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The Ubyssey Jan 26, 1926

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Issued Twice Weekly by the Students' Publications Board of The University of British Columbia.
■ l^.'l -v'S.'f-
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Volume VIII.
VANCOUVER, B. C, JANUARY 26th, 1926
No. 22.
U.B.C. SOCCER MEN DIVIDE
HONORS WITH ROYAL CITY
Largo Crowd Witaossos Ono of Best Games of Season.
Queue Yip Proves Deckled Asset to Varsity.
There was a great orowd on hand, and by halt past two the stands were
Well filled. First the Westminster United team came on the field snd warmed up around the net. They got a big hand. Five minutes later Varsity,
heeded by Mosher appeared, and were received with still greater enthusl-
sent which broke out Into cheering when Quene Yip, ex-Chinese Students'
eenter-forward came on the field. The old veterans of the Varsity team,
Mosher, Crute, Ledlngham, Buckley, Phillip* and Oomeron, all grey and
decrepit, staggered down the field towards the far goal. Of this years's
players Crees and Manning looked promising, while ths newoomers, Gray,
«p, and Stevenson looked lively. At last the whistle blew, the teams lined
ap, snd kicked off.
At first It seemed as though Varsity had no fight. Westminster beaded
by Adam Kerr started with a rush and kept coming down. Phillips playing
Sgain st centre half with all his old time foxlness, secured the ball, eluded
three Westminster players and put in a long shot whioh Alsbury, the goalie,
rsn out snd caught. Before he knew what had happened, Yip had run Into
him and knocked him over, but one ot the baoajs cleared the ball. Then
Westminster's outside right worked the ball down, resulting in a corner.
Adam Kerr, unmarked, put the ball into the top right hand corner of
the net, putting Westminster shead
V-o.
Westminster continued to press.
pelsney st left halt, and hie companion brother, right half, continually
sending their forwards away with
Well-timed passes, but again and
again Crute or Mosher proved too
clever for them. Phillips at last sent
Cameron away who crossed to YIp;
the latter, marked by both backs, passed psrfeotly over his head to Crees,
who evened the score with a first
time drive.
Ledlngham at this point got Gray
Snd Stevenson going. Both exhibited some trloky dribbling and Gray
put in two good snots. The Westminster backs, however, showing excellent co-operation, kept the score
down. On the play in the first halt
Westminster's passing gave them an
advantage, although Varsity's defence, after a disastrous beginning,
livened up, showing the style of play
Which three years ago made the team
olty champions.
After a meagre luncheon hostilities were renewed and Varsity forwards proceeded to show Westminster just bow forward line soccer is
played. Yip proved to be the
strength of the line, the centre forward that Varsity has heen looking
for. Tho forward line went down,
was repulsed, ami came hack again.
This time Quone Yip eluded three
United players and passed perfectly
to Camerou, who put ia a shot which
Alsbury heard as It hit the back of
tbe net.
After ouch a reverse, Westminster
bombarded Varsity's goal from every
direction. Inside of ten minutes
Mosher made three saves such as
even his teammates considered spectacular. He excelled himself. Gentle
George Ledlngham ran and skidded
like a bus In a dense fog, but he
seemed to keep his headlights on the
ball. Bill Phillips played as if he
thought he were the vigilance committee, He always seemed to consider
that no Westminster forward bad a
right to dribble the ball and kept taking it away from them, His long
passes up to Yip started the play
going towerds West minster's goal.
Buckley often chuckled to himself as
he banged gently against Kerr,
A penalty v/as given against Manning for hands. Everyone hold his
breath while Mosher caught the shot
and as he fell, turned It away from
the oncoming forward's foot. Throe
minutes and a quarter later ho picked the ball away from three forwards,
went down In a scrummagn, but
cleared the ball In the cud, A few
minutes later, however, Crute, in attempting to head the bull, de Ducted
It Into the nut, thus tying the score
a--2.
