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The Ubyssey Feb 9, 1951

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 JUL.
The Ubyssey
VOL. XXXIII
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1951
NO. 47
Brickbats
iy Jim Banham
Whether students like it or
not, politics stand p. good
chance of controlling student
government next year, according to information that has
reached me.
The first Installment ot this repulsive tUqught has already been
visited ufton us In the form of
the president tor next year. He is
thp>former president of the student
liberal Club.
Norman Dent, who has taken
over the presidency of the Liberal
Cjub since Vaughan Lyon resigned, will be on tbe ballot next week
with' other candidates for the position of Co-ordinator of Activities.
Mr. Dent has also "resigned" so
that there will Ostensibly be no political taint on him.
Ron Cheffins, president ot the
student OOF Club, will run for
Junior Member. Mr. Cheffins lent
strong support to the campaign
of Mr. Lyon as an assistant campaign manager.
All this points to a suspicion I
had the other day which was confirmed for me by several reliable
sources.
, Last year, even before the election hae) been thought about, political clubs fot together and decided to put up a slate of candidates. In this way they hope to gain
control of the Alipa Mater Society
atod make it the tool of Interests
which, 1 believe, will not be In
the best interests of the student
bct-dy.
The aforementioned parties, I
know, will volubly deny every
statement written here. But I
know that this information is cor-
retJt.
A lot of other strident* will Immediately raise the point that fraternities and sororities do the same
thing. For my part, I think that
the Greeks have the interests or
the entire student body more at
heart than do th* political groups.
It's t)me that those people who
don't care one way or the other
' made themselves felt on election
day. T|ie Indepedent voter, always
the person who deckles the election
can be a real force In tho coming
weeks In seeing that politics don't
control   Student   Council.
9ft 9ft 9ft
One of the worst examples ot
underhanded campaigning I have
ever heard of was brought to my
attention by several undergrade
atbs Thursday.
Supporters of a candidate for the
presidency of the AMS started circulating a rumor that an opposition candidate, At Westcott of the
Canadian Legion, was ln favor of
conscription here.
The rumor began Its rounds on
the day that students voted for the
president. If this is an example
of candidates ethics the AMS can
(U> without them.
Stay Away
V
t
From Gym
-Osborne
Physical education head
Robert Osborne today asked
UBC students to stay away
from the War Memorial Gymnasium as they are hampering
workmen now putting the finishing touches on the student
building.
Osborne's statement came at the
request of construction foremen
at the gymnasium who said that
sludenls are hampering workers In
their jobs.
Foremen said one student had
broken a large pane of sheet glass
and others had walked over freshly painted areas of floor In the
building.
"In order to allow workmen to do
the best job possible on the gym.
It Is essential thai students curb
their enthusiasm to see the Interior of the building before it is
completed," Osborne said.
Workmen are now painting large
floor areas, numbering seats and
putting the last sheet glass into
window areas in preparation for
the unofficial opening of the gym
Pebiliary  J'!.
VIC  COLLEGE   COUNCIL
TO VISIT UBC MONDAY
Members of the Victoria College Student Council will
visit UBC as the guests of the Student Council Monday.
The yiotorians will be conducted ori^a tour of the campus including Publications offices. They will be hosted at
dinner by councillors before attending the weekly council
meeting in the evening.
Included among the fifteen guests will be the vice-
president of the Players Club and the editor of the "Tower,"
Vic College's annual.
COUNCIL CANDIDATES
Eleven Seconders
Submit Statements
Following are the seconders' statements outlining the qualifications of the candidates for the council positions of treasurer, coordinator, secretary and junior member.
TREASURER
Tom Fro nek
Phil Andorson
Excluding Council President,
Treasurer Is the most Important
student office. Excluding the president of the LPP Club it is tho most
unpopular.
A man with outstanding qualifications is needed. Phil Anderson
is such a man. Through participation in sports he understands the
athletic organization of the university—our biggest financial endeavour. Through summer jobs and
university training he knows business, finance and sales promotion.
He is interested in the job of THE-
ASURBR and not merely a position
on Council.
Engineers build our bridges; lets
have a Commerceman watching
our funds!
Joe Nold,
1st Year Law.
I second the nomination of Tom
Franck for A.MS Treasurer In the
sincere belief that he Is well qualified for this office.
As Secretary of the War Memorial Oym Finance Committee this
year, he has added to his understanding of the problems of student finances gained through participation In club activities and
through his service as an active
Arts representative to the Undergraduate Societies Committee last
year.
For ability, experience and Integrity, prime requisites for an A.MS
Treasurer, give Franck your vote
next Wednesday, Feb. 14.
Frod L. Savage,
1th Year Civil Ung.
JUNIOR MEMBER
Don Gleig Ted Uo
During the" years  thAt' T Dfrfff H#^B^^**WWlJ1»^1i<WIWf'*rtr
known Don, I have found him to
Ted Lee, I am confident that  he
be level-headed and in possession I has the necessary qualifications of
of a keen sense of responsibility | leadership  and  character for this
for a man of his age. He shows. \ position,
too, a remarkable Insight into student affairs which have interested
him since he has been on tht; campus. He is well-informed und makes
a point of supporting functions related to a wider diversity of campus interests.
My personal knowledge, of his
character and personality is such
that I have no hesitation in asking
for your support.
Bruce Arlldge,
3rd Year Law.
Doug Foerster
I have the pleasure In seconding
the nomination of Doug Foerster,
candidate for the office of Junior
Member.
I do so with all the confidence
that he, as Junior Member, will
servo with proven ability.
In the past he has had experience as being president of Student
Councils and has been awarded a
silver medal for leadership. In
sports he has participated In H.C.
Badminton and Hasketball championships.
Doug's  experience  coupled   with
his willingness to work makes him
in my opinion, and I hope In yours,
the man for Junior Member.
Bill Walsh.
This year Ted was Homecoming
Ball Chairman, Publicity Commit
tee Co-Chairman for the (lym Drive
and Counsellor to the Frosh Conn
ell. He Is active in Intramurals,
and served last, year on the AUS.
