UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Daily Ubyssey Oct 6, 1948

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0125334.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125334.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0125334-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0125334-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125334-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0125334-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0125334-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0125334-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0125334-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0125334.ris

Full Text

 The Daily Ubyssey
VOL. XXXI
VANCOUVER, B.C. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1948
No. 10
4,        v~*f f'M
>
Pictures Tell Story of Over-Exuberant Student Government and Heritage of Debt
GRAVY TRAIN CARGO left over from last year's ride is mod- ROOMFUL OF SWEATERS adds another few thousand INTRAMURAL SPORTS PROGRAM, reputed to be the largest,on
elled by pretty Marjorie McDonald. The pennants, balloons and dollars to the deficit Shirley HoPkins tries on one of the North American continent, grabs a major portion of the $16,000
,   . . , A.        , x,    ,.„„.„      _,,     , ,      ,.      the dozens of faculty sweaters at $6 a piece that are being MAD budget. Council magician and treasurer Paul Plant hopes to
hats account for a portion of the $17,000 worth of merchandise     ,, .,        ,   .,    „, „ _ o,   „ ,    _._"_«_... ._ i  ^° ...„i_:_ _* °_j_..» i:„_ u_... iL. j.i.* .^ * , *«»..*«
the AMS found itself saddled with this term.
sold through the College Shop in an effort to keep the explain at today's meeting how the debt will be made up.
AMS in business.
Photos by Mickey Jones, R. Steiner
Arts-Science Rivalry
Sparks Blood Drive
Science  Sure  Of  Victory
Claim  Artsmen  "Bloodless"
Genuine blood will flow during the latest Artsmen-Engineer
feud.
Beginning today, Arts and Applied $>-
Science undergraduates will try to
outdo each other in their donations
to the Red Cross blood drive.
, Artsmen fired the opening shot by
challenging Reshirts to top them pint
per capita of contributions.
Confident of victory, Redshirt
spokesmen expect to oust their rivals
because "Everybody knows Artsmen
ain't got no blood."
They shrug off stories reported in
tht column of beloved campus hum*
«rtst Jabez that Engineers have but
two red corpuscles. Engineers are
alive says Jabez, because the corpuscles chase each other.
Tlie "Reds" claim Jabez was prejudiced because he was an Artsman.
A prize will be offered to the Faculty winning in the inter-student
competition.
The drive, sponsored by the Undergraduates Societies Committee, will
feature a new painless process of
taking blood.
Phrateres members will register
students at booths situated at strategic spots around the campus.
Engineers Undergraduate Society
is registering its own members
through   class representatives.
Members of Nurses' Pre-medical
Undergraduates will "cover" all major functions during this weekk.
Red Cross officials report that all
students will be given a thorough
examination before their blood is
let. Students must eat breakfast before donating blood, they warn. Free
coffee is served later.
"Lover" Comedy
Staged   Friday
Students again will hear the
sidesplitting operation of "Her
Scienceman  Lover."
Sex rounded and hilarius, the
"Lover" will be presented again
by request. This will be the third
performance   of   this   season.
Students with 25 cents to invest'
in an uproariously funny sex education will be able to see the
presentation on Friday, October 8
at 12:30 p.m, in the Auditorium.
'tween classes:
Student Asks
Help For ISS
Undergraduate Societies' Committee
has been asked to help promote International Student Service on the
campus- -,--
Greg. Belkov, student - who attended the ISS seminar in Germany last
at a USC meeting Monday,
summer,   asked   USC's   co-operation
Belkov charged ISS committees of
the past have been "too temporary"
a nature to do their job.
He said that "something must bc
done" to promote continuity in the
organization, to keep it working
smoothly from the end of one year to
the bniegn ineotfgnh ctaoin et hrdu
t'he beginning of the next.
The student directory goes to press
next week.
^ ii, #
Undergraduates who have changed
their address or telephone number
since registering must inform the
Publications Board secretary of the
change by Thursday, October 7th.
The "Pub" is situated in the north
Brock  basement.
"Students who don't make thc
change will be out of luck," says
Marjorie MacDonald, editor.
Most  Ambitious  club  at  UBC,  the
young Pep Club is asking for applicants.
Club applications and  all  other stu-
All Freshmen- who signed Pep
dents interested in cheer-leading,
decorating, and organizing new ivas-
ions. pep meets, ad rallies arc to
meet i Arts 204, Friday at noon.
>f! '!( #
A Witness of the 20th tragedy in
Greece will address Varsity Christian Fellowship today at 12:30 p.m. in
Arts 204. Rev. K. Paul Yphantis. Th.B.
who served as a missionary in Greece
during the German occupation, will
speak on the "Spread of the Gospel
in Europe.
Both Purple:
'Always A Job For Law
Students', Says Curtis
By ART WELSH
''What will happen to the large number of students graduating from UBC s Faculty of Law?"
This   question   was   answered   op-<^
timistically   by   Dean   G.   L.   Curtis,
Faculty of Law, to the Daily Ubyssey.
There will be, he feels, a place for
them all.
"Many graduates do not enter into
the practice of general law." said
Dean   Curtis.   "Many   of   them   will
enter varied allied  fields."
Furthering his explanation and referring to the large registration the
Dean .said, "It. is a post war situation.
The accumulation of DVA veterans
naturally swell the registration."
Dean Curtis believes that there will
always be a  need  for good   lawyers.
Some of UBC's graduates will be absorbed by city firms. Some will filter
into the United  States.
Graduates of the Faculty of Law-
will be on a par with, the best on the
continent.
Referring to the Gordon Martin
issue Dean Curtis refused any comment stating thai the case was not
under  his  juridiclio.n
Registration in tho faculty this year
is  nearly  450,
Next year's ''freshman" registration is expected to be considerably
reduced.
"Color" Quarrel
Sparks Faculty
Sweater Choice
If in 1960 your doctor removes his
stethescope, picks up a mortar and
begins to fill his "own prescriptions,
don't be surprised.
It may be the logical development
of a confusing parallel that harks
back t'o his college days at UBC,
It is now impossible to tell pharmacy and pre-medical students apart
because both have accidentally selected the same colors for their class
sweaters. Each of the quarrelling
factions claim the colors as their own.
Pharmacists insist that the choice,
purple with a white stripe, is their
original idea.
But pre-meds have the advantage
of having sweater? vti hand. Possession is nine points of the law.
If stubborness prevails and both
group insist on sporting the same
colors, the resulting confusion may
carry over into their respective training with disastrous effects to trusting
society.
Pre- meds have suggested that the
pharmacy student acknowledge defeat
feat and come up with something
different, though posibly more conservative.
Austerity Budget Heard
By General Meet Today
Approval For Emergency
Allocations Sought By Plant
Harrassed and weary from a month of trying to make ends
meet, student councillors today go to the undergraduate body
for endorsation of their money-saving fiscal policy. ;
"SCHOOL'S OUT"
FOR AMS MEET
IN ARMORY
.. Lectures scheduled for 11:30 a.m.
today have been cancelled to make
way for the Alma Mater Society
meeting In the Armory.
