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The Ubyssey Mar 10, 1921

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume III.
VANCOUVER, B. C, MARCH 10, 1921
Number 17
The President on
University Policy
At least 120 matriculants desirous of
entering the University next year will be
prevented from doing so if the University
grant at present promised by the Government is not increased, according to President Klinck, who was interviewed by the
"Ubyssey" shortly after his return from
Victoria, where he tried, unsuccessfully,
to secure a substantial increase in the
subsidy. While the amount of the estimate has not yet been definitely settled,
the Government is understood to have
fixed upon $445,000.00, an increase of
$25,000.00 upon last year's grant. In view
of the fact that substantial increases in
salary are necessary, if it is desired to
retain the present high standard of the
University staff; that a considerable increase in student enrollment was anticipated for next session, and that many
.departments are in a very incomplete
state of development, this increase is
considered quite inadequate.
"Whether it will be necessary to reduce the enrollment to less than that of
last session has not yet been decided,"
said the President. "Certainly there can
be no increase in the number of students.
Yet there will be a considerably larger
number of matriculants writing this
spring, and a proportionate increase in
the number seeking admission to the
University. Manifestly, with the present
grant, there can be no improvement
effected in accommodation, nor can the
staff, already overworked, be asked to
assume further responsibilities. Add to
this the fact that in both expense and
accommodation there will be a greater
strain next year, since the senior classes
will be more nearly equal in strength to
those of the junior years.
"The Government has undertaken to
provide higher education for every student in the province desirous of securing
it. With this undertaking goes the
responsibility of seeing that students are
not turned away. Unless the facilities
necessary to provide this training are
given, legal complications are likely to
arise next fall, and, since matriculation
examinations are in large measure con-.
trolled by the Department of Education,
the University authorities are of the
opinion that the responsibility of deciding
upon the course to be taken should rest
with the Government.    Thus it is still to
(Continued on Page 2.)
EDITORIAL
The present issue of the "Ubyssey"
is designed to accomplish two objects.
First, we have endeavored to present to
the students and friends of the University of British Columbia the prospects of
the University for the next session,
particularly with relation to the recently-
expressed policy of the Provincial Government. It should be pointed out that
an invitation to the Minister of Education to express the Government's point
of view in this issue has, up to the moment of going to press, brought no reply.
The second object has been to place
before the student body questions which
will shortly come before them for their
decision, to the end that the action taken
may not be hasty or ill-considered. While
we regret that it is necessary, for these
purposes, to compress the news of the
week into a fraction of its usual space,
we feel that the end justifies the means.
If there are any of those who have
allowed themselves to be catechized,
who now feel that they have been
inaccurately or insufficiently quoted in
these reports, we offer them an apology.
If errors have been made, they have been
on account of limitations of space, necessitating the removal of sentences from
their context, and have been in spite of
the best efforts of the editors.
It is unnecessary for the "Ubyssey" to
offer any comment on the Government's
University policy. There can be no doubt
what the opinions of the students on the
matter are. They have been expressed
often enough, and strongly enough. They
are substantially the same as those expressed in the news columns of this issue.
It only remains for the students to do
, what they can to show the Government
that the University constituency consists
not of a few hundred schoolboys, but of
tens of thousands of influential British
Columbia voters, who believe that men
of practical education, and qualities of
leadership, are public assets as worthy of
consideration and development as are unopened hinterlands and struggling industries.
Several Changes
in Alma Mater
Several important changes in the administration of the A. M. S. will occur
next year if proposals now being put
before the society are approved. Chief
among these is the suggestion of Mr. A.
Rive that a student manager be appointed, to take the burden of routine work
off the shoulders of the members of the
Council. This would probably be a postgraduate student, elected with regard
both to his scholarship and his ability in
handling student affairs. He would be
paid by the A. M. S., and would be expected to handle the- Council's books,
selling of tickets, and other routine work.
The duties of secretary and treasurer
would then be sufficiently lightened to
make it possible to merge these two
offices into one. Whether the manager
would be elected or appointed by the
Students' Council, and whether he would
himself have a seat on the Council, are
details yet to be decided. The practicability of this project depends upon the
decision which is reached in regard to
Alma Mater fees, a matter now being
considered by the Senate.
An additional office on the Students'
Council will be created if the proposal
to do away with the Rooters Club and
elect a University marshal is approved.
This is the suggestion of Mr. P. D. I.
Honeyman, president of the Rooters'
Club, and will come before the A. M. S.
a week from to-morrow.
In regard to the student managership,
opinion among student leaders, interviewed by the "Ubyssey," was very
divided. Among those supporting it are
Honeyman, Anderson, Kingham, Ban-
field and Miss Robson. Lord and Whitley are in favor of the idea, but think we
cannot yet afford it. Lawrence is opposed. Concensus of opinion is that such
a manager should be appointed by the
Council rather than elected. Objection
is principally upon financial grounds,
although some leaders say there is no
need for the position. With one exception, the idea of a University marshal is
emphatically approved.
Practically all were of the opinion that
social functions were too numerous, but
did not think that the Council should
take any official action in the matter. It
was agreed that the expense of these
functions had not been too high.