As Junior Member of tho A.VIS,
I feel Ted Lee would serve all the
students of UBC to the best of his
ability and would prove to be a
distinct, asset to next year's Council.
Mervln   I.   Ohertkow.
1st  Year  Law.
Ron Cheffins
I second Ron Cheffins nomination for Junior Member because
he Is a first year Law student and
Fort Camp resident. He has taken
an active Interest In the activities
of Parliamentary Forum, Civil Liberties Union, Political clubs and
the Literary and Scientific Executive.
Club activities of this campus
will receive a boost, if Ron Cheffins Is on Student Council next
year, because he supports the viewpoint of many, that the respect
that this university has earned
in the past 10 years is not due to
academic standing alone hut to
intellectual freedom.
Ray Parkinson,
1st  year,   Medicine.
Strutt Threatens
To Stop Elections
FM Of Dirty Campaigning
Graduating Clots Foe
Payable To Treosury
Graduating class feet are
now payable to the exeoutlve
treasury at two eampus offices,
Ken Murphy, treasurer of the
class announced today.
Fee of $3, to pay for the
gift of the class to the university, and other graduating
waek activities, It payable at
the Alumni office in Brock Hall
or the buraar'a office.
A class system will be eet
up to collect money from students who do not pay their
fees/ at these two points and
veteran students will be asked
-to pay In the March DVA pay
parade.
Engineers Issue
Yearly Challenge
in Blood Drive
In accordance with their traditional spirit of Inter-faculty rivalry Engineers have challenged all
other groups to out-donate them
in giving blood.
The Red Cross mobile blood donors clinic will begin asking for
student  donations  Monday.
Clinic will be on tho campus
for a week and will operate between the hours of 10 a.m. and
I   p.m.   in   the  Armory.
A special board, to be set up at
Ihe entrance to the Armory will
show students how the drive is
progressing.
Markers will show the standing
of each Individual faculty at the
end*«M-ta«*>iHty. -•-»■.■-    -
Election
the  destruction
Midwinter Charges
Labelled Invalid
Frats  Defended   By  Volkovitch
Following  Strong  Accusation
Charges that certain fraternities are putting up candidates
simply for the sake of having members on student council,"
were labelled "completely invalid" by chairman of the Housser
Cup committee Thursday.
Blasted By Elections Chairman
Faced with an increasing flood of "dirty campaigning" in
present AMS elections, Jo-Anne Strutt, chairman of the Elections Committee told The Ubyssey Thursday, "If this underhanded campaigning doesn't stop, the elections will!"
' "The    entire    second-round    of* —	
elections will be declared null and | ^ -
Sanction
Voted
Down
A poorly attended meeting ih
Arts 100 yesterday voted 37
to 3 against the resolution
"That the U.N. should apply
sanctions agiinst the Chinese
aggressors."
Speaking in the affirmative,
Norm Dent, president of the Student Liberal Club, asked. "Should
the United Nations apply sanctions against the Chinese? Of
course they should, they (tihe COM*
munists) started It first.
Hod Young, former NI.p., pointing out that Oreat Britain has large
amounts of capital Invested in
Hong Kong, said, "The applications of sanctions will result in
the closing down of Hong Kong
and will aid and abet the Communist alms."
In conclusion, Mr. Young said,
"For us to apply sanctions against
China ls for us to say, 'we refuse to allow you to come to court
but we will condemn you to hang
IP. your jpsepce!' "    ,   ,
In reply to this Mr .Dent said.
"The Chinese are already represented In the U.N. through the
Soviet Union."
Alter the subject had been discussed by the membership ahd
voted upon, (he meeting ended with
a bung as a modern City Pawkos
exploded a firecracker at the feet
of parting opposition members.
void," she said.
"Dirty campaigning" began In
the closing days of the presidential
elections, when campaign posters
were ripped from their framings
und destroyed. /
These tactics broke out afresh in
the first day of second-round nominations, when outdoor signs
were destroyed, and all posters and
banners in the Cafeteria were torn
down.
CAF POSTERS DESTROYED
Students entering the caf at 8:.30
a.m. Thursday morning, found campaign material scattered all over
the floor and tables.
candidates attributed
of some outdoor
signs to bad weather, but agreed
that the weather alone was not
responsible.
"Flections Committee will act
upon their ultimation if they continue to receive complaints from
tho candidates," Miss Strutt said.
SHOULDN'T   NEED   WATCHING
"It is not the job of the Elections
Committee to check upon each detail of every candidates campaign,"
she suid, "and we feel that students should be able lo conduct
clean campaigns without personal,
twenty-four hour supervision."
"It it up to each candidate himself to check his own campaigners,
and those of the other candidates,"
she concluded.
Charges were levelled at Student •
Council meeting Monday by Jim
Midwinter, coordinator of activities who asked, in a motion subsequently tabled, that no points bo
allowed fraternity members ou
council in competition for the
Housser Cup.
The cup' is awarded annually to
the fraternity whose members liuve
contributed the most to their group
and tho university.
Midwinter's statement aro "completely .senseless," Jack Volkovich,
a law student and chairman of the
cup committee said in u statement
to Tiie Ubyssey.
MIDWINTED FRAT MAN
"Midwinter says tho practice of
fraternities in backing candidates
is detrimental to the best interests
of   the   Alma   Mater   Society,''   the
FOREMOST ARTIST
Brilliant Pianist Coming
Margaret Ann Ireland, brilliant
young Canadian pianist who performs in the Auditorium at 12:ISO
Tuesday, has been acclaimed as
one of  Canada's  foremost artists.
Her debut as a concerto soloist
was made at Hi. winning her an
ovation and the late Hector Char-
lesworth, dean of Canadian critics, prediction of "a distinguished
career." Since then she has touted
extensively In recitals throughout
the Dominion and has become well
known  to radio audiences.
Miss Ireland was horn in Win-
ulpeg, but her parents soon moved
to Toronto. She began her first
piano lessons at  live, and by eight
j slit! had won her first scholarship
al the Royal Conservatory of
Music. Al. 10, she was giving recitals of works by such composers
as Hach, Jleethoven, Schumann,
Chopin and Debussy. When she
was I", Margaret Ann travelled
to New York to continue her advanced studies willi the great Polish pianist  llorsyowski.
