level
talks, however, will not end the
conflict between two opposing
social systems. Rather, these
talks themselves are important
engagements in the continuing
psychological conflict we call
the "propaganda battle."
The Soviets' successes in the
realm of foreign policy have
been achieved largely by putting the physical instruments
of military and technological
power to use of psychological
strategy. On the psychological
battlefield, the West has failed
to match Soviet prowess—
despite the West's over-all
superiority in material power.
This paradox calls for a new
look at Soviet conduct of propaganda as compared with ours.
Perhaps at the very root of
Soviet superiority in the psychological arena has been the
Communists' comprehensive
and cynical view of propaganda. Most American propaganda is based on the assumption that people tend to act
rationally and that truth will
always prevail. Broadly speaking, American propaganda attempts to apply commercial
advertising and public-relations
techniques to the international
contest for men's minds. It
proceeds from the assumption
that a mere presentation of the
"facts" will suffice to win over
the audience.
The Russians, on the other
hand, understand that in the
mid-twentieth century propaganda, rather than being a
mere exercise in rhetoric, is an
immensely complex endeavor
which brackets the entire range
of international activities. The
propaganda of words reinforces
—and is in turn reinforced by
—the propaganda of deeds. In
an era of mass communications,
every act—even one of "non-
political" scientific research—
can be projected onto the immense screen of world opinion
and made to carry a poignant
political message. Thus, less
than forty-eight hours before
Premier Khrushchev's scheduled arrival in Washington, the
world received the news that a
Soviet rocket had hit the moon.
The timing of the lunar probe
was obviously designed to
heighten the psychological impact of Mr. Khrushchev's
"peace" mission to the United
States.
The Soviets' firm grasp on
the protean nature of modern
propaganda has enabled them
to co-ordinate their diverse
policies and operations to obtain the optimum results. Their
propaganda is, in a true sense,
synthetic.
According to Communist
strategic doctrine, war, politics,
diplomacy, law, psychology
and economics are all closely
integrated in the conduct of
foreign policy. Communist psychological strategy seeks to exploit the opponent's cultural
and ideological preconceptions
and to harden those assumptions, consciously held or not,
which inhibit his ability to
counter the challenges of the
Communists.
In short, while American
propaganda atempts to persuade, Soviet psychological
strategy seeks to condition.
The Communists, therefore,
wage psychological warfare,
^rather than propaganda as conventionally defined. Soviet psychological thursts are aimed
at whole peoples, not merely
heads of governments. Thus,
the Soviet campaign of missile-
rattling in Europe has been intended to induce a profound
fear of war among the European peoples rather than the
immediate rejection of the
American . alliance by incumbent governments. As Mr.
Khrushchev  stated  in  1958:
"If we show persistence—■
the people are now beginning
to press increasingly on their
governments—with every year
and even with every month,
the champions of the cold war
will find it harder and harder
. . . Not only the Laborites in
Britain, but even part of the
Conservatives say: 'No, the
Russians do not want to wage
war, and we believe it'." In the
same vein, Mr. Khrushchev
offered the United Nations his
all-or-nothing plan for "general
and complete disarmament"—
a reiteration of a Russian proposal first advanced in the
League pf Nations thirty-two
years ago.
The desire to condition large
segments of popular opinion explains the monotony of the
Soviet campaigns. Ever since
Lenin's time, for example, the
charge that colonialism and im-"
perialism are synonymous with
the foreign policies of the capitalist states has been a dreary
stock-in-trade of Communist
propaganda. Yet this campaign
has been remarkably successful. Intellectual elites throughout the world now take it for
granted that imperialism is a
peculiar vice of the West.
Conditioning is a slow process. According to available accounts of Communist brainwashing techniques, weeks are
often neded to break down a
victim under the weight of end-
lesly repeated charges. In the
larger dimension, it may take
decades to produce a similar
effect upon whole groups of
free world society.
