UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 15, 1949

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0125336.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125336.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0125336-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0125336-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125336-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0125336-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0125336-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0125336-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0125336-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0125336.ris

Full Text

 GET THAT REDUCED
HOCKEY TICKET
TODAY
The Ubyssey
GET THAT REDUCED
HOCKEY TICKET
TODAY
VOL. XXXII
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1949
No. 23
Con Education Save Us?
WE CAN DO SOMETHING
TO SOLVE THESE PROBLEMS
This is the last oj a series of six articles by Ubyssey Editor, Les Armour,
on phiolsojihy, Ote social sciences, and education. In the first five he discussed
the general aspects of the problem, tlie problems of the philosopher, the
problems of the social scientist, the scepticism of the public toward philosophy
and the social sciences, and the attitudes of tlie philosopher and tlie social
scientist toward the public find toward the immediate problems of mankind.
ln this article, he pets forward some solutions to the problems	
By LES ARMOUR
In the course of the past five articles we attempted to show
that the most basic problems facing mankind are those which
could best be solved by philosophy and the social sciences. We
have also said that, while much that is positive and valuable is
being done in these fields, progress is impeded by the shortage
of men, the shortage of funds, the scepticism of the public, and
the attitudes of the philosopher and the social scientist.
It is not enough, however, to point these
things out. We must attempt to find some
solutions to the problems.
It has been suggested that the philosopher
and the social scientist might make more
definite conclusions so that the public might
have something tangible to go on, that a
more concerted effort might be made to put
the conclusions in the hands of the layman
in a form intelligible to him, and that problems of immediate
pertinence might be attacked wherever possible.
WE MUST FIND SOLUTIONS
' But first and more immediately, we must have more men
and more funds. All too ofetn our philosophers and social scientists are overworked and underpaid. They have little time, in
many cases, for research projects and even too little time to
give adequate individual attenton to their students.
If we are convinced that the pressing social problems which
threaten man with annihilaton can be solved by the philosopher
and the social scientist, we must ask ourselves what we can do
about these problems.
MORE MEN AND MORE FUNDS
Universities might agree to devote a greater part of their
resources to these problems, but it could be done only at the
expense of other educational functions. Even at that it might
be worh tit. We must look farther, however, for a long term
solution.
Government must be prevailed upon to grant larger portions of their research funds to social problems, and less to
physical problems. If half the money being spent on the development of bigger and better atom bombs were spent on social
problems, there might be no need for the atom bomb. If a tenth
of the defense bill were diverted to such research, the defense
bill might eventually b reduced to nothing.
TOO MUCH FOR THE ATOM
But is there something that we, as students at the University of British Columbia, here and now can do?
We think there is.
Our departments of philosophy and the social sciences have
a staff of about thirty—roughly eight percent of the faculty,
(This is exclusive of the department of social work which is
concerned largely with vocational education.)
EIGHT PERCENT TOO LITTLE
Eight percent! This is a ridiculously low figure when it is
considered that over forty percent of students take courses
in these departments.
Even in so small a group there fs a remarkable number
of brilliant men. But they are so loaded down with work that
their potentialities may never be realized. They are forced
to give too many courses now, yet the fields are not adequately
covered.
Suppose the staff were doubled. Thirty additional staff
members could relieve the load, lower the size of classes, increase the number of courses offered, and still leave some
time for research projects.
WE CAN DO SOMETHING
At an average salary of $3,000 a year, the increase would
amount to $90,000.
If students agreed, through an increase in fees, to assume
half the cost, the provincial government could probably be
prevailed upon to pay the other half.
Assuming a permanent student body of approximately
5,000, the fee increase would amount to less than $10 a year
per student.
Out of that ten dollars amazing results might be achieved
when it is remembered that, once adopted here, the scheme
might be taken up all across Canada.
In the thirty-year history of this university, students have
always taken it upon themselves to solve their problems.
The provincial government has always been ready to cooperate—provided  that students  themselves  made   an   equal
eff°rt-   to ,m\ >■
IS $10 THAT MUCH
This problem is one which not only concerns us, in view
of the fact that our departments of philosophy and the social
sciences are too understaffed to provide the best possible
education, it also concerns mankind as a whole. Somebody must
make a start somewhere.
That start, however small, may lead to things undreamed of,
Think it over.
Is $10 that much to you?
In closing, / sliould like to thank tliose members of thc faculty and
student body whose aaviee and ideas have made the articles possible. Peiirri-
culnr thanks arc due to Professor Geoffrey Andrew, \elio pointed out many
of tlie problems, and to Professor Burnett Savery of whose ideas 1 luivc
made liberal,  if twisted, use. Les Armour
BCE Turns Down AMS Plea
For Student Fare Reductions
BCE officials have refused a
fare reduction for UBC students
on the university bus, and Van?
couver city streetcar lines.
In a letter to Jim Sutherland, AMS
president, W. C. Mainwaring, BCE
vece-president, stated that his company was refusing the request because
thc UBC bus route has not met,costs
for a number of years and because
campus bus rntes were not raised
in the recent fare increase.
RESULTED
The letter resulted from a November 1 conference between Mainwaring,
Sutherland, and George Cumming*,
student co-ordinator of affairs.
Cummings and Sutherland were attempting to have the present three
cent fare done away with Completely.
If this wa.s not possible they had
i asked for transfer privileges when
travelling to Varsity.
STRESSED
Mainwaring stressed the fact that
the BCE was not paying its way at
the present time and therefore was not
in a position to grant any further
concessions to the university.
Ubyssey Photo by Micky Jones
PROMOTING THE TROJAN WAR in Players Club production Helena's Husband, which
jpens Wednesday night in the Auditorium is Joanne Walker, shown here with Ed Finnegan
who co-stars with her. Admission is free for UBC students Wednesday and Thursday. Friday
and Saturday performances are open to the public. Students can get free tickets in the Quad
box office starting today at noon.
Players Club to Present Three
Plays; Two Student Showings
Three Short Plays Will Star
Newcomers to Players Club
Wednesday and Thursday of this week, the Players Club will
present three very diverse one-act plays to the students.
The   first,  "The  Doctor  from  Dun <$>-	
more,"   i.s   &   modern   Irish   comedy,
New Members for
Sigma Tau Chi
Sigma Tau Chi, the honorary men's
fraternity at UBC, has released th*
list of newly elected members.