The Sydney Post reports Miss
Ireland's performance as "fine and
and spirited playing ... to a capacity audience." The St. John Telegraph describes her recital as "fine
of t lie most brilliant pianoforte
recitals ever given before a Saint
John   audience,"
statement said. "I would remind
Midwinter that he himself was
backed by a fraternity when he ran
for office.
"I would point out that throe of
tho four men running for junior
member are Creeks," Volkovich
said. "Does Midwinter feel that,
these three should withdraw."
FRATS BACK CANDIDATER
Fraternities have been backing
candidates for office from the time
tho first fraternity was established
on the campus many years ago,
Volkovich said. "Obviously Midwinter feels that this practice has
had a detrimental effect on the university. Let him prove lib: charge.
Members of past councils have
been no less abb; or <|iui!ifled be
cause they were fraternity men.
"The making of such allegations
is what i.s really detrimental to
the   Alma   Mater   Society,"
To discontinue awarding points
to fraternities for having members
of studetil council would be 'sense
less,'   Volkovich   said.
"Housser* Cup   points   are   based
on    the   cont rihutions    Hint    fraternity   men   make  both   in   their  Ira
leinities   anil   the   university,'   the
statement  continued.
"What difference lines it make
whether a man's achievement, is
in the field of scholarship, or
sports, or campus government'.' All
are eipially deserring of credit."
Student Teachers
Sponsor Candy Sale
"Friday is Chews Day" is th"
slogan for lhe Candy Sale sponsored jointly by the (lym Fun 1
and   Teacher  Training  students.
hags of chewy, inexpensive
sweets are being sold all day today from various spots on the
campus.
Tween Classes
Peer V. Paynter
To Give Lecture
On Social Credit
MR. PEER V. PAYNTER,
national vice president df the
Social Credit League, will give
the first lecture in a proposed
series on economics when he
addresses students Monday In
Arts 103 at 12:30 on "The
Economics  of  Social  Credit".
* #      if.
THE SAILING CLUB will hold
a meeting in Arts 104 today at
I2:l!0. plans will bo laid for the
proposed team races In Seattle
on Peb. <■*> and 26.
* *        *
SPANISH MUSIC by Graiiadoa
and Oampina Is the MAC presentation in Men's Club Room in the
Hrock today ut 12:110.
* *        *
THE  BOTANICAL GARDEN Society presents Dr. V. C. Prink, showing  kodachronie  slides  of  native
flora in  It  loo nt  I IMP) today.
i * * *
j THE SAILING CLUB is sponsoring  the  World  Series   Piltll  ill  Phy-
| sirs lino Tuesday and Wednesday at
Iii: Hl». Proceeds will lie used to
finance the trip to Seattle. There
will   hi!   a   silver   collection.
* * *
THREE  IRC MEETINGS will bo
h<*lil I'or Ihe llellinghiim Conference delegates, Monday, Pel). 12,
Pridny Pel). Hi Tuesday Pel). 20 at
I2:i!0 In the reception room of the
Hrock. Delegates are asked to give
their banquet fees of $1.50 to
Coriune Robertshavv, Alma 2H08-M
before  Peb.  10.
The conference is hoped to be
conducted after the tnxhion. of
"Town   Meet ing  of  the  Air." Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
Friday, February 9, 1951
The
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRH8S
Authorized aa Second Class Mail Post Office Dept. Ottawa. Student Subscriptions f 1 per
year (Included in AMS Fees). Mail Subscriptions—$2.00 per year. Published throughout
the university year by the Student Publications Board of tho Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein,arc those of the editorial staff of The Ubyssey and hot
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society nor of the University.
Offices i.i Hrock Hall, Phone ALma 1021 For display advertising phone ALma SSN
EDITOR-IN^CHIIF     RAY MOST
GENERAL STAFF: Senior Editors, Ann Langbein, Marl Stainsby, John Napier-HemyI
Copy Editor, Jim Banham; CUP Editor, Joan Churchill; Women's Editor, Joan Fraser,
Sports Editor, Alex MacGlllivray; Fine Arts Editor, John Brockington; Editorial Writers,
Les Armour, Hal Tennant; Photography, Tommy Hatcher.
Senior Editor—JOHN NAPIER-HEMY
Associate Editor—JOHN BROCKINGTON
Writcro This Issue:
BILL 8ALTER DOUG UPEX
ELSIE  GORBAT JOAN CHURCHILL
DON McFETTERIDGE JIM BANHAM
Treat  Em Rough
Jo-Ann Strutt's announcement that she
will crack down on dirty AMS campaigning
ie more than timely. It's somewhat overdue.
Elections this year are seeming more and
more to be characterized by back-room politics, under-the-table digs and off-the-record
accusations.
As elections committee chairman, Miss
Strutt will be doing the campus a great serv-'
ice if she can use every power at her disposal
to bring the election battles into the open.
It doesn't seem likely that all tho rumors
circulating these days about destruction of
posters, bloc conspiracies and conniving at
tiie polling booths are false. There are* so
many such rumors that the possibility  of
them all being wrong is very small.
Even if they are all wrong, and this is a
perfectly clean campaign in other respects, it
.is being badly besmirched by the rumors
themselves, many of which obviously stem
from various campaign headquarters.
Our presidential candidate who went to
the polls Wednesday didn't do much in this
regard to preserve their lily-white reputations
Other candidates who follow the same
tack deserve all the rough treatment that the
elections committee is able to give them.
LIT S SIE NOW
Girls Like
Just For The Record
Greek Letter Societies have been first-
class targets for shot-gun style social reformers since their inception. In the past 60
years, they have probably been charged with
every sort of social aim in the book.
UBC's Greeks have not been immune,
but they have usually emerged from the fray
with their reputations relatively clean.
What foundation there is to current
charges that fraternities are mixed up in undesirable politicking, we don't know.
Co-ordinator Jim Midwinter's suggestion that points ought not to be warded in
the Housser cup competition to fraternities for
electing members to student council is probably a good one whatever the facts may be.