(Continued on Page 7.)
Don't Forget — Hockey Finals To-Morrow THE   UBY.SSEY
March 10, 1921
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to the young men who strive for an
ultra-smart appearance.
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Try our Lobster Salad, our Sundaes and specials. You will find
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Calfskin, on the latest popular lasts
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Price $10.00
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649 HASTINGS STREET, W.
THE HOME OF GOOD SHOES
THE  PRESIDENT
(Continued from Page 1.)
be decided upon what principles the elimination of students will be based: whether on
a higher matriculation standard, or sterner
methods of marking; by elimination of partial and conditioned students, and of all
students under a certain age; or by any
other scheme that may be suggested. There
are obvious disadvantages in all these
methods.
"Other proposed ways of reducing expenses, such as by dropping a whole faculty,
or whole departments, grouping courses or
equalizing classes, would result in material
loss to the student, and a decrease in the
efficiency of the University.
The President contrasted the Saskatchewan policy of adopting a programme over a.
series of years with the lump-sum method
which prevailed in British Columbia, and
which made conditions harder both for the
University and for  the  Government.
"The additional grant asked for," said the
President, "would have been largely devoted to increases of salary, which are now
considerably lower here than in other universities. A failure to do this would mean
not only that it would be impossible to
attract new talent to the University, but
that the strongest men at present on our
staff would be induced to accept more attractive offers elsewhere. In Toronto there
has been a 50 per cent, raise in two years.
The contemplated increase in U. B. C.
amounted to about 33 per cent. Few new
appointments and no new departments or
buildings were contemplated. Allowance had
been made for a Dean ot Women, and two
instructors in physical training. We still
hope to be able to secure a Dean of Women
for next session."
The President was unwilling to prophesy
when the move to Point Grey would be
made. There is certainly no immediate
prospect. A residence for out-of-town
women would be a pre-requisite. Tentative
arrangements with the B. C. B. R. for a
through street car line have long since been
made, though the route has not been settled
upon. One hundred thousand dollars is being expended by the Government in clearing
and road work at the 'Point this year, largely as a relief for unemployment.
The question of fees will come before
Senate next Monday. If the fees are raised,
it will probably be by not more than 25 per
cent. Fees are already higher here than in
other government colleges, and the effect of
a further increase would be to drive students elsewhere.
The practice of the University in regard
to Christmas expulsions will be substantially the same this year as last, if more specific regulations, which will do away with
the    present    difficulties,    are   approved    by
The President is in sympathy with the
action of the students in requesting compulsory physical training. It is at present impracticable, however. The matter of an
instructor in public speaking had not yet
been taken up by the governors. Asked his
opinion about the scheme of appointing a
student manager, Dr. Klinck said that such
action would have to be taken sooner or
later; he was uncertain whether it was yet
time. The President was unfavorable to the
idea of granting credits to students taking
part in undergraduate activities, such as
debating and music, except insofar as discretion was already allowed to heads of departments. Dr. Klinck is in favor of the
honor system where it is accompanied by
proper physical conditions.
Asked for his opinion in regard to the
multiplicity of social functions at U. B. C,
the President was non-committal. He
stated that he was more than satisfied with
the spirit of the students towards the University, the staff, and one another. The
whole-hearted co-operation of the student
body, and especially of the members of the
Students' Council, had greatly simplified
the work of the administration, and had
been very greatly appreciated by the President.
Dr. Walter C. Murray, president of the
University of Saskatchewan, has been asked
to deliver the Congregation address this
spring. Dr. Murray was secretary of the
University Site Commission of 1910, which
fixed upon Point Grey as the most desirable
site for the University of British Columbia.
He is one of the most eminent scholars in
Western Canada, and is equally respected
as a man of affairs. Dr. Murray's reply has
not yet been received.
IRELAND    ft    ALLAN
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STATIONERS
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and
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-of-
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for 1920-1921
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OP
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., etc.
578 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
High-Grade Work and Quick
Service characterize our up-to-date
establishment. March  10, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
SWEET LAVENDER
All plans for the annual spring performance of the Players' Club are complete, and to-night will see the first
presentation of "Sweet Lavender." The
Avenue this evening will be crowded
with Faculty, governors, and Senate
.members; and in the gallery there will
be an enthusiastic audience of college
men and women to liven things up.
The record of the Players' Club needs
no re-telling here, but perhaps one or
two facts concerning the disposing of the
proceeds would be of interest. During
the last five years the Players' Club has
raised over $6,000.00 for different purposes. The proceeds of one night's performance each year since 1918 have been
given to the Women's Auxiliary of the
Vancouver General Hospital. This has
enriched the funds of that organization by
approximately $500.00 each year.
Of a total of $1,900.00 collected -for the
Wesbrook Memorial up to date, $1,300.00
has come from proceeds of Players' Club
performances. This year the proceeds of
the first evening will be devoted to the
Reserve Fund; those of the second evening to the Wesbrook Memorial; and
those of the final evening to the Women s
Auxiliary.
Every student is invited, nay, entreated,
to contribute "a rag, or a bone, or a hank
of hair" to the rummage sale which is being staged by the Faculty Women's Club
on March 23rd in aid of the Ann Wesbrook Scholarship Fund. Dean Brock
has generously offered to double, up to
$400.00, the amount collected by the club
this year.
