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The Ubyssey Nov 3, 1961

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 WE UBYSSEY
cm   od
sheet
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3,  1961
No.  21
■' , 'A£m 4*&&*
<w*l
For best design
centre
wins medal
The Massey gold medal for the most outstanding piece of
architecture completed in Canada during the past three years
has been awarded to the Vancouver firm of Thompson, Ber-
! wick and Pratt for the Thea Koerner graduate centre at UBC.
The   same   firm   has   been
MOST  OUTSTANDING  PIECE OF  ARCHITECTURE completed in Canada during the past three
years, js   the > }$.400,000  Thea, Koerner.  Graduate   Student   centre   at   UBC.   Architects   were
V    awarded the Massey  gold  medal for  its  design.	
more aid
f ays Liberal leader
~ Physical and intellectual development of the University
"will be stunted unless the provincial government increases aid
substantially, B.C. Liberal leader Ray Perrault said in Brock
- — —    * Lounge.
Ban-bombers
to protest
The Nucl ear Disarmament
club will stage a march from the
University gates to Victory
Square on Remembrance Day as
"^part of "Disarmament Week"
Nov. 6-11.
Included in the weeks events
are:
•Monday: film   on  the  Alder-
maston March, in Buchanan 106
-j-at noon.
Tuesday:   debate  at   noon  in
|;; jBa|hanan-106,   "Resolved:  that
:; Canada have no nuclear weap-
feons:'*
1     Wednesday:   mass petitioning
for  signatures   against   nuclear
arms for Canada.
Thursday: campus demonstra-
tion and the destruction of the
effigy  of  a  Bomarc missile  in
5 Buchanan  quadrangle at noon.
J*     Friday:   Dr.   Hugh   Keenleyside, former United Nations official,  speaks  at  noon  on  "The
i-World Situation of Today."
Saturday:  the march to Victory Square. Students will meet
,s at the University gates at 7:30
^a.m.
Perrault said that despite the
"money for marks" system started in 1959, B.C. ranks seventh
of all Canadian provinces in student aid. ;;
When provincial expenditure
for universities is compared
with personal income — a
measure for effort—B.C. is near
the bottom, he said.
BELOW AVERAGE
At UBC the rate of students
to lecturers is 17-1, below the
national average ratio of 13-1
and far below the ratio of 11-1
which is considered ideal.
Perrault told about 350 students that Social Credit claims
that aid to students has increased by 227 percent are true
enough.
"But," he said, " it is a pathetic effort when compared with
Alberta's 640 percent increase
in aid.
"UBC will need $60 million
to take care of the predicted student influx—the university will
be lucky if it gets half of this
amount."
GOV'T APATHETIC
"The government's pres ent
apathy — if not arrested — will
leave a scar not only on the
physical assets of the university
but also upon the intellectual
development of those who must
lead our province," he said.
Applicants wanted
for  Quebec  trip
Student council decided Monday to send two delegates to the
Laval University Conference on
Canadian Affairs, November 15
to 18.
Theme of the conference will
be "The Canadian Experiment:
Success  or Failure."
Students wishing to be delegates should submit letters of
application to ,the Alma Mater
Society office by Wednesday.
"The congress will concentrate on an examination of the
unity and dualism of modern
Canada, and of the contempor-
ry evolution of relations between
same
awarded one of 19 silver medals
."or   the   common  block   at   the
new University residence devel-
' opment on Marine Drive.
!     C. E. Pratt, a senior partner
| in the firm, recieved the medals
' 'it a  ceremony at the National
' Gallery   of   Canada   in   Ottawa
Thursday.    The    medals     were
' presented   by   His   Excellency,
' Major-General G. P. Vanier, the
governor-general of Canada.
315  ENTERED
The Massey medals for architecture are awarded every three
years by the Massey Foundation
established by the Right Honourable Vincent Massey, a former governor-general. The first
awards were made in 1950.
A total of 315 projects were
entered in this year's contest.
Judges were Pietro Belluschi,
dean of architecture at Massachusetts Institute of Technology;
John Bland, d. i r e c tor of the
school of architecture at McGill
University, and; Peter Thornton,
Vancouver architect.
Thompson, Berwick and Pratt
have been architects for the University since 1912 when they
won an international contest for
the design of the campus and its
first permanent buildings.
SEVENTH MEDAL
The firm has won seven Massey medals—three of them for
University buildings. They have
been awarded three honourable
mentions in the same competition.
UBC buildings which have received awards are as follows:
1952—silver medal for the War
Memorial gymnasium (associate
Pair of tegs-
going, going...
From a male viewpoint, the
girls were all legs.
And on the basis of these
legs, the men made their bids
for a private secretary for
Thursday afternoon.
Occasion was the annual
leg auction held by the Engineers Thursday at noon in
Eng. 201.
For the privilege of-bidding
each man paid the difference
between his bid and the previous one. At a predetermined
time, bidding was called and
the girl belonging to the legs
went to the highest bidder.    ,
The money goes to aid the
orphans of the Korean War.
I architect—the late Frederic Las-
French and English Canadians." | serre)-
Delegates should have a
working knowledge of French
and should have a background
of Canadian history and current
affairs.
1958—honourable mention for the Buchanan (arts)
building; 1961—gold medal for
the Thea Koerner graduate centre and silver medal for the common block.
Power export
will develop
Peace-Bonner
British Columbia must export
power it wants to develop it on
a grand scale, Attorney- General
Robert Bonner said Thursday.
He was speaking on the theme
of "electric power" in B.C. be-
iore about 400 students in Brock
Lounge.
Bonner told the students that
instead of developing power resources a little at a time to meet
domestic needs, export would
allow for the financing of projects such as the" Peace.
He likened the export of
power to the export of plyweod
and natural gas. He said that
B.C. has more hydro-electric
potential that it can use now,
but that the power demands of
the greater Pacific Northwest
will more than double in the
next ten years.
To  pay  or  not   to  pay
Question still question
By KEN WAHREN
The question of who will
pay what towards Brock Hall
damages resulting from recent
"King" demonstrations remains just that—a question.
But the expenses will not
be shared by intellectual
Stunt Committee.
A resolution to include ISC
in the damage responsibility
was defeated 3-2 at a discipline committee meeting Thursday.
The committee reached its
verdict    after    hearing    ISC
spokesman Ed Lavalle assure
members ISC was not attempting to incite riotous actions
by crowning its own King.
The "crowning" took place
before the scheduled crowning
of "King of the World" Homer
Tomlinson.
In lieu of student council's
inability to levy fines for the
damage incurred, it has asked heads of the three responsible .societies—aggies, engineers and foresters—to contribute $10 apiece from society
funds.