Names of prospective members are
proposed by the group and put befof*
the fraternity to be voted upon;
Successful candidates this year are:
Hugh Less, Ben McConnel, Terry
Lynch, Bill Anstis, Jack Maguirt,
Hillary Wotherspoon, Jim Banham,
Doug Reid,  Phil  Brocking.
very much in the manner of Syngc.
Set on an island off the Irish coast,
the play deals with the unsuccessful
efforts of a money-grubbing doctor to
fool the local fishermen.
WITH POLICY
The leads in this play will bc
played by new members in keeping
with the policy of the Players Club.
A modern debunking of the Greek
legend about the fabulous Helen of
Troy occupies second billing. "Helena's
Husband" combines classic Greek
mythology and settings with modern
comedy treatment in the Broadway
tradition,
Jim Argue, last year's president of
the Players Club directs this play,
CLOSES BILL
"Lee Precieuses Ridicules" closes
the bill. Moliere's 17th century comedy
of manners has been translated into
English for this production by the
director, Gerald  Newman.
Student tickets to the Wednesday
and Thursday performances, which begin at 7:30, are available on uresentu-
tion of Ams cards at box office in thc
Quad.
IRC Panel to Discuss
Indonesian Problem
Latest Dutch-Indonesian agreements will be under consideration 'u'
the International Relations Club discussion in the Double-committee
room of Brock Hall, Thursday at
8  p.m,
Two Artists Join
Architecture Staff
Professor B. C. Binning, well-
known Canadian painter, and Professor J. H. Kleege, have accepted an
Assistant Professorship in Art and
Design, in the Architecture department at UBC,
Professor Binning, graduated from
the Vancouver Art School in 1932.
He did graduate work in the field of
Art at the University of Oregon. In
1938 he went to England and in the
next few years studied under such
famous painters as Henry Moore and
Amondee Ozenfant. He has been a
senior instructor at the Vancouver
School of Art for the past sixteen
years and has worked closely with
the Vancouver Art Gallery and the
UBC Department of Extension.
Professor James Kleege is a graduate of Syracuse University, New York.
In common with Professor Binning hc
was a member of the Art Students'
League. He has instructed in painting
and art in New York and lectured and
demonstrated in Visual Design in the
School of Architecture. Syracuse University from 1947 to 1949.
At present he- is involved in research work in optical illusions, sculpture and  light  modulators,
Both men will link art and design
with the applied aspects of architectural training.
Two Students Extinguish
Fire In Law Library
Quick thinking by two third year law students last night
averted serious damage in the law Library when they ex*
tinguished a fire in the men's washroom.
HOCKEY TICKETS
ON SALE AT CUT
FOR STUDENTS
Block of 500 tickets are on sale
to UBC students for the Monarch-
UBC hockey game tonight.
Student price is 75 cents, but on
presentation of privilege card,
price is only 50 cents.
Tickets at special rate arc only
available at office of thc Graduate
Manager of Athletics in the South
east corner of Brock Hall.
Tickets, go on sale at the hockey
pep meet at 12:30 p.m. and at thc
same time in the Brock.
Dean Curtis, head of the law faculty
commended the alertness of Frank
Lewis and Harold Dean who discovered the bla?.e in the men's washroom.
The Dean further remarked that
this fire illustrated his concern ovef
housing a $100,000 library in such a
vulnerable shell.
Harold Dean discovered the fire and
with the help of student librarian
Frank Lewis dragged the flaming
waste can outdoors where they ex-
tinquiished it with sand and water.
There was fortunately no damage
to the building but the lobby and
lecture rooms were filled with smoke.
CUMMING'S FACE RED, TWO
BANDS BOOKED FOR DANCE
Physical Education executive thought they were seeing
double' last Thursday night when two bands showed up
for their informal dance in Brock Hall.
Emergency call to Coordinator of Activities George
Cumming disciosed that he had booked one group for the
dance over a month in advance. In the meantime Physical
Ed coordinator had gone ahead and engaged another band
on his own hook.
According to contract, AMS will have to pay both
orchestras even though only one played the date.
'Tween Classes on the Campus
Winch To lell Of His Extensive Trip
Harold Winch, MLA, leader
of the opposition will speak to
the CCF Club on his extensive
trip through Europe and the
Near East at 12:30 p.m. tomorrow in New Engineering 200.
# * *
SOCIALIST George Weaver will j
continue hi.s scries on Marxian Social- j
ism   in  Arts  204  ill   12:110   p.m.   today. I * * ¥
* H- -¥• j     GREATLY   IMPRESSED   with   the
UNITED NATIONS CLUB will pre-I progressive aspects of Ihe Israel econ-
sent Dr. Burnett Savaiy speaking on j omy, Mr. Wiiu-h in his speech will
the Topic, "Analysis of lhe Dcclara- outline the methods employed with
lion   of  Human'Rights."  The   regular    the    serious    immiruanl    problems    of
UN   meeting   will   be   held   today   at
12:30 p.m,  in Arts 100.
¥ * *
PUBLIC SPEAKING CLASS formerly held Thursday noon in HL 2 has
been discontinued. Students who wish
lo continue this course may do so
Tuesday noon in HL 4, or Wednesday
noon  in HG 3,
that  new nation.
# ¥ *
DR. ELBERT PAUL will speak tomorrow at 12:30 p.m. in Arts 100. Dr.
Paul's topic will be "The End of the
Pagan Rood," anrl on Friday at 12:30
p.m. in Physics 200 "The World that
Christ Could Make." Scries is being
.sponsored by Varsity Christian Fellowship.
•V- * .y.
"RESOLVE THAT the blue laws
exemplifies {{roup pressure towards
the limitation of individual liberties,"
is    the    siaijeet    if    this,    Thursday's
Parliamentary  Forum.   Pro  is Howl*
Day and Con is Tom Frank.
* * *
MUSIC CLUB will meet in HB 3
(behind Brock Hall) tomorrow qt 12:3d
p.m.
¥ # ¥
' ACCIDENT SERVICE' is the nam*
of the film  being .shown to the pra-
meds at 12:30 p.m. in Physics 201.
¥ * %*
FRANKS SYMPHONY in D minor
will be presented tomorrow at 12:30
p.m. in the Men's Club Room of Brock
Hall by the Musical Appreciation
Club. Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November 15,  1949
The Ubyssey
„ Member Canadian University Press
Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscriptions—$2.00 per year.
Published throughout the university year by the Student Publications Board of the Alma
Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of The Ubyssey and not
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society nor of the University.