The cancellation gives every
undergraduate student an oppor-
tuntiy to attend the sessions	
All other classes will convene
as usual.
Bookstore Pays
Stockholders Today
UBC's student run bookstore will
hold  a  "pay parade"  today.
Over 1500 students are to be paid
off Wednesday and Thursday from
11:30 to 5 p.m. All unclaimed books
will go to thc International Student
Service.
System emptayed this year was a
"booming success" with a turnover
of  about  §9,000.
Pipe Band Asking Fors
More Student Drummer
You can blow or beat your brains out with co-operation
from UBC experts if you join the pipe band.
The band is badly in need of drum- <$-
mors.
Students with drumming experience
and equipment are asked to leave
their names on the pipe band notice
board  in the Legion office.
There will be a meeting and practice Friday, October 8 at 6:00 p.m.
in the armories.
Beginner's classes arc as follows:
GIVE LESSONS
Piping classes are on Tuesdays at
noon hour in HG-9. Students wishing to join these classes are asked to
bring a bagpipe chanter and a copy
of Logan's Tutor. First class is October 12.
Drumming lessons for all drummers
will begin on Tuesday, October 12
and following Tuesdays and Fridays
at 12:30 in HL-4. Members and pors-
pective members are asked to bring
sticks.
All equipment can be obtained
from  tho  Vancouver  Drum  Co.
Artsmen Tops In
USC Blood Drive
An average of 11 per cent of students from the ten faculties have
registered already for the campus
Red Cross blood drive, with Arts
leading  with  16 per  cent.
Quota set is 25 per cent of students
from each faculty. Registering began
today.
Here are the figures.
Faculty
Quota Re
sgistc
red Perce
Arts
940
149
16
Agriculture
129
17
14
Phys Ed
34
7
14
Commerce
144
13
9
Pharmacy
47
5
10
Teachers
36
3
8
Social  Work
25
3
12
Nursos
24
3
12
Law
112
11
10
Engineers
(Figures
Un
wallabie)
INFORMATION PACKED
TILLICUMS ON SALE
Do you know your university?
The AMS is selling this year's surplus Tillicums to
students seeking information about the campus.
Tillicums will be on sale at the door of: the Armories
today. Price will be fifty cents.
This is the new Tillicum, the students handbook, containing the revised constitution and information on all clubs.
This year's handbook was edited bv Laura Haahti.
Faced with a $20,000 deficit, Paul
Plant will present hii$ "austerity
program" budget today at 11:30 p.m.
in the Armories. The blonde treasurer, who worked himself into a hospital bed in an effort to balance the
budget, will be out to gain approval
for'moves which have slashed 30 per
cent from student activities,
THE LIMIT
Plant fell heir to most of his problem when a free spending administration headed by Grant Livingstone
td Bob Harwood overshot fiscal limits  by $16,000 in  the  1947-48  session.
UBC students will have a chance
to show their forgiving natures when
Cliff Greer asks for support for a
motion to bring German students to
study here on AMS funds.
NEW PLATFORM
Another item for student consideration will be the platform of this
year's Student Council which will be
read by Dave Brousson, AMS president.
He will promise increased support
to athletics, foundation of a University store, as well as an effort to balance  the budget.
Students will also hear from Col.
W. Swan, builder of the UBC Armories, who shall request support for the
blood drive now under way on the
campus.
AMS Asked
"Dollar For
American Educator
Will Visit UBC
A prominent American educationalist on a continent-wide tour will speak
at UBC Acadia Camp, October 5 at
1:30 p.m.
He is Dr. E. G. Olsen. director of
Schools and Community Relations for
the state of Washington and also od-
dress open the two-day sessions of
Vancouver Parents' Institute, Cctober
4 at 8 p.m. in the Hotel Vancouver.
Dr. Olsen has held chairs of education at Colgate and University
and   Russell   Sage   Institute.
Meetings   are   open   to   the   public.
—-,» ~	
New Series Airs
Student Views
UBC students arc going on the air.
Students for Canadian campuses,
including UBC, will have a chance
to air their views over a CBC round-
table series enlilled ''Youth Speaks
Out", beginning October 7 at 8:15 p.m.
First to appear will be undergraduates from University of Alberta.
11
It
NFCUS "Adoption
Plan  Put To Meet
Is democracy worth an extra dollar?
UBC students will have to answer
this question today at AMS general
meeting when resolution that one
dollar be added to next year's AMS
dues comes up for approval.
DOING NOTHING
Resolution proposed by UBC students Greg Belkov and Cliff Greer,
asks that the extra dollar be spent
to give European students an <>p*
portunity to see Canadian democracy
in action. Greer and Belkov attended
International Student Service serh«
iar in Germany last summer.
While there, Belkov and Greet1 '
found that the Western powers were
doing "nothing constructive" to '•d-f:
ucate Germans in democracy, while
Communist and Socialist forces weirif
carrying on an extensive propogartda
program.
If the resolution is passed, Canadian
government and UNESCO will be
asked to contribute to the scheme/
fifty* $1800 scholarships to be given
which will provide a minimum ot
European students for the purpose
of touring Canada and studying Canadian  institutions.
Resolution provides for the "adoption" of a European university by
each  Canadian University.
It   is proposed  that  UBC  offer. to(
provide four scholarships for students
from the university of Hamburg.
RESOLUTIONS MADE
Scholarships will be presented -to
students whose chosen vocations will
permit them to make fullest use of
the experience.
Resolution reads in part: "Whereas
wc, students of the University of
British Columbia . . . believe others
should enjoy,, the opportunities ...
which exist in our democratic forms
and   institutions.
"Be it terefor resolved that we
petition the Alma Mater Society to
add one dollar to each student's fees
for the purpose of providing ... 4
scholarships of $1,800 each to students
of the Hamburg to be used for bringing these students t'o Canadian ca'mp-
usese for one year.
"Be lt therefore resolved that we
th-? National Federation of Canadian
University Students to pass the resolution. . . member universities. « . and
to the International Student Service
for implementation. . . and that we
request the Canadian government anti
UNESCO to provide. . . two scholarships for each scholarship provided
by  Caadian  students . .  ," Page 2
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Wednesday, October 6, 1948
The Daily Ubyssey
Memher Canadian University Press
u, a    Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscriptions—$2.50 per year
PUwllhed throughout the university year by the Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia.
", a", *P ft1 *f*
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of Tho Daily Ubyssey and not necessarily those
of the Alma Mater Ssciety nor of the University.
a ;        .    . *P T* V
6fflfe«fl In Brock Hall. Phone ALma 1624 JTor display advertising phone ALma 3253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF   -   -   -   -   RON  HAGGART
-s-1 /:■•■• MANAGING EDITOR   -   -   -   -   VAL SEARS
GBMfcbAL STAFF: News Editor, Bob Cave, Chuck Marshall; Features Editor, Ray Baines; Photography Director,
Ellanor Hall; Sports Editor, Jack  Wasserman;   Womens'    Editor.   Loni   Francis.    •
City Editor This Issue - LAURA HAAHTI
Associate Editors - ART WELSH and DOUG MURRAY-ALLEN
Lift The Curtain
|t is unfortunate that a flood of nonsense
^^sfeevent UBC students from stepping
into history today.