Foresters agreed Wednesday to t&e $1& request.
Pete W o o 1 g a r, engineering member of the discipline
committee, said engineers
turned down the request at a
meeting Tuesday.
Dave Ormrod, aggie representative, said AUS council
will not^ vote until its gets a
written request for money.
The discipline committee
agreed to draft letters of request asking both the aggie
and engineering societies for
a $10 donation. Page  2
THE
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year in
Vancouver by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial
opin ous expressed are those of the Editor of The Ubyssey and not
necessaiily   those   of   the Alma   Mater   Society  or   the   University   of   B.C.
TELEPHONES: CA 4-3242, locals 12 (news desk),
14 (Editor-in-Chief), 6, 15 (business offices).
Editor-in-Chief: Roger McAfee
Managing  Editor     Denis  Stanley
V      Associate   Editor        Ann   Pickard
News Editor      . Fred  Fletcher
City Editor Keith Bradbury
CUP Editor       Bob  Hendrickson
: Photograpiy Editor Don Hume
Senior  Editor               Shanon  Rodney
- Sports Editor Mike Hunter
Photography Manager . . . . . Byron Hender
Critics Editor     David Bromige
STAFF THIS ISSUE:
-Layout:   Sharon  Rodney
REPORTERS: Mike. Grenby, Ken Warren, Judy Richardson, Tommy Dyck, Chris Fahrni, Lloyd Drake, Doug
Sheffield, Ian Cameron, Joy Holding, Krishna Sahay.
SPORTS:   BUI  Willson   (desk).   Bert   MacKinnon,   Ron
Kydd, Glenn Schultz, Bill Grant.
TECHNICAL: Kitty Watt,  Fred  Jones,  Beatrice  Wong.
We apologize
Getting news into this paper is turning into a real battle
■—with the advertising department. In today's paper there are
just more than 60 column inches of news inside the paper. The
front page offers another 75 column inches.
There are only 42 inches of sport news, to cater to what is
acknowledged as the most diversified athletic program in the
country.
Critical material, appearing once per week has only 120
column inches.
Photographs and headlines take up about 15 percent of the
total pager. Tikis leaves little space for news.
The 60 column inches of news—just more tihan half of one
complete page, is spreading over three pages. We can print
only part of the 'tween classes we receive.
The editorial page has had to take advertising.
The Ubyssey is constantly asked to increase its service.
Clubs are demanding more space, council and faculties want
■ greater coverage.. Some students want more "intellectual" content.
We fully .agree that these requests are justified. We just
don't have the space to accommodate them.
We apologize.
Perhaps the name of this publication should be changed
to <MThe Point Grey Advertiser".
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 3, 196-J:
*•#? - -
Letters to the Editor
i..
. . . . wet
Rain.
.We have always hated rain.
It wasn't so bad when C-lot was close.
Now they've moved it on us.
Now we have to walk througfn farm fields in the rain, instead of just through gravel pits.
Only yesterday, the rain wasn't rain.
It was snow.
We don't like rain much, but we abhor snow.
It's not only wet, it's cold.
Colder than rain.
And, worst of all, when it stops snowing, it turns to rain.
Yesterday we had to walk through farm fields and gravel
pits in the rain.
Only it wasn't ram, it was snow.
Show.
Hellish weather. Nobody can do much about it.
Man can produce a 50 megaton nuclear bomb.
He can build an engine that will push a 10-ton plane
through the air at more than 1,000 miles per hour.
He can shoot rockets miles into space and photograph the
dark side of the moon.
He can send a manned capsule into orbit around the earth
and bring the man back unharmed.
But he can't do much about the weather.
Sobering thought.
What is SCM?
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
In response to the article in
Tuesday's paper, I would like
to make a few comments.
First, I agree—the SCM is not
as outgoing as it could be.
Why? Because we are lazy,
apathetic, self-satisfied, sinners, hopeless in ourselves. I'm
afraid our only hope is Jesus
Christ. It costs 10,000 dollars
a. year to run this flophouse,
chaplains and all. Any other
reasonable outfit would have
closed down years ago, don't
you agree? Nevertheless here
we are, a fellowship of "repentant" and "non-repentant"
sinners.
Of course, the words, Christ,
sinner, repentant, have no
meaning whatsoever to the "natural man", and never will.
What is a natural man? He is
one who. might have asked
himself, "What is the meaning
in life?" "What about my exist-
ance?", or ''What or who are
we?" -— Ants on an anthill?
Flies on a dung heap? But he
has not been able to say,
"Christ is Lord", haying thoroughly: investigated Christianity objectively and subjectively.
Get this! A "natural man"
■has no responsibilities at all—
he does not. even have to think,
as a matter of fact, if he does
not want anything to do With
the words, God and Faith, I
would say he has been cursed
with a brain.
Scream, yell, rant, rave,
what can I do? Let's get together and talk, come to the
Agnostics Group in Hut L-4 on
Mondays at noon or anywhere
is fine with me. Where are
you? What is your name? I'll
go wherever you. are or you
can come to me, but PLEASE,
HOW CAN I FIND YOU? Who
knows, you might convert me.
Yours truly,
A CHRISTIAN.
Cozy club
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
The SCM has been called
medieval—that at Hallowe'en
with apocalypse - size Russian
firecrackers. WELL!
Any more atheists who are
willing to stand up and be
counted, like Bruce Richer in
his letter to the editor in last
Tuesday's Ubyssey? Come on,
get us Christians out of our
cozy clubrooms. We are still
dozing in a time when the
basis of all human values, life
itself, is b e i n g threatened.
Maybe you can be prophets.
Is tbe SCM not doing any:
thing then? Oh yes, some are
trying hard to put life and
vigor in our program. Some
work hard to ge students to
start thinking; but that's not
easy, you know! They get mad
at those who sit and relax,
Many Marys, few Marthas?
Yes, we know our Bible—a
little, anyway. We discuss it.
We even talk about Christ—not
that He stirs us to action. We
are too busy arguing about
Him. Ingmar Bergeman stirs
us a little more. He gets some
of us to see his movies.
All right then, atheists,
where can we find you? Are
you crying alone in the Chris
tian wilderness, Bruce? Mind
you, we found a few agnostics.
Yes sir, they meet with a few
Christians. The latter are protected by Chaplain Shaver, or
are the Agonstics? Anyway
they did not run away in disgust, yet.
Come on atheists, out of
your eggshells! Come on Christians, out of your shelters! Let
us meet! Where? When? Anywhere!^ Everywhere! Anytime!
Let's argue about religion, politics and many other things —
that's SCM tradition, you
know.
Yours truly,
HANK T. DYKMAN,
Theology II,
President UBC-SCM.