Offices in Brock Hall. Phone ALma 1624 For display advertising phone ALma 3253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF       JIM   BANHAM
MANAGING EDITOR   CHUCK MARSHALL
GENERAL STAFF: CUP Editor, Jerry Mcdonald; News Editor, Art Welsh; Features Editor,
Vic Hay; Sports Editor, Ray Frost; Women's Editor, Shirley Finch; Editorial Asst. Les Armour
Senior  Editor-HUGH  CAMERON
Associate Editor-BETTY HORTIN      Assistant EtIHor-ANN LANGBEIN
Unveiled Dictatorship
It is with some horror that we look upon
the lighted stick of dynamite tossed to the
administration by student council.
At the request of the Men's Athletic
Directorate, Council has asked the administration jto rule that any student playing on
teams other than those of the university
without first receiving MAD's permission be
suspended from the university.
We are not at all sure as to how difficult
it is to receive MAD's sanction to play on an
outside team. It may even be a mere formality.
But there is an underlying principle to
the thing. What MAD, in effect, is saying
is "as soon as you become a student at this
university you must take part in such activi
ties as the students direct or take part in no
activities at all."
They are telling us that, if the students
decide they need us, we must serve the
students whether we like it or not.
We hope that the administration will take
this into consideration in their decision. We
do not think the principles of the university
leave any room for such dictatorship.
The idea could have far reaching consequences: by the same reasoning members of
the publications board could be barred from
working for downtown newspapers and members of the Player's Club could be barred
from acting in off-campus productions.
Council's recommendations to the ad-
minstration amounts to unveiled dictatorship.
Letters to the Editor
THANKS
DR. N. A. M. MACKENZIE
PRESIDENT UBC
"The Blood Donor Clinic at the
University of British Columbia has
now been completed.
When one considers that the
number of students enrolled this year
is considerably less than in 1948, and
the donations for 1949 are approximately 25 percent more, that is 1637
as against 1368—the results obtained
were most gratifying.
"The members of the Vancouver
Branch Committee feel they would
be remiss if they did not bring to
your attention the outstanding work
done by Mr. J. Sutherland, president
of the Alma Mater Society, Miss
Wlieeler and Miss Byers of the nursing section, Mr. Peter Fowler and
associates of the Charities Committee,
and Mr. Lee, superintendent of buildings and grounds.
"As president of the Vancouver
Branch, Canadian Red Cross Society,
I have been requested to express to
you our very grateful thanks,"
Signed,
R. Bruce Buckerfield,
Vancouver Branch, Canadian
Red Cross Society.
FACTS?
THE EDITOR,
THE   UBYSSEY
To the editorial staff and Miss Finch,
your Women's Editor, in particular,
may I extend warm congratulations.
The confident, clear statement on such
a delicate subject as "SEX" on the
campus leaves nothing to be desired.
The quotation, "While women in the
outside world continue to make learn-
In This Corner
For those who like horses and sentimentality, "The Red Pony," currently
playing in Vancouver, will probably
be gratifying. For discerning moviegoers, who have read John Steinbeck's
story of a small boy growing up in
Salinas Valley, the picture will be
just another mediocre Hollywood
effort.
For the purposes of the movie, the
story hag been distorted until most
viewel^won't even recognize it. Where
the book relied on strong emotion and
suspense to make its point; the picture
degenerates into a succession of slushy,
bathotic scenes.
Thfcappearance of Grandpa comes
early||ri the picture and he takes a
major role in the thread of the picture
after this. Most sentimental of all the
sceneS 'in the picture is one that does
not appear in the book at all. Louis
Calhetjnas the young boy's father is
appaifsjiitly fed up with his farm and
just about bows out until he is convinced to stay by wife Myrna Loy.
For those who may have imagined
Billy Buck as an older man, many
may be surprised by the casting of
Robert Mitchum in the role. Put he
takes his part rather convincingly in
spite of the slush going on about him.
Most realistic scene in the picture is
the young boy's fight with a buzzard
who is about to devour his dead pony.
The bird actually fights  back.
Unless you're a native Frenchman,
most movie-goers will have a hard time
figuring out exactly what it was that
won "Monsieur Vincent" the Oscar for
the best foreign film of 1948 .
While the picture does have moments of power, most of it will strike the
audience as a disjointed hodge-podge
of scenes strung together with a moral
message.
The first reel of the picture, in which
Pierre Fresnay as Monsieur Vincent
comes to the city of Chatillon and convinces the population they are not
going to die of the plague, is the best
part of the picture. From here on I
had a hard time trying to figure out
where he was and what he was doing.
Some of the camera work in the picture i.s notable. One of the best scenes
is in a bare room with only a long
table around which cluster a large
number of women, for a prop. The
camera seems to climb over, around
and under the table while the women
castigate Monsieur Vincent for his
work.
*
#
#
*
Back in town for its second run is
"The Stratton Story," a well-done
movie about Monty Stratton, who, after blowing off his leg in a hunting
accident, returns to baseball to pitch
again.
Monty's career with the Chicago
White sox before his accident showed
by jim banham
a great future, but his hopes were
shattered when he blew his leg off.
Jams Stewart as Monty Stratton plays
the role with little tear-jerking and
he is ably assisted by Frank Morgan
and June Allyson as his wife.
T* *r* TT*
Some of the better movies at downtown and suburban houses are: "Home
of the Brave," the story of a negro
who loses the use of his legs after seeing his best friend, a white man, killed
by a sniper's bullet on a Japanese-
held island in the South Pacific.
The picture plea for racial tolerance
is one of the most dispassionate ever
put on celluloid.
If you like oldies, don't miss "You
Can't Take It With You." James Stewart and Jean Arthur make the picture
a lot of fun to watch.
One of the better foreign films, "Pai-
san" is now making the suburban
rounds. This one is worth a trip across
town.
Another tense, interesting, semi-
documentary is "The Street With No
Name," which features newcomer Mark
Stevens as an FBI man who traps
a gang of holdup men in the slums of a
big city.
Others worth the price of admission
include "The Snake Pit", "Man From
Colorado," "Command Decision,"
"Once More My Darling," "Time Of
Your Life."
Critic on the Harth        by John brockington
*
Neither   Licia   Albanosc   nor   Alec I Albanese  was  magnificent.  Her   face   again too soon.