Since 1945, however, the
Communists have conditioned
world opinion unconsciously to
accept certain ground rules for
fighting the cold war. They
have marked out non-Communist territory as a "war zone"
and have succeeded in confining the struggle to this part of
the world. Under this. set of
rules, the West is expected to
condone forays into the "war
zone" and abstain from disturbing the Communist "peace
zone". Almost all the debates
in the United Nations from
1948 until 1959 over "threats
to peace", "intervention", "imperialism" and "rights to self-
determination" dealt with problems and tensions arising primarily in the non-Communist
world and between the Western
powers and the colonial areas.
The question of Soviet imperialism has been raised much less
frequently, and with a noticeable lack of fervor, by the majority of United Nations members.
An integral part of the conditioning process is the deft
variation of themes, designed
to keep the opponent in a constant state of confusion. Thus,
demonstrations of strength alternate with proposals to "relax
tensions"; threats of war are
followed by protestations of
peace. A classic example was
the Stockholm peace appeal,
which was circulated during
the Korean war—a conflict initiated by Moscow and Peiping.
Similarly, Mr. Khrushchev's
"peaceful" visit to the United
States grew out of the crisis he
had provoked over West Berlin.
The Soviets, in waging psychological warfare against the
West, hold certain advantages
which are inherent in the nature of "closed" societies pitted
against "open" societies. Briefly, they are the following:
(1) The Iron Curtain. One of
the most important means by
which the Communists preserve unity of mind within their
bloc and shield it from outside
influences is the maintenance
of the so-called Iron and Bamboo Curtains. These insulators
give Moscow and Peiping enormous advantages in psychological warfare.
(Continued Next  Issue)
LETTERS
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
The football team has been
quite successful in their endeavours this season. This is
well and good and the rowing
crew is pleased.
However, there is a chance
that success will rise up to
lodge in the area surrounded
by their football helmets. To
keep the football players properly humble the crew challenges the football team to a
test of strength and endurance.
The crew would consider this
effort their contribution to the
morale of the football team.
The challenge is in the form
of a tug-o-war to be held on
the grass of the Main Mall at
12:30 on Wednesday, the 28ti
of October.
Bill McKerlick,
Capt., Rowing Team.
The Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I should like to inquire as
to why all the fuss is being
made regarding discriminatory
sororities.
In our country, which Is
based on so-called "freedom of
speech," it is the prerogative
of the individual to hold definite opinions on any subject.
As each person has a certain
belief, it is natural for groups
with common bonds to be
formed, whether they be of togetherness, indifferent or discrimination.
Our society as a whole is not
prejudiced against race, color
or creed. However, it stands
to reason that fringe groups
upholding discrimination
should exist.
Therefore,  I say—let  them!
Any member of a hypothetical minority group who knowing well the attitude of such
an organization, tries to become accepted into the fold is
either crazy or deliberately
trying to create an issue.
Our campuses have dozens
of societies designed to meet
the taste of each student.
An attempt to disorganize
any of these societies leads towards confusion and formulates an unnecessary issue.
Disorganization is wonderful
fodder for communist expansion.
(Signed)
Joseph  Mandy, Arts. Thursday, October 22, 1959
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
 - : --4-p.
CLASSIFIED
Riders wanted — Two riders
wanted, vicinity of 4th Ave.,
west of Burrard St. Call Alan
Furniss, MUtual 4-6651.
For Hire, Dance Band. 5-12
pieces. Professional Campus Musicians. Call Larry, LA 2-6789.
Wanted riders from West Vancouver. Phone WA 2-9252.
Ride wanted from Gilley and
Portland, S.B., Mon.-Fri., 8:30
to  5:30.  Phone HE 3-3393.
Would the person who took
the black wallet from the men!s
wash room of the Gym,, please
return the .wallet and identif cation. Phone RE 1-8739 after
6 p.m. »
A set of Ford car keys healing   licence   tag   No.   349-47|.
! Finder please phone RE 1-361$.
Would the person who took
the black wallet from the women's gym locker room please
return it with identifcation cards
to local address on cards.
