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The Ubyssey Oct 30, 1959

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 UBYSSEY
BUZZER
BUZZ
yOL. LXVII
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1959
No. 19
Debates Rage At UBC
Forum
Decision
*-
The Student's Forum Discussion decided that capitalism
is compatible with democracy.
A vote taken at the end of
an hour of discussion defeated
the resolution, "A Capitalistic
Economic System is Incompatible with the Democratic
Ideal."
The Forum, held every Thursday in Bu 104, was chaired by
Lorenne Gordon, with Victor
Anderson defending the resolution and Peter Penz opposing it.
Anderson spoke first for five
ttkinutes, and was followed by
Penz.
Each was allowed a three minute rebuttal period  at  the end
Of an hour of discussion.
ENCYCLOPEDIA CITED
In his opening speech, Anderson quoted the Encyclopedia:
Brittannica's definitions of democracy and capitalism, where-
' by the first is ". . .the equality
of individuals and their equal
right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness", and the second becomes, "production by
private initiative for private profit".
He maintained that these two
'concepts are completely incompatible and discordant.
He pointed out that the slave
and opium trades of the past
few centuries were examples of
private initiative for private
gain.
To support his contention that
the same capitalistic principles
that operated in the past were
present today, he gave several
examples.
STEEL STRIKE
SHOWS STRIFE
One of these was the situation
with regard to the strike of US
Steel workers, which, said Anderson, proves that the capitalist
— installing automated machinery for efficiency and thus for
greater profit — does not care
what happens to the men who
Will be thrown out of work and
left without means to support
their wives and children.
In conclusion, Anderson said
that rich capitalists had a detrimental influence on democratic
elections.
His example was the nomination of General Eisenhower as
the Republican Presidential candidate.
"Ike was not the most popular candidate at the convention,"
he stated, and went on to say
that it was the influence of
credit controlling bankers and
ttieir   economic   pressure   that
<?>
PANEL AGREES      >
CANADA AHEAD
Canada's lack of aggressive nationalism may put her one
step ahead  of other nations  on the way  to  an international'
record.
This statement was made yesterday by UBC Law student;
Ruth Kidd, at the NFCUS panel discussion entitled "There is.!
no such thing as a Canadian".
The panel, consisting of Miss3>
Kidd,  Professor Waters  of the
AMS TREASURER DAVID EDGAR must be the original
invisible man. During his two years on student council he
has escaped the traditional ducking in the pool. Fate caught
up with him this week in the form of burly Engineers. One
wet Edgar. - —photo by McAfee.
elected Eisenhower on the first
ballot.'
"This shows," he concluded,
"that capitalism is incompatible
with the Democratic Ideal."
"The general, objective definition for capitalism is a system
by which the guidance of the
economic process is entrusted to
the businessman," said Peter
Penz in reply.
He agreed with Anderson's
definition of democracy, and
added that it implied representation by population and not by
wealth.
"Capitalism does not mean exploitation of employees," he
stated.
"Employers need to pay their
workers   well   enough   that  the
worker can buy the goods produced by the capitalistic system,
See FORUM DECIDES
(Continued on Page 3)
Well Known Folksingers
Perlorm At UBC Today
Folksingers Ewan McColl and
Peggy Seeger appear in Brock
Lounge at 12:30 today.
Both well-known artists, McColl, of Scottish descent, has an
extensive repertoire of folksongs
and ballads of that country.
He is author of several anthologies of folksongs, and has worked as scriptwriter for British television and radio.
Miss Seeger, an American, has
travelled in Europe where she
appeared on both television and
radio.
She serves as accompanist to
McColl in concerts as well as on
recordings.
The event is sponsored by the
Special Events and Fine Arts
Committees.
English Department, German
exchange student, Hartwich
Schults, and Law student, Bill
Wright, was firmly convinced
that there is such a thing as a
Canadian.
"We have mature nationalism," said Professor Waters. We
don't want flag waving, rambunctious, aggressive, nationalism."
Europeans' have considered
nationalism bad in the past because of the conflicts it has
caused.
Canada is working in the
reverse to present .; European
ideas by desiring to , build up
nationalism, said exchange student,  Schults.
Schults said that before coming to Canada he had a distinct
vision of them as bush people.
Wright said that Canadianism
is not subject to definition, but
to an emotion.
"Citizenship is only an accident of birth," he stated.
As Canadians, we have the
feeling that we belong to something and will defend our nation if it is under attack, he
said.
Foreigners think of Canada*
as a country which will give j
aid%and not think of what the#/
will do for Canada, said Wright,,
We should be ourselves an&jj.
others will respect us for ilfc
continued Wright.
Professor   Waters    suggested^
that Canadians  tend   to  resist
things.   They want to feel »$$£•'
ferent. .;'.!,   *
He says he doesn't jhinkf w0
are'going in. the same place as;:
the United States,, or we|woul<4^
have joined themi long ago.
Miss Kidd, who spoke against*
Canadianism said that we have
no   distinguishing   racial   characteristics or national dress.
In response to this Waters
said that no new countries have
national costumes, the U.S. tot
example.
One singular characteristic is
our distinctive speech, continued;
Waters.
In any English-speaking country we are not picked out as a
native.
The only reason an Englishman or Australian would confuse a Canadian with an American is because they are so unfamiliar with Canadians, said
the professor.
Cinema 16 Halted
Last chance to buy 4"OTEM
ft FOUR   DOLLARS   is  TO-
©AY, FRIDAY.
-! Get it at the AMS OFFICE
or the COLLEGE SHOP.
*7u>eeH ClttAAeA
DANCE CLUB'S
FIRST FLING
TODAY
DANCE CLUR
Dance club will hold its first
dance 'q|. the year Friday, October 30, St to 12 p.m. Members
15c; non-members 25c. Wear a
mask.