The sale of tickets for the Congregation dance will be held in the Students'
Council room next Tuesday, Wednesday
and Thursday, at noon.
THE FACULTY INTERVIEWED
Members of Faculty, requested by the
"Ubyssey" to comment upon the policy
of the Government towards the University, were naturally rather reticent. The
Faculty's idea, however, is pretty well
summarized in the statement of Dean
Coleman:
"A living organism must grow or die, and
the Government does not seem to have
any growth on the part of the University.
I would rather work double shifts than
allow students to be turned away. Once
a government university starts to limit
its attendance, its future is gravely imperilled. Not only will the province suffer by forcing such matriculants as can
afford it to leave the province, but the
supply of men and women qualified for
leadership, which is the greatest asset of
a new country, will be curtailed.
Dean Brock pointed out that the greatest problems in this province are engineering problems, and can only be
solved by technically-trained men. Yet
the Government was refusing to make
provision for the training of such men.
The head of another Faculty was more
terse. "The Government hasn't any
policy in regard to the University, ' was
his comment. Dr. Ashton was of the
opinion that the University should immediately bring all the pressure in its
command to bear on the Government.
He thought such action would be followed by an increase in the estimate.
Dr. Sedgewick felt that the Government
should not be too severely censured; the
fault lay with the public, which had not
yet been taught that the University was
worth its active support. Dr. Eastman's
idea was opposed to this:
"I had always been told that Vancouver and the Coast supported the University, while the Upper Country was indifferent.     On   my   recent   tour   of   some
Phone, Seymour 7853
C.  HERMANN, Proprietor
U.B.C. Students Should Patronize
HERMANN'S    BARBER    SHOP
ROGERS BLOCK, 484 GRANVILLE STREET
BASEBALL TENNIS LACROSSE
FISHING TACKLE
EVERYTHING  FOR ATHLETES,  SPORTSMEN  AND
OUTDOOR PEOPLE
GOLF
TISDALLS   LIMITED
The Complete Sporting Goods Store
618 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Phone, Seymour 152
inland towns, representative men assured
me that the majority of their fellow-citizens were whole-heartedly in favor of
building up the Provincial University
even at a considerable cost. I am naturally driven to wonder what, or who, is
the object in our path."
Different opinions were expressed as
to the way the present situation should
be met by the University. Dr. Boggs
recommended the reduction of capital expenditure to the lowest possible point.
Another suggestion was to eliminate
specialist students, for whom the per
capita cost of education was often very
great. Many believed that admission
could not be refused to any matriculants,
and all agreed that it should not be.
Should this be necessary, however, it was
for the most part agreed that relative
rank in the matriculation exams, should
govern admission, although one alternative was that a certain number should be
received from each district, these to be
accepted in order of the receipt of their
applications. Dr. Sedgewick felt that it
would be grossly unfair to raise the
matriculation standard with the intention of passing a fewer number of students this summer. Incidentally, Dr.
Sedgewick strongly advocates a four-year
course in high schools.
The Deans indicated that but little expansion had been contemplated in their
faculties for next year. No new appointments were planned in Agriculture. In
Science it had been intended to establish
fourth year courses in Civil and Mechanical Engineering, to appoint heads for
these departments, and to further develop
the Department of Forestry. In Arts a
few appointments were planned, notably
in History and Economics.
PREPARE
for the world of
BUSINESS
by taking a short course In the
Sprott-Shaw School
of Commerce and Telegraphy
Day  and  Evening  Classes
Phone, Seymour 1810
R.   J.   SPROTT,   B.A.,   Manager.
MCDONALD'S
CHOCOLATES
Have you had a box of Chocolates
yet from McDonald's new store?
Gee!  it's a lovely place!
888 Granville Street
(One block south of old store,  corner
Robson Street) THE   UBYSSEY
March 10, 1921
PURDY'S ARE
PURE
Mr. Purdy did not follow the
routine of candymakers' recipes
when he started making candy.
He broke new ground all the
way. That is why Purdy's are
so original in every way—and
they're absolutely pure.
$1.25 pound
Maker of Purdy's Chocolates
675       GRANVILLE       ST.
AVENUE THEATRE
THREE   NIGHTS
Commencing  Tuesday,   March  15.
Augustus  Pi tou,   inc.,
presents
MAY ROBSON
in a new comedy
NOBODY'S FOOL
By  ALLAN  DALE.
Prices:   ?2.20,    *1.65,    $1.10,    83c,    55c.
Seats:   Friday,   March   11.
NEW FRILLING
Of organdie, finely pleated and
finished with picot edge; widths 2
or 4 inches—75c and $1  a yard.
Fine Mesh Frilling, in cream;
comes 3j4 ins. wide, with hemstitched border—$1.25 a yard.
Cream Net Lace Frilling, in 4 to 6-
inch widths; very attractive at
$1.75 and $2.50 a yard.
-^C?fe^|
LIMITED
575 GRANVILLE STREET
(Member  Pacific  Inter-Collegiate  Press
Association)
Issued every Thursday by the Publications Board
of the University of British Columbia.