Empty rag?
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
"Dear Sir:
I.can no longer remain silent,
restrain my vigorous (though
heretofore unrevealed) disgust
of this empty, useless, completely uninspiring, co.lbrless,
characterless rag so ignomin-
ously named "The Ubyssey".
In short, I think The Ubyssey
stinks. It ° offers absolutely no
incentive, no satisfaction to the
student searching for original
and exceptional articles. Filled
with serious,;: dreadfully dull
and boring, automated reports,
produced undoubtedly by serious; dreadfully dull and boring
automatons, it nevertheless attempts (or could I be mistaken?) to provide highly interesting reading matter. In
this attempt The Ubyssey fails
miserably. The fact that The
Ubyssey is> a "newspaper" is
not sufficient reason, in my
opinion, to operate entirely
Within the .principles of The
Vancouver Sun.
Therefore, take note, sir!
Away with indigestible criticisms produced by your literary eunuchs! Away with inconsequential facts! Instead, fill an
occasional page from contributions of the general student
body. Come! Come! Don't tell
me, sir, that no contributions
from the grand student body
are worthy of publishing; that
no contributions are forthcoming!
After all, in case you are not
familiar with this unimportant
fact, I would like to inform
you that there are 12,977 and
one-half students attending this
university   (census   not  mine).
Further, there are student
writers and poets on this campus, who, I am of the opinion
would occasionally submit an
interesting essay,   short  story,
or poem, if given the opportunity.
Ha! you cry. We cannot do
that. This is a newspaper. We
cannot print every insipid, literary attempt by the half-witted student. We must print
news—its written in the constitution. Sir, define the word
"news"! Does "The Critics*
Page" contain news? If so, are
the criticisms on this page any
more newsworthy than a poem
or story?
I insist most violently that
you recognize that there are.
literary-minded individuals on
this campus with an interesting paper!
Since undoubtedly all sorts
of challenges and reproaches
would be presented regarding
my own contributions, I intend
to slay said challenges, etc., before they hatch from the desolate and intellectually stunted
minds of you and your atrabil-
ous henchmen.
Enclosed is a contribution.
Disdainfully  yours,
JOHN BUCHHOLZ,.
Geology.
Flim flam
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
"Thou shalt not take the
name of the Lord thy God in
vain", is one of the Ten Commandments. If any of the ^fellows in the Faculty of Forestry
profess to be Christians, I suggest that they take a good long
look at their faith before they
again join in their Faculty's
deplorable chant, "Forestry
once,. Forestry twice, Holy
jumping Jesus Christ, Flim
Flam God Damn, who are we?
Forestry!"
Sincerely,
BARRY WHAITES,
Education III.
Exams for staff?
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
With reference to your
article re UBC making tougher
the admission of students, I
would suggest that instead, the
policy should be a toughei*
entrance for teaching staff.
Why not Ph.D.'s all around
and please let us ask the king
of the universe to preserve us
from graduate student instruct;
ors—in class and in labs. They
are unqualified. Why not a
purge? We are not paying
higher fees for unqualified"
personnel.
Yours truly,
GORDON HOLLYWOOD
WttAT  IS SPIRITUALISM?
A series of four lectures will begin on Sunday, Nov. 5 at
11:00 a.m., 2380 Pine St.
God as Universal Mind
Death the Bogeyman
Is  Communication with  Spirits  Ethical and  Desirable?
From Spirits to Medium to Public
The Myth of the Mediator
The speaker will be RUDOLF  HENKE, secretary of the  B.C.
Spiritualists'  Association.   If  you   wish   to   attend,   please
phone AL 5-7845 since seats may be limited.
Universal Spiritual Development
Association Friday, November 3, 1961
THE,    UBYSSEY
Page  3
Drift
WORDS
By MIKE GRENBY
I enjoy watching people
watching people.
In fact, I'd just as soon watch
people watching people as
watch people.
•v For example, I get the biggest kick out of looking at a
girl as she gives another of her
own kind the once-over.
It's supposed to look like
-just a casual glance, but if you
watch closely you see that it's
a lot more than that.
Being a member of the more
staid sex, I can only guess at
what impulses are being sent to
the female's mind by those two
-beady scrutineers.
Perhaps something like:
"... she sure didn't curl her
hair last night . . . wonder
where she got that awful shade
of lipstick . . . wish I could
afford a sweater like that . . .
if she must wear seamed stockings, at least she could wear
them straight . . . ugh, cracked
Hail polish . . ."
Or if our adjudicator sees a
more acceptable specimen, it
might go more like this:
". . . what an adorable pair
of shoes! , . . skirt's too short
T. . what a beautiful diamond
engagement ring! . . . nice
hair, wonder where she had it
dyed . . . what a clever little
handbag ... her fiance's
cute ..."
The appraisal is usually quite
short but nonetheless appears
to be very thorough.
* *   *
When female views male,
it's a slightly different situation.
As the male enters the female's field of vision, he is
unaware of the mental gauntlet he is about to run.
The girl peers casually over
her notebook.
,t Suddenly her eyes click into
focus as they observe the spectacle of pants, shirt and tie
slowly passing by.
Does she look at his intelligent smile? Does, she marvel at
his broad shoulders? Does she
mentally strip him down to his
essentials — to his real self
based on what she has seen?
x Hard to say, really. Or better still—really hard to say.
* *   *
Male checks over male. Happens rarely (except in special
Cases), and then it's usually a
quick, open process.
"What a fink!" or "Where
4'id he get that crazy beard?"
or "How did he ever get a
doll like that?"
Unwritten motto seems to be,
"If you can't say anything bad,
don't say anything at all."
And when boy looks at girl
his feelings are almost always
verbally evident.
Tact and subtlety are unknown arts in this field. Frank
(some might call it crude) comment abounds and there is little
need for speculation on innermost thoughts.
* *   *
It's a fascinating hobby, this
people-watching; much more
interesting than studying.
WINRAM INSURANCE LTD.
SPECIALIZING   IN
AUTO INSURANCE
1678   W.  Broadway,  Vancouver   9
BE    1-5328
NDP says
Perrault
backed down
Provincial Libera) leader Ray
Perrault has backed down from
a debate challenge he made here
Wednesday, claims campus New
Democratic Party club president
Phil Waddell.
At a meeting held in Brock
lounge Wednesday noon, Perrault said he would like to have
a debate with "a representative
of the NDP", Waddell said. The
subject was to be open. Waddell
contacted Dave Barrett, CCF-
MLA from Dewdney, who accepted the challenge.
"I then approached Mr. Perrault with our acceptance. Although he was not prepared to
set a specific date, he said he
would inform Mr. Barrett of the
time," said Waddell. A few minutes later Mr. Perrault told me
that he changed his mind and
would no longer consider a debate with Mr. Barrett."