, tpt^ortant as the business of the Alma
Miter Society is, petty wrangling may so
tediously delay the general meeting of the
Aihia Mater Society thalj undergraduates will
hiVe ho time to hear the proposals of two
«tUd«nt»i recently returned from Europe.
:; &()prpjposa)s of Cliff Greer and Gregory
'iS«6v are simple. /They will ask UBC students to pay a dollar a year so that, as they
put if, students from continental European
Countries "where democracy is not safely established" may come to Canadian universities
:r8k •Scholai'Ships for Knowing Democracy."
To launch the scheme, Greer and Belkov
will ask. today that students petition the uni-
V&Psity for an additional dollar a year auto-
&§jG|heckoff to. establish four $1500 scholarly Ihimtghi International Student Service.
Student exchange throughout the world
is one of those noteworthy projects with which
tveryone agrees, but, unfortunately, one that
has ljftin. dormant in politician's pigeonholes
for years.
Now UBC students are offered the oppor-
ItiMity 4© stir the cobwebs from Ottawa in
launching the scheme.
In addition to establishing the foreign
sclidlarshi^Sj -the two students urge that UBC
''Ad6ptn the University of Hamburg and bring
fdU* students "of high academic standing,
qualities of leadership and political maturity"
to Vancouver.
;i  Sitch definite action is, of course, long over
due. Just the other day this newspaper reported Ihe departure for France of a former
U,BC student who endeared himself to the
campus under the penname "Jabez."
French government scholarships such as
that won by Jabez have offered the opportunity of overseas study to Canadian students
for many years.
They have flocked to Paris to live among
the people of France, to ab.sorb her customs
and traditions.
France has found its international scholarships a sound investment, as would Canada
were it to rerftove the subject from the realms
of polite academic daydreaming.
Such scholarships are actually the province
of governments, as Greer and Belkov realize
when they ask that Ottawa assist directly, pr
through the United. Nations, in the estfab-
lishmen of world fellowships.
UBC may well have to wait out the slow
grinding of governmental mills, however, before it sees the establishment of world-girdling
scholarships.
It seems probably that UBC's Bpard of
Governors, though they might view the proposal with favor, will not take easily to another rise in student fees. The pyramiding
of fees to finance worthy projects is a simple
solution to many problems, but this proposal
coming so clo.se on the heels of the university's
own tuition hike will probably meet with
regretfully nodded heads.
Here is a challange, however, for both students and--university to step -forth- in forthright, progressive action.
briefly noted
It seqms that we ,n?ay have ,a
Medical Faculty at UBC after,.a}!
(providing of cpurse that rnc,re
money is forthcoming to mqet ,inr
flationary construction coats.)
P|an£ for the .Faculty art;, >yell Advanced, $1,000,000 tms, alre,a4y beei»
allocated towards .construction, and
gyoynd services f,pr. the! rn,e,dical
suitable Dean to, organize rnedjcal
centre, and th*,search is on for a
education, at UBC,
Despite the fact that it wiH be at
least a year betpre courses ;n first
year medicine will be offered ^md
ited to about 50 students, the news
that total registration may be lim-
is decidedly a*icot4rBgjng. The
spectacle of UBC. si'udents. gpipj?
as far afield as Cbir,a, l^g.ypa^ ).o
enter a medical school and h^ncjr
reels of applicants with excellent
schfllaBtic record* knocking vainly
at the doors of McGill and other
;Cana,dian universities is a poor
reflection of pur ,nrppare,dness fof
expahded hospitalization and
health services to the people of
Cal?ada., ,      .     ,,       ..   _
Pre-mecj si'udents at UBC ^and
for that matter throughout Canada) who are eagerly following developments her*, cpuld'wejl initiate a program of publicity to speed
its progress, and perhaps raise a
half-a-million dollars or so to-
>yardsr,qp«t^ How ,f(b,QUt, it, pre-
med^? Tjie g^me initiative,and enthusiasm which made UBC possible wil,l e^ta^llsh a .Judical Faculty hefe, in, record tirp^,   ,U(| „,
It's good to see that the library
is, operating .smoothly, again. Despite the ten days of,jqneral incpn-
venience to the sv'udent at the
beginning of the term (which
might have been avoided,* > the en-
streamlined 'organization have
larged facilities for study and
made it more of a pleasure than
by leon lipson
#A, effort to study, in the library.
!I),\e "serve yourself" system Jn; the
Reserve ,jSeo.'ion is a tremendous
improvement,
There is good news , for ithpse
y/hp wpn't go, |]{j me'Until, library
deprs i-lQse.flt. night., Jhe CJanqdlan
l$H\tyl cqnfceeo wHl.,b^iQpen in, %
eveji)gs .beginning Octoh^r 1,2 from
7 p.m, tp 10, p.m., for j, those who
wish: to ,,fakp,, JJme; out, for refreshments. ,No other canteen, will be
cpen on the campus during these
hours.
C^mp, tp. their ba^ Uiera ar,e
'|}hpvisancU" of children at Little
Mqupt'ain,
Get behind the Legion ,in ..thpfr
plari ;)tp Ijring, put veterans ,at
Shaughpe^sy Hospital to see the
Thunderbirds, take their first win
cy\ Oc.tpber 16<h, If you have, a car,
ycu pan arrange to, .bring one pr
two fnen out. Wt the very least,
pa,trpni^e the, Region Canteen at
noon hours. All proceeds during
this.period wi)l go towards a fund
to bring the boys to the game.
forVehOnl^ C.U.P. Highli^Mi
Still, Small Voice
Student apathy is not a particularly pleasant topic to bring to the attention of 8000
AMS members. They have the advantage
in numbers and the old adage about the pen
©rid sword is somehow losing its effect in
ihf& day of foce. ,
The usual method is to blast away at uninterested students after they have neglected
j;.-,- ran   ■ '
to dp <his and that throughout the year. We
leel that it might be wise to remind students
(who <should be keen as mustard at this time
of y«ar) of the tremendous importance of
today's general AMS meeting before it takes
the first of the general AMS meetings, rather
place.
,   It should not be considered a duty to attend.
It should be thought of as a matter of per
son;:! inter .!, even concern. The items on
the agenda which require majority votes to
make then: law will affect every student and
his activit'o. throughout the coming year.
It's of little use to criticise the council during the year for putting this regulation or
that law into effect after it has been passed.
If you disagree with the proposals on the
agenda get down to the Armories and vote
against them.
It is not intended to become philosophical,
and point to the "education in the ways of
democratic government!" You know all about
that. But remember your "still small voice"
carries a lot of weight in a population of 8000.
Make the most important function of the
year a booming success. Don't just bc at UjBC,
be of UBC.