This ended thu scoring, although
Varsity forwards often threatened,
Stevenson, Yip and Crees being
prominent. Westminster was best
served by the right back, the two
wing halves, and the two outside
wing forwards. YIp and Mosher
were the outstanding men on the
field. Stevenson and Gray showed
(Continued on Page 4)
Lack of Interest
in MeL.S. Contest
Out ot the multitude of lusty young
orators who are known to Inhabit
these edifices, only six appeared at
the try-outs for the Men's Oratorical
Contest on Friday afternoon. Accordingly, after the six candidates
had been heard, ths try-out was adjourned until some of the shrinking
violets summon enough courage to
make an appearance.
The speeches delivered were good,
with well-chosen and Interesting subject-matter.
Mr. D. A. Davis gave a chatty talk
on "A few Incidents with pack horses. Mr. P, Murphy declaimed on
".Nationalism," and Mr. D. Murphy
on "World Peace." Mr. McClure
made some pertinent remarks on
"American Football." Mr. Cameron
dealt with the very timely topic of
"The Honor System in College Discipline." Mr. Gordon Telford concluded the session with a discussion of
the "Real Conditions in Russia."
As no further speakers were forthcoming, tho contest was then adjourned. Announcements of the successful candidates will bo made later.
Both the Men's and Women's Oratorical Contests will take place in
the Auditorium on the evening of
February 10th.
ifisa
Imperial Debate To
Be In March
Arrangements for tho visit ot the
Imperial Delegates are already beginning to take concrete form. Tho
British team will be in Vancouver
from March 5th to 10th and the contest with the University will be staged   on   Monday   the   8th.
The Imperial team will be on a par
with the Oxford toam which debated
here a year ago. However, whereas
the Oxford team was chosen from
only one university, the four members of the Imperial team were chosen from Oxford, Cambridge, Edinburgh and Manchester Universities.
The Britishers are spending an entire year touring the Empire and debating with teams from the various
universities under tbe auspices ot the
National Union ot students. They
have arrived In Canada, snd after
meeting teams from the Eastern Universities and the Prairies, will reach
here on March 6th. Leaving Canada
they will prooeed to Australia snd
New Zealand.
The subject ot the debate with
U. B. 0. is, "Resolved that Western
Civilisation Is becoming a demoralising influence on mankind.''
of tbe Introduction of American Rug
by into our University. He sees many
things which wouiti uphold either
view of the subject but does not yet
desire to put himself expressly into
print as definitely upholding one aide
or the other.
Interviewed on the subject of introducing American football in U.B.C,
Prof. Henderson said that since he
was unfamiliar with the game he
could not discuss its merits. He
thought that the opinions of the other
professors were reasonable. It seemed
to him that the Introduction of a
game that would be as complicated as
the American game tended to be was
Inadvisable.
When asked for his opinion on
American Rugby In Ihe U.H.C., Dr.
Sedgwick replied, "I like the game---
I like to sec people play It- but under
the present conditions heie, it in Impossible." Furthermore, he remarked
(hat he did not want (o see the condition of athletics In American colleges prevailing here.
MISS ISOBBL BARTON, of Arts
'28, who will take the part, of leading
lady In "Pygmalion," the eleventh annual spring play of the University
Players' Club, to be presented In the
Auditorium early in March, Miss Barton Is well known to Varsity audiences, having distinguished herself in
"The Luck Piece" this Christmas.
AMERICAN RUGBY
AGAINJMSCUSSED
Dr. Davidson does not wish to commit himself by exaaysslng. an opinion.   .........
on such an Important matter as that !* Blue and Cold Senior A cage artists
CePeS. Basketers
Defeat Senior 'A'
•'   Si-"-?*"",*:'    If'■*■.*»!-'
r
University
er
£)   (OLOM6.A
The Foundling
were forced to accept defeat at the
hands of the Puget Sound Loggers on
Saturday night to the tune of 41-10.
Varsity were far below their usual
form but nevertheless the Sounders
were full value for their victory. The
first half was very fast with both
teams trying hard to pull out in front.
Varsity led for a short time 4-2 but
could not hold the pace, and at halt
time the score stood 17-12 for the
Visitors. Frank Wilson, of C.P.8.,
showed rare ability and thrilled the
crowd with his flawless shooting. He
annexed 12 points during the half.