Templeton   are   primarily   recitalists.   and   voice   were   a   mirror    ."or   her
Miss  Albanese   is  a  superb   operatic j heroines' moods.  From the demented
prima-donna   and   Mr.   Templeton   is
an  intimate musical satirist, yet both
forunately   appeared   here   last   week
on the concert platform.  I  say  "for
tunately" because if they have not
chosen that particular medium we
would have been deprived of the
peculiar magic of their individual per-
M'arguerii'e in Boito's "Mefistofele"
throurdi the vvordly and cynical Vio-
letta of "La Traviata" to the naive,
rhapsodic Maaclme Butterfly her his
trionics wore most affecting and her
voice thrilling in its intensity. These
excepts left one with a great desire to
hear   Miss   Albanese   in   a   complete
sonalities. The only opera we see J operatic performance where she would
in Vancouver i.s the tired and rather b,. ,,bk, lo ,,resent in full her corn-
shoddy San Carlo and the only inli- polling characterizations,
mate entertainers on view are dimly
visible through a haze of sniok-,
draped around their indispensable
microphones. ,
Miss Albanese scored a personal
triumph. From the moment she swept
regally onto the stage, gorgeously
gowned in white, until her final
curtain call after the sixth generously
bestowed encore, the soprano completely   captivated   her   audience.
The program was artfully designed
to display her talents. Four operatic
acrias wereistralegically placid among
noncerr songs of :oi essentially dramatic nature,
In   the   ItiUian   operatic   arias   A I.i.-,.;
However, in .Susanna's aria from
Tho Marriage of Figaro the singer
seemed a little too sophisticated and
aloof for the bubbling good snirits
lhat one associates with the character
of Susanna.
Vocally Miss Albanese was not always impeccable. Some of her top
ne.'.o-i seemed spread aud a bit forced
and there was a certain insecurity
and (-(Tort in the more florid pass-
aaea of the L.a Traviata arias. But for
the nn>s,l part Miss Albane.se'.s heali-
tiiul voice was well produced and
used  with sensitivity and  skill.
For me Saturday evening was mem-
*
*
Alev Templeton is a tasteful pianist
but he possesses little temperament.
It is only when his satiric wit comes
to blows with the musical affectations
of our times that one feels that they
are in the presence of an outstanding
personality.
Mr.   Templeton   presented   for   his
main   bid   for   consideration   as   a
serious    soloist,     Beethoven's    piano
sonata   Op,   10,  No.  3.   Although  this
sonata    is    minor    Beethoven,    being
written   when   tho   composer   was   in
his early   twenties,  it  is not quite as
minor as  Mr.  Templeton would  have
us believe. His charming, rather vapid
treatment   of   the   work   seemed   unwarranted. A group of more modern
pieces  received   the same   unexciting
treatment,     But   when    the    pianist
j reached his jazz Prelude and Fugue,
| ''Mr.   Bach   goes   to   Town,"   lie   had
! arrived.  The rest of the evening was
'completely   filled   with   iprovisational
and    imitative   sketches   and    was   a
complete  delight.
*
#
Symphony wa.s focused on the North
noon's    concert   by    the    Vancouver
able.   Mias   Albanese   cannot   come j Symphony  yas  focused  on  the North
American premiere of the new symphony by the Australian composer
Arthur Benjamin who spent the war
years   in  Vancouver.
On a first hearing it is almost im-
possble to make a proper evaluation
of a new work. It is only possible
to present one's impressions. Such
was the case yesterday.
This work is amazingly complex
and technically difficult and not wishing to cast any aspersion on the great
service the Vancouver orchestra did as
in presenting this work it would
probably have emerged with greater
clarity in the hands of a better
equipped    organization.
One was immediately struck by i'he
originality and color of the orchestration and what almost amounted to
an obession for the solo snare drum.
Mr. Benjamin himself refers to it as
"mood music" and perhaps the patchy
effect one received was intended to
convey sudden changes of mood. Particularly enjoyable wa.s thc piquant
little scherzo movement.
I hope that the symphony will be
repeated again soon when the orchestra has had more rehearsal time. I
am anxious to hear it again.
eel speakers lamenting sexual inequality, UBC coeds are steadfastly refusing
to admit any inequality whatsoever,"
will undoubtedly be used by Dr. Kinsey in his forthcoming book.
Signed,
Mrs. Kinsey.
THANKS!
THE EDITOR,
THE UBYSSEY,
On behalf of the affiliates of the
International Council, the United Nations Club, the International Students
Club, the International Relations Club
and the International Students Service, I would like to thank you for
your cooperation in publicizing "International  Week."
We feel that any success we did
have during the week was due in a
large measure to the support you
gave us.
Yours truly,
Felicity Pope,
President  International
Council.
•WW) AGAINST ONE
THE EDITOR,
THE  UBYSSEY
Are 900 students wrong? About that
number listened to Hazel Harrison
and to all appearances enjoyed her
music. She played on an inferior instrument suffering from mechanical
imperfections. The program had been
printed only on the advice of her
manager. She had another planned;
yet changed her plans where possible
to follow the inaccurate program, I
wil leave to your own opinion her
technique and delivery. I was well
satisfied.
Critics in such papers as the New
York Times acclaimed her understanding of and sympathy towards music
as superb. Even if such statements
as the above were exaggerated for
publicity, the truth lay close behind
them. Here, after a full auditorium
audience enjoyed her music, someone
in tfteir immature years gave a repugnant commentary, I cannot call
it criticism, in our campus newspaper.
Now I can deem it possible to deride
an artist, when one denies the extent
and power of the great "Liszt B minor
Sonata," then their talents for musical criticism seem lacking. The Sonata has no lacy dress of the 17th
century; nor the artist in this case
a similar facade. I rejoice though
that love and sincerity in music can
never be erased by ill-huomored
criticism.
John W. Bargus,
Member Special Events Committee  Literary,   Scientific
Executive.
TYPEWRITING
Essays, Theses, Notes
Manuscripts
Mrs. A. O. Robinson
41S0 W. 11th Ave.       ALma 0915R
MORE FUN
IN BED
FOR      |
EVERYONI
OPTOMETRIST
GORDON TELFORD, M.A.
410 Birks Bldg.      TA. 2913
Eye Examination     Visual Training'
*) Here's the owurtatt bfdftM
•i story "ever toldl: Readundiir
• perfWt Ugbt thatfe Urtjfc
•, your eye*—while your favorit*
• radio program play* aoftlyto
*i your eara. The Lullaby, atylM
*i like a dream fo gleaming plaatw
J combines a true-toned quality
"I radio with a scientifically
*i designed no-glare reading Uohk
"j Compact; fits any bed; for AC of
Tl DC; lamp and radio operates***
•l aratelyortogetherafldesired.a6i
• and buy the Lullaby today! M
•J bsitaxnuliodeaJaraeTsiywlMnt
VS^T
J
i
iANUPACTURNO CO. ITO. '•
TORONTO 8, ONTARIO J
the Hm'my m?ma mm
The Standard Typewriter in  Portable Size
. . . has a fully standard keyboard in size,
slope, distance between rows of keys, and in
position of controls.