Fall mixer Friday, 8:30 to 12
p.m. in the Brock.    Admission
soc:
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Dance this evening at 8:30.
Members 10c; non-members 15c.
Wear a costume or a mask.
* *        *
NEWMAN CLUB
The Newman Club is holding
a Talent Night this evening at
8:30 in St. Mark's College.
Members and non-members invited.
* *        *
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Party will be held this eve-
(Coniinued on Page 8)
See 'TWEEN CLASSES
Cinema 16 will not be allowed to show films under Special
Events.
Council on Monday turned
down the motion to allow the
new film organization to show
foreign, language and experimental films on the Special
Events program.
Council's position was that two
film organizations were unnecessary because of too much duplication in films and because of
clashes in booking.
Filmsoc's program for next
year is almost exactly a duplication of the planned Cinema 16
films, stated Barb Bennett, vice-
president of Filmsoc.
The chief controversial issue
at Council on Monday was Cinema 16's proposed showing of the
American film, Anna Christie.
Filmsoc objected to the showing of the American film. -
The position taken was that
Filmsoc and Cinema 16 could
co-operate add perhaps form one
organization, with Cinema 16
showing only foreign films.
Dick Drysdale and John Mercer, the organizers of Cinema 16,
are of the opinion their organization could not detract from
Filmsoc as the Filmsoc program
consisted mainly of Hollywood
films.
Drysdale pressed for a completely autonomous organization
at the Council meeting. i
Barb Bennett stated: "We
feel, and thjs has the backing
of the AMS, that having two-
film organizations' on this campus is undesirable. Therefore,
Cinema 16 was asked to work
within Filmsoc, and this was
rejected by Cinema 16 themselves.
"Another plan to incorporate
them with the Special Events
Committee was rejected by
chairman Mike • Warren of this
committee. We can see no other
solution, then, other than dissolution of Cinema 16 as a campus organization."
"Cinema 16 will continue without AMS control or support,'*
stated Drysdale. \,
Help Wantecl
Ubyssey and Publications neej$i
a student for part time work o£,
Monday, Wednesday and Thurjjp
day afternoons. Anyone who ha£<
a car, please contact Jim Horse*,
man in Brock 201. Salary is $50,
per month just for running ep«„
rands.
 ■ : *.
RE AD   THE    BUZZARD  See Pages Four and Five PAGE TWO
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 30, 195&
THE UBYSSEY   letters to the editor
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times a week throughout the University year in Vancouver
by   the Publications   Board  of  the  Alma  Mater   Society,   University  of B.C.
Editorial opinions expressed are those of the Editorial Board of The Ubyssey
'" and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
Telephones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 ana 14;
Business offices, AL. 4404; Local 15.
Ediior-in-Chief: R. Kerry White
Associate Editor „ Elaine Bissett
Acting News Editor Bob Hendrickson
C.U.P. Editor Irene Frazer
'        Club's Editor Wendy Barr
Features Editor Sandra Scott
Head Photographer Colin Landie
"" Senior Editor .. Farida Sewell
Reporters and Desk:
"        Derek Allen, Diane Greenall, Sandy Crowne, Ed Lavalle,
Allen Graves, Pete Cruikshank, Edison Inouye, Eveline
Jackson, Edelgard Petzelt, Jerry Pirie.
Oh Oder* .
The unpleasant aroma which has emanated from the club's
division of the Alma Mater Society for some time, appears to
,'be getting stronger.
The usual exclusive atmosphere of many clubs is becoming
5 more pronounced; the majority of our service clubs are on the
* Verge of collapse; splinter groups are forming and breaking
*^offf iri seme organizations; and every day we hear more bitter
squabbles about office space, etc.
'' Many of those students who eagerly signed their names
"] and paid their dues on Club's Day are finding it very difficult
* to' break into tightly formed cliques and many others are dis-
. xour&ged by the uselessness of the club they joined. "Come to
"UBC, if there's a blub we haven't got, it isn't worth having!"
And because we have so many clubs, campus service organizations such as Mamooks, Radsock, and the Ubyssey find it
-next to impossible to obtain staffs. This also'stems from an
■ inherent laziness in most students. A possible solution to this
* and related problems would be to disband the less useful clubs
so that more support could be given to the worthy.
Last week the entire structure was rocked by two rather
- disturbing incidents: the formation of a splinter group within
Filmsoc and a loud protest against the Panhellenic association
•"which'has office space in the Brock Extension.
The first of these incidents brought to light a seeming lack
.  of decisiveness on the part of the Student's Council. A group
'within Filmsoc tried to obtain club status so that they could
"Concentrate on procuring   intellectual foreign   films   for. the
"Students. They wanted  autonomy because  they felt  Filmsoc
-^as not providing this type of entertainment and because they
*>d«sired a free hand to select the films. They realized that the
student body would have to be educated before their films
>Tro.'ulcl become popular (although the suceess of their first two
films seemed to belie this), but they sincerely believed the
task was worth the effort. While most council members were
hi* favor of  the   idea,   they hemmed  and  hawed  and finally
-"turned their thumbs down on the project.
1 The second incident started when Ramblers,  the  Intra
mural club, tried to have the newly formed Sailing club moved
• from the Ramblers' club room into one presently occupied by
Panhellenic and the Inter-Fraternity Council, which are not
"under the jurisdiction of the AMS.
&Qahush
in
1*ERSONAL PRODUCTS LIMITED, AND ORTHO
PHARMACEUTICAL (CANADA) LTD.,
members of the Johnson & Johnson world-wide family of
companies, are engaged in the reorganization and expansion of their marketing organizations (sales and merchandising). New territories areibeing created and the number
of field supervisory positions are being increased.
If, after reading their booklets concerning these
companies (available in the Placement Office),
you wish to request an interview with their representative, you should ask for their personal
history record which you will complete and bring
to the interview.