It is true that almost every group on the
campus indulges in a little electioneering and
there is no reason why fraternities ought to be
barred.
But AMS elections shouldn't be made the
subject of inter-fraternity rivalry. If they
are, there is always a possibility that the best
interests of the student body may be forgotten in the desire to back the individual's
group.
Moreover, the present point system is
an invitation to pressure-group politics. Such
maneuvers will never be eliminated, but they
shouldn't be encouraged.
Just for the record, the Greeks should
change the system.
Critic On The Hearth
By John Brockington
It  has   become   increasingly   noticeable
duirng the past six months that tho quality of
the Sunday subscription concerts of the Vancouver Symphony has grown steadily worse.
This decrescendo has taken two forms
appearing first in the matter of unimaginative, stodgy programming. In these days there
are enough radio programs and symphonic
recordings   to   make   Joseph   Rosenstock's
coupling of Beethoven's Eroica  Symphony
with Moussorksy's Pictures at an Exhibition
completely unnecessary. Not that this program in itself can be considered inartistic but
when it is the sixth of its type in a series of
ten then one begins to wonder. The point
being that surely in a world so full of superlative performances of the standard orchestral repertoire that, an inferior group such as
we possess in Vancouver, it seems to me,
would be far better justifying its existence
by the inclusion of a large proportion of modem works and less familiar opuses by the
greats and near-greats of former times.
Secondly, in the matter of technical competence the orchestra i.s rapidly disintegrating from whatever level of unanimity it possessed before. Any previous tonal sheen has
been lost by the strings which have become
arid in tone. The woodwind section with the
exception of the first flutist is still composed
of would-be soloists. In the brass section are
continued to be employed a large number of
performers whose technical competence seldom rises above grade-school level.  On the
other hand the percussionists are becoming
more secure and reliable. All in all an unhappy state of affairs but not without solvability.
The first move is of course the hiring of
a conductor on a full time, long-term basis.
In the choosing of such a man, certain qualities must be sought. What is needed is an
'orchestra builder," not a hand kissing
smoothie whose main talent lies in his ability
to whiy up the less polite emotions of the tea-
drinking socialites who constitute a large proportion of the Sunday afternoon audiences.
We need an intelligent, sinceve musician
with enough idealism and courage to inspire
his players and enough grit and patience to
teach them how to make beautiful sounds
all together. This is no demi-god that is needed but only something that can be obtained by
careful shopping. There are hundreds of conductors without orchestras from which the
man could be chosen. Artur Rod^mski did a
job comparable to what is needed when he
rebuilt the New York Philharmonic from the
remains left by its continually changing guest
conductors.
That is the suggestion for the cure. I
hardly think that much will come of it. Present control of the Symphony lies in the hands
(>f too many well-to-do charity workers and
methinks that when market day comes
around at the end of the season, the chic
French straw, lightweight and empty, rather
than thc good solid grey felt will adorn the
head of our shrivelling Symphony.
FOUND
PCM.IC   LIBRARY   ROOKS.   May
ho identified al   Lost  &   Found.
LADIES OVAL TYPE ITRSE may
hi>  Idenlil'iod  at  Lost &   Found.
BRIEF   CASK,   still   awaits   identification at  Lost  &  Found.
KEYS,   may   ho   identified   al   Lost
& Found.
RONSON  LIGHTER, may he identified- at Lost & Found.
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED from  Waterloo &
10th.   S:*t0s,   Mon,   lo   |.'r|.   plume
Dawn  at CII 4i'.">5.
RIDE WANTED for K|,-i  „••,■,  lool
in   cast.   From   Mh   &   Tolmie   for
Classified
|N::so.s  daily.   I'lease   phone   Marlon
at al o;i;my.
I WANTED
READER    WANTED.    Phone    KE
IIILIR.
A (iOOD HOME FOR A IMXi. KE
I I'I-'It.
FOR   SALE
"I'I HATES OF PENZANCE" by
Gilhert & Sullivan, Phonograph records. 10 records. (78 rpni) KE
134211.
TIIE NEW WEAR-EVER health
method of cooking is now being
represented in the i'uiversity Area.
Morris Daiincoy ll'i'.C) It.Ed. CE
lllll.
By Joan frottr
Have you ever lived ln a house
without a telephone? If you have,
you'll appreotate Just how the girls
at the dorm feel this week—their
phone was Just Installed. So they
are calling everyone they know.
One of tay friends received one
of these calls early in the week.
When we were sitting over coffee the next morning, we suddenly decided te go over.
Nine o'clock in the morning isn't
a good time to call over there, we
discovered, as we found tfiat our
friend had gone to an early lecture. But we decided to look
around anyway.
As we exclaimed over a huge
fulMehgth mirror (with lights
that are almost too good) in the upstairs hall, a door opened right behind us.
That was our introduction to Yo-
lande Bledsoe, a first year Arts
student from Powell River. 6he
took us into her room and showed
us all around it.
It was just right. Yolande said
there was no comparison between
living at the Mary Bolert Dorm
and at the Youth Training Centre.
"This is Just wonderful," Bhe Bald.
"And now we have our phone
in . . ."
Later I got a chance to speak to
Anne Henderson, Hall Chairman of
Isabel Mclnnes Dorm, She explained the system ot student government over there, and told me about
the inter-house council. The girls
have just been planning the house
rules, which are mainly concerned with neatness and quiet hours.
Anne confessed that she usually went to the library if she
really wanted to study, because
there are hen parties In the rooms
every night. Bounds like fun.
House spirit among the girls ls
wonderful. Right now the third
house has only seven residents
and Anne says they are having a
marvelous time.
What was the most fun about
moving Into the dorm? "It was
(he newness of things," Bald Anne.
"We had to sweep sawdust out of
the cupboards and dust all over.
"Tilings are still arriving, aud
it's fun to see them come. Our
I'oonis are almost completed now,
and the lounge furniture is expected dally.
"And did you know we had our
phones put in?" she usked. "It's
the big topic of conversation at
the moment." Seems we'd heard
that before.