The second half proved the downfall of the homesters when Puget
Sound fathomed the long passing
game lined by Varsity, The C.P.S.
forwards and guards managed to
draw their checks and allow Wilson
aud llanntis (o score at will. Fred
Newcombe had the misfortune to dislocate his collar bone and had to retire from the game early In the second half. His absence was felt on
the forward line as he can always be
counted on for a good share of tho
points.
None of the Varsity players were
outstanding In their performance and
they played far below the form of a
week ago against the Y.
The Puget Sound team had only
one personal charged against them.
C.P.S.—Wilson, 22; Blevens, 4;
Hannus, 11; Aldrlch, 2; Guest, 2;
Olnn.
Varsity—Newcombe, 2; A. Henderson. I; Hartley, 2; Wilkinson, 2; Nes-
bltt; Gordon, 2; H. Henderson, 2;
Duller,  2.
W.L.S. WILL HAVE
NEW PRESIDENT
Owing to prossiire of work, Miss
Marlon Smith of Arts '26, has found
It necessary to resign from her position as President of the Women's Literary Society. She has dono splendid
work during the past term and has
made the Society ft more vital force
In University life, Her place will be
taken by tho vice-president, Miss Alice
Weaver of Arts '2li, who has always
tnknn un Interest In the Women's
Mt.. hnvlng participated In the Inter-
clnss debates nnd I ho Women's Oratorical contest Inst year. She is also
a member of the Freshette Sophomore
team which Is to debate with Victoria
College  shortly.
IMPORTANT!
8enlor Draw. Science 200, Tueeday
Noon.
FEATURE NEWS
FROM OTHER
COLLEGES
Danes Orase Reason fer
Present Dress.
State College of Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 20.—That music was the
primary cause of the present short
skirt epidemic is the opinion of Lieut.
Com. John Philip Sousa, who this season makes his Thlrd-of-a-Century
Tour with his famous band, and who
will appear at the college January 80.
Iuslc, and particularly jaaa and Its
forerunners, set tbe American girls
to dancing, the dancing developed
their leg muscles and when pipestem
a& had beoome the exception, rather
than the rule, fashion decreed the
the short skirt.
"The present dance crass began
about a decade ago," says Sousa.
"The development of ballroom dsne-
Ipg received a powerful Impetus with
the introduction of the tango, the foxtrot and the maxixe, the predecessors
of present-day jasi. As s matter of
fact jass largely developed in the
dance halls, where small orchestras
sought out new effects with which to
•nllven programmes of dance music.
When the girls began to dance, the
muscles of their legs developed from
the exercise, with the result that the
Innocent bystander these days sees
much less that is distressing to gsse
upon than would have been the case,
had there been no dance erase."
The Human Touoh for
Pour Dollars
Entering students at Cornell are required to pay a speolal tax (In addition to the fees oollscted by every
normal university), the proceeds from
which go toward making Cornell s
"more human university."
If a four dollar tax would make this
University "more human," It Is well
worth paying. The human touch is
sometimes hard to find here. The
sychophantlo anglings of grade hunters have made self-respecting students shun the society of professors
In any but a formal way. Robbed of
this stimulus, an assignment is an assignment, and nothing more. There
Is scant Incentive to go beyond the
boundaries  of dally  requirements.
Rach student Is concerned with his
own affairs, each clique is a little
world In Itself, for which no other
world exists. Anyone with a trace
of individuality Is a freak, and suffers accordingly at. the hands of those
who don't know they are Juot types.
In plugging along the treadmill, as
the pursuit of education sometimes
appears to become, It seems proper
to wonder whether something a little
more human and vital couldn't be Injected into this business of chasing
diplomas and careers. Will four dollars buy It?—Californlan.
Sigma Delta Chi Spread Gloom
State College of Washington, Pullman, Wn„ Jan. 14.—(P.l.P.)—-Saduess
and gloom of a doubtful quality pervaded the campus Tuesday morning
while the Invitations to the annual
Sigma Delta Ch! "Gridiron Banquet"
were being delivered.
