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The Ubyssey Nov 26, 1937

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 Published Twice Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Friday and Saturday
CHRISTMAS  PLAYS
Auditorium
Vol. XX
ATTITUDE TO
LIFE COUNTS
SAYS McGEER
Guard Against
Fear
Sweeping before him the rhetorical queation of hia address, "After
University, What?", Gerald Grat-
tan McGeer, K.C, M.P., threw down
the gauntlet to hla student audienoe
of over a thousand Wedneaday noon
when he declared, "What happens
to you depends on your attitude to
life."
KNOW ALL
Stating that the training which
they reoeived in the university waa
only a preliminary to the greater
university  ot life,  he  advised  his
llatenera to guard against a belief
of knowing all, a finality of judgement, and the fear of failure.
"The fear of being laughed at
la the greatest Impediment In a
man's life," he eald. "I have been
laughed at more than any ether
mmn In public life In B. C."
"I have alwaya felt that the understanding of those laughing waa
not as high as it might have been."
"Thla goes for seme ef the professors  at thla  unlveralty,  tee,"
he added.
'ICI
"Never haa the demand tor aervice been greater than now," he
stated, "and if we live ln a hard
competitive world we are better
able to progress since we are
equipped with an understanding
and facilities far greater than heretofore."
Quoting   from  the   writings   of
Abraham    Lincoln    wherein    the
grsat Amerloan daacrlbod himself
as "a man of grsat humility," he
eald,  "That   la  one   plaoe   where
Lincoln and  I disagree.    I  nsvsr
did lay olalm to humility."
However, Lincoln did agree with
him on the question of money and
banking, he admitted, as he pointed
out  the   necessity  ot  a  controlled
medium of exchange.
BANKING
"If one millionth of the time which
has been spent on the study ot the
circulation ot the bloodatream, or
electricity, had been apent on the
circulation of the medium of exchange the absurdity of our system
would be apparent," he aald.
"Per Instance," he pointed out,
"although materials and labor are
available,  yet  you  eannet  build
your unlveralty."
"What we need is men who are
as  disinterested  in  regard  to  the
control of flow and circulation of
money and oredit as the Chief Justice is in the Interpretation of the
lawa of the country," the speaker
declared.
Mr. MoGeer'a speech was sponsored by the National Conference
Committee aa one of its series of
lectures.
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1937
No. 17
|    "THIS CASTLE HATH A PLEASANT SEAT"    _
A remarkable photograph of Victoria College, U.B.C.'s affiliate institution across the water The above picture was taken
by George Gregory, using infra-red film. A story of some of
the interesting features of the college is printed below.     *
SHORTAGE OF
TICKETS FOR
XMAS PLAYS
N.F.C.U.S. HAS
QUIZ TOO
The National Conference Committee questionnaire will be circulated on the campua one week following Student Council's quia,
now in the mails.
The two should give a thorough
account of all student connections.
Student Council will cover campus-
city relationships and expenses;
National Conference's concerna relations between studenta on the
campus.
Various campus barriers will be
aired in an effort to break them
down. Fraternity, faculty and economic obstacles in the way of more
friendly relations between all students will be considered. Various
suggestions for their removal will
be offered.
The questionnaire will not be given as a matter of curiosity, but
with a real purpose behind it. It is
hoped that the results will have a
practical value at U.B.C. as well
as furnishing statistical information for the National Conference in
December.
Victoria College Housed
In Ancient Splendour
By JOHN GARRETT
Victoria College, the foster child of U.B.C,'housed in a romantic
old castle, is now as much a part of the provincial capital aa are the
parliament buildings.
Overlooking the whole city, the turreted, slate-roofed chateau
atanda silently atop the slopes of Craigdarroch. Almost aa old aa
Victoria, the old building is linked with the early history of the colony.
DUNSMUIR CASTLE
Not quite a century ago there lived in Victoria a family named
Dunsmuir. The head of this family was soon the richest man in the
province, and he determined to build for himself a miniature of a
castle in Austria. Slate, stone, wood and skilled workmen were imported from England.
The castle waa duly erected, and event lived in, but the wealthy
family soon lost interest in the chateau, and departed to build another
one at Colwood. After a few years, during which the castle served
alternately as a military hospital and an uninhabited landmark, the
City of Victoria Anally procured the building for the purposes of a
university structure.
STONE AND SLATE
Built af an enormous cost, the
castle stands out against Victoria's
sky-line. The striking edifice is
constructed of stone throughout.
Its roof is steep, red slated, and
pierced by innumerable lofty stone
chimneys with intricate and artistic chimney tops reaching heavenwards.
A spacious balcony runs around
the south wall of the caatle, and is
edged with old-fashioned iron railings.
To the north Is where the main
entrance onee stood; and where
the    College    principal's    offlce
now   neatlea,  neatly   tucked  between the four ptllara of the old
entraneo arch.
Today  lectures   are   given,   and
examinations written in the musty
atmosphere of Vancouver Island's
courageous history.   The magnificent drawing-room, with two old-
fashioned carved fireplaces at eaoh
end, and with plaster decorations
adorning the gilt ceiling, now forms
the main  lecture room.   Ita only
rival as to  sise is the monstrous
billiard room on the aecond floor.
ARISTOCRATIC
Even though the room appears
a trifle bare these days, with none
of the old curtains, furniture, ear-
pets or fittings, there is still a
deep austerity and an aristocratic
air about the "hoary pile."
Any feeling of cold, hard business is impossible in the registrar's offlce. Richly finished in
the finest old oak panelling in
Western Canada, and kept domestically coay by a huge open
fireplace whose chimney divides
at the mantlepiece to enclose a
stained glass window, this "offlce," originally the library, Is a
fascinating room.
MAIN HALL
The main hall of the castle winds
to the turret of the building, passing three floors.  The staircase, like
the  registrar's  office,  and  the  old
dining-room, is panelled in the same
light oak.   The ceiling of tht hall
is   a  matchless  piece  of  now forgotten wood carving, and the huge
'fireplace is surmounted by a bronze
plaqe bearing tbe inscription:
"Welcome comes in Smiling,
Farewell goes out Sighing."
It would take too much space
to describe all the rooms of the
old  College.   Suffice to say  that
(Continued on Page 8)
The Players' Club announcea that
Christmaa playa do not cpme under
the Pass System, and that tickets
to the performance laat night were
Issued on the "first eome flrst
served" scheme.
Complaints regarding the shortage of tickets came into the Players' offices throughout the day
Thursday, but it waa decided not
to stage a seoond student night.
"There is no question of every
atudent having the "right" to attend the plays," members of the
club declared.
"The Christmas productions do
not benefit from the Pass System,
and the pass waa only used as a
meana of identification when we
Issued student tickets," they state.
Spring performance a of the
Players' and the Musical Society
will be free thia year, however, and
students will save the SB cents they
used to pay for each show.
SOLIC ITED
INFORMATION
WILL BE USED
Sponsored by Student's Council,
questionnaires have been sent to all
students concerning their finances
while attending university.
Statistics compiled as a result of
this questionnaire will be sent to
downtown businessmen to show
them the value of the unlveralty to
local commerce and to ahow them
where and in what quantities the
student money is distributed among
downtown concerns.
CO-OPERATION
The co-operation of the atudent
body ia asked and students are requested to make their answers
sensible and sane as the results of
the survey will benefit them.
Questionnaire is divided into
three parts, one for both the men
and women, and two men and women separately. Questions have
been chosen that they may be answered by all either poaitively or
negatively or with the stated
amount.