As a reason for his refusal,
Perrault said that lie would not
consider debating with any
member of the NDP other than
the Provincial leader, even
though his original challenge
had been directed to "any representative", said  Waddell.
"When the word of the provincial leader of the Liberal
party cannot be taken at face
value, it is little wonder that
students are often cynical in
their attitude towards politics,"
Waddell said.
EUS finds •/ chariot
—  atop  Buchanan
The Engineers retrieved
their famed chariot quietly
on Thursday.
Terry Guest, EUS president,
and approximately 10 engineers lowered the chariot from
the roof of -the Buchanan
building.
A handful of Aggies watched. There was   no resistance.
The chariot had been missing from the Engineering
building for approximately
nine months.
Pick up cheques
All scholarship cheques
must be picked up today in the
Administration Building or
the money will be sent back
to the donors, say officials.
Ottawa   students
to protest testing
OTTAWA (CUP)—University
of Ottawa students are planning
to picket the Russian and United
States embassies to protest the
resumption of nuclear testing.
The university's newspaper,
The Fulcrum, reported that the
student union passed a motion
to organize a demonstration by
a vote of eight to six.
Opposition to the motion was
voiced on the grounds that the
student union does not have the
right to represent the students
on a political level.
A five member committee was
struck to organize the march. No
date as been set for teh demonstration.
FOR RENT
Bachelor  suite,   near   UBC .gates.
$45 per month. Separate enti-«ince.
CA 4-6738.
TYPEWRITERS
Portable & Office Models
Terms & Trade-ins allowed
A    wise    investment    for    all
ISn'iversitv- Students
Call MEL BRYAN
YU 8-7764
I Ft! asks Vancouver
to "come to
International House Association will invite Vancouver to
"Come to the Fair" Saturday at
7:30 p.m.
Proceeds will be devoted to
establishment of a building fund
for the proposed International
House residence for foreign students.
Colorful and unique will be
displays and attractions featuring precious metal work,handU
crafts and an international food
bar. Charcoal artists will sketch
portraits, valuable prizes will go,
to winners of lucky drawings
and poetry and jazz groups will
play on verse and instruments.
Throughout the evening mem-:
bers of the International House
students club in the national
dress of their countries will appear in the songs and dances of
Estonia, the Philippines, Japan,
FOR RENT;
Fi-esh,  clean  bright  double   room,
tVin   beds,   bathroom,   phone,   kitchenette.    All    found.    Car. pool
.Available.   Very   reasonable.
After S p.m.
FOR RENT
Basement suite for two. Cboking
facilities, fireplace, private eh'
trance. Close to university. Available  Nov.   1st.   Phone  AM   6-4719.
ENGAGEMENT     RINGS
Engagement   rings   of   the   finest
quality are available to you near
manufacturer's   cost
'.  FOR   PERSONAL   SERVICE
AND   INFORMATION   CALL
PAUL  CURTISS-RE   1-7928
Arts IV After 6  p.m.
Players Club offers playreading noon
today in the auditorium . . .
Most important, the layout staff of The
Ubyssey holds its bi-annual shareholders
meeting noon today in the pub office.
"Hips" wiH  be there.
thi MILDEST BEST-TASTING cigarette
rr
East Indies; French Canada and
Germany. Music for public dancing will be. played by the Steel
Band.
swdiot comnn
Notice of Hearing;
Take notice thai the Stu*
dent Court will hear chaVges
of conduct unbecoming a stu*
deal preferred a ga in s i Ed
Grbnde in the Stage Room at
1:00 p.m., Thursdays the ninth
day of November; 1961.
Continental Styte
$18 95
Muted  checks  in  Brown
and Olive
Sizes From 34
United Tailors
BRITISH WOOLLENS
549 Granville
QUE: Where can I get
a sharp sweater?
ANS:
The
Cavalier
Shoppe
3573 W. 4Tst
AT DUNBAR
Terms available Page 4
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, Noveml
Veni  Vedi   ^
FRANK AND GEORGIE ("Country Girl") ELGIN, showing the
strain of their fight with Frankie's habit. These parts taken,
in the current Cambie Theatre production, by Bill Buckingham and Audrey Khiveton.
THERE   SEEMS   TO   BE   KIND   OF
magnetism possessed by a few musicians
which enables them to capture their audiences almost immediately and hold
them in rapt attention throughout a performance. The Russian born pianist Shura
Cherkassky is one of these. Scarcely had
the slight, five foot virtuoso sat down and
hammered out the opening notes of Tsch-
aikowsky's Second Piano Concerto with
the Vancouver Symphony last Sunday,
then one could sense the immediate power
of communication between this man and
his listeners. Cherkassky didn't merely
play the piano, he attacked it, bringing
forth all its power; he coaxed it, bringing
forth all its lyricism.
*     *     *
The concerto iiself is far less familiar than the composer's Concerto Noll.
It lacks some of the latter's brilliance and
sustained musical interest. Yet in the
hands of a pianist such as Cherkassky its
weaknesses can emerge as strength, for
so penetrating is this artist's approach
that he can draw character from even the
least imaginative passages.
THROUGHOUT ALL FOUR MOVE-
ments the soloist amazed his audience alternatively by his digital prowess and his
■ ability to - caress beautiful melodies, cot
oring each phrase with subtle nuances. In
the sceond movement Gideon Grau, violin, and Ernst Friedlander, cello, joined
Mr. Cherkassky in some splendid ensem
ble playing. Then came the last move-
could to dart out snatches of melody be-
ment, with woodwinds trying as best they
tween the piano's flashing bursts of joy-
our energy. Substantial elsewhere, the orchestral accompaniment was best in this
movement, seemingly compelled forward
by the pianist's impetus. As the concerto
came to a thrilling close, one could almost
imagine Cherkassky's thoughts—I came, I
saw, I conquered.
■k -k k
THE CONCERT OPENED WITH THE
orchestra's performance of Beethoven's
Third Symphony. Aptly^titled the Eroica,
this is one of the ireatest works in the
symphonic repertoire; epic is proportions
and a challenge to conductors for over a
century and a half.