Extra  mural   subscriptions,   $2.00 per  session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief P.   N.   Whitley
Senior   Editor A.   A.   Webster
I A.   H.   Imlah
Associate Editors   I S.  M.  Scott
v Miss  R.   E.   Verchere
Chief  Reporter A.   F.   Roberts
/"Miss  A.   Anderson
J.   C.   Clyne
Reporters -[ Bert  Sweeting
Cliffe Mathers
V Miss  P.  Stewart
Exchange  Editor Miss   P.   I.   Mackay
Literary   Editors \ A-   L.   Stevenson
I G.  G.   Coope
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager L.   T.   Fournier
Asst. Business  Manager..!.   E.   Mathefon, Arts '23
Advertising   Manager H.   M.   Cassidy
( D. A.  Wallace
Assistants -| H.   G.   Scott
I M.  A.   Dyce
Circulation   Manager R.   C.   Palmer
Editor  for  the   Week S.   M.   Scott
SPORTSMANSHIP
This session has seen a most remark-
ab'e revival of all kinds of sport in the
University. Engaged, as we are, in every
branch of athletic endeavor, it has been
our privilege to meet all manner of opponents on the field, on the floor, or on
the ice. Some of these have proved themselves   true  sportsmen;   others   have   not.
One of the most pleasing things of the
season has been the attitude of the
Towers Athletic Club towards the University teams. The last occasion on
which their sportsmanlike attitude was
shown should not pass without some
official notice from the University. In
the first play-off game for the City
League title there was a disputed goal.
Technically, the Towers could have maintained that the goal was scored, and thus
have entered the second game with a
one-goal lead. But, like true sportsmen,
they requested that the disputed score be
not counted.
We cannot commend this spirit too
highly, and, on behalf of the University
students, we express our deep gratitude
to the Towers, and assure them that because of this action, a criterion of their
attitude during the entire season, the
'Varsity folk hold them in high regard.
We are pleased to have met such gentlemen, and we wish them every success in
their athletic endeavors.
CRITICISM
Judging from recent letters appearing
in this paper, a great many students attending the University are only capable
of pulling things to pieces—and leaving
them in pieces. In the last four numbers
of the "Ubyssey" seventeen letters were
published, only three of which offered
any sensible suggestions for improvement
of present conditions. Of the remaining
fifteen, no fewer than twelve were futile
criticisms either of University organizations or of deportment.
There are two distinct kinds of criticism—destructive and constructive. The
first kind involves little effort, and, consequently, most of us indulge in it exclusively. It is the kind that attempts to
destroy existing conditions without showing how better ones can be made. The
person who uses this style is like a little
boy with an alarm-clock and a screwdriver. A very much rarer kind of criticism, and one that seldom appears in the
"Ubyssey," is constructive criticism. This
is the only kind that is worth the paper
it is written on. The person who can
see the defects in a thing, and who can
then apply the right remedy, is an asset
to any organization. The University
needs more of these people who can repair;   any  fool  can  pull  things  to  pieces.
Perhaps it would be advisable for those
of us who are such ardent critics to refrain from publishing their grievances in
the "Ubyssey" until they can offer, along
with them, some sensible and effective
remedy. R. M.
©
orrcapo
i)deT>
ce
WHY  NOT?
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—Last week two men dealt
destructively with an editorial of the previous week, "A Chivalrous Offer." I wish
to point out one of the salient features of
that editorial, which, just before our elections, we would do well  to consider.
Anyone who has a hobby for antiques, and
still possesses a copy of the "Ubyssey" of
February 17th, will see in the second last
paragraph of that editorial, "Let the Women's Literary Society, out of the fullness
of our health and charity, take over, adopt,
and cherish our stricken brother." Then
follows a "mere outline," which, if filled in,
would, from a literary point of view, be of
value  to the University.
There are three literary societies under
the Alma Mater—the Ladies' Literary Society, the Sigma Delta Kapa, and the Men's
Literary. Herein may be found a dissipation of energies of both the students and the
professors who are assisting, which is preventing the best work being accomplished.
Whether the Ladies' Literary Society take
over the men or the Sigma Delta Kappa
take over both is immaterial; but what is
necessary is one society, a "University of
B. C. Literary Society." Such a society
would embrace the best in the University,
and would at least have a fighting chance
to accomplish something.
The editorial may have been written as
a "gentle chafing," yet it contains the truth
of close observation.
ALCEKIADES.
Lectures  on   Italy
The last of a series of interesting and
instructive lectures was delivered on
Friday morning by Professor Piccoli, of
Padua University, Professor Piccoli was
sent to America by the Government of
Italy to interpret modern Italian literature and culture to the students on this
continent. Students who attended the
series of lectures in this University were
privileged to hear a speaker of scholarly
attainments, who presented his addresses
in most pleasant form. In the final lecture of the course he made a profound
appeal for a more prominent place in
American learning for the literature, art,
economics and politics of his country.