8QUARI  DANCE SATURDAY
So that the residences may be
fully furnished, active and alumni Pan-hellenlc groups are sponsoring a square dance In the Brock
Hall Lounge on Saturday.
The dance Is open to everybody
—tickets are $1.50 per couple. Pat
Taylor of the UBC Square Dance
Club will be calling the dances.
This should really be a lot of
fun—even If you haven't tried It
before, It's easy to catch on. 1
warn you though—wear low-heeled shoes. And be ready for sonu
energetic  dancing!
Irene Carlson has announced a
rough plan for the programme
of the Talent show to be held
next week. Plans include singing,
dancing and  even  bagpipes.
First of the two shows will be
hold at noon on Friday, February
1(1. Definite programmes will come
out next week. And don't forget
the second show—It will bo March
9th.
RADIO, Emerson Portable Electric, $45. Al Van Ryswck. AL .'I44DL
1!'47 ANGLIA, with horse and 2
year supply of oats. This horse has
been completely winterized. Over
20 miles to the bushel. Trot it
uway. Phone Walt E. Atkinson,
N 272GL1.
FOTH-DERBY CAMERA, I!.:, lens,
local plane, shutter to 1-500. sees.
Recently overhauled. W. J. Welsh.
Hut 5, Rm. 25, Fort Camp.
ROOM *. BOARD
ROOM & BOAR.D Young man
wanted to share comfortable room
In private home, good meals, and
pleasant  surroundings.  CE 0707.
LARGE ROOM wttb breakfast,
lunch and laundry. $35 per month.
1422 W 13th. AL 1004L.
SUITE. Wanted, suitable person
to share'suite,' Male. Phone'H. A.
Btiekrriaster, AL 1415 evenings.
SINGLE ACCOMMODATIONS at
Fort & Acadia Cariips. Also MAR
R!IE'D accommodations. Little
Mountain'' Caitip. Apply Housing
Administration, Room 205A, Physics Bldg.
NOTICES A MEETINGS ETC.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE, weekly
meeting will be held ln Physics
300 at 12:30 p.m. All welcome.
TYPING. English & Foreign languages, theses, essays, letters of
application, card work, manuscripts. Campus rates. Miss Eloise
Street,  Dalhousie  pts.  AL  OfiaSR.
VUULS
%¥ tfcut  Valentine
1.00 eoch
Mosaic Brooches and Frames from Italy
Brooches are oval or shaped like
a mandolin. The frames measure
approximately 2"x2V4M.
Beautifully
handcrafted they are amazing-
value for one dollar.
Jewellers
Vancouver
MA 6211
iu-a
THE DEFENCE RESEARCH BOARD REQUIRES
, PHYSICS GRADUATES
The Defence Research Board requires graduates, for full-time
employment ln the following specialized fields of Physics: —
RADIO PHYSICS
ELECTRONICS
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
AERODYNAMICS
These positions are for the Board's Laboratories located at
Halifax, N.S., Valcartler, P.Q., Ottawa, Ont., and Esquimau, B.C.
The Initial salaries tor applicants with Bachelor Degrees will
not be lower than $2,760 per annum. Allowances will be made tor
those applicants having experience and additional academic quail-
cations.
Apply to: DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH PERSONNEL,
DEFENCE RESEARCH BOARD,
DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE,
"A" BUILDING, OTTAWA, ONTARIO.
■MM
THE DEFENCE RESEARCH BOARD REQUIRES
ENGINEERS
The Defence Research Board requires graduate Engineers, for
full-time employment ln the following specialized fields:—
Electrical   Engineers—Five   positions—for   Laboratories   at
Halifax. N.8., Valcartler, P.Q., and Ottawa, Ont.
Mechanical   Engineers—Ten  positions—for   Laboratories  at
Valcartler, P.Q., Halifax, N.S., and Suffleld, Alta.     ,
Chemical   Engineers—Four   positions—for   Laboratories   at
llulirax, N.8., and Valcartler, P.Q.
Metallurgical    Engineer*— Two   positions—for   the    Board's
Laboratory at Halifax, N.S.
The initial salaries for applicants with Bachelor Degrees will
not he lower than $2,760 per annum. Allowances will be made for
applicants having experience and additional academic qualifications.
Apply to: DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH PERSONNEL,
DEFENCE RESEARCH BOARD,
DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE,
"A" BUILDING, OTTAWA, ONTARIO.
TIIE FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PLAN
OF THE
DEFENCE RESEARCH BOARD
FOR 1951-52
The Defence Research Board is now accepting applications for financial assistance from high ranking Canadian' students registered in Science or Engineering, who
will graduate from University in 1952, preferably at the
Mastei-'s oi* Ph D Levels.
The, conditions of acceptance will be the same as for
1950-51, but the monthly payment will be $162.00.
Application forms may be obtained from the Registrar
or Placement Officer.
Apply to; Thc Director of Research Personnel,
Defence Research Board,
Department of National Defence,
"A" Building, Ottawa, Ontario.
THE DEFENCE RESEARCH BOARD REQUIRES SCIENTISTS
FOR FULL-TIME EMPLOYMENT
. LOCATION
Excellent opportunities for iiuulil'led Scientists are available ut
the following locations: Halifax, N.S., Valcartler. P.Q., Ottawa,
Kingston and Toronto, Out., Fort Churchill, Man., Suffiold, Aita,
Esquimau, ll.C.
WORKING CONDITIONS
Each laboratory |h thoroughly modern, contains the latest typos
of equipment, und provides excellent working conditions for tho
individual scientist.
SALARY SCALES
Starting salaries will vary from $2,7(10 to fl.ooo per annum depending on academic qualifications  and experience and  provision is made for regular annual Increments within each salary
range.
EM PLOY EI-]   UENEFITS
(a> Group,Hospital and Medical Insurance Plans,
lb)  Retirement of Superannuation benefits,
(c) Generous leave benefits, including:
(1)  I'p to 18 days' vacation leave per year,
(2i  to Statutory holidays per year.
*      CI) Cumulative sick leave credit of 18 days per year.
(4) Other special benefits for specific purposes.