At the start of the noon hour a
handsome hearse moved from Its shed
drawn by two trustworthy steeds
from the Veterinary Department,
which had purchased them for purpose of study, and began a staid progress toward the lower part of the
campus. In advance of the hearse
were two splendid war horses hung
with glittering trappings of pure Iron,
dlghlly rusted. These charges curried two of the chief mourners who
directed (he line of march. The trap-
nlng* of the loom that "drafted" the
hearse were tho finest obtainable,
nnd cost 94.2.1.
II was In this way thai the Invitations to the Gridiron Banquet were
delivered (o the prominent fraternity
n,en of tho campus.
COUNCIL COURT CONVICTS
PRISMMAN
Ralph Farrls, Arts '2ft was found
guilty at Council Court on Friday, of
smoking on the campus. As this was
his first offence he received only a
light sentence. Farrls spent his noon
hour picking up papers on tbe campus,
depositing them In a gunny sack 1
THE   UBYSSEY
January 26th, 1926
Sbr IbyBsri?
(Member of Paciilo Inter-Collegiate Press Association).
Issued every Tuesday and Friday by the Student Publications Board of the
University of British Columbia, West Point Orey.
Phone: Varsity 1434
Mail Subscriptions rate: $8. per year.   Advertising rates on application.
Editorial Staff
BDITOR-W-CHIBF—A. Earle Birney.
Senior Editors—Miss Sadie Boyles and W. Murphy.
Associate Editors—David Warden, Miss Marlon Smith, Don Calvert and
Miss Kathleen Baird.
Feature Editors—Brie Dunn, B. Morris, and 0. Vincent.
Assistant Editors—Miss Florence Cassidy, Miss Alice Weaver.
Business Staff
Business Manager—Harold Q. McWtliiams.
Advertising Manager—J. Btanley Allen.
Ciroulatton Manager—Digby Leigh
Business Assistants—Lyle Straight and T. Barnott.
Edltors-for-the-laeue:
Senior, Sadie Boyles; Associate, David Warden; Assistant, Alice Weaver
APATHY
A short tlmo npo a suction of tho student body who wished to
see a secret system of discipline replaced by un open one, itgituted for
an Alma Muter meeting Tliroiifrli mismnnAgcmont thoy allowed attention to be Bhiftod to the wishes of n radical minority, and by so
doing, lost their chances for an immediate vote. The Council has
since disclaimed any responsibility for calling a second meeting without formal intimation from the faction favoring open discipline, All
that is necessary is a written request for an Alma Mater meeting
signed by twenty students. The division opposing secret vigilantes
bad evidently a larger following at the meeting than the "total abolitionists;" it is quite probable that they represented a majority at the
meeting. Yet, with such encouragement, thoy have since that date
apathetically let the matter drop.
Some peevishly complain that "they never get what they want,
and it doesn't matter anyway." Such sulkiness is unworthy of any
free human being born this side of the Middle Ages. Apathy is the
affectation of a moral second-rate, and its appearance among University students causes nothing but mischief. It was apathy in the
Newbolt affair, resulting from a misguided sense of disappointment,
that stopped the pursuance of a just fight to a satisfactory conclusion. Two, possibly three important questions, in addition to that of
discipline, must be voted upon by students this term. Let us hope
that sulkiness will not again bo in evidence. "Without courage,
conscience is a sorry guest."
0UT.RALEIGH1NG RALEIGH
This matter of University transportation has always been rather
a vexing question. Perhaps things would go better if a little common sonse wore used. In tho larger centres, as far as getting into
busses is concerned, the "ladies first" motto is dead, and has been so
for ages. This convention has no place in our modern era of common
sense. It is not practical. It is the superficial remnant of nn outworn chivalry which passed out of order with the decay of the medieval ages and tho dawn of our modern world.
Some conventionalities we accept without a murmur. In tho
days when garbage was "avalanched" through the window, the
lady was "given the wall" in order that tho remains of the vegetable
salad might have a better chance of catching her man in the face.