WHILE IRWIN HOFFMAN'S READ-
ing was certainly better than that he gave
Beethoven's Seventh last season, it cannot be called a complete success. By
adopting a moderate rather than Toscan-
ini-like tempo he shouldered an added
burden, for the slower the tempo, the
more expressive thfe conductor must be to
avoid monotony. Mr. Hoffman unfortunately did-not always succeed in doing
this. Dynamics were nsualjy good aftd the
paee was at least consistent but here a
cello passage and there a violin entry
would be too weak. Pauses were often too
long when melodies were passed from one
instrume
another,
Wft
movemei
seemed 1
performs
very Ion
carefully
avoid mc
The-
was capa
interestii
enough
proach it
FCft
ance ertc
Transitic
brisk, an
finale es
well pla;
A h
Mendel*
rounded
ductor it
rapid pa
-tone in
fee tions
tion resj
long-lived message, short on arI
REVIEW OF THE MOVIE
"THE  BRIDGE"—
THE ERIDGE, a German
film showing this week at The
Studio, is the winner of the
German film Critics' Award,
the Belgian Film Critics' Grand
Prize, the Peace Prize of the
United Nations' League, the
Grand Prize of the Festival de
Mar del Plata, Best Foreign
Film of the Year of the Ibero-
American University, and in
addition won a nomination for
the Academy Award.
The last four don't bother
me—Academy Award nominations usually find out the cin-
ematographic worse, and
wherever Ma r del Plata and
the Ibero-American University
are, it's obviously pot in the
.mainstream of , contemporary
culture, while■■": the UN prize
is for message, riot cinemas-
tery. But the certainty that the
• assembled Germad^ind Belgian
critics' also gave their vote for
message instead of art upsets,
and   brings   me   to   the   point
where, careless of hubris, I
have to investigate the area of
their error.
Critics are usually o I the
liberal - humanist persuasion,
and liberal-humanists have an
understandable affinity for the
message of THE BRIDGE,
which is, to borrow Peter Morris's succinct summation, WAR
IS HELL. I find no fault with
this sentiment, nor with the acceptance of it by humanists,
but I do object to critics allowing emotion to dissuade them
from doing their duty—that is,
to examine THE BRIDGE as a
piece of cinema.
And this they obviously
haven't done, for the artistic
faults with which THE
BRIDGE is riddled are so obvious that only a man blinded
with belief could miss them.
The plot leans on that old device so popular with the unimaginative writer; the trick of
parallel episodes, in which the
lives of several characters are
compared   and   contrasted   be-
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fore being tied together in a
single knot' of destiny at the
story's end. This technique has
sometimes been brilliantly ex-
ploited, of course: THE
BRIDGE AT SAN LUIS REY
and, to a lesser extent, THE
BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES
are examples. But its drawback is that, unless very carefully hand le.d , it leads to
sketchiness of characterization
which ends in the dramatis
personae being differentiated
only by stock labels: COWARD-
COWARD, COWARD-BRAVE
IN THE END, BRAVE-BRAVE
and so inhumanly on; and
THE BRIDGE fails into this
travesty.
*   *   *
Some of the acting is quite
good, but with' a script like
this, what can mere actors do?
If the schoolmaster is the best
performed role, it's because
it's the only part written with
any subtlety.
The camera work is" generally stagey and static, the editing merely confusing, and
indeed only the sound-track,
with its satisfyingly weird
clangings and gratings, e v e r
rises above mundanity.
The saddest thing about this
film is that it has a sub-theme
which,   properly   explored,
would make an excellent film,
but which is treated here with
a paranoic simplicity which
negates it almost entirely: I
refer to the anarchy which ex-
ists-in a town where all the inhabitants are aware a hostile
army is to take over within a
few hours. The director of THE
BRIDGE goes into this rich,
complex vein with a pickaxe
instead of a geologists's hammer. A shining example of his
gaucheness is the scene in
which an officer, who has witnessed the boys' heroic battle
for the bridge, calls the two
survivors "cardboard heroes"-—
a scoff, I submit, which we
doubt ever got scoffed under
these circumstances.
* . *   *
Sad, too, is the treatment of
sex, which Is handled with an
adolescent prurience. Compare
this film with BREATHLESS,
a film in one way totally concerned with sex. yet which
avoids at all times the hard-
c o r e pornography offered in
THE BRIDGE. It can't be argued that this is an attempt to
show sex as distorted in the
male virgin's consciousness:
one of the boys at least is palpably not a virgin, yet, instead
of seeing his affair true and
whole, the camera leers
through a shower-door, half-
true and keyhole.
War as an area  of emotion
distinct from theme is, how
ever, treated extremely well-
another cause, I suspect, of th<
critics' myopia. Wounds a r j
mortal and ugly, not nicks.:t<
be forgotten in the gritting o
a set of dentures and the light
ing of a Camel. And when th<
American tanks move menac
ingly towards the seven Ger
man boys who must futileh
defend their bridge, only ai
iron stomach can fail to somer
sault in fear. -   ^
This director—(no credits, a<
names available) •— convindB
me that he knows war. But hi
doesn't convince me he cat
communicate what he know;
in the form of cinema and '.
suggest, if he is really concern
ed with getting his pacifist
message across, and not mere
ly with trading on it to ge
rich quick, that he become g
pamphleter or, if he wishes tc
remain In his present field
that he devote himself to col
lecting and editing newsreeh
of battlefields and concentra
tion camps.
david bromige
the
sc
Friday is U.B.C. Night
Vi Price With
A.M.S. Cord
DINAH WASHINGTON
THE EXCITING QUEEN OF SONG
Theatre Restaurant
626 HORNBY ST. MU 2-3677
FILMS
CINEMA 16. Oh Monday,
Eisenstein's first masterpiece
p.m. UBC Auditorium.
STANLEY. LA DOLCE VI
three days. Get in the swing
fourth time, like Bobby T. . . .
RIDGE. On Sunday, Nove
liance Francaise shows L
CLEFS  D'OR,  3:00  & 7:30 p
PLAYS
CAMBIE THEATRE. Until
THE COUNTRY GIRL, Cliffor
$1.50 - $2.50,  Hudson's Bay oi
p.m.
UBC AUDITORIUM. Noon 1
Dramatised reading of that trie
year   favourite,   DEATH   OF! 1961
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  5
I C I
group of instruments to
ng in disjointedness.
*     *     *
3E F U N E R ALSLOW
not overly sluggish there
a lack of direction in the
t just went on and on. This
:ment, and requires a more
in interpretation, again to
r.
»g in the third movement
t the net result proved unsatisfactory tempo is not
ate interest when the ap-
overly deliberate.
"PELY T Hi S PERFORM-
ich better than it started,
r e smoother, pacing was
orchestral sound full. The
y was well developed and
riven, exciting reading of
Fii ng al's Cave Overture
2 afternoon's concert. Con-
f spurred his men on in
and moulded a rich full
rket, darker ones. Imper-
ipline aside, to orchestra-
well.
william littler
P
c
E
I
T
I
C
A G E
EDITOR: DAVE BROMIGE
Layout: Jones
Photo by Mary Thompson
f INTERVIEW LIKE THIS would have killed Willie Lohman-
t this is NOT a scene from DEATH OF A SALESMAN. The
med executive, John Sparks, however, DOES appear in
(play, which will be presented by the Players' Club in
> Auditorium at noon Friday.
entertainment
n-seen scene
nber   6th:
KE.   8:00
in its last
t  for the
.m.
th: L'Al-
E     AUX
ber 11th:
5. Tickets
oor. 8:30
Nov. 3rd,
rue f irst-
.ESMAN.