Full  information  regarding positions now available  may  he
obtained by writing to:  —-
TIIE DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH PERSONNEL,
DEFENCE RESEARCH HOARD,
DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE,
"A" HOLDING. OTTAWA. ONTARIO Friday, February 9, 1951
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3
Anita Jay
Through her three years on the
campus, Anita Jay has established herself as a capable and conscientious person, worthy of your
support for the office of secretary.
Active ln campus activities such
as Mussoc and Phrateres, Anita
has also acted as President of W.
Vancouver Hi-Y, vice-president of
Greater Vancouver Inter-club council, and editor of her school paper.
Consistently winning high second class honors, Anita is capable of assuming the responsibilities of your student government.
John (Junior) Tennant,
SECRETARY
Mary Rittich
CO-ORD
Norman D#nt
I would like to introduce my candidate, Norman Dent, to you, the
student.
Norm is taking a double degree
in Arts and Law; has held 3 executive positions in the last two
years; has been active in numerous organizational projects and
routine committee work (most important—gathering pledges for the
War Memorial Oym); and is, incidentally, a good student.
Because of his familiarity with
club functions and his personal
suitability to the job I am delighted to be able to second Norm Dent.
Anne Hutchison,
3rd Year Arts.
JockLintott
Jack Lintott is an excellent candidate for Co-Ordlnator for many
reasons:
1 Varied campus experience by
participation ln LSE activities.
2 Jack has the executive ability
necessary for Co-Ordlnator evidenced by his capability as tbe
Varsity Outdoor Club's  president.
3 His  organizational  and  plan-
Durlng her university career,
Mary Rittich has taken an active
interest in student activities, yet
maintained a high scholastic standing. As a student at Victoria College, she was active in sports, in
the Newman Club and ln the Debating Society.
At UBC, Mary ls active in Intramurals,' in the Newman Club, In
Mussoc and in the current Oym
campaign.
Tills experience, combined with
her intelligence and fine personality, makes Mary an ideal choice
for AMS secretary.
Bill Craig,
3rd Year Law.
NATOR
Don MfiwHInnty
I am highly pleased to second
the nomination of Don Mawhin-
ney for Co-Ordlnator of Activities.
Without a doubt, he ls the man
singularly suited to this job. Experience of past campus elections
has shown that promises are mere
words and seldom translated Into
action. Here ls a man who bases
his platform on one slogan. "Actions speak louder than words."
Let's be realistic. The job of coordinator calls for a person whose
time and energy will not be devoted to other activities, whether
they be mountain-climbing or politics.  *
John Volkovich,
3rd Year Law.
nlng talents (both essential for
Co-Ordinator) were demonstrated
by the completion of the $15,000
VOC cabin during the fall term.
4 Jack possesses the maturity
of thought, initiative and drive that
Council members require.
Consider Jack Litott's ability and
qualifications canefully, for I sincerely  endorse his  candidacy.
Tim Hollick-Kenyon,
4th Year Arts.
Quota Exceeded
Figures Released By North Show
Pledging Campaign Nets $6633
UBC students topped their quota in the gym fund drive
by $160.69 according to figures released today by the pledge
campaign committee.
Final figures given to the Ubys
Council To Censure
UBC Litter-Louts
Stern Letter  From  Council
To  Reprimand  Messy Students
Litter-louts at UBC will get a stern letter from student
council soon..
Undergraduate Societies and<
campus clubs have been littering
the campus with post-rs, leaflets
and other advertising material
which has made the campus messy,
a councillor told the student government Monday.
Joanne Strutt, AMS secretary
will write groups telling them of
the existing regulations in regard
to posters and leaflets and telling
them that these regulations must
be adhered to.
"One religious group recently
put on a good advertising campaign,'' AMS president Nonie Donaldson told The Ubyssey, "but
their literature, napkins, blotters
and leaflets left the campus in a
mess."
In the future, clubs will have to
have large-scale advertising campaigns approved hy the AMS secretary.
Indian Students
Elect Executive
The newly-formed India Students Association elected Its executive at yesterday's noon-hour
meeting which was attended by
most of the East Indian students
on the campus. Future activities
of the group  were also discussed.
The office of president was filled by IShag Singh Dhuliwal, while
the only lljdiun girl on the campus, j
l'olkar Manilas, was elected vice-'
president. Gurdov dill was elected
secretary-treasurer.
Committee Studies
New Blazer Crests
New crests, suitable for blazers,
are now being studied by the student committee on pins and crests,
Charlie Flader, council sophomore
member announced Monday at
Student  Council,
Several companies have been
asked to submit designs to the university for council's consideration.
Council Is seeking a design somewhat similar to that now being
worn by student councillors on
blazers.
Students purchasing the crests
would have the name of their faculty embroidered under the crests
in eacli case, the committee said.
"The committee is seeking to
standardize all the crests being
worn by students," Flader said.
Sule of crests and pins purchased last year has been progressing
well, the committee said. Stock
has heen allocated to the chairman
of  undergraduate  societies.
sey by campaign manager Roy
North indicate that students have
pledged a total of $6633.85 toward
meeting their share of War Memorial Gymnasium costs.
The following ls a breakdown of
the contribution by faculty:
Percentage
Medicine        8B.3
Money
166.48
Quota
186.22
Nursing
1st. yr.
94.4
68.02
72.03
2nd. yr.
16.29
17.50
Home Ec.
/
2,3,4th. yr.
81.3
309.48
380.73
Arts
1st yr.   '
106.8
2464.49
2307.63
2nd yr.
102.1
1706.39
1670.80
Aggie
2,3,4,&5th yr.i>6.17
311.84
322.42
Law
1st  yr.
107
110.02
102.97
2nd yr.
89.8
172.09
192.08
3rd  yr.
119.')
200.46
168.07
Commerce
112.8
251.47
222.96
Biochemist!*
y
425
115.6
182.18
157.82
Pharmacy
88.2
81.89
92.61
Teacher
Training
103.3
326.63
315.56
Social Work
Bach
94.4
106.88
113.19
Master
102.8
112.87
109.76
Physical
Ed.
111.4
45.87
41.16
6833.65
6473.16
UBC will, play host on
Thursday to one of the big
name diplomats of France.