For faster, easier typing — these keys are
shaped to the contour of your finger tips!
Only Royal has them.
Eliminates fumbling and fussing!
Simple down-up motion secures
new ribbon in place! Saves time,
trouble, temper!
If
'cmtw*
Position  the   carriage,   flick
lever  with  one  finger, and  y
margin is automatically set.
Streamlined, compact beauty goes along with these and
dozens more outstanding Royal features.
Royal Gray Magic is easy on the eyes — easy to the touch.
It's designed for beauty, built to maintain its looks and
precision for years of rugged use. To get — or to give —
it's the gift that's really Royal!
Both models — Quiet De Luxe and Arrow — are now on
display at Royal dealers. Ami'they're ,//. //'/, /file on easy terms!
Made in Canada by Royal . . .
World's Largest Manufacturer of Typewriters
"Magic" and "Touch Control" arc registered tr.uk.ni.uks of Koy.il Typewriter Co., Limited Tuesday,  November  15,   1949
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3
Colemen Brothers Appearing
In Armories at Noon Pep Meet
Five Artists to Present Program
Of Current Popular Songs
Coleman Brothers, internationally known for their distinctive song stylings, will be featured in a noon-hour pep
meet, in the Armories, today.
Winners of the Peabody Award for
COLEMAN BROTHERS
',  , . Million-Aires
entertainment, and the first colored
group to appear in television, Coleman Brothers Million-Aires will present a program of current popular
songs and old favorites.
FIVE ARTISTS
The five artists who have appeared
on NBC and CBS are on their first
nationwide personal appearance tour.
They have appeared as guests on the
Fred Allen show and the Arthur Godfrey show, and for nine months were
with the Circle Arrow Show.
The pep meet will publicize the
Tuesday night hockey game between
the Thunderbirds and Kerrisdale
Monarchs at the new Kerrisdale arena at 8 p.m. Tickets for the game
will be on sale at the Armories.
At Any University
Focus Art Activities Aim
Of New Art Club
As there is yet no Fine Arts Department at UBC, a visual
NFCUS Offer
Exchange
Scholarships
Exchange scholarships to any
university in Canada are being
offered to UBC students by
National Federation of Canadian University Students.
Only   scholastic   requirement   is   a
second-class average.
i
Students must have their proposed
courses approved by the UBC registrar and by the registrar of the university where they plan to attend.
Tlie plan is particularly applicable
to students entering second and third
year Arts but is open to any college
student.
Fees will be paid for the exchange
student whom ust return to his home
university for one year after his exchange.
Ubyssey Classified
Calendars    are    available    in    the
NFCUS office (Hut B2 behind Brock)
I giving the courses available at other
tact Tim Hollick-Kenyon, NFCUS
chairman in the NFCUS office.
The 93 sudents at the meeting votecB	
in a steering pommrttee to select a
name for the club, outline its aims,
suggest its activities, and draw up a
constitution, to be ratified or amended
Friday noon, and presented to the
LSE for approval next Monday.
According i'o Professor Hunter
Lewis, representing the President's
Fine Art Committee Thursday, "the
maturity of a University may be
judged by the interest of its students
in the ifine arts."
Professor Lewis feels the Campus
is ready for a student club, dominated
neither by the faculty nor a clique,
focusing en the "critical and creative elements of the visual arts."
On the steering committee, holding
office until the constitution is approved are President Peter Cotten,
Secretary Bill Clark, and Trevor
Glucksman, Ron Baker, Shirley Dan-
ielson, Jim Wilson, Ralph Blakstad,
Ken Ducommun.
Application forms and interest questionnaires are available at the reserve desk of tiie library, and may
be turned in at the meeting this
Friday at 12:30 p.m. in Arts 204.
UBC Professor
Gets Oxford Degree
Dr. Evans, head of the Department
of French at UBC has received the
degree of Doctor of Letters from Oxford University for his outstanding
French literary works.
Some of his most important work
has been done on studies of the French
philosopher and writer, Pierre Leroux.
At present he is writing a book on
the French Socialist movement.
Dr. Evans has been professor and
ment at UE'C since 1.929. Prior to that
head of the Modern Language Depart-
he was associated with Sheffield University, the University of Manitoba,
and the University of Deleware. He is
on leave of absence from UBC at the
present time.
Winslow Boy to Be
Presented Next Week
The "Winslow E'oy," by Terrance
Rattingl will be produced by the
UEC Players Club Alumni on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, November
24, 25 and let in  the auditorium.
Production is being sponsored by
the University Women's Club ot Vancouver and thc Women's Auxiliary
to the Vancouver General Hospital .
Recently released for amateur production its presentation by the Players Club Alumni will be its premiere
stage performance in Western Canada.
The Winslow Boy was winner of the
Dame Ellen Terry Trophy, British
equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize in
194G,  It  ran  in  London  for  Ifi  week:;.
Tickets for tho Winslow Boy can be
obtained by calling Miss Evelyn Robinson, CH. S572 or Mrs. E. F. Car-
ruthers  at  FA.  633GY.
Eastern College Head
Predicts 'War in 1955',
Wolfville—(CUP)—Almost certain war in 1955. That was
the gist of a prediction made by Dr. Watson Kirkconnell before
a large group of students and townspeople a tthe annual SCM
service held in Acadia University Hall Sunday. Aiming his
sermon at the unreasonably high standard of living and comfort
that we enjoy, Dr. Kirkconnell contended that unless we learn
the secret of Christian selfsacrifice, the rapid depletion of the
world's natural resources will lead to a deeper frustration
than has been felt during the past.
The Acadia University President
pictured Vhe frustrations of the war
years and told of the wild abandonment indicated by public spending in
the years from 1945-1948. In 1949,
he said, "The compulsive pressure of
world   forces   has   begun   to  manifest
McGoun Semi-Finals
Held Week Thursday
Semi-finals for the McGoun Cup
will be held Thursday, November 24,
at 3 p.m.