The theory is  it's easier to watch it than  to
read it yourself. Test the theory.
MUSIC
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE. SYMPHONY CONCERT. Nov. 9th, 8:30 p.m.: ORCHESTRA  SAN PIETRO.
ART
VANCOUVER ART GALLERY. Nov. 8th to
Nov. 26th: 3 exhibitions in one: DESIGN IN
CZECHOSLOVAKIA, CANADIAN GROUP,
and DON MCINTOSH.
LITERATURE
RAVEN short story deadline, 3:30 Friday,
Nov. 3rd. Editorial meeting, 4:30 Sunday, Ian
Dunn's. B.Y.O.B.
N.B.: PLACEBO was taken by the Admen
this week.
N.B.: CRITICS' PAGE on Thursday next
week.
* K IN E O
; By PETER
A RAISIN IN THE SUN
I was inclined to be pessimistic about A .
RAISINJN THE SUN (director: Daniel Perriej
when I learnt U had b e e n adapted for the •
screen by Lorraine Hansberry from her own
play. Authors are rarely capable of transposing •
their  material from one  medium  to another:
they are too inclined to revere the original
form. Unfortunately, Miss Hansberry is no exception to this maxim, ahd my pessimism was
justified.  A RAISIN IN THE SUN may have
been a great play but it is certainly far from
being a great film.
MONEY'S EFFECT
The theme is one that would be bound to
raise unusual comment for it is concerned solely
with the life of a Negro family in Chicago and
the impact on them of a life insurance cheque '
for $10,000. Each member of the family has different ideas for using the money and in their
antagonisms and interchanges is   revealed  the
character of each and their view of the general
Negro situation and the great white world beyond. The theme is a brave one with excellent
dialogue and must have been yejy. cojiipelljng.;>■;
on the stage, but is blatantly obvious that both ?
the writer ahd director have not realised that...-.
theatricai|y: effective dialogue and acting are -,
generally'unsuccessful in tlje cinematic  medium.     ''''■■' -'.■'■>'!'.'
feEVEAl-S LAXftY  ;
The opening shot gives one reason to hope
for more than is fulfilled. A huge close-up
frames the face of the sleeping son (played by
Sidney Poilier) as the alarm clock rings. In this
close-up and the intimate facial expressions
it reveals we see something that is made ob-
■^otts later^in the dialogue: that here is a man
Willis riotf merely, sjeepy but %who also lacks-
any desire % arise and face the World. Not very
profound, perhaps, but at least is shows a proper use of the medium.
The rest of the film, with the exception
of a few isolated shots and one scene, is photographed theatre. The camera is positioned in
one corner of the room (generally the kitchen)
and simply records the action. (One could'ima-
gine the camera-man. setting up his camera,
pressing a button and hurrying off round the
MORRIS
corner for a quiet.smoke whilst the actors got
on with it). This theatrical influence is also revealed in the groupings of the characters which
are not arranged for the camera but according
to sdine ,stage law. In fact so poor are the group
compositions that-, the most prominent figure
in the kitchen scenes is often a large white refrigerator!
RESEMBLES PLAY
One could also isolate those points in the
film which coincided with scene endings in the
play, for the climaxes are distinctly stagy in
nature. The wife slowly faints and, to the accompaniment of shouts from the mother, we
have a slow fade-out (or curtain, if you will).
Obviously the end of an Act occurs when the
swindled son cries out to his betrayer and the
disappointed mother cries out to the Lord, until
they subside into a theatrical grouping with
heads bowed, hands clasped etc.-—fade-out, curtain.
Only one scene (which obviously didn't
occur in the play) rescues the film from complete visual boredom. The mother goes to fetch
her son from a tavern where he is soaking his
Ditjerriess in'vdMftfc; As she enters the tavern
the^ cahieya mdyes before her, looking up at
"* her,in medium close-up. In those few seconds
-the jnatriacfccal dignity of the woman is con-
rveyed more effectively than ten minutes ef
dialogue could h^ve achievecj.   ;, i
V    tLtJTfERED' SG/EIsTES   ^ x!
The photography, with odd exceptions, is
unimaginative with its stagy, cluttered compositions. The glossy Hollywood lighting serves
oiily to illuminate the scene in view and not
the emotions of the characters.
. The ^ciujS' "ipstty jserfoOTned bj! t»e original; Br0*Jd#% c^ff is (effective, in the -ithn's]
3uieter;imbment^ljbut iw the climaxes all" the:
actors lose control; and try to get life into their
parts by she£r violence. Loud screamings and
exaggerated gestures, do not project well in the
c i n em a. ';'.-"-...
The eriel result is a persuasive and moving
play ruined by a totally un-cinematic production that, removes all power from the theme.
Perhaps one day directors like Perrie will realise they defile their art when they work in such
a way.
WRITER'S SERVICE
Let us sell your story, article,
book, TV, songs and poems.
Violet Sacchwell,
6125 Ewart St..
South Burnaby
HE  3-3176
Open Evenings
Queen Elizabeth
Theatre
and
THE   PAUL   SMITH  TRIO
Tickets now!
4.50-4.00-3.25-2.50-1.75
Box Office
HUDSON'S   BAY  CO.
Daily 10-5 MU   1-3351
Presented  by
Famous Artists Ltd. & CKWX
THE MONEY GRUBBING
IVY LEAGUE HIPPIES
OF
COFFEE HOUSE
IN KEEPING WITH THEIR GENUINE FAKE ARTISTIC POLICY
(BURP)* PRESENT ANOTHER WEEKEND OF JAZZ, FOLK-
SINGING, CLASSICAL GUITAR, CARIBBEAN DRUMMING AND
DRAMATIC READINGS FOR THE EXORBITANT PRICE OF
$1.10 PER PERSON (THE DIME BEING YOUR CONTRIBUTION
TO THE B.C. HOSPITAL FUND).
"From the Redoubtable Critic Jamie Reid
Ubyssey Critics Page 4. Oct. 27
OUR UNDERPAID, SMOOTH-TALKING UNIVERSITY-TRAINED
HIP WAITERS MAY EMBARASS YOU TO THE POINT OF
PURCHASING A SIX-CUP POT OF TEA FOR 50c ... AT 25c
EACH, THIS MEANS A SACRIFICE OF LUNCHES FOR THE
FIRST THREE DAYS OF THE FOLLOWING WEEK.