Articles listed on the query are
those which will be of most Interest  to downtown  buslnesaee:
insurance,     cosmetics,     clothes,
transportation costs, amusements,
sports   equipment, beauty   aids,
et cetera.
These   queries   were   mailed   on
Wednesday, and should have reached
or will reach  atudenta thia week.
All questionnaires must   be   completed by next Thursday and turned
in at the ballot box at the foot of
the Cafeteria stairs.
A.M.S. FOOTS
RUGBY_LOSS
Treasurer Bob Smith reported to
council Monday evening a $606.32
loss in the recent Canadian rugby
series with the Universities of Alberta and Saskatchewan.
Smith   put   forward   tentative
plans   for   a    pool    of    expenses
whereby the three teama In the
series would place all profits in
a  common  fund, to be used  in
covering  costs   of   all   gamea  in
the aeries.
Some of the largest items in the
financial   statement of thia year's
series  are:   Trip  to  the   prairies,
«1,138; rent of Athletic Park, $160;
Vancouver  Rugby   Union,   968.50;
meals for viaitors, 981.60.
PROFIT  INSUFFICIENT
Total profits on games in Vancouver waa $681.70. Included In
thia sum is a profit of 98.46 from
the tea dance, 9-70 on sale of pen
nanta, and 9640.06 over actual game
expenses.
The profit made   in   Vancouver
waa far from enough to cover the
trip east, and it ia here that the
big loss waa taken.
NARROW BUDGET
Other   expenses    in    connection
with   Canadian   Rugby   thia   year
have put the Alma Mater Society
in a precarious financial condition,
with hardly any working margin
above the budget, Smith declares.
Council    membera    feel    that
aome different financial arrangement for the Hardy  Cup  series
next year can be made, in ordej
to   atave  off   a   similar   loes   tn
1988.
AUDITORIUM PACKED TO SEE
VARIETY PERFORMANCE
Consistently bigger and more ambitious, the Flayers' Club opened
its twenty-third year of activity on the campus last night with the
annual Christmas quartette of one-act plays.
Contrasting in type as usual, and marked by improved and more
elaborate staging and production, the plays show result of thorough and
comprehensive rehearsal.
PLANS   TO   RAISE   FUNDS
FOR CONFERENCE SQUASHED
Permission to Raise
Money Refused
By Council
A long discussion regarding the
National Conference of Canadian
University Students to be held this
winter ln Winnipeg, resulted in a
Students' Council decision Monday
evening not to advance the conference any financial assistance.
Clarence Idyll and Norah Sibley appeared before council aa a
delegation asking for either a direct council grant, or permission
to charge admission to the series
of Wednesday noon leotures.
NO FUNDS
The five-cent charge had already
been banned by council the week
before, and there was no change in
the stand.
A discussion of near one hour did
not assist council ln  its efforts  to
find   some   source   of   money   from
which to help the conference.
Idyll declared that It la hoped
to aend 18 U.B.C. delegates eaat
next month, at an average eost of
•60.00.
Of   this,   most   of   the   delegates
would   themselves   pay   $25.00   or
more.     Needed   from   council   was
9250.00.
Already promised from the B.C.
M. and Union College was a total
of  $200.00.
The decision of counoil leaves
the conference group with a difficult problem to find finances for
the trip. They do not want to
cut down their delegation, claiming that thla would Inorease expenses under the pool system being used.
COMSOY PLKASSS
"Fascinating Foundling," an early
Shaw comedy, was a pleasant opener,   surely   handled   by   ita   principals.    It had no action but for a
rather tepid outburst of horse play
at the beginning, but dialogue was
crisply handled by the stylish and
impertinent   leada.    C.   8.   Fowler
gave rotund fullness to his role of
Chancellor, hla voloe and carriage
both convincing. Unfortunately, his
make-up was rather too livid.
"The Blind," uttermost In grim
tragl-phantasy,  stsrted  well  and
often aehleved real dramatlo ef*
feet;   but It waa too long te be
auatalned.    Effectively staged, It
get Ita beat effect from grouping
and  lighting.    Vetoes, on whess
quality the whole  play depends,
were   mostly   good,   particularly
the women'a.    Men's volees tended te be overstralnsd for effect.
Because of difficulties Inherent in
the play, lt could not be wholly successful,   but   the   Players'   efforts,
both honest and intelligent, achieved a large measure of effect.
■ PPBCTIVS TRIATMINT
"X=0," a peace play by John
Drlnkwater, directed by Mr. Dilworth, received most thorough and
effective treatment of the four
plays. The beauty of the verse was
admirably handled by all four
speaking characters, despite evidence of retarded development on
the part of the audience, who were
simply panicked by a little snow
from the previous play.
Setting and lighting here were
again most effective, the ever-versatile velours coming ln for good use
once again.
Crowded with hair-raising tension and ham emotion, 'Curse You,
Jack Dalton" provided emotional
relief after the strain of preceding
offerings. A genuine old-style rip-
snorter ln the shaving-mug school,
this farce was smoothly handled
and distinguished by fine comedy
sense and timing.
MR. fl AGS DIS SOTS
Bob Hayman handled hla deep-
dyed mouatache to good effect, Barbara Griffin was motherly aa possible in the deep-fried down-Eastern
tradition, and the female playera
were appropriately noble and sinful. The light and happy touch of
Director Walter Gage could be discerned throughout.
CAST
The oasts in detail: "Fascinating
Foundling": Alice Mather, John
Garrett, Pat Fowler, Pat Keatley.
Direction, Mrs. D. C. B. Duff, Dr.
Joyce Hallamore, Nora Gibson.
"The Blind": Margaret Sage, Cecily Holmes, Eileen Newby, Theodora Colomboa, Pauline Scott, Aileen Seaton, Dick Clark, Jack Mercer, Archie Bain, Jack Dlether, A.
V. Hummel, Dave Stoddard, John
Kuhn. Direction, Dorothy Somerset, Beth Gillanders.
x=o
"X=0": Norman Beattie, William
Grand, Don MacLean, George Kidd.
Direction, Professor Dilworth, Don
Cameron.
"Curse You, Jack Dalton": Barbara Griffin, Dacre Barrett-Leonard,
Bob Hayman, Anne Carter, Esme
Caydsien, Betty Blakely, Sandy
Nash. Direction, Professor Gage,
Art Sager.
Political
Petitioners
Confident
Supportera of the petition asking for a apecial A.M.S. meeting
to discuss Student Council's ban on
political cluba declared Thursday
that the petition would be in the
hands of Counoil today.
According to the A.M.S. code, a
special meeting muat be called if
100 students ask for one. Whether
Council will take any steps to persuade the petitionera to withdraw
their request is not known.
It is known that Student Council
opposes any reversal of the ban
placed on campus politics * fortnight ago.
Earliest date that a meeting
could be called now is Monday
noon.
ADVERTISING
ADVICE
Mr. James Lightbody, B. C. Electric publicity manager, spoke to a
university audience, Thuraday noon
on the "Psychology of Advertising."
Mr. Lightbody stressed the importance of making a lasting Impression on people's minds. The
first law ls to be different. Too
much similarity decreases the reaction.
HUMOR
Humor can be used effectively,
but this approach ls much more
fully developed ln England.
Smartnesp is vital, for the commonplace has no appeal.
According to Mr. Lightbody,
the Indirect, or eubeeneoloua appeal, la extremely Important.
Time and eonatant reiteration are
necessary to allow a nmm* er an
Idea te be firmly establlshsd In
people'a minds.
Contrary to general opinion, there
la a very amall field for creative
work, and a great deal of routine
in advertialng. The work ia becoming more and more scientific and
definite. Newapapera and other advertialng mediums are developing
more efficient in the checking of
the value and reaulta of the different typea of advertialng.