INTERVIEWING WILL BE ON MONDAY EVENING,
NOVEMBER 2nd, at the Hotel Vancouver, with Mr.
"Harold C. Cash. Advise the Placement Office that you
wish an interview and you will be given a specific time
on the5 above mentioned date.
aoccooooooocoe
Mt)RE DISCRIMINATION
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
I wish to ado* my protest to
the growing feeling of revulsion that has resulted from the
unwarranted expulsion of a
student at a large eastern university. The senate at this university at a secret meeting
expelled a student for his political belief on the subject of
discrimination. They felt his
views were contrary to the best
interests of that university.
My fervent hope is that such
a situation will not be allowed
to happen at the University of
British Columbia.
I am sure that the freedom
of political ideals is a democratic and God given right and'
will therefore be supported by
every student on this campus.
We must never allow a majority . viewpoint to suppress
the rights of a minority by
reason of beliefs that they profess to uphold.
Only the might of collective
student action can uphold the
right.
Yours sincerely,
—JOHN R. CLIFF.
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
Perhaps I have too high an
estimation of the effects of a
university education. It is
quite possible that some persons can refine and train one
portion of their minds while
still remaining child-like in
other respects.
I refer specifically to the
average university student's
tastes in music. A few years
ago, to the irreparable detriment of our society, rock 'n'
roll was born. Until now,
desire for such non-music was
limited on our campus, the
students not having been indoctrinated at a sufficiently
early age to make it acceptable
to them. But our new students
this year, and in years to come,
have been and are still being
exposed to The Beat during
their highly formative 'teen
years.
The time has come to take
a stand, for the effects of this
process are beginning to show.
Rock 'n' Roll has appeared on
campus,   radiating   its   insipid
monotone   message   from   the
very    speakers    of    our    own
University      radio      network.
Granted,   there  is  little of it,
sparsely,   distributed   amongst
other jazz, popular, and classical selections.   But it is nevertheless    there,    and    it    will
spread, weed-like, with the annual influx of freshmen whose
musical appreciation has been
seduced   and   polluted.     Last
year, there was no rock 'n' roll.
This year there is. In addition,
the amount of time given over
to popular and jazz tunes has
increased  considerably, at the
expense of the classics, with a
trend    toward    louder    and
brasher pop and jazz forms.
One further caveat;, the number of Radsoc's outlets is increasing quite rapidly, and
anyone who has experienced,
as I have, a furtive flight each
year from the speakers which
appear in places where he was
previously accustomed t o
study, knows the inability of
the human mind to concentrate, against a background qf
loud harsh music, on anything
requiring more attention than
a comic-book. ;
No one, you say, should at-T
temsjt to^fflGy %i "the^BroWt
lounge, or the art gallery?
But they do, and these stalwarts are to be commended for
their powers of concentration.
Many, less endowed, would
join them I am sure if the
music were more subdued.
I have said that the time has
come to take a stand. You
may ask, and rightly so, what
that stand is to be, for so far
I have offered no constructive
criticism, merely criticism.
Personally, I would advocate
a programme consisting of
100% classics. Of course this
is selfish and impractical. But
even if there is to be no classics, at least let there be a
furtherance of quiet, unobstru-
sive selections, and I beg of
you, send me no more rushing
for the open air to escape some
hog-caller's attempts _ to express his id through music.
—Allan Graves.
Editor,
The UbySsey.
Dear Sir:
The presentation by Filmsoc
of "Henry V" climaxed for
me an ever-increasing disappointment in Filmsoc's capabilities. A film acknowledged
to be one of the best of its kind
was ruined by the disarranged
Acts, almost unintelligible
sound, constant jading of the
picture and poor focusing.
This opinion seems justly
emphasized by the letter to the
editor from a third year education student, yet the action
taken by the students council
denying Cinema 16 the privilege of operating under
special events in order to protect Filmsoc appears to show
complete lack of justification.
I dispute Filmsoc's ability to
prese.nt a film in a standard on
a par with the University to
which it acts as a representative, and expect a published
explanation of its attempts so
far this year.
I think the Student's Council should re-examine its decision against Cinema 16 in the
light of the article "the Five-
Thirty Club" (Ubyssey Oct.
29),   and   of   the   letters   com
plaining  against   Filmsoc.
Yours sincerely,
—Patrick Wheater, Arts II.
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
As one who enjoyed very
much the Frederic Wood production of Little Eyolf, I was
surprised to see your drama
critic's generally unfavorable
review. If not champagne, it
was very good wine indeed
and compared well in my
mind, with several good professional productions of Ibsen
(in New York and Cambridge)
that I have seen.
I believe that all associated
with the production are to be
commended for bringing first-
rate theatre to the University
campus.
Sincerely yours,
—Jacob  Wigod.
DEMOCRATIC
DISAGREEMENT
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
, In reply to the letter of "Intelligent Imagination" concerning the forcing of Fraternities
and Sororities off campus, I
must state my disagreement.
I imagine Mr. Imagination's
imagination of Greek Letter Societies is clouded by his complete ignorance of certain pertinent facts.
He suggests democratic reforms such as, quote, "forcing
all fraternities and sororities to
give up their chapter charters,"
with the alternative of requiring fraternities to give up their
houses. Is force a part of democracy?
"Discrimination" is simply
the right to choose one's personal friends. "Intelligent Imagination" apparently is using
his right to discriminate against
Greeks as HIS personal friends.
Finally, Mr. Imagination
should be informed that as yet, ,
there are no Fraternity Houses
on the campus.
Sincerely,
—E. KILL AM
Arts II
I960 fracfuateJ
CANADA'S LARGEST EMPLOYER
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CANDIDATES MUST WRITE A GENERAL
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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14.