Today the barrage has shifted. But man still retains his "bumper"
position in absorbing most of the rain and mud swished up by balloon tires, thus affording protection to the delicate silk hosiery now
in vogue. At least there is an element of common sense here. But
in this bus proposition—women are crying out for equality. Give it
to them, by all means, we say. They have taken over what were
regarded as man's privileges; they drink and smoke and swear. Why
not? The Ubyssey has always stood for emancipation, and backs
up Bobbie in the claim:
"His prentice hand lie tried on man.
And then he made the lasses  0."
But wo are not dallying at court now. Vancouver rain and Vancouver fog at B..30 are hardly conducive to (lie arousing of the chiv-
alric or aesthetic emotions. That it should he "ladies first" is
really no one's fault. However, if one door were for the women and
the other for the men, there would lie equal rights and opportunity.
Granted, it is rather amusing to see the first in the long lino of soppy
men just putting an oozy shoe on the running board, and lo! a reinforcement of "the lasses, 0' rushes up, and commences a flanking
movement that might have shamed the Canadians at Vimy. Back
goes the line again. Spencer's hand bags are already limp and
wanky, and Latin books are eagerly seeping up the moisture that
their system craves. And the men, even more vigorously than the
women, pray for equality.
To be serious, however, there are some aspects of the old chiv-
ric tradition whose only redeeming feature is their inherent humor.
Perhaps for this very reason we should cling to them, What a contrast to the "really-rather-trying" forced humor fed to us "ad
nauseam" in the class room, day after day. But in the last analysis
—if chivalry, its usefulness outworn, had only been content with
its proper fulfilment of function; and then died. If only we could
say that it was "like unto the olive, which, matured and ripened,
drops to the ground, thanking the tree that hero it and the power
that gave it life!"
BARD WANTED
The Students'Council is offering a prize for an acceptable U.B.C.
song, It is to he hoped some hard in our midst will be stimulated hy
the tilTer, and by the general prayers of Ids Alnut Mater, to imsc null
compose a fitting saga. If an original tunc, at least within tho necessary compass of an octave, is too much to hope, for, it is still only
reasonable lo expect  that any one of several students could  write
one or two short verses setting forth tl sscntial and unique charms
of our Alma Mater.
Such a consummation is devoutly to he wished for.    Our yells
are good, but Ihey are adapted with difficulty to our more dignified
ceremonies.    We hour, in addition, the unwelcome distinction of be
ing flic only Canadian or American university of kindred size and
position, to exist without at least one standard battle hymn.
Let but a Homer or Sappho arise, and a new name will be placed
on that panel of our Hall of iVame which already bears the name of
one, Arthur Lord, beloved author of " Kitsilano.'"
The senior swung down from the
train. Naomi, he thought, would certainly be Impressed with his sartorial ensemble; the flop hat, the delicately blue-gray Bult, the mahogany
shoes; but above all she would bo Impressed with the meerschaum, so professionally nonchalant In the corner
of his mouth. It would be effective,
ho decided, to stroll up to her with a
slight -suggeBtton of condescension,
take out the meerschaum when still
a tew feet distant, start a tolerantly
conventional smile, and—.
Tho cultivated air of ennui left him
quite suddenly: there was no one on
the station platform but his sister,
Bisters wore till right, of course, but
they had un Indetinnhle sameness
about them always—even after not
having been seen for three or four
months, However, Mary wus evidently very pleasod to see him, tor she
kissed him enthusiastically. There
was no loiterer on the platform to
see this overt act, yet tho senior deoid
od that he would later lecture his sister for her lavish effusion: later, of
course, because he was concerned
with a question of far greater importance at present.
In the car, Mary's sudden silence
forced him to break the ice. He puffed vigorously at, the pipe for a minute, took a rather long breath, and
fixed his gaze on the right front mudguard.
"Er—seen Naomi lately?"
Mary's eyelids flickered (but he did
not see that); and she stepped on
the gas a little as Bhe replied: "Ob,
yes, she's quite the rage; been to all
the parties lately. She seems to be
enjoying herself a lot more nowadays."