OUR SLOGAN
MATERIALISM
COMMERCIALISM
AND A SACRIFICE
OF ART Page  6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 3, 1961
Students apathetic
toward world affairs'
By KRISHNA SAHAY
Canadian students are apathetic towards international
affairs, said Dean Geoffrey C. Andrew, deputy to the President.
Students in Canada should
agitate, through student councils
and through the National Federation of Canadian University
Students, to force the federal
goverenment to give more aid
to poorer countries, Dean Andrew said.
AID UNWORTHY
The amount of aid that the
Canadian government now
gives, ($67 million) is a shame
and hardly worthy of the wealth
of this country, he said.
Dean Andrew was speaking
on a panel discussion on the
"Challenge of Underdeveloped
Nations"!
Dr. John Conway, of the Department of History, speaking
on the social implications of the
world-wide advent of freedom,
said the chief cause for the advance of Communism is not so
much a deficiency in the monetary aid that the west gives the
underdeveloped countries, but
an evident lack of sympathy.
He said Communists do not
give the newly independent
Asian and African countries a
great deal of aid,, but they sympathize with them and try to
understand their problems.
SEEK EQUAL STATUS
The underdeveloped nations
wish to get equal status, in fact
as well as theory, with the rich-
General Foulkes to
speak at seminar
General Charles Foulkes will
speak at a seminar, "Berlin-
1961," to be held today and Saturday in the Law Building.
The seminar is sponsored by
the extension department.
Other speakers will be John
Wood of the Slavonic department. Dr. John Conway of the
history department, Gordon Selman, of the extension department and Dr. Herbert Linner,
vice-consul for Germany in Vancouver.
9I66C 3H 'AeMpeoia *M 9£9Z
iW3HJL MOllOJ N3H1
(spuiiu poiu jno jo 4uaui6ij d
jo uoipnpojdaj Dijuai^no uo
sj   ip|i|M)  'j,uojOD4saj   jno  Oi
J3AO   UO   91U03   Oi   CU31H    ||8J^
jOOJ suoou
-J34JD  9   puO   ')|39M   D  SSJjU   9
|pq  d oadi)  ud3  noX VWVa
-VZZId »D i^m uiam ||Sj 'S9A
•UMO(  Uj   SDZ
-z|d jsajD9jS am jo uojtduDs
-ap Bujzijotuo* d 6u;posj ojd
noX |Din uuai^ \\a\ tsnj '6ujop
oj,noX jdijm s5)sd suoXuo J|
'Buiijoixios jo—
;nu d jo pui>j auios a->\\\ >po|
jsnuj noX 'noX jd a\qot am
ssojdd 6ui>joo| auoauios oj^
j,UMop sp;sdn jsd
-od s\m ij|(M ajatj Bujujs noX
ajD XqM os '(tj ojui paddoji
ojsm jo) ti pnaj noX puD
s.\m   p;g  sm  joaX      I fiJ-t
VMMZld
er and more powerful countries,
he said.
Dr. Cyril Belshaw, head of
the campus United Nations
training centre, speaking on the
technical and economic aspects
of the situation, emphasized
that if the West wishes to give
aid, it should be given on the
terms of the recipients.
Aid as given by the West today has too many strings attached, he said.
Dean Andrew said one way to
get rid of the feeling of condescension in aid was to give aid
multilaterally, rather than unilaterally, through organizations
such as the UN.
- TWEEN CLASSES -
CIRCLE K
Important meeting noon today
in Bu. 2218. Speaker is Mr.
Clark from McDermid, Millei
and McDermid.
* *   *
JR. CHEM. CLUB
Dr. Hooley speaks on "Chemistry in Europe, noon today in
Chem. 250.
* *   *
SOC. OF BACTERIOLOGY
Film: "Microscopic Fungi",
noon today in Wes. 200. Everybody welcome.
* *   *
LAST MINUTE CLUB
No tickets available for Anton Dolin. "Ballet of Britain"
concert is cancelled.
* *   *
VCF
Rt. Rev. R. S. Dean, Bishop of
Cariboo, speaks on "Who is a
Disciple?", noon today in Brock.
* *   *
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Mr. McNairn, Fine Arts,
speaks on Precolurnbian Archaeology in Central America
noon today in Arts 103.
DIVERS
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Located on Univ. Endowment
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after 6 p.m.
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ANGLICAN   -   EPISCOPAL
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7:30 a.m. Low Mass
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2431   SOUTH GRANVILLE
RE 8-8012 - EVES: LA 6-3268, TR 6-8795 Friday, November 3, 1961
HE      UBYSSEY
Page   7
Willamette puts
hope in Bear-foot
By BERT MacKINNON
Tommy 'The Toe' Lee headlines a really big shoe that
opens at UBC Stadium Saturday.
The show features the Western Canadian Intercollegiate
champion UBC Thunderbirds
and the 1960 Northwest Conference hampion Willamette
College Bearcats. The game
begins at  1.
Thunderbirds won the WCI
championship last weekend,
beating defending champion
Alberta 13-6.
*   *   *
Coach Ted Ogdahl's Bearcats have long been a football
power. They were undefeated
last year, and were ranked
ninth in the nation among
small colleges. Their last
year's record included a 33-17
defeat of the Thunderbirds.
This year, Willamette has a
2-3 record, but last week defeated Lewis and Clark 14-7
as quarterback Lee passed for
212 yards on eight completions.
Lee, a native Hawaiian who
kicks converts barefooted, has
two letters and is an able
quarterback. He is joined in
the backfield by fellow Hawaiian, fullback Doug Chan,
the team's leading rusher with
239 yeards in 35 carries.
•k    rk    "k
Barry Carkner will be in at
quarterback for UBC and is
expected to take to the air in
an effort to scramble the Bear
defense.
UBC    coach   Frank    Gnup
TOMMY  LEE
... toeing   the   line
plans to make extensive use
of Jack Schriber, Roy Bianco
Pete Black, and Bruce McCal-,
lum.
Black was a standout in
the last outing against Alberta
and Gnup hopes that he can
come up with another good
Bear-hunting  expedition.
Veteran Tom Andrews is a
doubtful starter for the Birds.
Injured early in the season, i
Andrews dressed for the first
time against Alberta but re-
injured his knees. Tackle Roy
Shatzko also won't dress.
Students!
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roommate Wanted
Girl   wants  grirl   student  18-22   to
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BE  8-34lo
SPORT
Runners head
for Spokane
UBC's seven - man cross-coun-
ry team becomes a six-man
team this week for the Inland
Empire Championships in Spokane.