,, .present MacJ^ic in, h#s ,.ra-
d|p (ftd^re^ pn;,Monday. expressed
surprise that. 1500 pf, our young
peoplq (student-.y$te}-ans, wtio applied for admission to UBC) were
married with ^jnall children,. Tljis
necessited a housing program un-
Rrecodented in, VBC's, history with
t|ie assccia|ted ppoblem? pf medical
and nursing services, baby clinics,
laundries and washing machines,
dryig rooms, playgrounds and
nurseries.
,,-Jf ,you ask me, the .problem is
becoming even more acute. According to the lai'eest available
estimates for Little Mountain
Camp, population growth continues M steadily. Canadian legion
housing officials,, work it cut this
way,: the/e,ars 2$3 ,familie?, which
makes 586 men and women—must
bo around 400 children (the most
difficult' ^igur^ to estimate) and
, pprjia.ps <$0 njore ejfpectqd—tqtal
whon all the storks have arrived,
1,566. Just to be on the safe side,
I must admit that the figures on
children are my own, estimates
and not those of.,the, Legion.. B.ui'
if you want to believe B.C.'Electric bus drivers who have to make
the   hazardous   trip   through   the
A te?v' ,in the uee pf English, (Js
now required pf freshmen catering the, University qf $a$atjcl?-
ewan-, This new deyplppment has
been, .greeted with favpr by university officials, and mixed feelings by the students. Those who
get poor grades on the 500-word
essapy are condemned to drill lab
classes in English. Said President
Jhompon, cf U. of S: "The prpper
use of any language is an art—it
should be conducted with the re-
,speyc,t and attexUipn due aryr pf tfiie
o^hjer Arts." ^aid a. freshman:
"They can't make me take It—It's
too late for me to get any help
from a lab." Said an unknown
party: "Wfiat do you think o| enforcing a literary test on the Sheaf
staffs" (The Shpaf is the U of S
student newspaper.)
Club Mentis
Special ior ,:Thursda^, Optobcr
7th—the UBC Film Sociefjr is offering Puccini's delightful "ia
Boheme,, starring Jan Kiepura,
Marta Egyerth and the Vienna
Philharmonic Orchestra, 3:45 p.m.
in the, University, Theatre (Auditorium), price 25 ceni'3, one showing only.
Mm*  "Tomb   Est"
Transportation
ANYONE WANJIHQ ,A ,R1PE TO
philUwack E'''day phone G. Bowman
nt AL 3352-L.
ANYONE MOTORING TO .NORTH
Okanagan this weeteef>d<''wlfh room
for paying passenger please contact
C, .Breen or phone BA 5585 immediately.
WANT TO FORM CAR CHAIN Vicinity 32m Ave. and Granville. Phono
BA 9333-L
Lost
BLACK ONYX RING INITIAL "R"
lost Wednesday. Finder please tarn
in to the AMS or phone PA 2875
after 6:00. Reward.
PAIR OF GLASSES IN BROWfcl
leather case. Contact Kathryn at CE
2850.
ON THE CAMPUS DURING t-A$T
April exams, one pah: clgar-rimme,cl
glasses in blue leather case having
Robert, Strain, ppj-pmey'rlst on case.
Please phone BA 3916-M.
WILL THE PERSON WHO PICKED
up a slide-rule and log book in App.
Sc4 lfll please call A. C. Kenny at
Fori  Camp.
BLACK ZIPPER WALLET LOST IN
cafe en Tuesday, please return to
Jean Titterington.  BA. 0825-R.
WILL THE. BOY WHO FOUIfD A
single strr.nd of pearls in the cafeteria , please phone again? Anne. BA
8415- L
WOULD PERSON PLEASE RETURN
the tan jacket he took by mistake to
the Physics 100 coat room. Yours has
your name in your pocket'.
PLUE PARKER PEN WITH SILVER
top. Lc;et in field, house. Phone Ron
Williams at CE 2248.
COLLEGE SURVEY. LOST IN .ARTS!
JOfl Wed. Name - Benny Kent in bock
Phone KE 3813-R.
For Sale
AUTOMATIC RECORD PLAYER, ,£
scleral, albums cf classical records
(Mozart, Bach, Chopin, ScftrJaUi) ,in
excellent condition. Half price. Phone
AL 1611-R. Ask for John.
ONE TUXEDO COMPLETE WITH
shirt and brocaded vest. Size 38;; also
one pair of white trousers and waist
33" worn enly once. Phone BA 3916-M
PORTABLE RADIO ,FOR, ",§EItfES"
.complete with ,two se^s pf .batteries.
Both AC and DC. Price $45.00
TEACHER-TRAINING BOOKS FOR
rale. Phone BA 6877-M.
8    TUBE    OLDER    TYPE    PHILCO
radio. Marvellous, reception for local
.and distant, stations., $10 cash. Phone
Chuck at BA 4051-M.
GOOD PAIR SIZE ,10 FOOTBALL
cleats. Phone Harry BA 1352-R after
7:00 p.m.
Accommodation
ROOM    AND    BOARD   FOR    ONE
girl on Wesi' 41st Ave. 2 blocks from
Dunbar. Phone BA 3916-M.
TOP-NOTCH BACHELOR ACCOM-
odp.tion — 2 vacancies—self-contained.
4000 West 10th Ave.
TWO SINGLE ROOMS, WILIy GIVE
breakfast and lunch. Rates by ar-
ranbemont. Phone Mrs. Gardner, BA
2281-R, 3091 Puget Drive.
FOR RENT. TWO ROOMS FCIt 3
men  si'udents.  Phone  KE 5057-R.
CLEAN DOUBLE. ROOM£ , 'FQJt
boys. Twin beds. Morning and evening meal optional. AL 2948-Y.
FOR RENT COMFORTABLE FRONT
sleeping room. Phone Alma 2043-L
or call at 3828 West 10th Ave.
(        PERSONAL
EXPERT TYPING OF ESSAYS,
theses, etc, Mrs. Rogers. CE 3509.
EXPERT TYPING. QUICK SERV-
ice. J. C. Davie, 4000 West 10th Ave.
AL 3459.
i .: it..'
WOULD HECTOR ROBERTSHAW
please phone DE 0(102 re personal
letters ei'c.
■:Si      ' SAM
BRAVE NEW SPORTS WORLD
By Lloyd Male
"Yessirrec," cracked the venerable Won
Dilsqn, for over three decades the coacli of
the famed British Columbia grid squad," this
\g our fifth straight unscored-upon season
but things sure used to be different."
"Why I remember way Baaken '48 with
the ole UBC Thunderbirds. We were three
teams deep at every position in inexperience.
Of course there were a few standouts one
of whom comes to m'ind — Dick - uh - Dick -
uh - Ballpoint, I think it was, all West Pt.
,Grey tackle for 1948. Most of the fellows were
former English rugger men and I think if
they'd had the extra four men there would
possibly would have been some difference.
"Those were the days when - I guess
you were too young to remember son - we
had no scholarships for needy football players,
no part time jobs for fullbacks with thirsty
Cadillacs, why we didn't even have a wind
watcher squad •— "
"Pardon me," I interrupted, ''did ymi
say wind watcher squad'?"