NOTS BOOKS
Mr. Lightbody'a advice to atudenta Interested ln advertialng la to
atudy the effect of ada displayed In
publications and on billboards. Because the principles are constantly
changing, text-books are ot very
little uae.
One of the main objoetlveo ef
advertialng la to get consumer ae-
oeptanoe.
The advertlaer'a ehlef problem
la to find out what the buyer
wanta, and, If he doean't want It,
how to make him.
COMING EVENTS
Today-
Players'   Club,   8.16,   Auditorium.
Women's Big Block Club,  12.00,
Arts  104.
Saturday-
Players'   Club,   8.15,   Auditorium.
Tuaaday—
Parliamentary    Forum,
Arts   100.
noon,
Haven Of Lost
Articles   .
One lonely blue ear-ring lies In
the Lost and Pound offllee, patiently waiting for Ita owner to
eall for It.
But that lan't all. Haa anyone
loat a favorite pipe? It's there
too . . . waiting.
There are also searvea, ooata,
keys, pens and many other things
that have been found on the campus.
It Is significant that of all the
text-booka that have been turned
In, only  18 have  been reclaimed.
The list In the office proves to
something long suspected, —
namely, that U.B.C. students are
money-minded. Five purses have
been lost this term, but every one
waa  promptly   reclaimed!
Mr. Horn states that all articles
unclaimed by May 18 will be
given  to  charity. Two
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 26, 1937
THE   UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society
of the University of British Columbia.
Phons  Point Grsy 206
Mail Subscriptions, $2.00
Office: 206 Auditorium Building
Campus Subscriptions, $1.50
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Kemp Edmonds
NEWS MANAOIR
Dorwln Baird
SENIOR IDITORS
TUESDAY: Frank Perry FRIDAY: Dorothy Cummlngs
FEATURE EDITOR SPORTS IDITOR
James Beveridge Frank Turner
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Monty Fotheringham Bill Sibley
ASSOCIATI SPORTS IDITOR EXCHANGE EDITOR
Jack Mair James Macfarlane
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Rosemary Collins Irene Eedy Beverley McCorkell Robert King
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITORS
Van Perry Hugh Shirreff Myrne Nevison
CIRCULATION MANAGER
Norman Depoe
REPORTERS
Jack   Bingham,   Joyce  Copper,   Joan   Haslam,   Ann   Jeremy,   Ozzy   Durkin,   Barbara
McDougal,    Jack    Mercer,    J.    C.    Penney,    John    Garrett,    Keith    Allen,    Victor
Freeman, Verna McKenzie,  Ed. McGougan, Virginia Galloway, Katherlne McKay, R.
Ker, Eiko Henmi, Lester Pronger, Doug Bastin, Helen Hann, Molly Davis.
SPORTS REPORTERS
Orme Dier, Norm Renwick, Basil Robinson, Frank Thornloe, Archie Byers, Bob Melville
Random Ramblings
_
BY
THE 8TUDENT   PRINCE
Advertising Offles
Pacific Publishers, Limited, 303-A Pender Street West, Vancouver, B. C.
Telephone: TRINITY 3002
All advertising handled exclusively by Pacific Publishers^ Llmjted__
LIBRARY HOURS
With the Christmas examinations just two weeks away
it would be of very great benefit to students who stay out
nights to work on essays and do reference in reserved books
if the library could be kept open for an hour later than usual.
When the library closes as early as nine-thirty it means
that the students have to be interrupted after only two hours
of work. Not only is their time cut short and concentration
interrupted, but by the time they arrive home it is far too
late to begin working again. Thus, what might for most
people be an evening of study is interrupted before it is half
over.
The library as a place to study is very important at this
time when work is so concentrated. Most students who live
at home And it almost impossible to do any work whatsoever
with a telephone ringing, a radio blaring, and family friends
talking all around them.
Students who board often find it even worse to try to
do any work in their houses. Other students in the same
house forever drop in to chat at most inconvenient moments.
Therefore it is very necessary that the library should be
available for study at convenient and a sufficient number of
hours.
The extra time would of course increase the work of the
librarians, but surely the few extra hours during the last two
weeks would be of more benefit to the students than it would
be inconvenience to the staff.
MUNRO PRE-
MED CLUB
The Monro Pre-Medlcal Club was
formed on March 2nd, 1933, "to promote the educational Interests of
all students engaged in any branch
of pre-medlcal work at U. B. C."
and was named ln honor of the late
Dr. A. S. Munro, by whose will the
University received $80,000 for
medical research.
Since there is no college ot medicine at the University ot British
Columbia, it is necessary for pre-
medical studenta to arrange their
courses in accordance with the requirements of the college where
they will atudy later.
One of the most useful features
of the society ls the collection of
requirements for registration at
universities ln Canada and the
United States.
At the four meetings held annually, the apeakers are prominent
men ln medicine and public health,
who outlined the various phases of
the profession, and other topics pertinent to the future work of the
medical student.
A recent speaker was Dr. J. S.
Simpson, associate dean of the Medical College at McGiil. Included in
this season's program la also a student speaker, Joe Pierce, who will
recount some ot his experiences as
an orderly at Rock Bay Hospital.
In order to observe the workings
of medical units, visits are made to
Essondale Mental Hospital, and local hospitals.
Here the pre-med. student can
survey x-ray machines, pathological
specimens, dietetic charts, and
may have an opportunity to see
operations and autopsies performed.
The present executive are Honorary President. Dr. R. E. McKechnie; President, Jack MacLaren;
Vice-President, Pauline Banford;
Secretary-treasurer,   Marian   Reid.
Reinhold Niebuhr
Scheduled to Speak at
National Conference
WINNIPEG, Nov. 22. — Two ot
the principal addresses at the National Conference ot Canadian University Students, which will be held
in Winnipeg, December 27-31, will
be given by Reinhold Nelbuhr ot
New York, outstanding thinker in
the field of world trends.
The advisory oommittee of the
National Conferenoe of Studenta
stated today that they consider
themselves fortunate that Reinhold
Nelbuhr has consented to attend
and speak at the national student
assembly. His two outstanding
books, "Reflections on the End of
an Era," and "Moral Man and Immoral Society" have been translated into many languages and are
widely diacussed, especially ln England and Europe.
Few world leaders are gifted with
a mind better qualified for analysis
than Reinhold Nelbuhr, Bald atudent conference leaders. He opened
a student conference ln Indianapolis   three  years  ago.
He was the only man to give a
series of addresses at the Oxford
World Conference this summer.
More than 350 Canadian university
students will attend the Winnipeg
conference.
Manitoba Dramatic
Production Acclaimed
WINNIPEG, Nov. 26 (WIPU) —
The University ot Manitoba's major
dramatic venture of the current
season has proven to be an unqualified success, and is being acclaimed
on  all sides by the critics.
The play, "Once In a Lifetime,"
by Hart and Kaufmann, is an ultramodern satire based on Hollywood
life at the beginnings of the introduction of sound. The brilliant dialogue and amusing situations have
kept two capacity audiences laughing continuously.
A HOST OP LOVELY  CHRISTMAS GIFTS AT
FIRBANK & LANGE
Seymour at
Dunsmuir
SEY. 2088
PERSONAL JEWELLERS TO EVERY MEMBER OF THE FAMILY
"♦"PHIS," said Aggie Joe, "ls differ-
-1 ent. This time it Is the real
thing. If you'd ever been In love,
you'd see that."
He gazed mistily across at Mary
Ann and breathed deeply. Halfway
down the offlce a Phi Kapp and an
Alpha Phi were staring blankly Into each other's eyes. A freshette
reporter and a sports editor came
ln all starry eyed from a walk ln
the wind.