Details regarding the examination, application forms and
information circulars and folders are available from
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE
OR
■ ■ CML.-SERVICE COMMISSION friday, October 30, 1959
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
O'Neil Proclaims
Politics A Must
By ED LAVALLE
Ubyssey Staff Reporter
"Labour must take off it's
rose-coloured glasses if it is to
achieve its aims and objectives."
This statement was made by
Pat O'Neil, secretary-treasurer
of the B.C. Federation of La
bour, at a campus meeting
sponsored by the UBC-CCF.
O'Neil said that trade unions
have felt sucessful when they
received five and ten cents at
the  bargaining  table.
"Now labour realizes that only
through political action can the
aims and objectives of the trade
union movement be  achieved.''
He stated that the aims of
trade unions are -not as narrow
as some people would have the
public believe; but that the
movement is interested in homes
for the aged, hospital insurance,
and many other things.
He elaborated by explaining
that many of these things and
others were discussed at the
recent BCFL  Convention.
O'Neil said that labour ntis
always actively supported and
asked for social welfare measures and went on to attack
groups such as the Chamber of
Commerce, the Manufacturers'
Association and the Board of
Trade for "opposing" such
action.
"This is the hypocrisy of the
situation," O'Neil stated after
telling his audience that these
same groups advocated curbs on
the trade union movement.
On the CLC's support of the
Co - operative Commonwealth
Federation, O'Neil mentioned
that the aims and objectives of
the trade union movement
paralleled those of the CCF.
He supported his statement
by   drawing   comparisons   with
the Province of Saskatchewan.
O'Neil said that Saskatchewan's labour legislation was
"the finest on the North American continent."
He pointed out that the basic
minimum wage for male and
female was $30 in Saskatchewan while it was only $18 in
B.C.
On education O'Neil said:
"We don't believe it should be
a privilege, but a right.'
O'Neil felt that assistance
should be rendered particularly
to the student outside of the
Vancouver District who has
transportation and living expenses as well as tuition fees.
O'Neil rapped the combines
and corporations which he accused of price-fixing.
He stated that the fines which
t esulted from convictions
against large corporations were
nowhere near the amount of
profit these firms had made
from their years of illegal activities.
He rapped the reversal of
position that created a situation
where "instead of protecting the
public from corporations . . ;.
corporations are protected at
the expense of the public."
He noted that a union's conviction in court led to the imposition of very heavy fines
against  it.
He attacked the indiscriminate use of injunctions and cited
the case of the Ironworkers
Union which was brought to
court this summer.
In an answer to a query on
the future political policy of
the     trade     union    movement
Romanoff And Juliet
By Peter Ustinov
Romanoff and Juliet, to be
presented by the Players' Club,
is a whimsical comedy, utilizing
the basic situation of Romeo and
Juliet to satirize the absurdity
of present day politics. It is set
in a country only found on the
best maps, coloured there a dys-
pectic mint green, blurred at the
edges so that you can almost
hear the printer saying "damn",
or so its General President describes it. Constantly occupied
and as constantly liberated it is
now besieged by the Eastern and
Western blocs from opposite embassies across the city ssuare.
But already the subtle defences
of the country are at work. Juliet
Moulsworth, daughter of the
American ambassador, has fallen
in love with Igor Romanoff, son
of the Russian ambassador. The
General, a benign despot, takes
on the role of Cupid. Ian Thorne
will direct the following cast:
1st. Soldier, Frank Able; 2nd
Soldier, Cecil Plotnikoff; General, John Sparkes; Juliet Moulsworth, Penny Gaston; Igor Romanoff, Barnabas Baker; Hooper
Moulsworth, Les Wager; Beulah
Moulsworth, Lloy Courts; Vadrin
Romanoff, Walter Shynkaryk;
Evdokia Romanoff, Elizabeth
Kaiser; Marfa, Maxine Gadd;
Freddie, Michael Matthews; The
Spy, Martin Bartlett; The Archbishop, Ken Kramer.
FORUM DECIDES
(Continued from Page 1)
labour legislation in B.C. and in ^CLC), he said that the unions
a new labour party of labourers
would support the formation of.
and farmers, believing that the
farmers and unionists were
reconcilable.
O'Neil lamented that employers led the public to believe
that unionists like James Hoffa
and Dave Beck, whose actions
distressed him, were an example
of the labour movement as a
whole.
He stated that he was prepared to compare the honesty
and integrity of the twenty-
thousand permanent employees
of the trade union movement
with those of any organization
in the world.
When asked if he was considering becoming a candidate
in the next provincial election,
O'Neil  said,  "No."
NEW  SERIES
PLANNED
A lecture entitled "The Reformation Becomes a Movement"
was held Wednesday by Gamma
Delta, the Association of Lutheran Students.
The lecture, given by the Rev.
C. Guebert, was the last of a
series of five covering the Reformation, with special emphasis
on the life and work of Martin
Luther.
A new series Will be held, in
Bu 227, as follows:
Nov. 10—"I Believe—the Nature and Significance of Faith".
Eev. F. Gabert.
Nov. 18—"One God in Trinity
•—How can this be?" Vicar Roger
Humann.
Nov. 25—"The Safety Margin
in Social Drinking". Rev. E.
Treit.
Dec. 2—"The Christmas Story
According to Luke 2". Rev. H.
Fox.
Aggie   Dunked
Aggie supremacy remained
unchallenged Thursday noon
when EUS President Bill Roden-
chuck was given his annual
cleansing in the Lily Pond.   ,
Rodenchuck was dunked by
the Aggies in payment for the
Aggie-Engineering Blood Drive
race.
The president of the losing
faculty was to be thrown in the
pond.
for employees make up the market from which the employer
gleens his profit," he said.
The depression of 1930 was a
miscalculation of the business
men, said Penz, but they learned
this lesson from it: they must
pay their employees sufficiently.
He concluded, saying that "we
do not need a, system of the
strictest organization . . . leaving no liberty for the individual."
"The necessary balance of supply and demand guarantees the
democratic ideal," he said.