The series of lectures were well attended,
and a great deal of interest was shown in
them. March 10, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
VIEWS OF THE AGGIES
The Agriculture Undergraduate Executive were interviewed by the "Ubyssey"
en masse. They favored the graduate
manager (finances permitting) and the
marshal, and were of the opinion that
there were not too many social functions,
nor "too many societies." They did not
favor the union of the Lits. They approved compulsory physical training,
with paid instructors. Further suggestions were: Kla-how-ya "get-acquainted"
tea dances on Saturday afternoon at the
beginning of the term; self-supporting
dormitories for women to be established
immediately; co-operation- with graduates
to secure summer positions for students;
an information bureau for Freshmen, and
the enforcement of the rule limiting the
number of offices that may be held by one
student.
FACULTY ARE VICTORS
On Tuesday evening, at the Terminal
City Club, teams representing the students and Faculty met in a friendly contest at English billiards. The terms of
the match were for 400 points, the aggregate for the side deciding the issue.
The result was a victory for the
Faculty representatives by 258 points.
The victory of Professor Turnbull was
most decisive, as he beat Mr. C. P. Leckie
by 142 points; Dr. Clark beat James
Lawrence by 92, and Mr. McLennan defeated Fournier'by 52. Mr. John Ridington lost to Clive Miller by 28 points.
No high runs were scored, the best being
Miller's 27 (twice) and 26, Mr. McLen-
nan's  24,  and   Dr.   Clark's  22.
AGGIES   WIN   SHIELD
The series of inter-class debates ended
on Wednesday last, with Agriculture
again in possession of the coveted shield.
The much-discussed reciprocity agreement of 1911 was again the issue, Mr. H.
Cassidy and Mr. A. Roberts upholding
the affirmative for Arts '23, while Agriculture was represented by Mr. C. Traves
and Mr. E.  Langston.
The debate was of a very high order,
in every way up to international standard, and both sides showed a thorough
knowledge of the subject. This is twice
in succession that the "Aggies" have won
the shield, but Arts '23 is already laying
plans for a strong "come-back" next
year.
ARTS '21  OFFICERS
The graduating class in Arts have
elected the following permanent officers:
Honorary president, Dr. Boggs; president, Mr. J. L. Lawrence; vice-presidents,
Miss A. Ure, Mr. A. Russell; secretary,
Mr. S. M. Scott; treasurer, Miss P.
McKee.
A tentative programme for Convocation Week has been drawn up, as follows: May 3rd, tree planting and banquet; May 4th, stag party; May 5th, tea
dance; May 7th, class picnic; May 8th,
church service; May 10th, class exercises;
May 11th, reception by Mrs. Klinck;
May 12th, Congregation.
PRESIDENTIAL   NOMINEES
Two nominations have been received
for the office of president of the Alma
Mater Society for next session. The
names are those of P. N. Whitley, Arts
'22, and Syd Anderson, Sc. '22. Mr.
Whitley is this year editor-in-chief of
publications, and Mr. Anderson is president of Science. The election will take
place next Monday.
Following are the dates for other elections:
Secretary and treasurer, nominations
March 14, election March 21; presidents
undergraduate societies, March 22 and
24; presidents athletic societies. March 23
and 28. Appointments to the Publications
Board are made by the Council, as follows: Editor-in-chief, March 15; business manager, March 16: senior editor,
March 16.
A programme of Saturday hikes for the
Outdoors Club has been drawn up, as
follows: March 12th, Capilano; Marcli
19th, Lynn Valley; Good Friday, an all-
day hike up Grouse Mountain. Plans are
being made for an interesting trip on
April 2nd. The big picnic on April 30th
closes the hikes for the year.
ARROW
SHIRTS and COLLARS
Follow the
ARROW
and you follow
the Style
E. SCOTT EATON, B.A.,
Principal
Success Business
College, Ltd.
The School of Certainties
Phone, Fairmont 2075
ON MAIN AT TENTH
VANCOUVER, B.C.
ORPHEUM
Week   Commencing
Monday,   March   14,   1921.
Vaudeville's
Delightful   Character   Star
HARRIET REMPLE
Tom   Harry's  Romantic  Fantasy
THE   STORY   OF   A   PICTURE
Ford   Sisters  offer
THE  FORD  DANCERS
including
MAYNE  GEHRUE and EDWIN   FORD
Lottie   Ford,   Bob   Adams   and
William   Cutty
HARRY FLORRIE
HOLMES & LAVERE
Novelty  Comedy  Skit,   entitled
"THEMSELVES"
ELIZABETH EILEEN
OTTO  &  SHERIDAN
in
COMEDY   SONGS   AND   MUSIC
EVEREST'S
NOVELTY   CIRCUS
MARGUERITE & ALVAREZ
AERIAL  ENTERTAINERS
MOSS & FRYE
"How   High   Is   Up?"
'How  Come?"
British   Weekly. Concert   Orchestra
EDUCATIONAL
STATIONERY
STUDENTS WILL FIND IT
INTERESTING TO VISIT
OUR UP-TO-DATE STORE.
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS
FOR EDUCATIONAL STATIONERY — CHAPMAN'S
LOOSE-LEAF    BOOKS,   Etc.
.®1>P.
GUark? Sc Stuart do.