Ah open meeting of the United
Nations Club will bear M. Paul-
Emlle Nagglar, ex-Ambassador to
Peking and Moscow and representative to the United Nations Assembly, at 12:30 in the Auditorium
Feb. 15.
M, Naggair, who entered the Foreign Service of France in 1908
has spent much of his period of
service in the Far East. Between
1945 and 1948 he was the French
Representative on the Allied Commission on Japan, and he has headed the Asiatic and Pacific Department of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He was in China as
the Ambassador when the final
Japanese Invasion came in 1938.
After he relinquished the post ln
China, M. Naggair went to Moscow,
and was Ambassador during the
unsuccessful Anglo-French negotla_
tlons with Russia which culminated In the Russo-German Pact of
1939.
This special meeting, made possible by the French Consul M, Alex
Anfossy, is open to all students.
*9/g Mm Oti the Campus!
The man who smokes
a pipe rates high with
the Campus Queens.. a
especially when he
smokes PICOBAQ
You'll find the fragrance of PICOBAC
is as pleasing to others
as it is mild and cool
for youj |
ALSO GOOD FOR ROLLING YOUR OWM,
FfCCtAClTivr/ey Tobacco-fhe coofaf, mildest tobacco over grown
Residence Phone Numbers Released
Phone numbers of the new Women's Residences, a closely guarded secret until this week, were
released to the press today. The
Ubyssey prints these numbers as
a special service feature to males
on the campus.
Mary Bollert Hall—AL lfeoO.
Isobell   Mclnnes  Hall—AL $366.
Silk Specialists
*
622-828 GranvUfc
Phone TA. 12*1
une
SUuMA
* if you would her
heart arouse
be a sweetheart
give a BLOUSE.
Here's a wonderful selection in crepe, sheers, or nylons .. .
lacy as a valentine, or tailored with new and clever
tactics. White and colors. Sizes 14 to 20.
3.95 to 12.95
But they've reduced their budget problem*
to this simple formula — steady saving
at "
Bank of Montreal
/our Bank on the Campus ...
In the Auditorium Building
MERLE C. KIRBY,
Manager
WORKING WITH CANADIANS IN EVIRY WALK OP LIM UNCI 111?
WHT SW0«0W»V i»«w.     CtOMIHI I
SHIRTS mt CLEANING
1-DAY SERVICE
<fJ(i/ffJJ
45I3W. 10tt» Av«.
Another E. A. Lee Service!
Wc are pleased to announce the addition of a
COMPLETE  FORMAL WEAR
RENTAL  DEPARTMENT
apart from our regular formal wear stock
Von will lind lhe proper attire for every formal occasion in this
new department . . . Morning Clothes, Directors' Suits, h'nll Dress
Tails, Dinner Jackets and Tuxedos . . . all In the same high
quality and styling that has made the E.A. LCT] label a mark
of distinct ion.
This is all new stock . . all new 1951 models in
EVERY size! Shorts, Tails, Regulars and Stouts!
Give us a call ... we shall be happy to serve you!
E. A. Lee Ltd.
623 Howe St.
MArine 2457
P.S.—We are also carrying a Full Selection of Correct
Formal Accessories.
^sS^
 .-^§i§s^
£__JOY THE BESJ, Page I
THE UBYSSEY
Friday, February 9, 1951
Southcott Back; 'Birds
Play Leafs On Saturday
Bill-it
.... High icorer
in
City League Finals
UBC Intermediate A girls basketball continued their winning
streak by downing the Simpson
team 64-23 In ' the second semifinal game Wednesday nlglit.
High scorer? for the t'BC fern
mes were Doreen Cummings and
Mary Ward with 17 and 13 point,*
respectively.
,'*Thelr win Wednesday makes the
squad eligible for the City League
finals. First game of the playoffs
**v,lll, be next. Wednesday at John
sr High School gym at 7:45.
John Southcott, rated the top
left-handed hoopster at UBC
since McGeer, returned to
action Thursday night when
the 'Birds met Pacific Lutheran College. He will fill the
right forward position when
the Pomfretmen meet the local
Clover Leafs on Saturday at
UBC Gym at 8:00 p.m.
Southcott, out with a cracked
ankle bone during the past six
weeks, will considerably strengthen Thunderbird scoring power,
in pre-Conference play he was the
second leading scorer, trailing centre Art Phillips by 10 points.
Last night the Birds battled
with one of the top three teams
in the League, at Parkland. TUp
Gladiators have suffered two setbacks ln eight league games, losing
to Eastern by three points and
Whitworth by seven, while defeating the remainder of the Conference schools. They are rated as
having a good outside chance of
walking off with league honors
since they still have home games
against Eastern Savages and Whitworth Pirates,
So far  in  the  league  play  tbe
Thunderbirds  have  dropped  eight
games, including a loss to the Lutes early  ln  January  by a  68-52<*>
score.
Big Gene Lundgaard was high
man with 24 points. The locals
have chalked up one victory oVer
the St.  Martins Rangers.
On Saturday they will be at
full strength while the 'Leafs will
be missing Sandy Robertson, and,
of course, Jack Pomfret, coach ol'
the Birds.
Pomfret ls expected to start with
Art Phillips at centre, John Southcott and Ron Blssett In the forward positions, and Ron Stuart
and Willie Louie as guards.
Up to date Blssett has been the
most promising of the newcomers
and ls expected to be the big gun
for the 'Birds in the near future.
Southcott
.. ht'i back
Ole Frowns; Penn
Grins: Chiefs Win
UBC Chiefs and CBC Braves
fought their scheduled grudge battle Thursday at noon with Dick
Penn's Senior "A" squad coming
out on top 61--I!'.
Although the Penn hoopsters
were never behind In the fierce
match Ole Bakken's quintet yave
them far more trouble than Ihey ex-;
pectecl. The game started out in
the proper fashion with the under-j
dogs dragging behind hy eight
baskets hut. the lead quickly diminished   to a.  meagre  four  points.