Contestants participating aro Ron
Birnie,   Al   Fraser,  Foster  Isherwood,
itself.   Shocked   and   somewhat   be-   Don Lanskail, Hugh Legg. Stan Me
%% PART IIME EMPLOYMENT $S
Large commissions paid daily to
energetic men and women who are
anxious to increase present income.
Your work now a deciding factor
for employment next summer. No
experience necessary. Every home,
factory and office a prospect. Write
at once for full details and free
outfit. Dept. 11 H, P.O. Box 32,
Terminal A, Toronto 1,
wildercd listeners sat up and took
novice as the noted international
authority on Communism launched
into a discussion of present world affairs. ''The third world war has
already begun," he stated, "and with
the fall of Canton the first round
has gone to t'he enemy." He deplored
Roosevelt's shameful betrayal of
China at Tehran and the continuance
of this policy by the present administration at Washington.
Dr. Kirkconnell issued a statement
in clarification of his Sunday statement that the world would be involved in war by 1955. He felt that
five years was the time necessary for
Russia to prepare its war potential,
not only in the Soviet Union but also
in the satelite states, including red
China, He thought thai' an accident
might cause war sooner but pointed
out that intelligence estimates of
Russia's accumulating personnel
would indicate that they will not be
ready  before  1955.
land,  L.  Robson  and Rod  Young.
The t'opic is: "Resolved that jury
trials  should  be abolished."
A panel of five judges will selcr"<-
the best speakers who will represent
UBC in inter-university debate
against   eastern   universities.
34 YEARS OF SERVICE
TO THE   UNIVERSITY  OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA,
ITS FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES.
THERE'S A REASON
Meetings
LE CERCLE FRANCAIS will hold
its regular Causerie meeting at 3:30
p.m. on Wednsday in the Outrigger.
PHILATELIC SOCIETY meets in H
L 2 Wednesday noon. New members
welcomed.
VOC MEETING for old and new
members, Thursday, November 17,
12:30 Arts 204.
HAROLD WINCH reports to the
CCF Club Wednesday on his recent
trip to Europe, New Engineering
building 200, 12:30.
CCF CLUB presents George Weaver's discussion classes on Scientific
Socialism, Arts 204 Tuesday noon.
SLAV CIRCLE meeting Thursday,
November 17 at 3:30., Double Committee Room Brock. Remember to
bring socks for dancing,
MEETING OF ALL CURLERS in
HM 10, 12:30 noon. Those wishing to
partake in this senior sport please
attend.
MEETING of Commerce Women
Wednesday at 12:30 in HG 9.
Notices
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY rehearsal in UBC auditorium every Wednesday at 6 p.m.
AT THE JAZZ Society Wednesday
behind the Brock, Jack Kyle of Saturday E'op Shop fame will discuss
the topic "Sex and Modern Music."
Do come.
THE FILM "Peiping Family" will
be shown at the next meeting of the
Chinese Varsity Club in Room 859,
Library at 12:30 on Thursday, November 17.
Lost
TEACHER TRAINING NOTE'S in
small black loose leaf binder. M.
Sutherland.  Phone eves., CH. 7267.
REWARD for person turning in
fawn gabardine coat left in Hut M 10,
Monday, November 7.
LOST, November 1 between HM 2
and Electrical Engineering building,
a gold signet ring, initials H.C. phone
West 419M or leave at Lost and
Found.
BROWN PENCIL pouch containing
2 fountain pens, etc. Beverley Harris,
CH. 8802,
WOULD PERSON who removed
gabardine topcoat from HB 4 by
mistake on November 9 contact Ken
at KE. 5291R.
AIRFORCE RAINCOAT—new lining
Mechanical Eng. bldg., Tuesday, November 8. Reward. Phone BA. 3258.
COLLEGE OMNIBUS in Library
last week. Finder kindly return to
Lost and Found.
PAIR OF HORN-RIMMED glasses
in brown case. Notify D. L. Jenkins,
AL.  2455M.
WILL THE person who found wallet on Saturday please contact J. S.
Roberts Tuesday afternoon in HM 2.
For Sale
KODAK "35"—3.5 lens, coupled
range finder, leather carrying case.
AL. 2226Y after 6 p.m.
WOOD TURNING LATHE-36 indies between centres, like new. One-
third h.p. motor, belts, 4 speed pulleys
set of turning chisels, 558.00. 2011
Wesbrook Cottages.
25' CABIN BOAT, beam 7'6". Continental type engine, Sound hull.
$501 or swap for car.*AL. 3072Y. Ask
for Ian.
VOIGTLANDER 35 mm f 3^5 1-200
second Compur shutter. What offers?
Phone  Bill,  CH.  2463.
CCM Bicycle, heavy duty. Carrier,
excellent condition only $30. Phone
AL. 3163.
ENCYCLOPEDIA BR1TANNICA
with bookcase, all new. CE. 1491.
FULL-LENGTH wine velvet evening coat with hood attached. White
satin lining also inter-lined perfect
condition, $20. Phone CH. 8814, 2621
West 22nd.
GRESVIG ASH SKIS, V. Steel
edges, poles and harness. Good condition, $24.50. CE. 5433.
Wanted
"COLLEGE SURVEY of English
literature" shorter edition. Phone AL.
at KE, 617'JL.
TENOR AND ALTO SAX players
who can read music required for
Varsity Swing Band. Syd Lawson,
AL. 2023R.
RIDE TO CRESTON or vicinity for
Xmas. Will share expenses, also driving if desired. Contact Bryan Quinlan,
CH. 5931  or room 208 Ap. Sc. Bldg.
'DRUNKEN SOT requires steady-
handed driver to take him to 8:30's
from Granville and 55th area. Phone
Tim at KE. 6096L.
HELP PLEASE-Ride for 8:30's
along Marine Drive and Blenheim
Phone Stella, KE. 6356R.
RIDE FOR 8:30's from vicinity of
Dunbar and 33rd. Phone evenings. Sid,
KE. 5854R.
WANTED TO BUY good used portable typewriter. Phone Ed at FR. G068
after 7 p.m.
Quiet and warm. ?33 with breakfast
and $25 without. 359G West 27th, CE.
8077.
FOR RENT single room, 3-4 bed.
Batching facilities. 4566 W. 6th. AL.
3495L.
Miscellaneous
FRENCH INSTRUCTION by M.A.
graduate, diplomas from University
of Paris. Phonetics, grammar and
composition made easy. Conversation.