For a moment the meerschaum was
In great danger. Why In the devil,
he thought, should Mary make a statement like that? Quite unnecessary.
He inferred from his sister's tone that
.Naomi was getting along quite nicely
without him, thank you. Well, so be
It.   Why should he worry about that?
What was he to Naomi, or Naomi
to him?
Nothing—nothing at all—.
Mary had not taken her foot off the
gas, and she skilfully missed the
driveway gatepost by a matter of millimetres.
"What the—? Mary, who on earth
told you to drive *rn like that?"
"Now, now, Paul, be a good boy,
and put away that nasty pipe. Hurry
up, that's a dear./ Mother's just pining to make you some of that Orange
Pekoe you hate so much . . . Paul—
do be nice and cheerful; you'll hurt
mother, you know!"
All things considered, tea was a
success,
Later, when Mary was washing the
tea things, Paul slipped Into the kitchen. It was not a custom with him,
of course, but circumstances after all.
This time he found that gazing fixedly
out of the window was helpful.
"Naomi—not able to make It today?'
Mary polished the cup with gusto;
turned Its mouth to the light, and Inspected it 'rather too earnestly. Paul
beffan to shuffle, darn It.
"Nuomi's Krowiti'? up, Paul, big girl
now, you know; she'll be nineteen
next month."
"Well?"
"Well? . . . You haven't written to
her very often, havo you?"
"Write?    I  like  that!    Good  lord,
Mary, when a fellow's studying—."
"Piffle. Anyway, she evidently
found that she wasn't quite so keen
about you as she'd thought, any—."
"Well, go on."
"It seems as If she's recovered entirely, if you want my frank opinion,
brother mine. '
"Oh."
"But—."
"Oh, rats, rats!"
Through the hallway as if In seven-
league hoots; the hat snatchod and
pulled extraordinarily low over the
brows; out Into tbe sunlit street. The
meerschaum? Damn the meerschaum.
Six blocks he walked at full speed;
he was going to see Dan Parkman.
In the seventh block his pace slackened; Dan would talk baseball, and
he didn't want to talk baseball. Come
to think of It, he didn't want to talk
at all—not. at all; ho wanted Just to
think.   Yes, think, that was it,
He did think. Tho more ho thought,
tho less ground he covered. Soon he
was barely moving, and there was a
little drag to his feet. His shoulders
sagged; nnd his mouth, when rovealod
hy shafts of yellow light piercing the
roadside trees, showed an almost Imperceptible drag at the corners. He
did not notice the roadster which drew
up to the curb behind him, nor did he
notice the girl step out of It; and It
was quite suddenly that he became
conscious ot two wistful eyes barely
visible beneath the brim of a floppy
white hat. Wonderful eyes I
—eyelids lightly falling
On little glistening seas.
It was a low voice, a fluty voice, a
most enchanting voice.
"What's the matter, Paul?"
In the shadow ot her eyes he could
see a shadow darker still. Her eyes
were deep blue, but the shadow waa
an appalling, uncompromising indigo.
"Nothing," he said, resting his eyes.
The shadow wavered, flickered.
"Nothing at all," he emphasised,
still resting his eyes.
The shadow fled,
I. FOWLER.
i i't,.«.,a.,«Ha-a~«~«-«'.«i.a.«..«.,«,.«,,«,,aiia">"«,,«,,a,.a.'a.
AFTER VISITING THE BAKERY, and
seeing the oare and immaoulatenees
evident there-
SHELLY'S
Bread and Cakes
WILL BE 8ERVED AT THE
UNIVERSITY.
Lewis Wharton, b,a„ u.m,
Tuition Slven In University Subjeots
  AT 	
Room 326, Shelly Building,
119 Pender 8trest, West
AND
4875 7th Ave., W„ West Point flrsy
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PHONES. PT. GREY 28S-R »nd 138
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Church's Famous
English Shoes
Are Exceptional In Quality,
Style and Workmanship
Ingledew Shoe Co*
623 GRANVILLE STREET
EXCLUSIVE AGENTS
BOOKS
ALL KINDS
Half Price and Less
LANG'S
1184 Granville Street
Phone. Seymour 1013
"ft Homeiftway From
Home"
A NEW;BOARDING RE8IDENGE
EXCLUSIVELY FOR U.B.C. BOYS
All Conveniences.    Bus Fare Only.