A red head looked ln the door,
crooked her finger, and the News
Manager trotted obediently off to
tea. A freshman hanging out the
window to phone wore a glassy
smile ln spite of the rain, as he
purred sweet nothings into the
mouthpiece.
November has always been a bad
month around the campus, but this
year ls exceptional. The Hollywood
dictum that college students never
do anything unless they're ln pairs
seems to be an established law.
All that remains is for Dick Powell and Joan Blondell to appear,
followed by the Yacht Club Boys
in Pep sweaters, and everybody will
start "trucking." We don't like lt.
Simply not British and all that sort
of thing.
MERRY CHRISTMAS
/~»HRISTMAS, we are Informed by
^* every magazine cover and department store window, is on its
way. Only four more weeks in fact,
until the happy morn rolls round
again. All of which brings up that
Christmas card problem.
Nothing dampens our spirit more
ln the festive season than the arrival of cards from people we had
forgotten. Or the non-arrival of
cards to whom we had sent twenty-
Ave centers.
We suggest, therefore, that somebody should print some Christmas
card notices, to be mailed each December 1st, which would say briefly,
"You   may   expect   to   get   a   card
from me cost approximately  c.
R.S.V.P."
Gift notices would also save embarrassment. Something like, "I
really can't afford it, but I suppose
I shall send you something costing
about 92.00, probably a cigarette
case."
It would all be much simpler,
however, if everybody would go
back to believing in Santa Claus.
Especially that part about the good
children and the bad children.
AROUND THB VILLAGE DEPT.
/GLADYS SWARTHOUT'S pianist,
" Mr. Lester Hodges, was a bit
burnt up at the recital last week.
Just before the program atarted the
maestro dropped around to the baok
aisle to see how well filled the
house was.
One of Hilker Attraction's staff
of hand-picked U.B.C. ushers, who
was not the least Impressed by Mr.
Hodges' top hat and tails, demanded the gentleman'a seat stubs, Mr.
Hodges recoiled visibly, drew himself up to hts full height, and sputtered, "I haven't got one, you see
. . . I'm . . . I . . . well, I'm working here, that's why!"
Who would have guessed that beneath Stewart McDanlel's Jacket,
slacks and knotted muffler last Friday, he wore only his pajamas. It
was the morning after the Arts
Ball, if you remember, and he got
up in a hurry to return a U-Drive
car. It felt so comfortable, that
lje wore the ensemble by lecturea,
too. We may try it ourselves some
cold morning.
USELESS   INFORMATION   DKPT.
JJEMMINGWAY's latest, "To Have
and Have Not," strikes a new
high in fast moving carnality. He's
slipping, though; there's only half
a page of italics ln the whole thing.
. . . Musak, Inc., a New York company, will wire musical programs to
your home 24 hours a day for $25
a month.
The recordings are specially
made for the program by the best
artists, and can't be bought. There
are marches for breakfast, awing
music for the cocktail hour, waltzes
for dinner, and no crooners till
after eleven at night, when nobody
minds anyhow.
Eavesdroppings: "... afterwards we went to the Palomar and
a bunch of Phi Kappas there with
the most peculiar looking women
. . . ." ". . . . my life has been
ruined by too many affectionate
people.  .  .  ."
Manitoba Student
Petition Affirms
Freedom Of Press
Duplessis Government
Padlocks Montreal
Newspaper Office
WINNIPEG, Nov. 26 (WIPU) —
Enforcement of Quebec's notorious
."Padlock Law" is at present one of
the chief topics of discussion on
the campus of the University of
Manitoba.
Indignation at the high-handed
manner ln which lt has been enforced recently against the newspaper, "La Clarte," has been the
reason for the circulation of a petition to Premier Maurice Duplessis, voicing a spirited protest
against this infringement of the
principle of freedom of the press.
PETITION
The general opinion of the student body ls clearly Indicated by
their willingness to place their signatures on this petition. Students
are however not alone ln this motion of condemnation and most of
the prominent faculty members are
also outspoken in their views on
the question.
The petition, too,  Is being circulated at an opportune time, for
with the  National  Conference of
Canadian Unlveralty Studenta ap-
proaehlng very rapidly the ordinary atudent Is being made muoh
more aware of trenda In both federal   and   world   political   movements.
The petition reads as follows:
To Premier Maurice Duplessis:
Whereas the   Padlock  Law  recently Invoked In Quebec Invades
the    traditional    rights    of    frss
press and free apessh,
Therefore   we,   the   undersigned,
wish to go on record as  being entirely out of sympathy with the action of tbe government of Quebec
in    padlocking    the   offlce    of   the
Montreal   newspaper,   "La   Clarte,"
and   as   urging   the   immediate   repeal of the Quebec  Padlock Law.
Juniors at Alberta
Refuse to Replace
Corsages By Favors
BDMONTON, Nov. 28 (WIPU)
— Attempta of the Junior Class
Bxeoutlve to replace the uaual
eorsagea with special favora of
oompaots and braoelats at their
annual  Prom have failed.
The Idea had been to collect
the aum of one dollar, the average price of a ooraage, from eaoh
peraon purchaalng a ticket to the
big dance of the year and to uae
thla money to buy favora which
would be treaaured and uaed for
a long time by the ladiea.
The glfta were to take the form
of specially engraved oompaots,
or brae'elets. The plan fell
through, however.
University Students
Pay Over Half Cost
Of Their Education
Bach atudent at U.B.C. la ooat*
Ing the Provincial Oovernment
$162, Hon. G. M. Weir, minister
of education, told membere ef the
Houae  In Victoria thla week.
Using thsse figures, It haa been
aseertalned that all atudenta here
pay  at  leaat half of the ooat of .
their  education,  and   that   many
of them pay mere.
Counting expenae of booka aa
part of the financial burden of
neeeaalty assumed by all U.B.O.
studsnts, a rough eatlmate aeta
the eost per student at at laaat
$178. The average la muoh higher, beeauae of the greater expenses Inourred by Applied Selenee
etudents, whose Initial fee la $180.
UMBRELLA  LOST
A blue-striped umbrella was lost
in the gym last Wednesday. Would
the   finder   please   return   to   Mr.
Home's  office?
GOOD NEWS! Advertisements
in THE UBYSSEY bring good
news for careful University shoppers.
NOTICE!     FIRST-YEAR    STUDENTS
WHY FAIL?
Use SHURPASS NOTES snd psss your
Christmas Essms.
Csll No. 4 DICK BUILDING
Broadway snd Grsnvllls
VARSITY
SERVICE STATION
"AT THE GATES"
"Our Sarvlcs Mesns Happy Motoring"
<^3
"We ought to be making up our Christmas list."
"No need to — we'll put everybody down for Sweet Caps!'
SWEET CAPORAL CIGARETTES
"The purest form in which tobacco can be smoked."—*Qancet
Gifts
That
Endure
Spread ths happy Christ
mat spirit, throughout thi
entire ytar with a glf
from
Questionnaire
Cleared  Up
A "mystery questionnaire" which
puzzled Students' Council a week
ago, popped up again Monday night,
when the National Conference committee asked permission to mall the
query to students.
The questionnaire deals with
"campus relationships," and will be
used by the conference group ln
connection with their preparation
to.'  the  Winnipeg  meeting.
Coat of mailing the letter to all
atudenta will probably be borne
by the oonferenoo oommittee, al*
though thla group la olalmlng to
be abort of funda.
What council members wanted to
know about Monday was the stand
of    Jean    Meredith    in    connection
with  the  questionnaire.