The Forum was then thrown
open to questions from the floor
addressed to the chair.
Democratic institutions have
come about not because of capitalism, but in spite of it, said a
faculty member speaking from
the floor.
Another listener disagreed,
saying that only in a capitalistic
society could these institutions
be fought for. •
Another speaker cited Cordova
Street as a product of capitalism
and asked if the people frequenting it were engaged in the
pursuit of life, liberty and the
pursuit of happiness, especially
the pursuit of happiness.
The Forum also considered the
difference between monopolistic
capitalism and straight, non-
monopolistic capitalism.
The example cited in this respect was the Krupp monopoly
in both Nazi and post-war Germany. .
One speaker held that this
economic empire, which was so
helpful to the Hitler regime, was
responsible for the deaths of 26
million people.
The monopoly was destroyed
after the war, but it has rebuilt
larger than ever and is now instrumental in the economic and
industrial regrowth of West Ger
many, commented a speaker.
Anderson, speaking first in rebuttal, said it was "the nature
of capitalism to become monopolistic" as large companies strive
for efficiency.
"I question that there are any
really truly democratic institutions in our society. I would like
to hear some names."
In his rebuttal speech, Penz
stated, "Anderson's argument
that socialism is better than capitalism does not mean that democracy and capitalism are incompatible."
He concluded, quoting an example from the German Volkswagen plants where the workers
were given shares of stock in
the company. A check two days
later showed that 80 % of the
men had sold their stocky
This means that the workers
do not want to have a part in the
management of the industries
they work for, he said. They
reject the responsibility, he added.
In the vote that followed, the
resolution as it stood was easily
defeated.
The next Student Forum .—
topic: Resolved That Religion
Serves a Useful Purpose in North
Acerican Society—will be held
next Thursday, in Bu 104.
Volkswagen Owners
Trained Volkswagen
Mechanic on Duty at
University Shell
10ih and   Discovery
Married Accommodation
in Acadia available for under-
graduaie students, all years. ~
Call at Housing Office
Rm. 205-A, Physics Building
A. R. BAIRD
Housing Administrator.
University Hill United
Church
Worshipping    iii     Union    Coltege
Chapel
5990 Chancellor Blvd.
Minister —  Rev.   W.   Buckingham
Services   11:00   a.m.   Sunday
NOW PLAYING
THE GOOFERS
HILARIOUS MUSICAL COMEDY SHOW STOPPERS"
Res. MU 1-8728 - MU 3-9719 Shows: 9:30 and 12:30
ALSO
BAGDAD EXOTIQUE
■■ *   *'  '•
Dance to
DAVE ROBBINS
and His Orchestra
CAVE
drive the
' smart new
A-55
FOR
I960
AT
GORDON
BROS.
10th and Alma •
THE PERFECT ONE COLOUR
LOOK IS NOW YOURS!
problem!
No "just-off" colours but
guaranteed colour harmony I So, for tea at
the Dean's or cokes at the corner it's
the new Kitten matching skirt and
sweater in heather-mix lambswool
soft as a handful of Scottish mist
... in subtly muted colours.
THE SWEATER: Wing-neck,
bracelet-sleeved pullover, sizes
34 to 40, price $10.95.
THE SKIRT: slim and half-lined,
sizes 8 to 20, price $17.95.
Look for the namef@UU(s
733Q THE UBYSS1
"A BROCHURE  FOR PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS
THE   CAMPUS
The University of British Columbia, founded in
1890, is beautifully situated in Vancouver's Point Grey
area. First housed at Fairview,, construction work started
at the permanent university site in 1914. Since then, notable additions to the university's facilities have been
made under the direction of the architects, Thompson
Berwick and Pratt.
Their plans include the use of B.C. building materials with an architectural style best suited to U.B.C.'s
natural surroundings.
THOMPSON, BERWICK, BL1 M) PRATI
THE RESIDENCES
■ ' Student enrolment has grown steadily since the
first convocation of the university. The excess of servicemen after the Second World War resulted in a great
strain on accommodations, but the university is now
well prepared to house its students. Foresight on the part
of university planners, with the help of B.C. Government
grants and the industrialists of the province have enabled U.B.C. to keep pace with the growth of student
enrollment.
HEAD AND FEET IN THE AIR
THE STUDENTS
Everywhere on the campus, debates and discussions
are carried on with enthusiasm. Students congregate in
groups, both large and small, quietly or anxiously talking over problems . . . world crises, campus situations,
politics, religion. Debates upon literature, art, music . . .
all are mused over the university trade mark, the cup
of coffee.
It is obvious to the observer that this is a seat of
higher learning where minds are engrossed in expanding their store of knowledge.
YOU MEAN THAT THIN ONE? Y BUZZARD
f THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA"
THE LIBRARY
The centre of knowledge of any university is the
Library, and U.B.C.'s Library, like other important institutions on the campus has kept pace with the ever increasing quest for knowledge.
Situated in the centre of campus activity, surrounded by well-kept gardens, the library is an imposing
edifice. Within its stone walls students from every corner
of the campus use numerous books for quiet study.
The student knows that the library is the one place
on the campus where his every need is looked after and
where there is a minimum of waste-time.
TWO MONTHS' LOAN TO FACULTY
THE FACULTY
To keep scholastic standards as high as those of
previous years, a constant campaign is ever in force to
attract to the university educators of outstanding calibre.
Good publiciy for this campaign are the well-known graduates of the university; for example, Attorney-General
Robert Bonner ancf B.C. Power Commissioner Dr. Gordon
Shrum, both now serving the provincial government.
U.B.C. is fast becoming the leading intellectual
centre in Canada, and will continue in this as long as
notable academics are being drawn .to her halls.
AU REVOIR
THE FUTURE
Because of the sympathetic understanding between
the Chancellor of the University arid the provincial government, great things are expected of UBC in the future.