TORNADO SQUAD
"Yep — aboi'l (it'Uvn of my buys ;ir.' in
charg? of lyinp, dmvn l!n> phy.-.ic ; 1 uiitcUit; i'i
case of a tornado; haven't had a Inr.ianb a no •
I been here - never can toll thou:,!.. Anvhow
il; keeps (jthe boys in coke money, exact
figures c:-eape rr.o - somewhere between
three and lour hunnert a month.''
'J hope you dont' mind if i bring this
up," I interposed again," but a few of our
competitors in the Pacific Coast Conference
have been complaining that we pay some of
our players outright for playing football instead of providing them with responsible positions such a.s the W. W. squad.
TRINKET OF ESTEEM
There was a roll as of thunderclaps in the
coaches voice, "Absolutely unfounded, I'd
like to know who started that. From time to
lime certain cr ;n.u;:al:ons on the campus
h;.ve boon k'...n/.' to oll'or up some trinket
of their esteem to some deserving individual
( u the team, say a cabin, cruiser or a few
iii'i-i-and .''hares of Canadian Pacific stock, ll
h '". boon rume'vd that some of tho pwfessor,;;
;e:anos come l-.p more than these baubles are
v.oith. We're having the matter looked into."
''A number of the team members have been
complaining that their studios are interfering
with their blocking practice," I queried, 'is
any ifling being done lo  remedy this'.'"
"We've   boon.  considei'!n°:   the   matter,"   the
hi:loved  mentor  explained,  toying with  the
football from last seasons' Notre Dame tilt,
the side facing me being emblazoned in gold
letters "UBC—53, N.D.—N.G.", "and we have
'c
finally decided to have classes or^y, pn, eyjery
oilier Wednesday afternoon instead of weekly
a I present.''
1-TGSKIN EDUCATION
"It was also bruited .about that some of the
fellas on the team were given pass mai^ks
at tlie last exams for merely exhibiting some
rudimentary knowledge."
i   :     !   i •   <
Again ire creased cross the,coach's countenance (wow! looka that alliteration), "Com-
laletely false! The dirty , my illustrious
( ppnncnts no doubt refer to the unusual
i u't-mce. of our star quarterback, Mhlgwscki,
1 eing passed with first class honors for being
; bio to write his name at the head of the
paper.
"While this was .unquestionable as far as
laaglih was concerned, there was,some doubt
as te> whether the same, feat could get the
'mm'o-threater through Math until it was
I    ' ■'• d 'ut by the head of the department he
. i1 v'lh which he had arranged his press
clippings in chronolical order."
GOOD OLD DAYS
'J he great man paused and gazed at an enlargement covering the entire east wall of
tlie^ office of a newsphoto depicting the fleet
of ambulances used to carry away the c'as-
unities of the opposing side in the Rose Bowl
match between UBC and the U.S. Collegiate
All Stars, This game, as you will remember,
being called at the end of the first half as
tho, American aggregation did not have enough men left to field a full team,
"It wasn't always like this," he sighed
nostalgically indicating that the interview
was about closed, "matter of fact I recollect
back in forty-eight it got to be so that we had
to say that we were building up a giant Jackpot 5,c!)re. Watch it grow and GROW and
('•HOW. Each Saturday we fail to win we will
eld seven points to the grand total making
next game's--plus seven more points feu1 the
holiday—Giant Jackpot  Score 54 points!"
''Ahhh, them were the days," he reminisced
i:lac.' kicking mo neatly over the window sash,
"don't suppose I LI ever forget our dressing
11 on, motto .-"Tomb K ;l' ." Wednesday, October 6, 1948
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Runneth Over As
oods Jam 'Lost' Safe
"Wotto boy"
By Don Cunliffe
Braving Thc Line Tamers
ily Ubyssey office safe is filled to overflowing with
a wei^cl ^election of merchandise.
No, the newspaper isn't tryipg to$      ■' >■—' ■	
,-'■'■"' i    ,A,    ,    ,   L   t,        . in during the past two days, while
supplement   its   budget   through   an
elephant sale.
As another of it's public services,
the Ubyssey has taken oyer the,Lost
and   Found   from   the   Alma   Mater
Society.
' ,    -i !•    ...   . ' . i   ■
Included in the selection of articles
now on file are 3 dozen wallets, 25
\:       f I.  i T  - l; ,
pens, 4 bo6ks, 2 watches, 1 compact,
and a lonely little ring of keys.
Also wailing for owners are several expensive, sets pf drawing instruments, a jslide rule or two, and
klx> .kerdhlets.
About 20 articles have been turned
ttlm -t
|fc*t * »J
Speak On. Europe
U.B.C. Slavonics expert and director of the Department of Slavonic
StUdieSj Dr. James O. St. Clair-Sobell,
will open Victoria Extension Assoc-
lationclasfes this winter, under spon-
worship of UBC Extension Depart-,
mem'. '
,H)Dr. §ol?eU y/U\ be, the first c* J3
/tpcak^rs to address Victcqa audiences, He will give, ,the,tbackgrpun3 behind USSR'S position of supremacy
ii. Eastern, Central and South East
Europe, and explain the new economic policies of Soviet control being
Introduced.
Unless losers show up, the overflow
only about six have been claimed,
thueatens to jam the doorway.
The new Lost and Found will be
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and is located in the Publication Board's office, north basement of Brock Hall.
:6rurti^eth Class
MsIn mm
- Speaker's ,'ass of the p* rjiarr^rttpry
foium ,M$der professor Bert Hughes
has «haj(iged its name to "The Speak-
ir/. Workshop." ;
Innovations in ihis.-year's speaking
classes are the intrpcjijctlon of wire
recorders, for improving radio. Wearing technique. This;wUl be under the
direction of Ernie Perault.
A publicity meeting of thye .overall
organization will be held October 8-
in Arts 106.
, "Spoakej;?  Workshop"  section  will
meet October 12 in Arts 106.
'!    si I'
THE
SIGNBOARD
ANYONE MOTORING TO
Cariboo, this coining weekend and
could take q'paying passenger, please
phene Wendy at.AL 0635 or lqave
note in Aggie Girl's Common Hoom.
The Engineering Institute of Canada will hold a organizational meeting at 12:30 Friday in Applied Science
208.  . ..      .
7*5
Photo by Larry Addes
LOST PENS, typical of clutter of misplaced student equipment overflowing Publications Board safe, are held
by"Pu,b," .secretary Shirley Dack. Lost
and Found department has been transferred to Daily Ubyssey offices.
o.
-L.
-U.
KOOty AND, BOARD FOR GIRL
jjtudent in return for light services.
Kerr. 9891. 3989 Hudson.
MATH REFERENCE B£QK£. JMAR-
geneau and Murphy, Maths for Physics and Chem." Doetsoh "Laplace
Transformation". Phone Bob at FA
7844-Y.
EXPERT , .TYPlNG-pNQTES, Essays, etc. Quick service, 12 cent's .per
page. Mrs. J. C. Davie, 4000 W vOth
Ave,,, Wpfk c$n be left with J, C.