The Chiefs then used every play1
their master-mind had dreamed up
hut couldn't increase their lead  to
more   than   lu   points   againsl   the1
aggressive  Braves.
lu the first quarter I'ukken's
group was out-scored hy 111 baskets, hill in (lie see (iiul quarter
Ihey   oil! -shol    Ille    Chief-;    L'-li    wil !i
some    smart    checking    by    both
teams.
The last half was by far the
most even as well as the roughest.
Only 21 points were chalked up by
the Chiefs while* the Brave's registered 2<i markers, finally managing to break through the victors
zone defense.
■•"our men were fouled out for
the Chiefs. Ralph Bowman was
sent off in the third quarter while
Seymour, Kyan and Xaharko went
off during the third. Stan Lawson
was the only Brave to mark up
five  fouls:
Highest individual scorer was
Seymour of the Chiefs who scored
l:i baskets, with Denis (Irisdale
of Hie Braves clan following with
11'   points.
Jelly Anderson
Continues Talks
Jelly Andersen continues hit
spring football training schedule today with a chalk talk
In  hut  L2.
The spring training Is open
to anyone Interested in learning the basic fundamentals of
football.
All those who played for the
Thunderbird football team are
urged to attend the series of
lectures.
At the completion of the six
weeks course Andersen plans
to divide the boys Into two
teams and a spring game will
be played.
SPORT
Sports Editor—ALEX MacGILLIVRAY
Associate Editor—SHEILA KEARNS
Last Miller Cup
Game On Saturday
UBC Braves Battle
Redskins Saturday
Coachless UBC Braves will bat*
tie the Redskins ln a preliminary
game toMbe^enior rugger match
at CBC^Bt|dlum, provided the
weather  holds  out.
The Braves are currently la
first place in tbe second division
Bell-Irving Cup league having won
six and tied two games with no
Training hard for their coming games in the McKechnie I losses. They have plied up over a
and World Cup series, Albert Laithwaite's rugby fifteen will | ^[^ "jj"18 as agaln8t the °P'
meet a West Van squad in the last Miller Cup game the 'Birds 11)0S
will play this year.
Because of repeated cancellation in this Cup league the team
has found it necessary to drop
from competition after the match
this Saturday at UpC.
Poor weather conditions have
alBO cancelled McKechnie Cup
games. The next is scheduled for
February 17 against Victoria
Crimson Tide at Varsity Stadium
but so far it is only tentative.
Victoria and UBC are currently
tied for first place, eacli having
lost one and won one.
Saturday's match will pr6bably
see big Dave McFarlane ln the fullback slot. McFarlane ls well
known for his football activities ln
the fall, and ln spite of his lack
of experience in rugby he is expected, to be a great asset to the
team when they play the huge
Oallfornlana.
John Newton and Oeorge Pull
will be filling the wing positions
in the c6mlng games, Newton ls
said to be the most promising player UBC has had In a long time.
Oeorge Puil is another football
star who Is rapidly learning the
art of rugger. Pull la very fast
and tricky on ills feet.
Three star athletes, Stan Clark,
Jerry Main, and Hugh Qreenwood
will be filling the two (centre, positions. Clark ls a four year veteran with the team and Greenwood has played for two seasons
with the Birds.
Jerry Main is another promising athlete from Victoria, and Is
one of the teams  best tacklers.
Diminutive Jack Smith, Danny
Oliver, Junior Tennant, and Second - division scrum-half John
Scott will make up the rest of the
three line.
Time for Saturday's game Is
2:00. p.m.
BBirvA
EVER TRIED!
ii'ii'M!1''!!.?!1**!.
\;|scllll<'
Vase.
New 'Vaseline/ Cream Hair Tank
It's got everything, men! Gives
your hair natural lustre, keeps it
in place with that "just-combed"
look all day long. The only hair
tonic containing Viratol*. Try it
and you'll agree it's "the cream of
all the creams",
*Cives your hair lustre — keeps il lit
place without stiffness.
iL'inarn Ihii ///////.
-,s-
Opens - Monday, Feb. 12
■ov«,"ir$ CVEN
R THAN THE STAG!
THAT PANICKE0
N AND NEW Y0RKI
mm wmi ami (otm-i*
Sf>milN« IMIOIUI, Ml
SOM! Of THI fUNNmt
SITUATIONS  IVII
MUSIC  ROPE  CLIMBING
EATS FEATURED IN MEET
To the strains of inspiring melodies fifteen teams competed
r. thp annual Girls' Indoor Track Meet Wednesday night in
the gym.
Records     supplied     the     background   music   as   the   girls   pro
gressed from high jumping to howling, rope climbing, standing broad
jumping, basketball free shooting
and  spot  basketball  shooting.
Most difficult event was the
rope climbing. Many girls couldn't
even get up the rope, and they watched enviously while a tew agile
people made lt up to the top and
collected 10 points for their teams.
After each team had completed
the rounds of the six even's, pop
and donuts were served «nd a
sing song was organized. The evening ended with Informal jitterbug
and Charleston sessions.
Do Brinham, on behalf of the
competitors, thanked the Phys Ed.
majors and all the other people
who worked so hard to make the
evening the grand success It proved to be.
Joan MacArthur topped the Individual scoring with 50 points,
and Pat McEwan followed her with
42. Pys. Ed. II led the teams with
161  points .
The team scores in order were:
Phys. Ed. II, 164; Aggie I aud
Phys. Ed 1, 134; Arts 111, 130;
Team !), 116; Newman, 111, Team
11, 112; Pre-Med, 102; Team 20.
99; Aggie 11, i>8 Pre-Med III, 95;
Home Ec. Ill, 94 Residence Red,
91;  Team 8, 88 and Arts IV 82.
cEciiPARKER^rur,i;r
A. E.MATHEWS":::
»no hiw rom
ihcCHILTERN
,   HUNDREDS
: >mi inm >r
ANA   Ml >RRi
Varsity Jheaire
«.
j TffiWiniiiirtmiii-i
You fas
\
To he refreshed
w»*Hj
Quality means
wholesome goodness
Coca-Cola is jtiitthat1
DRINK
CmM
COCA-COtA LTD.- VANCOUVER

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