MEREDITH   ON  COMMITTEE
When the matter was under discussion a week before, Jean admitted being on the committee arranging for the questionnaire, but could
not advancb any Information as to
who was  behind  the move.
The letter received by council
Monday, asking permission to send
out the letters was signed by Clarence Idyll of the conference committee, and by Jean Meredith, secretary of the committee.
THE HOTEL VANCOUVER
featuring
Mart Kenney's Music
AND  HIS  TWELVE  WESTERN
GENTLEMEN
BEIT SCHOLARSHIPS
Trustees for the Beit Fellowship
for Scientific Research have announced that the twenty-fifth election of Fellows will take plsoe ln
July of next year. These scholarships in science are of the value of
£240 a year. Further information
may be obtained at the Registrar's
offlce.
Ruined em tbe CampH* . . .
RESTORED AT THB
BAY CLEANERS,
DYERS & TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO MEASURE
ALTERATIONS AND REPAIRS
2594 SASAMAT, Corner 10th Avs.
•US snd CAR TERMINUS
Opposite   Vsncouvsr   Dreg
PHONE:    PT.  GREY   118
Xfe Call and Deliver
"Dear Dave:—
And now the Christmas playa are
upon you. Aa an old Player'e Olub
alum' I have my tloketa for Prlday
night, and only death oould keep
me from attending the performanoe.
Being sentimental, I think of my
own attempta at noting In the
Christmas Playa — I alwaya did my
stuff at Chrlatmaa—somehow I Juat
waan't Spring Play material.
Don't auppeee you ever heard ef
the "Town Hall Tonight"? That
waa one of my beat efforts.
The baby'a howling.
Lovingly,
CLAUDIA."
LAUNDRY CO LTD
SEYMOUR    1424
"THB V.  B.  C.   Or  DANCING"—
Freshmen or post-graduates will And our courses easy to learn, with
a qulokness that amaaea. Speolal rates September and Ootober to
Varsity etudents.
BAt-LROOM
BAIXKT
LILAS MOORE
Reeoantaed Authority on Daneins
70S Wee* Oeeraia Street
TAP
Trinity 1T1S
Head Office
MONTREAL
University People — students and
faculty alike—will find a friendly, helpful
banking aervice at Canada's oldest bank.
RANK OF MONTREAL
Itiabllahad ISIT
"a bank where small accounts are welcome."
WEST POINT GREY  BRANCH — Sasamat & Tenth Avenue Weat
A. B. MOORE, Manager.
i Friday, November 26, 1937
THE      UBYSSEY
Three
"
The Season's Third
Concert
by the
VANCOUVER
SYMPHONY
SOCIETY
Conducted by
Allard de Ridder
Will be held In the
STRAND THEATRE
Sunday- December 5th
st i p.m.
OLOA STEER, Well-known  Pianist
will bs ths assisting artltt.
Sssts, 50c te $2.00, st
M. A. KELLY CO.
Orsnvllls Strsst Trinity 1«3I
NOTE—Early Reservations Advisable.
Continued from Page 1
COLLEGE
eaeh one la of ihe characteristic
old-fashioned, elaborately decorated atyle, eaeh with Ita own separate fireplace, and each.with ita
glorloua stained glaaa or curved
plate glass windows.
Perhapa now  one  can  see  why
this offshoot of this university is
so well-known, and why all Victoria
atudenta speak of their old Alma
Mater with a reminiscent sigh.   It
ia the glamourous atmosphere, the
ancient   surroundings,   steeped   in
the eolour of passed fashion, that
gives Victoria College its distinction.
COUNCIL OFFICE
Student activitiea seem to flourish under these conditions. I can remember the Student's Council room
on the third floor, .looking out over
the Straits and the Olympic Mountains.
There waa a small balcony out-
aide the French door that faced the
aouth, and there, bathing in sunshine that only Victoria knows, we
held our council meetings.
All the main aocial affaira of
the year seemed to carry on thia
air   of  informality.   The   whole
building   gave  auch   a  domestic
touch  to our   "College  Dancea"
that the crowd behaved exactly
like a great big happy family.
Not without all thrill and excitement, these dances must have been
tempered  by the conservative and
restraining influence  of the castle
spirits.   The faculty seemed to delight, too, in appearing at all celebrations, playing the part of Lords
and Ladies of the Manor.
BALLROOM   LIBRARY
One was  compelled  to  think  of
the gay balls that once had been
held in the apacious ballroom of the
castle, now the college library, and
to feel that the old place had not
changed at all, but that our dances
were replicaa of past "At Homes,"
"And so let na part," and try
to forget the lurea of   the   old
caatle unlveralty,  for memories
that fill my mind so frequently
tend to blot ont preaent Joys, Let
any who feel that thla tale Is
exaggerated wend a weary way
to the old pile, let him aee Ita
"pleasant seat."
HARALD KREUTZBERG
Mr. Ridington Hon.
President of Back
Stage Listeners' Club
U.B.C.'a number one "backstage
listener" ia librarian John Ridington.
Whenever a apeaker is addressing studenta in the Auditorium, it
is almost a certainty that Mr. Ridington will be found perched on a
bit of scenery or an old chair, behind the curtaina, taking ln the
show.
Wednesday he heard O. O. McGeer, along with 1000 others. The
difference was that Mr. Ridington
was seated on a low stool by the
switchboard, in the wings of the
stage, viewing the speaker from the
side.
When Premier Pattullo spoke
last month, Mr. Ridington was
again backstage. A handfull of
students who usually occupy the
same position at meetings ln the
Auditorium have unofficially voted
the librarian as the honorary president ot the Backstage Listeners'
Club.
JOAN   HALL  WANTED
Joan Hall, please call at Ubyssey
otBce at  2.30  today and  receive  a
message.
LOST
Suitcase containing gym strip.
Finder please communicate with
Norman Llnd,  Science  letter rack.
LAST   DAY
Book   Exchange   pays   out   today
for the last time.
Witty, biting satire and comedy are the essence ot tbe dancing
of Harald Kreutaberg, sensational dancer ot Salzburg, Austria, who
appears at the University Theatre, December 6th.
The presentation of thla famed dancer at the Unlveralty by
Gamma Phi Beta Sorority marks the flrst appearance ot an Internationally renowned artist ln the campua theatre. Indications are
that the house will be as packed as was the Guild Theatre in New
York where Kreutaberg gave his series a few weeks ago. Extra
seats were placed ln the foyer by the Theatre Guild ln a vain effort
to accommodate the overflow crowda at all his concerts.
In Europe, Kreutaberg flrst received acclaim for his remarkable
work with the great Buropean director, Reinbart, at the famous Sals-
burg Festivals.
The general impression that because a thing is art it must necessarily be boring, is completely dtsproven by thla great dancer who
provides an evening of comedy and excitement seldom experienced
ln the theatre.
Seat sale Is now being conducted by the sorority through the
box offlce,  M. A. Kelly, 650 Oranville Street, Trinity 2418.
Edmonton Students
Co-operate In New
Xmas Charity Fund
BDMONTON, Alta., Nov. 26 (WI
PU)—Complete plans were ratified
this week at the University of Alberta for the provision of a University Christmas fund when the
Students' Union voted to bring the
scheme under its control.
Chairman    Areh    MoEwen   announced that the eo-operatlon of
the     Provincial     Relief    Department,   and   the   Department   of
Health   had   been  gained   In  providing the Data of nssdy families.
All  applicants  must  have  references  from a clergyman,  member
of   the    Legislative   Assembly   or
secretary-treasurer of a municipal
district.
Wilkins Tells Alta.