Davie, 1st year Law.
LOST BETWEEN BUS STOP AND
auditorium, brown wallet, Contents
urgently needed. Reward. Call Pat
at AL 2110.
GOLD RING, BLACK ONYX
stone initial "R" valued as keepsake,
turn in pub.
'       Jils,'.
BROWN UEAjmjjlR WALLET CON-
taining   money   and   papers.   Return
to AMS offiqe,,, Reward.
GREEN  .SHAEFFER'S    FOUNTAIN
pen,   Friday   October   1.   Phone   AL
1339-Y.
RIDE , FROM BROADWAY AND
Main, for 8;30's or 9:30's. Phone Cherie
at FA 3033-R.
Rp|l FROM VICINITY DAVIE AND
Nicola for two girls 8:30 Monday,
Wednesday and Friday. Phone Rae
PA 4756.
AT THE ANTARCTIC CLUB ON
Sunday morning, woman's blue bur-
beray, one pair toe rubbers and one
WANTED, STUPENT TO SHARE
large    front    room.    Private    home.
Breakfast cjptional. Car ride morning
lectures.  CE 5679.
CAR CHAIN-3 'CARS ■>,WANTED
from New Westminster, Phone Bill
-1464 N.W. or Reno 3643-L-2-N.W.
2nd YEAR COMMERCE STUDENT
who wants room and board within
reasonable distance of UBC. Will
share  with   other  student.   Call  Bob
at KE 0548.
; i
ROOM TO RENT. SLEEPING ROOM
for two beys sharing. Short .walk  to
UBC  bus.AL 3165-R.
ROOM AND BOARD FOR 2 MEN
S12.0O per week. Phone Hast. 1292-R.
RIDE WANTED DAILY FOR 8:30
lectures from 12th and Burrard. Also,
if available, ride, -downtown from
UBC  at 12:30.  Phone  Reg.  CE 3744.
RIDE WANTED. ALL 8:30's MON
to Sat. inclusive from vicinity 16th;
and Dunbar. Phone BA 5587-R.
WANTED. RIDE 8:30 DAILY VICIN-
ity Hustings , and Nanaimo. Phone
Jack.  HA  5379-L.
WANT A RIDE? ANYONE LIVING
in the Kerrisdale district and interst-
ed in forming a car pool please phone
KE 2513-Y.
WANTED BY COMM. STUDENT
RIDE FROM WEST END (VICINITY
of Kitsilano Beach)   for 9:30 lectures
-Mon. to Sat. Phone Helen BA 8476-Y.
(ride from 25th and Heather for 8:80's
■>'"".s)-Jt !■
>     a*&*
a Letter Home
The Daily Ubyssey sent home
to father, mother or to the little
brother who'll be here next year
will tell the folks at home how
you're spending their money.
The Daily Ubyssey
[ i
Send The Daily Ubyssey Home for a Year — $2.00
Brock  Hull,   University  of  British   Columbia
Today is last day for intra-mural
volleyball and toueh football entries.
To date 44 volleyball and 27 touch-
yuav, have been received. Groups desiring to enter must contact Reid
football entries, eight less than last
Mitchell today as entries will not be
icceived later.
Executive elected Friday to handle
the sports were: President ( Psi Eps-
;hn,) Jim Bagnall; Secretary, (Delta
.IJpsjlon),, and Bill Sparling; Treasurer
(Zete-PsD s   „     „. „ ., ... „
Life would prooably be much easier for
all of us if it weren't for the full length mirror.
In a hotel room a co.uple of weeks $go I
was shocked and offended when confronted
with my naker^ image while climbing out of
ai bath-tub. Jrin^) as tf my own nudity weren't
enough I, saw ttiat I was developing a pot . . ,
buy window, to you. I ask you. What could
be more disconcerting?
For the-n^xt few days I wandered around
trying to hold in my hel— er, stoma— er,
tummy. This was greeted with mixed remarks from those who falsely claim to be
my friends. Some asked why my face was
strained and suggested that the little boys
rooni was just down "the hall. Others imag-
ineed me to be holding my breath and became
quite indignant when they thought of all the
reasons why 1 should ever want to hold my
breath. Still others guessed the truth and
howled .merrily over my embarrassment.
But I soon discovered that you can't go
around holding in your solar plexus for ever,
jomeone suggested thAt I try a little exercise
so I walked around the block. I can now
report with all possible authority that exercise is (no good at all.
All of this time I found myself in the
throes of ijiental anguish. Everywhere I went
I could imagine people pointing at me and
giggling. Young women no longer tossed me
pny ''come hither" looks. Middle aged and
elderly ineen began to look upon me as a
boon companion. A dying judge suggested
that 1 become a member of his club. And,
on a street-car one day, I'm positive that a
little girl was pointing at me when she asked
her mummy if "that man is carrying a little
bundle from God under his heart."
Finally, out of sheer desperation, my
mounting concern drove me to the sanctuary
of my own room and a stack of' magazines.
At last, I thought, some peace of mind. A
little tranquility.
But no. There on the back cover of the
first magazine I picked up was, you guessed
it, a girdle ad for bulging men. (It is obvious
what type of magazines I read.) The idea of
wearing a .girdle seemed completely out of
tlie question, at first. But ttie mote I thought
about it, the better the idea, looked. Sp:0-o,
the following morning I duly %preserilea myself, at one of the local department stores
and. in a quiet, confident voice, asked the
clerk for a girdle.
"Ahyesf" he rejiiiea1 In a loud, c^ea!
voice, '$ut first you'll Have to KaVe a fitting.''
"A what?'I asked. ?
"A fitting," he said, louder aiitd dearer.
"You can't possibly expect to have a gWdl'e
without a fitting; 'jffrkt o. ajl."
He obviously said all of this lot- the toerie-
fit of everyone else in the whole store.
"But look," I ventured, miserably. "I'm
in something of a hurry. Couldn't you just
estimate the size?"
This, of course, was a mistake. He Jooked
ft m» for a couple of minutes, and then
started eyeing me up and down. If he'd been
a woman I would have slapped hid face. He
disappeared behind a counter fdi. 'awttlle', ttteri
reappeared jwith three or four off-Whitish,
elastic cloth-like things. 1 suppose he iWtlfeeS
the consternation on my face, tot, i'rt & Voice
even louder and clearer than belfore fte
shrilled,
"Whaddya expect? Whalebone?"
Then, in full view of absolutely everybody
lie held these little monstrosities up agaihst
my front. I was concious of every eve withift
tight being concentrated ujSori ifte. All 'b^W
transactions had long a^o stopped. I could
feel myself flushing a brilliant scarlet. My
spectacles started to steam up.
•i   .'*      •  '.   ..I..
Finally the; obnoxious little clerk, a bug.-
eyed monster if I ever saw one, straightened
and held the most successful caftdidate fflr
my future support high in the air. It W#s
also the most expensive one.
A   '*a i, ft ,-.        ,     ...        , < ■*, ,t .,. I ',. ....