LIMITED
Wholesale and Commercial
Stationers
550 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
Tel. Ex., Seymour 3 THE   UBYSSEY
March  10, 1921
Buy Your Notepaper
by the Pound
ENGLISH LINEN NOTE PAPER--A
good quality linen finish note paper,
put up in packets of 60 sheets Ci'4
quires),  at    30c
ENVELOPES TO MATCH — Are put
up in boxes of 60, for 30c
SCOTCH LINEN NOTE PAPER — A
very good grade of medium weight
linen finished writing paper, put up
in 1-lb. packets containing about 120
sheets   (5   quires) 35c
ENVELOPES TO MATCH—Put up in
boxes of 75, at, per box 35c
SILK  VELVET  NOTE  PAPER—Good
quality pad finish note paper, put up
in packets of 60 sheets,
at,   per  packet 40c
ENVELOPES TO MATCH—Put up in
boxes of 60, at,  per box 40c
ENGLISH FABRIC NOTE PAPER—A
high-grade linen finish writing paper
in  a  plaid  effect,   put  up  in  pound
packets of about 100  sheets,
at,  per lb 75c
ENVELOPES  TO MATCH—
Per, packet of 25 20c
—Stationery Dept.,  Main Floor,
New Wing
David  Spencer
LIMITED
Phone,  Fairmont 722
THE BEX CAFE
TEA ROOM   BAKERY        ICE CREAM
Confectionery Tobacco and Cigars
692 BROADWAY, WEST
SAPP WANTS
A NEW NAME
I really don't like my name.
To be frank, it doesn't express
what a candy shop should be.
I am thinking seriously of
changing the name of the store
—and want some suggestions.
I'll let you know if I decide
definitely.
Robt. Sapp, Ltd.
Candymaker
814   ROBSON   STREET
WHAT THE PROFESSORS THINK
OF   STUDENT   AFFAIRS
The "Ubyssey" has approached several
professors, who are interested in student
activities, to secure their opinion on
various questions which will come up for
consideration very soon. Many of the
profs, hesitated to comment upon student
affairs. Those who would speak about
the idea of a student manager were generally of the opinion that the change
must come, but would be accompanied by
a sacrifice, as Mr. Wood expressed it, "of
a certain sense of ownership and personal
responsibility." Dr. Sedgewick favored
retaining the present system as long as
possible. Dr. Boggs would give the manager more responsibility than is suggested in Mr. Rive's scheme.
The question as to whether there are
too many social functions at U.B.C. was
in many cases evaded. The "Ubyssey"
understands, however, that, collectively
and officially, Faculty is of the opinion
that the social programme might be curtailed with advantage. They have suggested that next year two, instead of
three, major dances be given. Many
profs, gave the positive answer "Yes"
to the question, some very emphatically.
They did not find, however, that those
students who took the most prominent
part in student affairs were more backward in their class-work than others. Mr.
Wood mentioned that the "point" system
of limiting the number of offices held by
one student was not being enforced. Mr.
Wood also thought that the dance appeal
was being overdone. Dr. Boggs thinks
that dancing will soon give place to other
forms of activity. Prof. Robertson says
"it is not too much play, but a lack of
system in his play' on the part of the
individual student. He favors having all
social functions on Friday night, and doing away with Saturday lectures entirely.
Dr. Eastman thought the trouble was
uneven distribution of activities.
All agreed that our college spirit had
greatly improved this year. Kla-how-ya
Week was beneficial. Dr. Coleman
was greatly pleased with the spirit
manifested here in spite of the untoward
conditions. The high level of class-work
was a manifestation of this spirit. On
the other hand, Dr. Sedgewick expressed
the suspicion that studies had been neglected to some extent as a result of the
continued  excitement.
Asked about granting credits for- undergraduate activities, most of the profs,
declared against them, at least until proper arrangements could be made under
appropriate departments. Mr. Wood
made an emphatic exception in favor of
debating.
All those consulted favored the idea of
a Dean of Women. It was several times
hinted that the effect of such an appointment would be to improve the manners
of both men and women in the college,
particularly in the  corridors.
The theory of compulsory training was
approved in principle, with the rider that
sufficient diversity of pursuits should be
allowed, and that paid instructors and
suitable accommodations be provided.
Dean Coleman and Dean Brock felt that
such training was absolutely essential to
the welfare of the students. Military
training was not supported.
The
Students' Cafeteria
Do not forget when down town
to lunch at The Old Country Tea
Rooms,
641, Granville  Street
Upstairs
Hall   to   rent   evenings,   accommodating 60  couples.
Banquets, dance suppers and refreshments of all kinds served anywhere in the city. Enquire the
Tally-Ho.
A.   WALTER,   Prop.   Phone   Sey.   2045
NEXT TIME
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For     Light    Refreshments
Ice Cream and Candies at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
MIDWAY  PHARMACY
Phone,   Fair. 840
Cor. Broadway and Heather Street
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
WATERMAN'S PENS
EVERSHARP PENCILS
LOOSELEAF COVERS
AND REFILLS
NOTE BOOKS, Etc.
We deliver anywhere, at any time.