Students Russians
May Be Still Alive
By PRBD PRITCHARD
BDMONTON. Alta, Nov. 26 (WI
PU) — Speaking to University of
Alberta students, Sir George Hubert Wilkins, noted Australian explorer, revealed that they have still
Btrong hopes that Slgmund Levan-
effsky and the party of Russian
fliers were still alive.
Sir Hubert Wilkins sst out this
week for ths Aretlo region where
he Is aiding In the ssareh for the
filers foresd down last August.
Covering an area 1200 miles long
and 400 miles wide, he will depend
on   his   new   "Marconi   Dlrectlon-
flndlng' apparatus to prevent overlapping  on   return  trips  over  the
ice.
Pullen Lectures On
Telephone Saturday
The Saturday evening lecture of
the Vancouver Institute will be
given by Mr. Newton F. Pullen, his
aubject being "The Telephone and
the Community."
The lecture will be illustrated by
more than 60 slides, especially taken for the occasion, and by demonstration apparatus.
It will be held in Room 100 of
the Arts Building, the University
of British Columbia, commencing at
8.16.
Onstage Party Tops
Closing Performance
Of Plays Tomorrow
Players will doff their buskins
and grease paint after the laat performance Saturday night and prepare for an onstage party to top
off their twenty-third seasonal opening. Kicking aside togas, wigs,
Kleenex and false whiskers, they
will gather on the new stae floor
and stomp like mad to the music of
Jack Emerson and his band.
Refreshments will be ample and
delectable, proceedings will be
highly informal if not hysterical,
and all actives and alumni are Invited to drop backstage and Join
in the Thespian whoopde. A modest charge will be made to offset
expenses of food and drink, and
mualc.
4j^4'4t4>«4'«4'4>4'4>4»4>«4t4>4t4'4**4»4t-
H. Jessie How, B.A.
PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER
Popular Llbrsry
4451 W. 10th AVENUE     ». O. «7
^S^WS^ilBai
Collegiate Danes svery Friday till 1 a.m.
■alleont, Novelties, etc.
Exhibition ef "The lie Apple" snd sll
Collegiate tunes*.
COLLEGIATE DANCE CONTEST
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10th
Wlnnars to recsive 2 beautiful cups.
DANCING EVERY WED., PRI. * SAT.
The Nearest Bank is
The* Canadian
Bank of
Commerce
Tenth snd Sasamat Branch
A  general  banking  business  is  transacted  snd  accounts  of   the  Faculty
and   Students   of   the   University   of
British Columbia are welcomed.
Bankers to the
Alma Mater
Society
C. R. MYERS, Manager
THERE'S
Social Security
in THIS SUIT
Bast aide, west aids, sll around the town—you'll
notice • certain look of approbation come your way
when you're outfitted In the suit the young fellow
• Ve
In the  picture wears ao well. It'a
foung Man's
Double-Breasted Drape Sack. It haa three buttona (two
to button) with fullness across the chest sa shown.
The beauty of thia atyle ia chat It merges ao perfectly
with any fabric, colour and pattern aa to allow every
man full scope for his own ideas. While it won't
perform any romantic miracles—it may atart aomethlng. Who knows? ttu«87
TIP   TOP   TAILORS
LIMITED
HAND •CUT ANO  TAILORED TO YOUR PERSONAL MEASUREMENTS
199 HASTINGS ST.   WEST
637 GRANVILLE STREET
mmmmmm
Chocolate SBaA.
C.S7I4
A Story of Twenty-One Years
This Is the sseond In a eerlea of artlolea outlining the history
of the U.B.O. Publications Board. The flrat aootlen deserlbed the
birth of the forerunner ef the Ubyssey In 1917, and some ef the
Interesting features of life on the campus during the war daya.
OHAPTER TWO
In 1018 the paper had Ita flrst
campaign—The Viotory Loan Drive.
The Ubyssey, through its editorials,
made every effort to ralae student
feelings  and  patriotism.
The climax was a big parade
through town, where the students
accosted every pedestrian they met
and did their beat to aell Victory
bonds. This successful student campaign raised over $25,000 for the
National Fund.
During the spring term that followed a campaign for a Dean of
Women was not so successful. Student desires ln this direction were
not realized until 1921.
HAZING
At that time initiation was quite
different from what it ls today. For
the men there was a severe form
of hazing which has at succeeding
Initiations been worse and also
completely  absent.
Por   the   women   there   was   a
milder form ef Initiation but still
muoh   more  violent  than   la the
eaae ef today.    Headllnsa In the
paper proclaimed that the Unlveralty   would   not   tolerate   "High
Sohoollam"    In    the     Preshman
elass.
All   students,   other  than   Freshettes,  had  to wear their hair up.
Short trousers were frowned upon.
In fact it behooved Freshmen not
to wear them if they valued their
health and well-being.
About thla time the Unlveralty
authorities helped out In this connection. No etudent under 16
oould enter the University with*
out full Junior Matrloulatlon.
Continued next Tueaday
PHI DELT8 WIN AGAIN
Phi Delta Theta remain undefeated champions of lnter-fraternl-
ty English Rugby, having taken
Alpha Delta Phi Thursday noon by
a score of 19-0.
For sweaters, woolen suits, Imported scarves, and launty fur felts, go to
DEL RAINB (just a half a block west of Granville, on Robson). You sre sure
to find exactly what you want snd It will save you ever so much time.
* *       *
The Christmas plays have brought their usual quota of romances. Two
gentlemen taking pictures for the Totem were quite impressed with one of
the blind girls.
* *       4*
WILSON'S GLOVE AND HOSIERY SHOP have just the kind of gloves
you have been looking for to match your skiing outfit. They're knitted from
angora wool and come in bright shades of blue, yellow, orange, green, fawn,
red and brown.
4*      4»      4«
Perhaps this Is the secret of the Phi Delts charm. One worthy member
was overheard telling his feminine companion that his admiration for herj
was floating him out Into the sunset.
4*        4.        4i
It's no wonder that the Manitoba students refused to give up the Idea
of sending corsages to their partners before dances.  The surest way to please
on of the little ladies at U.B.C. is to arrange with Brown Bros, for a corsage
to show off her gown.
4*        4«        4»
Roses In December will thrill fhe most sophisticated girl friends snd your
careful regard of the conventions will please her mother tremendously. So
stop worrying about what to send her this Christmas and phone Brown Bros.
just before  the 25th.
4»        4c       4t
There's a  Phi   Kap who's been  trying  to meet a blonde freshette for
months.   Apparently the Zete football player keeps too good track of her.
* 4«        4»
Just two weeks until you will be taking the train back home for a gay
holiday with the family and old friends. So don't greet them looking even
the least bit seedy. Dash into the RUSSIAN DUCHESS BEAUTY SALON one
day before you leave and see what their permanent will do for your
appearance.
And while you're there you may just as well have one of the operators
analyse your complexion problems and tell you what you can do about it.
Mother and Dad will think Varsity does wonders for you if you return
fresh from the RUSSIAN DUCHESS.
4t       * 4t
Overheard in a group of co-eds after the Christmas plays:   "I  think the
villain in 'Curse You,  Jack Dalton,'  looks much  more dangerous without his
make-up. Ward De Beck   Winner In   Cross   Country  Marathon
'MURAL SPORT
TODAY
FOUL SHOOTING
COMPETITION
SPORT CARD
TOMORROW
ENGLISH RUGBY, 1st Div.—
Varsity vs. All-Blacks, Brockton
Time: 2.30 p.m.