"This," he screamed in,a positive bellow,
"is it. Shall I wrap it up, Sir?'' he added as
he wrapped it up.
A woman at my elbow giggled.
I fled, empty-handed into the crowded
street.
O.K. So I've got a bay-window. Wanna
make anything out of it?
calls the fashion signals
football season with skirts
classic lines you demand,
that are definitely 1948.
B
for the current Fall
and jackets, styled on the
given new fashion twists
A. Douhle-Brcas^ed Blazer with
long lapels, patch pockets, big
white buttons. Navy, scarlet,
Kelly green. 11-17   16.95
B. 2-Way Skirt of wool, slim in
front, gathered at the back.
Green, black, red, navy, aqua,
powder, gray. 11-17   9.9S
CoHcoe   Shop,   Third   Floor
Don't   forget,   Co-eds,   The   BAY's   College
Fashions Contest closes Saturday, October 23!
tWCOHPCMATta  ttn MAY I67Q.
Store Hours: 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed All Day Wednesday ftt»l
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Wednesday, October 6, 1948
Whitman Ups
Danger Signal
For Birds
'Surprise' Teom
Here October 23
Lewis and Clark College,
Oct. 6—Coach Joe Huston of
Lewis and Clark college hopes
there will be no more surprises
this football season of the type
he received when his Pioneers
eked out a 14-13 decision in
their Northwest conference
opener against Whitman here
recently.
"Whitman was a much tougher
club than we thought they would be"
Huston admitted today. "They really
surprised ua with a first-string that
was four or five touchdowns better
than the Whitman team we tied last
year. This freshman back of theirs
Don Siverts of Glendive, Montana,
is really one of the best."
Tlie Whitman team plays UBC at
Varsity Stadium October 23 when UBC
fans will see for themselves if the
team which beat out the 'Birds by a
tight 7-6 fast year is as much improved as Lewis and Clark coach Joe
Huston believes..
The Pioneers' head professor of
football also had complaints for the
passing of his quarterback, Freddie
Wilson, of Warrenton, and t'he all-
round fine work of Lewis and Clark
Fullback Stan Blair of Portland.
The 45-man Lewis and Clark squad
is toiling this week to improve its
timing, blocking and tackling which
proved a sore disappointment to
Huston in the Missionary game. Bill
Bell, of Portland, letterman left end
regular who was out Saturday with a
sprained ankle, rejoined the team
and will start against Vanport College at Jefferson high school field
Saturday night.
Only casualty incurred by Lewis
and Clark in winning its first' football victory in history over the Mis-
sionaires was centre Rans Sprinkling
of Portland who came up with a
pulled leg muscle.
The Pioneers who take a three
Week vacation from Northwest Conference competition, play their next
league game against Linfield at McMinnville, October 23.
NOTICES
Track, Field and Cross-Coujntry
Club; there will be a meeting in Hut
L-2 on Friday at 12:30. Training
schedules will be discussed.
GEOGRAPHY 102 TEXT, CASE AND
Berbsmark Phone KE 0797-L.
GENTS WINTER OVERCOAT SIZE
42. Color, dark navy, Almost new.
Less than half price. Phone AL 0340-L
ONE PAIR SKIS ALSO SNOW-
shoes. Cheap. Phone AL 0340-L.
'33 CHEV STANDARD SEDAN IN
good condiiion. See at 3460 W. 41st
Ave., Van,, B.C.  anytime after  12:00
noon. , j,. »
PRE-MED ELECTION. ALL FIRST
year pre-med students meet in Arts
103, Thursday, October 7 for ihe purpose of electing a first year representative to the pre-med executive,
A full attendance is requested,
DUE TO THE AMS MEETING, THE
Music Appreciation hour will not be
heard on Wednesday. Friday's concert will consist of the Dvorak Concerto in B opus 104,
SPECIAL MEETINC OF THE JAZZ
Society will be held this Wednesday
n#on, 12:30 in the club rooms behind
the Brock. The purpose of this meeting is the electing of this year's executive and the formation of general
club policy. It is hoped that everybody interested will attend.
BOB OSBORNE
. . . down from Olympic heights
Grid News 'In The Air';
'Birds Gain Reid Again
Storry Former Captain of Squad
Pulls 'MacArthur/ Will Be Back
Hopes of several UjBC victories in this years conference
grid schedule rose a number of points yesterday with the announcement that Dougie Reid will be in strip for the 'Birds
at the next game.
Reid captained last year's football <••
squad and was a standout in the passing combination of "Reid to French"
that resulted in the decisive 26-7
victory of UBC over the Lewis and
Clarke   Club   at   Homecoming   last
year. ,
Eligibility of Ried has been in
doubt for several weeks as he was
to be carrying an additional subject.
Requirements of the eligibility committee questioned such a course proposal.
With Ried back on the field, grid
fans can look to more UBC action in
the air. Ried will toss the long passes
and quarterback Bob Murphy concentrating on his bullet passes to wide
end and jump passes over the line.
Such   tactics   should   go   very   well
in the new T-formation which the
'Birds are currently employing.
There are also a number of reports
from the headquarters of the UBC
squad over in the stadium that there
will be a number of rugger stars out
in practice strip.
At any rate, UBC fans may look
forward to a tough battle in two
weeks time when Willimette University takes the field against UBC
in the stadium.
Coach Wilson is confident of several victories this season and with
the two weeks rest for injuries to
heal and practise to take effect, a
powerful 'Birdsquad will be set for
their initial win.
Pomfret Steps In
New 'Bird Mentor Must
HII 'Big League' Boots
Varsity Hoopmen Strong
Despite Loss Of Stars
Although deprived of stars that would have grounded any
other Canadian basketball quintet Thunderbirds, displaying
speed and form, floated through their first official practice
Saturday.
Energetic, ambitious hoop addicts
hurdled through the air in all directions forcing innocent bystanders to
seek cover. Back in the fight and setting t'he pace to prove themselves no
flukes but consistent champions were
old Thunderbirds Jimmy McLean,
Nev Munro, Bill Bell, Reid Mitchell,
and John Forsyth. Players of the
calibre of "Munro and Mitchell are
the backbone of a great team and
with the breaks may dish out thump-
ings fcr sufferings incurred elsewhere over the weekend.
Of the other prospect's, flipping
shots, the likes of which ensure
crowds, we couldn't even count them
for they weren't still long enough.
Young, and for the most part in need
of another year, if they retain their
speed and invest in arch support's
they still have plenty to warrant the
investment of a coach in order to
bring them up to par.
Chiefs Art Phillips, Gordie Broadhead and Pete Walker let it be known
through performance that' they were
ready for the big time and could take
INTERMURAL VOLLEYBALL
All Games Played At 12:30 P.M.
Wednesday, October 6
1.   Kappa Sig "B"
vs
Forestry "B"
Gym
2.   Beta Chi "A"
VS
Zebes
Gym
Thursday, Octobecr 7
1.   D.U. "A"
vs
Chi Delta "B"
F.H.
2.   Newman "B"
vs
A.T.O. "A"
F.H.