Training the future leaders of the province is a responsibility the university is ready to assume, if ensured of
equitable increases in fees.
Mutually compatible in their ideology, the Social
Credit Cabinet and the University Senate will endeavor
to keep active the 19th century principles of laissez-faire
for the years to come.
MIGHT IS RIGHT PAGE SIX
THEUBYSSEY
Friday, October 30, 1959
Co-Editors Ernie Harder, Ann Pickard
Staff
Mike Hunter, Fred Fletcher, Alan Dafoe
SPORTS    SHORTS
SOCCER
Varsity will play host to Al-
pen Club "A" in a Second Division soccer contest scheduled for
Mclnnes Field at 2 o'clock on
Sunday
UBC will meet the Dutch
iLions at Gordon Park in a Third
Division soccer game at 2 p.m.
©n Sunday.
MEN
TWO BARBER SHOPS
TO SERVE YOU
inside the gates
• Brock Hall Extension
• 5734 University Boulevard
BOWLING
Intramural     bowling     starts
November   2.
TENNIS FINALS
Intramural tennis finals will
be held today at .noon at the
tennis courts behind the gym.
Arts are scheduled to meet Education in the final.
PING PONG
Intramural table tennis starts
Monday.
SQUASH
The squash team plays in the
Invitational Tournament i n
Seattle this weekend. Team
members Scott, Hermont, Campbell, Irving, Pinchin, and Rae
will compete.
R P. SKOGLUND.,rVesfdenf
says
"Man watches the stars
while standing in mud"
Ever since Adam, man has been forced to do
endless battle with the hazards of his own environment. And for just as long, every round has
ended in a draw.
Sure, we gloat with pride when our newspapers
tell us that a new man-made satellite has been
put into orbit around the earth, or that a handsome,
gold-plated rocket has been shot 70,000 miles
into outer space. But turn the page, and our
dreams of grandeur crumble io dust.
Here in our own hemisphere- a volcano erupts
and demolishes a Caribbean village; a tidal wave
engulfs a whole town in Louisiana, while put on
a misty Atlantic shipping lane a so-called uhsink-
able ship goes down with all hands when it
collides with an unexpected iceberg.
fa everyday life, the wise man will take his own
private precautions against disaster. NALAC's
life, sickness and accident, and income - protecting insurance are the best guarantees against
tiie hazards of the future. Call our office soon,
and learn how you can insure confident living—
today and tomorrow.
•..insure confident living
North American
Jack Pomfret . . . Bird Coach
Thunderettes
Lose To Hastings
Thunderettes lost their second
outing, 42-35, to the newly-
formed Hastings team Wednesday.
UBC's full court press failed
to halt Hastings talented centre,
Barb Bengough. Barb was top
scorer for the evening. She
has scored 47 points in two
games.
DIANE  LEADS  SCORING
Diane Beech and Jill Symons
led Thunderette scoring. UBC's
passing and checking was exceptionally good.
Next week Thunderettes take
on last-place C-FUN, Wednesday at 8:30 at Winston Churchill
gym.
Pomfret's Birds
Visit Alberni As
Coach Jack Pomfret's Thunderbirds open a gruelling season
in Alberni against the defending champion Athletics tomorrow
night.
The young and relatively inexperienced Birds are this year
entered in the Inter-City (Senior A) league, and the WCIAU.
They play  12 games in each
of  those leagues,   and  are   also
signed up for some six or seven
exhibitions.
YOUNG SQUAD
The team's average age is 20,
and there is some doubt as to
whether they can survive in
the senior league, which has incorporated some of the "rougher" NBA rules.
But despite this theory, the
Birds should be a threat. Barry
Drummond, Norris Martin and
Wayne Osborne aren't exactly
the smallest players in the
league. The Birds have lots of
height to throw around, too.
OSBORNE LATE
Osborne won't be around
until after the football team is
finished the season. But with
Martin and Drummond supplying the aggressiveness and
weight under the basket, and
the outside shooting of Ken
Winslade, the team should show
well.
An impressive list of newcomers will bolster Pomfret's
bench. Leading the way are
Dpve Way, a rugged six-five
forward, and husky John Pearce
from MjcMastef.
Other rookies include all-star
PW   high-schoolers   Bill   Berna-
dino,   Mike Potkanjak   and  another Osborne, younger brother
Dave.
RETURNEES
Returnees from last year are
hustling Ed Pederson, Dave
Treleavan, Dune McCallum, Ed
Gushue, and six-six Keith Hartley.
Pomfret has some needed
help this year, with the addition of Reid Mitchell to the
coaching staff. Mitchell last
year led the upstart West Van
high team into the semis of the
B.C.   tournament.
Barry Drummond . . . Returns
jHMjt  SICKNESS sj>
ACCIDENT   •   CROUr
R. D, GARRETT - Provincial Manager
619 Burrai d Bldg. Phone MU 3-3301
P8».|«]
v-^ViS > *r*£&T4i
LESSON 111 . . .
HOW TO ASSUME
i GENTLEMANLY
i DISTINCTION
Here is a finely tailored
shirt of fine white broadcloth, imported from Holland   (new   note).   Has   %
i sleeves with contour cuffs
and stitched convertible
collar. Two initials are done
without extra cost, any ad-
- ditional one is 30c.
'i   This is shirtwaist - only
6 98
Blouse Counter, Main Floor Friday, October 30, 1959
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE SEVEN
Western Challenges 'Birds
Bellingham Fans
Accompany Team
By MIKE HUNTER
UEC Thunderbirds host Western Washington Vikings, in
what should be one of the closest games in UBC stadium.
Thunderbirds have been victorious in five out of six games
this season.
Game time is 2:00 p.m.
Several   busloads   of   Viking's*-
fans are expected to accompany
the  football team  to   UBC for
the game tomorrow.