Lost from women's wash room
in library—new camel hair coat.
Reward offered. Ph. YU 8-0966.
For sale—1937 Ford coach, R
and Hi good tires. $70.00 or offer.
Alma 4254.
1950 Vauxhali. Ph. RE, 1-8725
after 5 p.m.
Timex watch for sale, excellent condition, $5.00. Please contact A. M. Dore in Publications
bffice at Brock Hall.
New Camipus Club "Cinema 16-UBC", presents first production . . . Orphee (Orpheus) by Jean Cocteau, Thursday,
12:30, Bu 100. 35c.
TWEEN   CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
GRADUATE STUDENTS
Election of officers to the
Grad. Student, Association will
be held today at noon in Phy-
SPEND AN EVENING
in
THE DEN
1010 Harwood St.
Closed Wednesday
auditions  for  singer?  and dancers in Hut G-4.
1:20 to 2:30 — Meeting of
everyone cast in the show at
the Dance Clubroom.
* *     *
CHINESE VARSITY
General Meeting Friday, October 23, in Hut L-l at noon.
Elections will be held.
* *     *
ALPHA OMEGA SOCIETY
Students of Ukrainian descent
interested in getting together,
please meet in Bu 216, noon,
Friday, October 23, to discuss
club and social functions.
COME TO THE
FALL TERM MIXER
Sponsored by the Pre-Med Society
Saturday - October 24 - 8:00 to 12:00
BROCK LOUNGE - ORCHESTRA
THE UNIVERSITY NAVAL
TRAINING DIVISION
presents the
TENTH     ANNUAL
B
ARNACLE
B
ALL
at
H.M.C.S.  DISCOVERY
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30
Dancing 9:00 'till 1:00
Dinner Served
3 BARS ! !
Semi-formal, $3.75 per couple
•
Tickets available at A.M.S. office,
Navy office, in Armouries
•
JjiaditionaUy a 3>insi tpahiij.
Professor Crumb New Dept. Head
sics 200.
* *     *
BIOLOGY CLUB
General meeting to be held
Friday, October 23, at noon in
Bu ,200, to discuss club policy.
* .   * ■   *
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Members who are interested
in playing ping-pong in intra-
murals meet in men's gym Friday, October  23,  noon.
* *     *
INTERNATIONAL CLUB
General Meeting Thursday at
12:30.
* *    *
V.O.C.
Short and Long Hike applications available in clubroom
behind Brock.
* *     *
NISEI VARSITY CLUB
General Meeting noon today
in Bu 205.
* *     *
GERMAN  CLUB
Organizational Meeting Friday, October 23, in Hut L-3.
New Approach to be discussed.
* *     *
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
There will, be a second general meeting featuring the CSA
constitution in Bu 102 at 12:30
today.
* *     *
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting Friday noon in Bu
217.
* *     *
MEN'S GRASS HOCKEY
Practice today 12:30. All out.
If it is raining a session on
rules will be held in HL 1.
* *     *
SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
Presents Hon. Ken Kiernan tomorrow noon in Bu 100. Slides
and talks on Northern B.C. development.
* *     *
UBC FENCING CLUB
General meeting, Friday, Bu
327, 12:30 p.m. All interested
please attend.
Professor Joseph Crumb has
been appointed UBC head of
economics and political science,
President Norman MacKenzie
announced today.
Professor Crumb, the senior
member of the department, succeeds Professor John Deutsch
who resigned earlier this year
to go to Queen's University.
President MacKenzie said Professor Crumb's appointment will
terminate next June 30 at his
own request to allow him to
complete work on two books
dealing with money and banking, and general economics.
"Thousands of students are
indebted to Professor Crumb for
guidance and help which he has
given since joining the faculty
in 1938," Dr. MacKenzie said in
announcing the appointment.
"We are fortunate in having
so loyal and trustworthy a per-
Professor Joseph Crumb
son who is willing to give xsp
valuable research time to assume administrative duties."