Don't wait till exams are upon you,
J. T. Rush, AL. 3120L.
TYPING-Mandard rates, bring
work to Mrs. Bowron, Art Gallery,
basement of Library.
NEED HELP IN FRENCH courses
for Xmas exams? Coaching at reason*
able rates. FA. 8466R,
The flight Smoke
at the fcight Price
for Young Men
Found
BLACK WATERMAN'S PEN about
a month ago at 10th and Imperial,
Name engraved. Phone AL. 0198R.
Room and Board
SINGLE ACCOMMODATION, ROOM
and Board, Fort and Acadia Camps,
now available. Married accommodation, four-room self-contained suites.
$25.50 up. Little Mountain and Lulu
Island Camps. Apply Housing Office,
Room 205A, Physics building.
BRIGHT ROOM with breakfast in
quiet home near UE'C gates. 4785 W.
4th, phone AL. 1291L.
ROOM WITH kitchen privileges for
2 men or women students. 3446 West
16th, CH. 3825. New, clean, convenient.
2 LARGE modei'n furnished rooms,
close to transportation, near MacDonald   and  21st.   Call  CE.  4376.
GOOD ROOM and board for male
or female student. Home privileges.
3813 West 15th. AL. 1874R after 6 p.m.
2   NICE    single    rooms    furnished.
D1', 11 N C 11 1E
PRIM I IN a,
STATIONERY AND
PRINTING CO. LTD.
TELEPHONE      PA C I F I C   O I 7 I
566 SEYMOUR ST.   VANCOUVER,  B  C.
Swwdrtma, V Swmbtwna
OPTOMETRISTS
HtRBERT C. ARMSTRONG
ROSS E. ARMSTRONG
CEDAR   1611
IB22 W. BROADWAY
AT QRANVIUUK
VANCOUVER, B.C.
/IT T/M£S 6/<£ TH/S, *
fad 6roomi»S
calls for
Brylcree
At all times when good grooming counts, a single
applicat ion of Brylcreem" ThePerfectHairdress-
ing" will keep your hair neat, tidy and well-
groomed. BRYLCREEM—by actual survey, the
largest selling hairdressing in Canada. Available
in handy tubes for your convenience everywhere.
milk ckocolate maifcSl
.W-w.^". %MAAl*SSi4*jMi*Wli.Wii1>WWA^   AW.SA «..»■.•■*■  «MilWSMk&tia^*«WMvrt
Save Wisely TODAY .
for TOMORROW
Consult any of thc following Sun Life Representatives who have had wide experience in budgeting
your income to meet essential insurance needs:
KEN  DEANE
JIM BRANDON"
JOHN TENER
ED.  PECK
LARRY WRIGHT (Supervisor)
ROYAL BANK BLDG., VANCOUVER
HAROLD COWHIG
SYD BAKER
LLOYD JACKSON
AUBREY  SMITH
DOUG. KIBBLE
PACific 5321
SUN LIFE OF-CANADA «*.-. -^vttUiKttiiwtf
Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November  15,   194|
'Birds Show Best
In S
eason nnaie
Final
Maybe Thunderbirds did lose another football game, this
time to the powerful Whitworth team, but in the process they
showed the university that they possessed the fighting spirit
that makes fine football teams, that will make an even better
team next season.
Featuring a passing attack that
was almost comparable to that of the
winning Whitworth crew, UBC completed 10 of their 21 passes tossed.
One of them paying off for a touch
down   which
somewhat.
eased   the   40-20   score
Handling  most  of the passing  assignments  for  the  locals  was  Hugh
KtecArthur, who did his best this year !
despite the fact that he dislocated a !
finger in his right hand in the first:
ten   minutes   of   the   game,   befort
flinging the touchdown  pass to  end
Tom Barker deep in the end  zone.
Playing most of the remainder of the
ganje, MacArthur continued to pass
for the 'Birds, ignoring his injury.
FUMBLE SETS UP T.D.
On the ground, Thunderbirds still
made a good showing despite their
slow start, fumbling the ball on the
first play, giving Whitworth posses-, _p,to(o   hy  Doug  flarn<?t(
sion on 'Bird's 31-yard line. ' FORWARD LINE of UBC's Thunderbird  icemen  will  start
Ed Kretz made the first Whitworth    .      , ... .   , „      .   ,   .      . .   o on
,,   .   ,, .       . ,       .     .    the home season rolling tonight at Kerrisdale Arena at 8:3Q
tally in five more plays. Adams, hand- ,
ling all the conversions, made it 7-0. j p.m.   when   they   face   the  ex-pro   Monarch s   players.   Three
Another fumble by UBC on their stalwarts who will handle much of the offensive play are, left
own 13-yard line set up Whitworth's  to right, Bob Koch, Fred Andrew, and Hugh Berry.
second   major,   Kretz   again   making
the points. Conversion made it 14-0.
Other   three   touchdowns   for   the
winners were gained on passes with
the remaining plunge through centre.
UBC Home Opener With
Kerrisdale On New Ice
Special Block of Tickets for
UBC Students at Cut Rate Price
By   1IERM  FRYDENLUND
The UBC Thunderbirds hockey squad opens its home
season tonight against the Kerrisdale Monarchs at the new
Kerrisdale arena. The new suburban arena was officially opened
last Friday before a capacity house who witnessed a rough,
exciting game which was won by the visiting Kamloops sextet.
The new ice-house is a magnificent •; ■	
Volleyball
WEDNESDAY-^} YM
1. Zetes  B  vs Fiji
2. Arts Senior vs Newman B
FRIDAY-FIELD  HOUSE
1. Winner of \VU vs Norvans
2. Psi U vs Kappa Sig B
3. Fort Camp vs Zebes B
MURAL SOCCER
WEDNESDAY
1. Pre-med vs Chem Eng
2. ATO  vs  Phi  Delt
FRIDAY
1. Forestry vs Eng 11
2. Beta vs Koots
Sports Editor — RAY FROST
KNIGHT SCORES ON REVERSE
Second major for Thunderbirds was
made by Don Knight on the tricky
reverse play that was so effective the
week before, running the ball to pay-
dirt for ten yards.
Final score of the game came when
lithe George Puil ran around right
end on a lateral play for 60 yards to
make the score 40-20. Will Kennedy,
playing merely tp bolster 'Bird's defensive backfield, took the conver- Inter-collegiate basketball will return to the campus this
sions for the locals, completing two Friday night as the Thunderbirds meet the Seattle University
Chieftains at 8:30 in the UBC gym.