Four
THE      U B YS S E Y
Friday. November 26, 1937
w mi ii'i   " r____________a____a
CAGERS  TAKE CLOSE TILT FROM STACY'S
,_EB«3E-3SS8B_SSSSSSSSSS55SS
• OVER *
_\_TU P. _£____.
By Ormb Diss
The new deal on the Intra-mural
front under the guiding geniua of
Vim and Vigorr Van Vliet, has
raised the stock of the lnter-class
organisation to a new high on the
open market.
The  latest event to  go  over
with a bank that made the lada
alt up and take notice wae the
highly successful but extremely
wet crosa-country gallop on Tuea*
day    noon.    Thirty    determined
marathonera turned ont to do or
die in the splashing wet to aet
a record of entrants In the annual
claaalc.
Bud Burden, who came in sixth
In the grind, led the flrst half of
the route, as he was the only one
that could be sure of diving into
the bush and coming  out at the
right spot on the road that la a*
tricky as one Tommy Williams in
the backfleld.
Ward De Beck came through
with a victory that proved to all
the railbirds that he ia the premier
And of the year in the twinkle-toes
business. He showed that his
sparkling wins for Varsity in the
mile and two-mile at the High trick
meet were just the beginning for
him and that now U.B.C. can boaat
of a high class distance man along
with the other stars.
Vance McComber, who finished
a driving aecond, took the heart
out of moat of the boya when he
pulled up In heavy bush to tie up
hla flapping shoelace, and then
overtake the rest of the pack to
finish right up where he is accustomed to. The flashy middle-
distance runner found the trip a
bit long for his liking, but turned
in hla usual classy performance.
ORCHAIDS TO SCIENCE "40
Around on the baaketball floor,
orchida to the classy Science '40
squad for a well-earned championship. Jack Ross led thla team all
year and it is tough luck he can't
get out to play for Varaity, aa he
played for the Blue and Qold three
yeara ago when they lost to Victoria
In the Coast flnala.
A certain Mr. Fraresso, of the
winning line-up, who scored 8 neat
markers, .showed the crowd a new
one when he flipped in a one-handed
score  right  from   a   tip-off,   and
Maury  is  wondering   if  he  oould
show his charges the seeret.
Barney Boe and Angy Provan-
aano are two  all-rounders seen
In action In the Anal.   Boe la a
Canadian  football  veteran   and
Angy throwa hla   ample   frame
around  the hockey  rink,  awlm-
mtng pool and gridiron with the
aame abandon.
FAR-SHOOTING CONTEST
The Intra-mural Committee meet
ing every Monday noon in Van
Vliet'a office ia doing aome real
smart work and the latest brainchild of the Moguls Is the foul-
shooting contest which gets under
way today noon.
BRITISH
WALKERS
Everything a well-drssied msn
coal, want Is included in this
valua-hlgh collection of smart
(host.
STACY'S
LIMITED
TWO    STORES
528 W. Hastings      Opp. Spencer's
762 Granvilla     Opp. Lyric Theatre
CO-ED
SPORTS
SECOND STANZA RALLY NETS
VAN VLIET TEAM 34-30 WIN
"By" Straight, Rann Mathison Top Scorers;
Purv«s, Pay* Laad Shoe Stora Quintet;
Wright Stan      _______
■y JAOK MAIR
Coming up from behind in the third quarter of a rough
and tumble hoop battle, the Thunderbird cagers fought their
way to a 84-80 decision over Stacy's at the campus gym, Wednesday night.
The win puts the Collegiate cagers four points ahead of
the numerous teams tied for second spot and shoves the Shoe-
men deeper into the cellar.
However, Wednesday's tilt shows
that Stacy's have plenty on the
ball and are atlll very much in the
running. In the flrat frame the ex-
Province aquad, led by "Long John"
Purves, took the students' sone defense apart, walking through the
Blue and Qold squad to pile up a
4-polnt lead by the end of the first
quarter.
LEAD AT HALF
After the quarter the Shoemen
continued to breese through the
weak atudent defense, setting them
up for Purves, who dropped them
in with the greatest of eaae, to give
the visitors a 80-13 margin at half
time.
In the sseond oanto ths 'Birds
awltehed te man-to-man defenae.
A baaket by  Pringle dpensd the
acoring, and at thla point  Ftann
Matthlaon and By Straight ataged
a   baaket-gettlng  aprse  that   net-
the    etudente    13    markera    and
boomed them  Into a  28-23  lead.
FLYNN   STARS
From then on the Collegians held
their lead, stonewalling the Stacy
offensive With close checking that
featured the brilliant defense work
of Pat Flynn, who held PurveB
down to four points.
Purves  Isd the  lossrs with  14
points, while Rann Matthison and
By   Straight  were  standouts  for
the Varaity aquad with 13 and 10
mmrkmr* respectively.
CHATTER...
Many of the student fans wondered at the lightning-like change
in the playing of the Blue and Oold
hoopera after the rest period . . .
anawer found In Coach Van Vliet'a
where thoae aame melon toasere
went through verbal "hell" as
Maury dragged out expletives In
droves. . . . You want to watch thia
boy Pat Flynn this season, he's one
of the best recruit ballplayers seen
around these parte ln many a year
. . . and By Straight's threatening
to meet up with one Left McLellan,
of the shoe outfit, some dark night,
in aome dark alley — without hla
"windows", . . . And did you know
. . . that the Student cagers haven't lost a league game since they
started filing Into Maury's office at
half time late last season . . .
they're not superstitious—muoh I
VARSITY! Matthison IS, Matheson 2, Henderson, Flynn 2, Wright
2, Pallas, Pringle 4, Turner, Lucas
1,   Millar,   Straight   10.     Total,   34.
STAOY'S: Kennlngton 2, Purves
14, McLellan 8, Bumstead 4, Armstrong 2, Harvey, Murr, Paye 5,
Smith, Pugsley.    Total, 30.
GRASS HOCKEY
Men'e Oraaa Hookey Olub la out
to do or die for the Blue and Oold
on Saturday afternoon at Varaity
field when the rough and tough Indiana aro to be taken Into oamp In
no uncertain manner.
A full lineup la expeoted and the
Students are Itching to make up for
an early aeaaon defeat at the handa
of the aoalplng Indians with or without ahoaa. Oame tlm ela oalled for
2.30, and players are asked to be
on hand at 2.15.
RUGBY BANQUET
All English Ruggers are
meeting for a banquet on a
monster scale after the McKechnie Cup game December
4th. The time is 7.00 p.m.
and tickets may be obtained
from Noel Harrison for the
modest sum of 80 cents.
By MYRNE NBVISON
Hats off to the Intermediate hoop-
ettes.t    Having lost their flrst game
by a mere 77-0, they rallied around
to hold the Brnpress quintet Wednesday at the campus playground
18-14, after acoring a baaket for the
winners to start the game off in a
friendly spirit.    This is the nearest
a   Varsity  Intermediate   team   has
come to winning a game for years.
Valerie Oardlner, oentre of the
oo-eds' play, waa top scorer with
six points chalked up te her oredit.      The    other    playere,    Mary
Beals,   Oot  Chowne,   Kay   Bvana,
Dora Comboloa,  Mary Crane and
Joanne Browne, deaerve a lot of
oredit for their exhibition.    Nice
going, girls.
SENIORS IN SLUMP
The Senior girls dropped another
game to Fort Oarry, Monday, 42-19.
Although the Blue and Oold players
put up a great tight, they simply
could not get going.
Outstanding   player   for   Varsity
was  Ena  Clarke,  who turned ln a
brilliant defenalve  game.    "Corks"
McBwen, with six points, was high
lady in the scoring department.