3.,   Phi Kappa Pi
VS
Phi Gamma 'B"
F.H.
4.   Phi Sigma Chi
vs
Legion
Gym
5.   Kappa Sig "A"
vs
V.C.F.
Gym
Friday, October 8
1.    Newman ''A''
vs
Architects
F.H.
2.   Psi U. "A"
vs
Alpha Tau Omega
'B' F.H.
3.   Phys. Ed. "A"      '
V3
Kappa Sig "Bv
F.H,
care  of themselves in  the Evergreen
Conference  into which Thunderbirds
have stepped,
#
Plainly mystified by the whole
matter, however, was coach Bob Osborne, who heavily beset by other
duties mused as to might he be able
i'o polish up and when. Pomfret, former hoop warrior from south of the
border and currently backing up
Don Wilson with the gridders is
rumored to be a large factor as Bob's
right hand man. Quiet, and a fellow
who conveys information only, he,
like Bob, is appreciated by the players.
This much can bc said, Thunderbirds are loaded with fine coaches,
smart mainstays, dashing reserves
for the opening annual Grad fest
but three weeks away.
SWIM TEAM
Men will meet Fridcty, October 8th
at 12:30 in the Training Room, Gym.
VARSITL BAND-NEW MEMBERS
wanted, especially those who play
baritone, trombone, horn, and drums.
Meeting Friday noo i hut B-3 be-
hid Brock.
LE CERCLE FRANCAIS WILL
meet for informal conversation on
Wednesday at 3:30 p.m. at the Gables.
CLEVELAND       BICYCLE,       FIRST
cla'-s   condition,   generator   and   light, i
maroon color.  AL 0257-L.
By DAVE CROSS
Destiny of Inter-collegiate
basketball at the University of
British Columbia this winter
will be in the capable hands of
Physical Education instructor
Jack Pomfret.
Appointment of the popular campus athlete was made necessary by
the resignation of Bob Osborne, who
has coached the 'Birds with spectacular success in recent' years. Fully
occupied with his position as head
of the Physical Education Department, Osborne came to the reluctant
decision that pressure of administrative duties would prevent him from
devoting sufficient  time  to  coaching.
Pomfret, currently active as assistant coach of the grid team, has
been connected with basketball for
several years, both as a player and a
coach. During the last two years he
was an outstanding performer with
the Clover Leafs helpinng that club to
the Canadian Senior championship.
In addition, he coached an Inter A
team  to the B.C.  title.
It is o easy task that Jack is faced
with this season, however. He's replacing the man who wa chosen to
coach the Canadian entry at the
Olympics in London this summer,
after a record of continued success
with the Thunderbirds in Canadian
and international competition. Osborne, a former Thunderbird hoopster
himself, has gained, in the few years
he was at the helm, the reputation
as a far above average mentor.
Also calculated to add to Pomfret's
difficulties is the fact that in January
the 'Birds will be moving up into
i-tiffer competition, for at that time
UBC will become a member of the
tough Evergreen Conference. The
ability of the coach and of the team
as a whole will be put to a severe
lest, but if they come through it will
be a tremendous feather in the cap
of the university and the province as
a  whole.
FRED MOONEN, Sports Editor
Editor This Issue - DAVE CROSS
UBC 'Licked'
JACK POMTRET
.... new chief of chiefs
Hardy Hikers Spend
Thanksgiving Days
Flexing Muscles
The Varsity Outdoor Club's annual
Thanksgiving trip will be to Camp
Elphinstone   this   year.
An estimated 150 people will leave
Saturday morning and return Monday   night.
The main activity for the weekend
will be the climbing of Ml'. Elphinstone,     advanced     climbers     going
straight up and beginners taking the
easier route.
American Football
Oct. 9 Open Date
Oct.  16 Willamette University at UBC
(Willamette 33—UBC 0)
Oct. 23 Whitman College at UBC
(Whitman 7—UBC' 6)
Oct. 30 College of  Idaho (Homecoming)
at UBC
(Idaho 33—UBC 13)
Nov. 6 Lewis and Clarke College at UBC
(Lewis and Clarke 7—UBC 26)
Nov. 13 Linfield College at UBC
(Linfield 21—UBC 0)
Nov. 25 Western Washington College of
Education at Bellingham*
'Denotes non-conference games
Scores are from last year's games
'Hickory Stick'
In New Use Gives
Profs Hockey Win
The Grass Hockey season opened on
the campus Saturday with the first
of two pre-scheduule games between
the Faculty Cardinals and a Varsity
Eleven.
•
The Cardinals turned in a surprising 1-0 win thanks to superior
team work and all round keener play.
Outstanding performance of the game
was the stellar defensive play of
Professor Chapman, the Cardinals'
Coach and Captain, who single-handed broke up the Varsity attack. Professor Chapman, who joined the
University staff in 1946 has played all
his hockey in England.
Professor Wheeler of the now famed the scaring half way through the
ous Cardinal Ph.D. forward line open-
second half with a blistering shot
lo the lower left hand corner of the
net, which gave Eric Greeniys, the
Varsity  custodian,   no chance.
The Varsity side was considerably
bolstered by the addition of four
players just out from India. Two of
these, Paul Joftes and half back
Roger Fox turned in particularly effective  game's.
Varsity practices will be held at
3:30 to 4:30 on Tuesday, Wednesday
and Thursday of this week. Strip and
other equipment may be obtained at
the Gymnasium at 3:30 from Bob
Boss.
THE E.I.C. WILL SHOW THE FILM
"Resevoirs in ihe Sky," the story of
Vancouver's water system ,in Applied Science 100 on Thurs. Oct. 7th
at noon. Mr. T. V. Berry, Sec. of the
Water Board will introduce the film.
YOU...
can save a life
Give Blood
REGISTER NOW!
Campus Booths Are Open
From 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
UBC  BLOOD DONORS  CLINIC
of the
CANADIAN  RED CROSS
EXPORT
CANADA'S   FINEST
CIGARETTE
Banish   Washday   Blues   At
VARSITY
LAUNDERALL
4368  W.  10th Ave.
Phone ALma 2210
10 pounds for ,,'J5e in '•» hour
Hours:
8  a.m.   -    10   p.m.   Mon,   thru   Fri.
,S n.in,     "r al) n.m. Sal.
Change Of Address
If yon have changed your address or acquired a telephone number since registration, please notify the Pub
secretary in the Brock North Basement by Thursday,
October 7, lor correct, listing in the
dent Directory
NECK ? TIES
Want "Good As New'' Ties
reasonable?
Mail us the ones you're tired of.
We will return same number
beautifully cleaned, different ones
in exchange—15c each.minimum
$1.00. Indicate your preference for
conservative, sporty or assorted
tics. Use coupon below.
Tictrade Reg'd. P.O. Box 6113
Montreal.
To Tietrade Reg'd
P.  O.  Box  6114, Montreal,  Que.
I   am   enclosing   • • neckties
for exchange as advertised. If available,  I  would prefer:
Typo    	
Color ,
Name	
Block   Letters
Address

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0125334/manifest

Comment

Related Items