Geoff Eales, the standout this
year,( will not be running on
Saturday because he has to take
j comprehensive exam towards
his doctorate.
UBC's hopes will be running
with John Prior, Jim MacKay.
Rod Constable, Tom Fell, Stan
Joughin and Steve Porsche.
Teams from Washington State
Alberta, Idaho, Central and
Eastern Washington, haVe also
entered the meet. UBC finished
third last year behind Washing
on State and Idaho:-
Grasshockey after
4th   straight  win
The varsity men's grasshockey
team goes after their fourth
straight victory in the first division city league against India
Saturday.
Last week-end, Varsity blanked Redbirds 5-0 to take over
first place. In. other games, Blues
lost 4-1 to Grasshoppers; Golds
were edged 4-3 by Blackbirds,
and Pedagogues won by default
over Advocates.
NEAL   HENDERSON
... on injured list
Will success
spoil Bircls?
The rugby Thunderbirds go
after their first "official" victory
of the year Saturday.
They meet Richmond at 2:30
at Brockton Oval. Birds' only
win this year came last week
against UBC's second team, the
Braves.
The team is now in top physical condition after six weeks of
seasoning. Only fullback Neal
Henderson, who has been sidelined with a groin injury since
the end of last year, will not
play.
The Braves, meanwhile, meet
ex-Brit on the UBC gym field
at 2:30 Saturday. Braves, who
have lost their last two games,
need a victory to stay in the top
half of the league standings.
Frosh A plays ex-Gladstone at
Douglas Park at 1:30. Frosh B
has not been scheduled to play.
An inter-team competition between Phys. Eds. and the Tomahawks is also scheduled for Saturday. Phys Eds. are so far undefeated in second division play.
Game time is 1:30 at Hillcrest
Park.
SHORTS
BASKETBALL
UBC Braves were defeated
68-56 Wednesday by Kerrisdale,
their first Junior Men's League
loss this year.
Rory W e 1 I i n g s scored 16
points and Ren Erickson 11 for
Braves. Chuck Woodruff and
Ace Walker scored 13 and 12
points for Kerrisdale.
* *   *
UBC Thunderettes scored their
second Senior A women's basketball league victory in three
games Wednesday^ defeating
Sunset 44-31.
Barb Bengough got 12 points
for UBC: Barb Robertson added
10. Wednesday, Thunderettes
meet "rival Richmond Merchants,
,vho handed UBC their only loss
this year.
UBC's junior women's team
won their first game of the year
Wednesday, : defeating Hastings
33-30. Sue Hamilton scored 19
of UBC's points.
TENNIS
Men's tennis team practices
every Monday from 5:30 to 7:00.
All players asked to turn out in
strip Nov. 6 for pictures.
BADMINTON
The UBC "C2" Badminton defeated the Vancouver Racquets
Club seven games to five in their
first league match.
* *   *
BOWLING
UBC's varsity bowling team
defeated North Vancouver All-
stars 6-3 Tuesday. Jerry Devine
averaged 258 and Ray Hughes
243 to lead UBC.
The second team defeated the
second North Van team 5-4, but
the third team lost 7-2.
Sunday, UBC hosts three Vancouver All-star teams at the
Memorial Gym alleys.
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SHOP       DOWNTOWN       TIL       9
MUtual 1-9831
ON        FRIDAY Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 3, 1961
GRADUATE STUDENT RAY NOEL carries in another load of
'French Canadian books to the Grad Student Centre. More
than 300 books have been sent from Quebec since Noel
sent an appeal to three French language newspapers for
books.
-   'TWEEN   CLASSES -
raTEBKATIONAL   HOUSE
The annual International
pattseoBali.'will be held Nov. 10.
TJieme is Chinese, "Orchid of
fee Orient". Tickets available at
_ [ .i ■;;.>:'.,,■. ; *   *   tf"
"Mind and the Maker" Eng.
200. Lecture on Donne by J. de-
Bruyn. Tuesday noon in Bu. 100.
Everyaody welcome.
*   *   *
GEBiMAM CLUB
Messrs. K. Hermann and F.
Schmidt-Httsen will talk on the
German. University System noon
today in Bu. 204.
EAST ASIA SOC
Discussion group and general
meeting noon today in Bu. 203.
* *   *
NEWMAN CENTRE
Bridge Party, Sunday at 8:00
p.m. in the Centre.
* * *■
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSN.
"Luther's Personal Faith'',
Pastor N. B. Harure, Monday
noon in Hut L-2.
•*   *   *
FINE ARTS DEPT.
Art Gallery—Herbert Siebner
and Elza Mayhew will discuss
their work, now on display, at
noon in the Art Gallery.
Noel letter
gets books
for Centre
By  JOYCE HOLDING
A   graduate  students'   appeal
to French-Canadians for French
literature   has   resulted   in   3001
books and magazines being sent
to the Graduate Student Centre.'
The   deluge  was   in  response
to a letter written by Graduate ■
Student    Association   executive |
member, Ray Noel, to three of
Quebec's leading newspapers.
His letter asked the readers
to supply UBC with a library
of French-written material.
The former University of
Montreal student said he came
to UBC two years ago "to help
develop understanding o f
French-speaking Canadian culture among English-speaking
Canadians,
Said Noel, "I have found in
Vancouver a strong desire on
the part of English-speaking Canadians to understand and speak
fluently both official languages
of Canada.
~ "As there are .many French-
speaking and French - reading
graduate students, I felt that the
new Graduate Student Centre
library should contain French-
language as well as English-
language literature," he said.
On July 25 he sent his letter
to La Presse (Montreal), Le Devoir (Montreal) and Le Soleil
(Quebec City).
The response: from French-
speaking Canadians was instant.
"Packages of 20 books —- 10
books—five books began arriving at the centre," said Noel.
"Soon the post office asked
me to come and pick up the
packages myself."
The largest single donation
was sent by the Ministry of Cultural Affairs in Quebec. The
donation included reference
books, newspapers and magazines.
Current editions of La Presse
and Le Magazine Maclean are
now available.
Ilk lessors sm tirkinl'y tapcRtC
■:,
%& tky wd M me touchy
!iMt reactors omcl mkl
% lie to tai aH if
Perny-wise and dollar-wfse,
The student who would like to rise,
Wilt use this saving stratagem—
A bit each week in the B of M!
dp
Bank of Montreal5
gonad** "pcnat Studfo*. Student*
U6-61
The Bank where'Students' accounts are warmly welcomed
Your  Campus  Branch   in  the   Administration  Building.
MERLE C. KIRBY, Manager.
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Bay PARKADE. Entrance on Richards.
Use The

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