COMPETE WITH LIONS
The UBC - Western Washington football game Saturday will
toe competing for fans with the
B.C. Lions.
The athletic office Tuesday
wired WFC comtmissioner Sidney Halter, protesting the scheduling of the .Lions-Edmonton
playoff game on the same day
and time as the Thunderbird
contest.
Runners Fly
To Saskatoon
UBC cross country team
leaves today for Saskatoon
where they compete for the
WCIAU championship, and the
right to travel to Toronto for
Canadian collegiate competition
November 14.
Members of the UBC team,
coached by Peter Muffins, who
will fly to Saskatoon include
Doug Van Ness, Tom Fell, Jim
jMjcKay,. Don Longstaff and>
Gordy Johnson.
TO TORONTO
Mullins will also take with
him names of representative
track stars of UBC; compare
them with prairie stars, to determine, western representation at
Toronto next, month.
-Matz" &"Wozny
548 Howe St.       MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted suits
modernized in the new
single breasted styles.
Special Student Rates
Halter replied that "prior
commitments (television, etc.)
would not allow the game to be
changed. League policy states
that all playoff games be played
in the afternoon, anyway."
CHANGE DATE
UBC's attempts to have the
game played Thursday at noon
were dashed when it was found
several players were writing
mid-term exams. The game
can not be held earlier Saturday, since time must be allowed
to accommodate many students
travelling from Bellingham.
And can not be played at night
because the stadium doesn't
have lights.
"INCONSIDERATE"
P.R.O. Ben Cox said it was
"inconsiderate" of the WFC.
"They are trying to help minor
football, and a few thousand
dollars loss is an awful lot of
money to us." UBC is expected
to lose almost $2000 on the
game. Western is guaranteed
$1000.
Undefeated Jayvees
Host Seattle Sunday
UBC's undefeated Jayvees
will host Seattle Cavaliers
Sunday afternoon on the field
behind the men's gym.
Jayvees racked up their
seventh straight victory last
weekend when they shut out
Victoria   Vampires,   39-0.
Game time Sunday afternoon is 2:00 p.m.
Leland Wolf . . . Viking Tackle
UBC Lifters
Compete Sun.
UBC will be competing in the
B.C. weightlifting championships this Sunday.
The event will take place at
,2 p.m. in the Hollywood Theatre,   3000  West  Broadway.
UBC will have five lifters in
the competition.
Richard Murakama (132-lb.
class), Darcy' TJevine (148 lbs.),
Wayne Cannon "$tnd Roy Bar-
nett (165 lbs.), will be trying
the three Olympic lifts.
FOR RECOllDS
Wes Woo will compete in the
bench press.
Middleweight Cannon will be
trying to break teammate Woo's
1956 Canadian Juvenile clean
and jerk and snatch records.
Darcy Devine, a lightweight,
will try to repeat his performance of 1957 when he was
named best lifter of the year.
Murakami will take a crack
at topping the B.C. featherweight clean and jerk record.
He also has a chance to break
the total lift record.
Hang the
Coach!
IN
FEDERAL  PUBLIC  SERVICE
FOR
Civil ServiceXomiQisston filters
JUNIOR ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICES
ECONOMISTS AND
STATISTICIANS
DOMINION CUSTOMS
APPRAISERS
TRADE AND COMMERCE
OFFICERS
FOREIGN SERVICE
OFFICECRS
for Citizenship and Immigration. Externa Affairs,
Trade and Commerce.
ARCHIVISTS
FINANCCE  OFFICERS
These posts offer interesting work, numerous opportunities for advancement  and generous  fringe benefits.
Storting Salaries - $4140 and $4200
Under-graduates in their final year of study are
invited to apply but appointment will be subject
to   graduation.   Students  from   all  faculties  are
eligible to compete.
Written Examination, Saturday, Nov.  14
Details :regarding the examination, application forms and
descriptive folders now available from
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE
..- . ■ OR
CIVILSERVICE COMMISSION, OTTAWA
If you write, to Ottawa^ please specify the classes in
which you are interested arid quote competition 60-2650.
Following The Birds
By ERNIE HARDER
Believe it or not, East Hastings Street isn't the only scene
of football action tomorrow afternoon.
Western Washington's touted crew of gridders line up
against Frank Gnup's WCIAU champions in UBC stadium at
2:00 p.m.
i
An Historical Occasion.
For several reasons, including the fact that various publicity organizations have billed the other attraction as an historical, gala affair, chances are our wealthier counterparts
downtown will outdraw us.
Our meeting tomorrow was scheduled before the richest
football firm in the country ever dreamed of chasing Jackie
Parker in a playoff contest.
Could Lose $2,000
This university's athletic offices tell us we stand a good
chance of losing $2,000 because of the clash in games.
Before team manager Joe Dang hands out one helmet tomorrow, we'll be minus $1,000—guarantee to Western.
We asked Sidney Halter for some money as compensation.  *
He wired us a sympathetic "no".
Unconcerned About UBC
We asked Harry springs for some aid. He's not concerned
whether we have enough onlookers to eliminate stadium echoes.
His chief concern is how to make the turnstiles click more
.nan 40,000 times at the Exhibition grounds before 2:00 p.m.   '
Personnel wise we>e responsible for some of the efficiency
which Mr. Spring has received from his production staff as
of late.
Change Their Mind?
And, of course, after printers' ink pronounces our team as
one of the top college teams in the country midway through
next montli, Frank Gnup will have some friendly visitors to
his nest.
Past experience reveals that B.C.'s professional football
team is concerned about the welfare of this university's, football scheme.
Perhaps they'll change their minds about helping us financially, in respect to tomorrow's game. That is, if they outdrew
us—and they win! We hope they do.
It's a puzzlement:
When, you're old enough to go to college,
you're old enough to1 go out with girls. When 	
you're old enough to go out with girls, who
needs college? Oh well, there's always Coke.