Rhodes Scholarship
Eleven Rhodes Scholarships
are now open for Canadians, one
of which will be awarded to a
British Columbia student.
Selection is made on the basis
of school and college records
without written examination.
Some definite quality of dis-
tinctionk whether in intellect Or
character is the most important
requirement.
A candidate must be a male
Canadian citizen and unmarried.
Applications must be in by
November 1, 1959,
HALL AND CATERING
SERVICE
Special Attention for
University Functions
2723 W. 4th Ave.
RE 1-2814 - WE 9-3827
FOR RENT
2 single rooms - newly
decorated - privileges
3825 W. 21st.       AL 0433-M
Dunbar District
Do-Nut Diner & Snack Bar
King Size Hambarg-era
XUBJCET BVBQEB8
Sandwiches
Open  7:00 a.m.  -  7:00 p.m.
4556 West 10th Ave.
ALma 3580
Dine & Donee
Every Sat. Night 9:00-1:00
inGHVIEW LODGE
. Hollyburn Mountain
Music by The Highliners
Floor Show
Catering to Banquets.
Parties, etc.
SPECIAL
Hallowe'en Costume Ball
October 31st
Phone WE 2-9035
BIRD  CALLS
PLENTY LEFT
ON SALE AT
BROCK
Poc kef books
Magazines
Students Welcome
Blue Jay Library
4410 W. 10th Ave.
AL 0617
ENDS SATURDAY
Diiect from the Ed Sullivan Show,
The
KIRBY STONE FOUR
Columbia Recording Stars
Extra  Added   Attraction
"BAGDAD EXOTIQUE"
A Sensational and  Lavish   Production
iUPPgR cuue
Pes. MU 1-8728   -   MU 3-9719
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
HOURS:    -
SATURDAY:
9   a.m. to   5   p.m.
-   9  a.m.  lo   Noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS
EXERCISE BOOKS AND SCRIBBLERS
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER,
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS and INK,
DRAWING PAPER
Owned and Operated by . . .
THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C. PAGE FOUR
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 22, 1959
FIVE-THIRTY CLUB
By FRED
Monday night, as is their
habit, AMS council congregated
in the Brock for their weekly
meeting.
Two delegations were also
present—both pressing for independence.
The first of these was Mike
Sinclair, critics editor of the
Ubyssey, who spoke immediately after council president Peter
Meekison called the meeting to
order.
Sinclair was presenting a request for autonomy for the
critics editor.
He emphasized that he had no
quarrel with this year's editor-
in-chief^ Kerry White, but that
<he was trying to insure the per-
-manence of his page and to prohibit interference by a possible
.""Philistine" of an editor-in-chief
in future.
White asserted that he, too,
wished to see autonomy for the
critics editor regarding the contents of his page.
The general feeling on council,
however, seemed to be that the
editor-in-chief should have full
responsibility and, therefore,
lull control over anything that
is printed in the Ubyssey.
Finally, after lengthy discussion, a committee was set up to
stiidy the matter.
It was also to study the related matter of a code of ethics
or line of responsibility for the
Ubyssey.
The purpose of the latter
study is to determine who is responsible to what body for material printed in the paper.
Thus it is hoped that responsibility will be definitely assigned and items in bad taste
will be kept out of the paper.
The second delegation, represented by Dick Drysdale and
John Mercer, was seeking club
status for a group planning to
show foreign-experimental films
on campus weekly.
' UCC had unanimously passed
the matter and it was up for
council ratification.
FLETCHER
Mercer and Drysdale proposed
a no-budget, non-profit organization to show surrealistic,
avant-garde films.
Filmsoc opposed the venture,
feeling that they were showing
enough of the type of film proposed to take in the limited
audience that is interested.
There was a hint of personal
animosity between the two
groups.
Council defeated the motk>nv
to set the group up as a club
and tabled a motion to allow
them to operate through the
special events committee until
next week to enable the committee to be notified of the proposal.
The plan is to review the
activities " of the group next
spring with an eye to setting
them up as a club if there is
sufficient interest.