The results ef the Inter-colleglate   Arehery   Tournament   have
arrived, and U.B.O. pulled off seventh plaoe. Bight teams competed.
Varsity's first soore, 770 (made In
rainy    weather)    waa    the    one
which counted. Their eeoond ene,
12BS, whieh waa net eompleted as
the flret oount waa already turned
In, would havo given the U.B.O.
arehors THIRD plaoe.
FRBSHBTTBS ON TOP
The    Freshette    and    Bduoatlon
olasses oame out ahead In the Intramural volleyball Moifday by overwhelming  the  combined  forces of
the Aggies and  Nuraea, 67-20, and
the Juniors 87-24, reapecttvely.
The Bduoatlon team now holds
first  plaoe   In  thle  league,  with
the   Sephomoree  eteae   en   their
heels.
A film on posture will be shown
next Wednesday, December 1, at
8.80, ln Science 210. Miss Moore
will speak.
SOCCER TEAM
AT LAST IN
WIN STREAK
With the enviable record of three
points out of a possible four in the
laat two gamea, Varaity senior soccerites will be out to continue their
streak of upsets when they clash
with the strong Excelsior Lumber
outfit at Powwell Street on Saturday.
The Lumbermen are exactly
even in the league atandinga
with Maccabees whom the Col-
eglans noeed out laat week, and
Saturday's fixture will be another
real opportunity for the campua-
men to prove conclusively that
they don't mean to be the league'a
atepplng*atone any longer.
FIORILLO BACK
With Doug Todd still wandering
around with a tired expression on
his physog. as a result of the concussion, he sustained last week, the
inside-left spot is vacant and will
likely be filled by Dick Foster who
broke   up   last    Saturday's   tuaale
with   Maccabees.    Regular    goalie
Fiorillo will again be guarding the
neta for the students, and the right-
half berth will be a toss-up between
Leong and Klrkpatrick.
HAVE TO WATCH HARVEY
Coach Hitchlna haa warned hla
boya to be particularly careful of
Excelsiors'   big   threat,   Trevor
Harvey  and the big centre-half
ia aaaured of a full afternoon's
work with nobody giving him any
more leeway than they can help.
The campusmen have not played
on Powell Street before this season,
but as it is a hard, fast pitch much
the  same as Cambie  Street, there
seems no reason why the Blue and
Gold victory streak  should not be
continued.    Game   time   is   set  for
2.30 p.m.
The Juniors meet a strong Hammond team at McBride, but vow
they'll win this one. Although
dropping a 2-1 heartbreaker last
week, those same soccermen with
Harrower again in goal, ahould take
the Hammond bunch.
Senior  B. Team
Still Wlnless
Seniorr "B" baaketball at the
gym on Wednesday night aaw the
Varsity entrants bow before the
snapshooting Young Conservativea
to the tune of 28-16 in a hard-
fought tusssle.
Miller, Love, Taylor rand Roth-
stein led the Blue and Oold, but
eould not atop the auatained drive
of the youthful Tories, which gave
them a substantial lead at half
time. A laat period rally by the
atudenta failed to click and they
finished the game on the short end
of the score to leave them still win-
less in this half of the league.
DOBBIEMEN HOPE FOR WIN;
VICTORIA HERE NEXT WEEK
By FRANK C. THORNELOE
The "Ruggah" pitch is a acene of scientific mayhem as the Dobbie-
men prep for Saturday's match with the reborn North Shore All Blacks.
The place: Brockton Oval. The time: 3.30 p.m., wtth a Qrad-Rowlng
Club fiasco as a preliminary—or is it an appetiser? In the background
is the thought of Varsity's prize exhibit next week as they get a clear
field against Victoria Reps in the Campus Stadium.
Mattu, the aggressive acrum man, returna tomorrow and another
Robertaon moves up from aaoond division to take the wing poaltlon.
Teagle will continue to aubatltute for Johnny Bird, and Norm Stewart retalna hla aorum alot on the strength of laat week'a aparkling
play. The front line aorum la aa yet undeolded aa the choice'will
go to the leaat orippled of Andrewa and Harrlaon.
VARSITY   HAS  SPEED  AND  "OOMPH"
Be it as it may, rain (heaven forbid) or shine, this should be a
game to excell last week's victory, for North Shore Lions are "All Black"
in the face fuming dire threats of what they won't do to get Into the
playoffs. Varsity, however, with speed and "oomph" to burn, ls keeping
quiet and being accused (to their satisfaction) of being smug. Smug or
no, the competition for places on all the "Bgg-ball-trundllng" squads is
frantically keen and tact ls written all over the selection committee's
collective face.
This may be a sell-out, so early arrival is recommended. Possibilities are evident that a special Varsity section will be arranged with
cheer leaders and all that sort of thing.
FACULTY BUILDII.GS
UNIVERSITY  OP   MONTREAL
Ids new burkJlnst new nsarlnf
plstlen en ths southern tlepci ef
Mesnt Reyal will bs unique amongst
Canadian UnlvsrsMlss. fer a mete sill,
slant s-mlslrt'Stlen, sll faculties ars te
bs heuiae In s slnsj* unit el dlttlnsUvs.
medsra srshltsslwsl dstbjn.
British   Co n s o I s
DE BECK COPS BUNION RACE;
FROSH TAKE CLASS HONORS
Weather Man Slows Down Runners As Record
Number of Tracksters Enter Cross-Country
Ploughing steadily on, "O'er hill and dale.through brush
and briar," muck and mire, and even hurdling the odd wire-
strewn fence in his plodding, determined stride, Ward De
Beck led thirty-odd aspiring and perspiring cross-country
trekkers across the finish line on Tuesday noon in the fairly
fast time of 16 minutes 3 4/5 seconds.
THIRD BIO WIN FOR SENIOR TREKKER
DeBeck's win in the 2^6-mile grind gave his class, Arts '88, forty
large and solid points towards the Intra-Mural trophy, and at the same
time established him as the number one long-distance And in yeara.
Ward previously lead all "second-winders" in the mile and 2-mile eventa
in the Varsity-High track meet last month.	
Fighting  for  the   "place"  alot,
BASKETBALL   STANDINGS
the   "place"  alot,
and the thirty-flve elass marksrs,
Vanoe McComber, aee U. middle-
distance runner, managed to push
his weary and wet frame  Inohea
ahead   of   a   puffing   and   aoaked
Junior   by  the   name   of   Wilson,
who gained third place and thirty
pointa.
Moody,  of Arts  '41;   Fendray,  of
the Aggies, and Track Manager Bud
Burden, third-year Scienceman, finished ln a cluater, collecting fourth,
fifth  and  aixth  spots  respectively.
Robinson,   Pederson,   Trussell   and
Porter finished ln that order to garner   the   rest   of   the   extra-place
pointa.
FRESHMEN WIN.
A strong and determined band
of Freshmen hoof-fllppers finished
on top of the class heap with 69
points, closely followed by the
would-be farmers with 60; Arts '30,
with 45, and Science '41, with 42,
breeaed in third and fourth respectively, while Arts '80 (De Beck),
and Arta '38 tied for fifth with 40
markera.
MEN'S FENCING CLUB
All desiring equipment, see
Ken Shaw immediately.
There is aene letter than ths "Bets'**"
"Beaa'tt   ,.,
»*autu -&
SXwppt" «Z£mt
T?--<
INTER-CITY
W. L. For Agnst Pta
Varaity    4    2    181 166 8
Adanacs    2    2    110 100 4
Munros   2    2    129 124 4
Westerns    2    2    145 140 4
Ryersons     2    2    121 183 4
Stacy's     1    8    119 148 8
 WEST POINT	
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Friday,  November 26
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