BARRON
HOTEL
Restaurant
Two Blocks from Vancouver Hotel
When you compare quality, service
and price, and consider the high
standard of the food we serve, you
will realize wherein it is to your advantage to come here.
A welcome awaits you.
BARRON
Corner  Granville  and   Nelson
Phone, Seymour 2011
Operated by W.  D.  Wood Limited
MAURICE PERRIN,  Manager March  10, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
CLOTHES  FOR  YOUNG  MEN
Glad   to   show   the   new   models.
They are entirely different.
FIT-REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, West
J. W. Fofter
Limited
WE SELL CLOTHES FOR TOUNG
MEN AND MEN WHO STAY YOUNG
ANGELL EHGRAVINGJl
CUTS
For
Newspapers, Magazines, Catalogues
and   General  Advertising   Purposes
DESIGNING
Original and Distinctive
518 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
THE GREAT-WEST
LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
Head   Office,   Winnipeg,   Manitoba
Result of a 20-year endowment
which   matured   October   1st,   1920.
Name, Gilbert Inkster, Lady-
smith. Premium, $102.30. Amount,
$2,000.
In 20 years he paid $2,004.60.
The cash value of his policy was
$3,070, being the face of the policy
$2,000 and a dividend of $1,070.
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Vancouver Branch Office
A  SAVINGS  ACCOUNT
By carrying money around
in your pocket you will
never learn the habit of
THRIFT. Deposit your
spare funds with this Bank
in a Savings account; interest will be paid, and you
can withdraw both principal and interest at any
time.
We welcome small accounts.
The Canadian
Bank of Commerce
SCHOOL SUPPLIES
MADE HERE
Men and women who reason upon
the future know that we, as individuals, must each do our part
in bringing B. C. into the field as
one of the big manufacturing
centres of Canada.
The duty is a constant one — to
buy, whenever possible, goods
"made in B. C."
Keystone School Supplies
made  in  Vancouver.
are
Smith, Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
Manufacturers of School Supplies
VANCOUVER   AND   VICTORIA,   B.C.
HAGAR
SHOES
FOR
MEN
AND
WOMEN
As surely as there is a sun in the heavens, we can
satisfy any man or woman's Footwear desires in
"Hagar" Shoes.
We specialize in this brand and stand back of
every pair.
FOR QUALITY
FOR FIT
FOR STYLE
FOR VALUE
we earnestly commend the "Hagar" line.
INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
"Vancouver's Smartest Shoe Store"
666 GRANVILLE STREET
ALMA  MATER CHANGES
(Continued  from  Page   1.)
College spirit was considered to have
improved greatly, and in a lasting way.
The majority favored a repetition of
Kla-how-ya Week next year, though
Honeyman pointed out that if the week
was successful it should be unnecessary
to repeat it.
Compulsory physical training was approved by all consulted, but it was agreed
that a paid instructor would be required.
Honeyman would favor a military element.
President Lord stated that the canteen
contract would be awarded to the Tally-
ho next year. Treasurer Banfield intimated that there would be few, if any,
profits from the canteen this year. Ban-
field further suggested that, if it were
necessary to cut down budgets, small
societies should be the first to suffer.
Kingham suggests that supporters of
athletics next session should pick out one
or two teams and support these consistently, rather than try to take in all
the games. Lawrence will propose that
the Arts Book Store commence operations this year in the spring instead of
the fall.
In regard to the suggested union of
the Lit. societies, opinion is divided.
Rive, president of the Lit. and Scientific
Department, is frankly opposed; Hurst,
president of the Men's Lit., favors it;
Kirby, president of the S.D.K., is willing,
though apparently not entirely convinced;
Miss Coates, president of the Women's
Lit., favors closer co-operation of the
Men's and Women's Lits., with the S.
D. K. in affiliation with them. Miss
Coates will recommend a programme for
her society next year which involves
more active participation on the part of
the members.
Whitley reports that he will recommend that a hand-book be published next
session. This move is welcomed by all
student leaders  consulted.
The Continental Drama
Mr. Wood lectured on "The Tendencies of Continental Drama' at the
final meeting of the Women s Literary
Society, which was very well attended by
men and women students and members
of the Faculty.
The speaker dealt with the recent
drama of Germany, Italy, Spain, France
and Russia, under the headings of naturalistic drama, plays of romance, and
plays   of  purely   social  significance.
TURN YOUR IDEAS
INTO DOLLARS
LEARN   HOW   TO   WRITE
SHORT STORIES
Short-Story Writing
Illustrating
Bookkeeping
Journalism
Cartooning
Accounting
Write for particulars
Shaw Correspondence
School
1401   Standard   Bank   Building
VANCOUVER,  B. C. THE   UBYSSEY
March 10, 1921
SPORT OF THE WEEK
GODFREY   CUP
The University won the Godfrey Cup,
emblematic of the city hockey championship, on Friday night by defeating the
Towers by the score 5-3. The first period
opened with both teams playing as if
their lives depended upon it. The play
went from end to end, with both goalkeepers making sensational saves. There
was no score in this period. The teams
were playing very evenly, and there was
every indication of a great struggle.