A complication arose at this
point because the group had a
film, "Orphee," directed by Jean
Cocteau, that they had planned
to show today.
Dave Anderson proposed that
council sponsor the showing.
The motion was passed  and
the AMS went into the motion
picture business.
Council Quickies:
Clubs committee must check
paid-up membership in political
clubs before giving per^ capita
grants due to their notorious
lack of arithmetic skill in reporting.
Motions of congratulation wefe
passed complimenting the windy
Engineers and the gallopin'
T'Birds for their victories 'last
Saturday.
Buster's drivers have requested protection from students
following certain incidents last
week.
Mark Daniels, of the Brock
management committee and
former student leader at John
Oliver High has been selected to
represent UBC at the conference
of College Unions.
COLLEGE SHOP
CRESTED UBC
JEWELLERY
• PINS
• CHARMS
• CUFFLINKS
• TIECLIPS
• KEYCHAINS
GYM EQUIPMENT
• SWEATSUITS
• HOODED SWEAT SHIRTS
• SHORTS
• FACULTY & UBC T-SHIRTS
Open Daily in the Brock Extension
11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE A.M.S.
Professor Endures
Long Space Tests
WINNIPEG (CUP) — Dr. John
Zubec, head of the Psychology
Department of the University
of Manitoba, recently completed
11 days of isolation in a fiberglass dome atop a building.
The professor, head of the
Psychology Department at U. of
M., conducted the test to gather
information on living under adverse conditions.
He was kept in the dome, in
complete darkness except for
daily 45 minute periods and was
subjected to a monotony of food
or drink.
On the .third day, he began to
have visual hallucinations of
flickering lights and moving
clouds.
Then he sensed that he heard
the ringing of a phone and the
sound of an expert typist.
Upon emerging from the dome,
Dr. Zubec found that he could
not properly distinguish colours.
When given a number of coloured pieces of papers, he sew
them as blinding white.
Each day a dim red light came
on and he was subjected to a
battery of psychological tests
to determine any changes in his
abilities.
The purpose of the experiment
is not directly concerned with
space flight, although the information received may be applied
to it as well as to those who operate in adverse conditions.
MEN
TWO BARBER SHOPS
TO SERVE YOU
inside the gates
• Brock Hall Extension
• 5734 University Boulevard
SOVIET
PERIODICALS
In English
SOVIET UNION — Every
month 40 pages of photos,
text about Soviet life. 25c
or $2.50 a year.
NEW  TIMES  — Weekly
news and'comment on foreign   affairs   and   current •
events. 10c or $3.50 a year.
SOVIET WOMAN —Takes
you right into vital world
of Soviet women. 25c
monthly or $3.50 a year.
People's
Co-Op Books
307 W. Pender   MU 5-5836
ESSAY TYPING
Reasonable Rates
Accurate Work
RE 3-3780 - Evenings
There is something of woman
in everything that please.
—Dupaty.
ridge
theatre
16th at Arbutus
RE 8-6311
T. F. S. - Oct. 22-23-24
One of the Year's Top
1  ' Comedies
"The Perfect
Furlough"
Color
Tony Curti - Janet Leigh
and a great supporting cast!
Added
"Davy"
Color
Alex Knox - Harry Secombe
Comedy-Drama in the
Music Hall
Cartoon
M. T. W. - Oct. 26-27-28
Romain Gary's Prize
Winning Novel
"The Roots of
Heaven"
Ttev Howard, Juliette Greco
Errol Flynn
Plus
"Sea Fury"
Vic McLaglen, Stan Baker
NEWS
One Complete Shpw, 7:30
Doors - 7:00 p.m.
VolkAwgen OwmaI
We are happy to announce the addition to our staff
of an OUTSTANDING
VOLKSWAGEN MECHANIC
He has been trained in Germany on this model. You may
safely trust your car to us for expert servicing and repairs.
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
ALma 1707 10th Ave. and Discovery St.
PICK-UP SERVICE AND DELIVERY

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