SAY "COKE' OR •COCA-COW— BOTH TRADE-MARKS MEAN THE PRODUCT   •>
Of COCA-COLA  ITD.—THE  WORLD'S  BEST-IOVED  SPARKLING   DBNK. PAGE EIGHT
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 30, 1959
'TWEEN CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
3Ping in the clubroom, hut-M2,
at  8:45  p.m.    Dancing and refreshments. Members and guests
-welcome.
* *        *
CAMERA CLUB
Meeting today at 12:30 in Bu
203.   Hoi Tsau will demonstrate
Portrait Techniques.
* ' *        *
RAMBLERS
General meeting today at
12:30 in Bu 204.    All members
please attend.
* *        *
GEOGRAPHY CLUB
There will be a general meeting 12:30-today in F.G. 208. All
interested in geography students, please attend.
* *        *
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Psychology club present Mental   Health  Co-ordinator   Peter,
speaking on "Psychology in the
Schools," today at noon in Hut
-J^a, rooms 22.
:FRO«SH   UNDERGRADUATE
'fQCIETY
',   The Fresh Council meeting is
" scheduled for noon today in Bu
820.   Also one will be held 12:30
Tuesday in Bu 3^0.
' „.-.'..       .*...*.        * -
fADMINTON CLUB
'- Tiie gadminton club meets
Tuesday and Thursday at 8:30
in the Memorial Gym, and Sunday at 2:00 in the Women's
Gym; New members are welcome.
* *        *
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
The French club will hold a
meeting at noon today in Bu
214.
* *        * '
VCF
VCF present Dr. John Ross
speaking on "The Truth Will
Make You Free," today at noon
in Bu 106.
* *        *
SOUTHERN BAPTIST
STUDENT UNION
There will be a devotional
asieeting today at noon in Bu
227.    Bring your lunch.
* *        *
yfRITER'S  WORKSHOP
There will be a meeting Monday, Nov. 2, at 1973 West 3rd.
Manuscripts may be picked up
in Hut Mil either today or
Monday.
COMMONWEALTH CLUB
The Commonwealth Club presents films on the 1958 British
Entire Games, and Bannister's
four-minute mile in Bu 102 at
12:30 today.
* *        *
AD AND SALES CLUB
There will be a general meeting T*uesday, noon in Bu 225 to
arrange coming events. All
members are asked to come and
assist.
* *        »
LSA
The Lutheran Students' Association presents Pastor Peterson
discussing "The Doctrine of
Sin," on Monday at 12:30 in
Bu 216.
# * *
ROD AND GUN CLUB
There will be a meeting Tuesday in Bu 202 to discuss trap-
shooting and the fishing derby.
Everyone who attends will be
put on a list for the club newsletter.
* ' m        »•'     ■
HAMSOC
Those interested in radio
theory are reminded of the class
to be held Monday at 12:30 in
Physics 301.
CLASSIFIED
Attention: Former Math 308
students. One copy Higher Algebra by Weise. Will pay price of
new textbook for one in good
condition. Al Beadell, phone" RE
8-5010 between 5 and 7 p.m.
WUS Offers Students
Japanese Scholarship
WUS is offering a scholarship
to any Canadian student for a
university of his own choice in
Japan, beginning April, 1960.
Interested students should contact Rod Dobell in Brock Extension 166 before October 31.
THE SKI SEASON
IS HERE
Outfit yourself now while the
selection is at its best.
Call at
Arlberg Ski Hut
608 Robson al Seymour
MU 5-9411
Listen for Ski Report
Thursday, CKWX, 6:15 p.m.
Earl £ Riser
I plough a straight furrow
fn my finances with a
Personal Chequing Account
„...™ir
mtmumametm
Bank of Montreal
Your. Campus Branch in the Administration Bldg.
MERLE C. K.IRBY. Manager
a big step on the road to success is an early banking connection
 us-aa
The "Carlton" has often been
cited by CUP judges for editorial content, but it has never
Won the Southam trophy.
Journalist College Loses
Entire Newspaper Staff
OTTAWA (CUP)—Carlton University—the only university
in Canada to grant a degree in journalism — has found itself
without a college newspaper.
For reasons of lack of experi-*-
ence, the "Carlton's" entire editorial staff has resigned.
"One person resigned, then
everyone resigned," said a member of the college staff.
The students are already doing their best to get the paper
reorganized.
Approximately   32    students
have signed a  list  for recruits.
Although Carleton has a journalism school, journalism students take no official part in
producing the college paper.
It is understood that the paper
is having difficulties in securing
the advertising necessary to support the paper.
SHOULD WE BUZZ
OR BE BUZZED?
Did you like the buzzard?
Or would you like us to pull
the cord?
Comments would be appreciated as well as suggestions for
similar buzzes in the future.
Don't be a buzzard and give
us a buzz.
OVER 500,000
USED AND NEW POCKET BOOKS, MAGAZINES
BOOKS, COMICS, PRINTS, MAPS AND RECORDS,
ETC.
AT CANADA'S LARGEST
USED BOOK STORE
TED  FRASER'S  BOOK   BEND
1247 Granville Street MU 2-3019
I
^V*^1-
Continental Styling
Goes to College . .
CONTINENTAL
SIACKS...
Pair
16-95
See this new Continental concept
in campus wear . . . slim, tapered
slacks with pleatless front, flap
back pockets and slanted side
pockets. In fine wool worstted.
In six exciting shades. Sizes 28-36.
Wear with or without cuffs.
Alterations Free!
On Sale Now at HBC's
Men's Casual Shop, Main Floor
INCORPORATED   ^^1W  t&"X
_l
BIHD CALLS - 50c
ALMA   CABS
ALma 4422
Affiliated with
YELLOW CAB CO. LTD.
MU 1-3311
Authorised as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa.

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