In the second half of the pre-season
weekend fixture, the 'Birds are scheduled   to   meet  thc  mighty   Senior   A
p.m. on the
Hoop Opener Friday As
Seattle U Meets 'Birds
out of three
Spectacular playing by MacArthur
Who also handled many of the kick
inbacks,   by   Puil,   and   end   Tom
er, were part of the  highlights
Lame. MacArthur, who seemed ' Clovel' Lcaf c'uintet at
lied to be into the thick of things
Mt" through the game, had his 33
sweater ripped off on one run-back,
SENSATIONAL PASSING
Sensational and tricky passing by
the Whitworth crew added the necessary sparkle to keep the spectators
interested in the final UBC game of
the season.
This season has been by far the
most successful for UBC in American
football, and promises of an even
better year next season are self-evident, when we know that coach Orville Burke is contracted to be head
mentor once again.
*
Women's Mural
Wednesday - field house
12:50
,   Arts IA vs Arts IV B
1 Aggies vs Arts II B
•fre-med vs Arts III C
1:00
PE II vs Arts II A
Newman vs Arts I C
Nurses vs Arts IV A
FRIDAY   -   GYM
12:30
VOC vs Arts III A
Hillel vs Arts IV C
1:00
H EC IV vs Arts I A
PE III and IV vs Arts IV A
campus  maples Saturday.
After many weeks of hard workouts
under the watchful eye of coach Pomfret, the 'Birds are shaping up well,
and from all reports the weekend
games will bc battles down to the
wire.
Sports fans on the campus are
watching this series carefully, as the
results of these games might well bc
indicative of the style of play the
'Birds will feature all season,
After thc rather poor .showing of the
UBC club last year, better things are
hoped for, and if the "Birds have improved over last year at all, it is
bound to show up this weekend.
On the other hand, it is hoped that
the 'Birds will make a better showing
this weekend than they have been at
some of their recent workouts. Lately
the Pomfretmon have been a little
too sfoppy at ball handling and some
of their shooting is a bit erratic.
Probably Forsyth will start at centre, flanked by Bell and Munro.
Guards Watt and Mitchell might
bring up the rear. Second string w'll
show Phillips relieving Forsyth, while
Walker and Southcott spell off the
forwards. Louie and Hudson make up
the remainder of the second string
and round off the ten man team that
constitutes thc 'Birds this year.
Cross-Country
Championships At
Noon Tomorrow
Six men from Washington
State and one from Western
Washington will be competing
with runners from UBC and
Victoria in the Pacific Northwest Cross-country championships which start at UBC
stadium tomorrow at 12:30 p.m.
Senior and Junior races, the first
a four mile course while the latter
is only three, will start at the same
time.
On the UBC roster will be Piercy,
Bain, Minchin, Henniger, Porter, and
Stevens, comprising the six-man entry.
First four of each team to finish will
be counted.
Parnell and Salmond will be over
from Victoria to try their luck.
Juniors are those under 19 years of
age who wish to compete. UBC, Arctic
Club, and Victoria Y are all fielding
teams in this division.
Washington State team won the 2
mile Pacific Conference meet two
years in a row, and will provide the
stiffest competition for the locals.
Last year, Salmond won the event
but this year it is anyone's race.
HOCKEY
We are going to pin the THUNDERBIRDS
ears back and we would like to have a few of
you around to see us do it.
Wednesday morning the Thunderbirds will
be WINGLESS and WINDLESS.
Signed:
KERRISDALE MONARCHS
Game: - KERRISDALE   ARENA
Tuesday, November 15th
8:30 p.m.
structure in which every scat is
blessed with a clear view unobstructed by pillars. The layout is a tribute
to intelligent  engineering.
Tonight's game, which is at 8:30,
will initiate what should become fin
olfl fashioned hockey feud established
with   ill-fech/g  and  contempt.
The Monarchs play a pro type
hockey which features heavy checking,
stickwork, and playing the man first
and the puck after. This is contrary
to the very essence of amateur or
university sport. Thus tonight's affair will come as a contrast of two
types of hockey.
For tonight's game Ole Bakken has
procured 500 tickets at a special student rate which will go on sale at
11 a.m. today at the office of the
Graduate Manager of Athletics and at
the gigantic pep meet in the Armories
at 12:30. The prices are 50 cents with
the privilege pass and 75 cents without. No privilege passes will be honored at the arena for reasons best
known to the arena management.
In order to obtain this special rate
a block of 500 seats had to be taken
with the UBC squad footing the los:--
if any, The arena management has
thus outdone even the Kerrisdale
hockey promoters who can't see personality for money.
Tonight the 'Birds will have their
first opportunity of feeding humble
pie to their audacious opponents. Tlie
game promises to be a close hard
fought affair with no quarter asked
or given except the common decency
requisite in amateur sport.
DRAUGHTING
INSTRUMENTS
From $10.00
T-Squarcs, Protructors, Set Squares
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
AND
POLYPHASE SLIDE RULES
AMES   LETTERING
INSTRUMENTS
ZIPPER  RING  BOOKS
Complete with Sheets and Index
From $2.69
FOUNTAIN PENS
Clarke & Stuart
Co. Ltd.
Stationers and  Printers
550 Seymour St.     Vancouver, B.C.
Today's Outstanding Value!
AUSTIN
10th and Alma CE. 8105
SALES and SERVICE
f?
V
A HANDY REFERENCE BOOK ON
COMMON METALLURGICAL TERMS
The International Nickel Company of Canada, Limited
invites students planning or preparing for a career
involving the use of metals lo write for this valuable
■once hook. This 32 page hook entitled "The Technical Kditor Speaks . . ."contains a series of one-page
articles. These articles explain the practical meanings
of technical words that are used in describing and
measuring thc mechanical properties of metals and
alloys such a.s stress-strain, impact strength, Curie
point, elastic limit and thermal expansion.
Written by the Development and Research Division of The International Mokel Company, the purpose
of the book is to assist students and others interested in learning how to appraise the various properties
of metals. It will he valuable as a permanent reference book on metal terminology. It ia available
without charge ami will be sent on receipt of the coupon below.
THE INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED, 25 KING ST. W., TORONTO
Gentlemen: I'lease send me
"Tlie Technical J'iditor Spcal
ii  copy of  the  booklet   entitk
THE INTERNATIONAL NICKEL
COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED,
25 KING ST. W„ TORONTO
Na.vik
Addki'.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0125336/manifest

Comment

Related Items