The beginning of the second period
saw the 'Varsity forwards shooting from
all angles. However, the Towers were
the first to score when Fellowes beat
Broadfoot by a fast shot. The goal-
umpire did not allow this as a goal, but
the referee reversed the decision. This
evidently annoyed Shields, as he immediately took the puck up the ice and
scored when the play recommenced.
Both teams displayed very fine combination during this period.
The Towers came on the ice for the
third period determined to win the game.
They made rush after rush, all of which
were broken up by the 'Varsity defence.
Following one of these rushes, Plummer,
who played very pretty hockey throughout the game, took the puck to centre and
passed to Ternan. The latter went
through the entire team of our opponents,
completely fooled their defence, and
scored the prettiest goal of the game.
After this the 'Varsity continued to press,
and Shields scored again on a pass from
Hunter. Russell scored for the Towers
when there were but a few minutes to
go. However, with shots raining in on
him from all sides, Broadfoot was, as
usual, invincible, and the game and
championship came to the 'Varsity.
University of Washington puckchasers
were the next victims of the prowess ot
our worthy sextette on Saturday. The
game was the second of the home-and-
home series which was arranged between
the two 'varsities. In the first game at
Seattle last week the score at the end of
the game was 3-3. In the game here on
Saturday our squad clearly outclassed the
Seattle boys, winning 5-2. The total
score for the series makes our team winners by a comfortable margin.
The game was comparatively slow, our
squad being satisfied to take it easily
after the strenuous game on Friday. Our
defence was much too good for the U. of
W. boys, and our combination work was
c'.early superior.
Arts '23 Hike
On Saturday some forty or fifty members of Arts '23 undertook a hike up
Capilano Canyon. Under the leadership
of Prof. Sage, the party left this side of
the inlet at 10.45 a.m., arriving at the
hotel for luncheon. During the afternoon the more energetic of the party
made a visit to the intake, while others
spent an enjoyable time dancing at the
pavilion, and exploring the depths of the
canyon. Later two parties were formed,
one of which came back by West Vancouver.
MAINLAND CUP
The 'Varsity footballers won a comparatively easy victory over the Province
eleven at Camkie Street Saturday afternoon, winning by 2 goals to 0. The game
was the third round of the Mainland Cup,
and by this victory 'Varsity has reached
the semi-finals. The game was played
under ideal conditions and was fairly fast
throughout, the 'Varsity boys, however,
taking it fairly easy most of the time.
From the start Varsity took the offensive, but the Province defence was
equal to the occasion, and for some time
any scoring was prevented. Finally
Jackson managed to find the net and
sent, in 'Varsity's first counter. We
continued to have the edge of play and
just before half-time McLeod made a
beautiful run and completely fooled the
defence, sending in a nice placed shot,
which their goalie failed to get. In the
second period the Province pressed for
a while, but failed to be dangerous more
than once or twice. Cameron made several pretty runs and came near scoring
on some of his crosses, but the defenders cleared all and prevented any further  score.
Line-up — Crowe, Crute, Gwyther,
Mitchell, G. Cant, Say, Cameron, H.
Cant,   Jackson,   Rushbury,   McLeod.
THE ANNUAL RELAY
Plans for the annual relay from Point
Grey are now complete. The final date
set by the Track Club is Wednesday,
March 23rd. On that afternoon some
eight or nine class teams will line up at
3 o'clock for the start of the big race.
The course will be the same as last year,
except that the final turn just in front of
the Arts building will be eliminated.
That is, the relay will finish just at the
end of the lane which comes in from
Twelfth Avenue.
For the benefit of the Freshmen and
others who may not know, there is a
challenge cup donated by Arts '20 for the
winners of this race. Last year Arts '23
copped the honors, finishing the 7.8 miles
in 37 minutes and 30 seconds. This year
the race promises to be a humdinger, and
most classes are already in training for
the event.
LOSE CITY CHAMPIONSHIP
In one of the hardest-fought games
ever witnessed in Vancouver, .Y.M.C.A.
Towers won the city senior basketball
championship last Thursday evening by
defeating our 'Varsity team in the second
game of the series. Our boys entered
the contest with an advantage of four
points, the margin of their victory in the
first game of the play-off. When the
final whistle blew the teams were tied
on the total count. In the overtime
periods our rivals scored nine points,
while the U.B.C. boys were unable to
locate the basket at all. As a result, the
Towers are credited with 54 points and
the 'Varsity 45 on the two games.
From the beginning the players showed
unusual keenness and determination, the
pace being fast throughout. Toward the
close the battle waged furiously, each
team extending itself to the limit in an
effort to bag the odd goal.
When Wanting Nice
Things to Eat
CUSICK
CAN   SUPPLY   YOUR  WANTS
From the very finest Chocolates,
Home-made Candy, Ice Cream and
Soft Drinks, Pastries, and such like,
to the daintiest little Dinner and
Light Lunch you ever ate.
Make sure you go to Cuslck.
Cor. Heather and Broadway, West
SPECIAL
$25.00
Rough Blue
Serge
Norfolk Suits
REGULAR
$45.00
THE SHOP OF
3Fa0tflott - Qlraft
Thos. Foster
& Co., Ltd.
ONE STORE ONLY
514 GRANVILLE ST.

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