Phone, Point Gray 128-L
4454 2nd Ave., West
Royal Transfer Ltd.
Baggage Delivered
Furniture Removals
SEYMOUR - SIX
FRASER VALLEY DAIRY
MILK, CREAMO and ICE CREAM
ARE ON SALE AT
—YOUR GRILL—
NOTE.-A PRIZE WINNING COMPETITION:
SAVE ALL PICTURE CARDS
you find in Chocolate Ice Cream Glacier Bars and
Ice Cream Bricks.
FIRST PRIZE
A Week's Cruise for Two People, including Berths
and Meals, on the Union Steamship Co's
T.SS. "Cardena."
Many Other Good Prises	
Save
All
Cards
/a
PR0»U»RS£ASS8CiATifiN
Save
All
Cards January 26th, 1926
THE   UBYSSEY
thing ii Arrm' another.
t.natn»n »w l»'
Flapper Shop
CLEARANCE SALE OF
COATS — Fitting junior
miss and small women, in
smart, youthful styles and
good colors.
COATS—Made from pure
wool coatings, fully lined and
interlined; nave fur collars;
sizes 15 and 17 years. Reg.
to $13.90. i£Q AA
Sale price   -   <<p0.e7U
COATS-Of velour, well
tailored, all have fur collars
and finished withfancy stitching ; sizes 15 snd 17. Reg.
to $23.95. *tlQ AA
Sale price-    •plOeeW
BETTER GRADE COATS
—In smart styles, all fur-
trimmed; in colors of rust,
green, leather and tan;
aizes 13,15 and 17.    Reg.
to $24.95.
Sale price
$14.90
**
David Spencer
LIMITED
Best Productions direct from
New York at the
Strand Theatre
Excellent features snd artists
that can be seen or heard
nowhere else in Vancouver.
U ■*■ ■*■ A at. A at. ail eta st* ttt Asm* at*
rTtTTTTtTtTTTT
Cabaret Belmont
i     DANCING and ENTERTAINMENT
;; Granville and Nelson St*.
&-W****4-^4'+++4*++^,M'+4"H
THE PRESENT for
THE FUTURE
YOUR PHOTOGRAPH
^ STUDIOS
413 GRANVILLE ST.
Mur UnUar-llr itudaaU ha»a found,
•ad exe now f lading, (bat • training In
•■• of the many couraaa lb Ike
PROTT
HAW
CHOOLS
— OF
00MMIR0I and TIIICRAPHY
IS RIAILY WORTN WMILI.
Wt itaad ready to assist all who seed
assistance.
Oar Ssoretarlal Course Is one which
septals to University students.
If latereatad, give us a oall at any of
our THREE BRANCHES;
330 HASTINGS ST., W.
TOWER BUILDING
MAIN and TENTH -
I Say. 1810
I Say. 7123
Say. 74SI
Fair. 41
| Class and Club Notes i TaVE ATQUE VALlF]
-nV-*--^-*^-'^■-*-■■ *--*--a*..ali■*■-**■   ■*--*- ■-*    a..^.-a^^ ..^--^..^..^--a—ah. jMSm        tSM.e\t.em^Se^Siea§MMSemSh^e*..*e^ei..e.^*i  ..ui i.n.aaa..alB.alaaal.aa^afcalMal—**---*   -*-
BBBBvayarajavB7avaya«Bf^^aBayavBB^.ayB.BjB|By.*afa..a#HaaaaBBBaB^.aaya.aB.araBa«a.iiBf ■■■ya.ay ■ Bl' aa eeff ■ ■J^W *■»*-■■**"■■" W^eraaa/aaay■*■/■<■/*■*)   "ej■■?!*/<n^e'™^f"J"^aa»a^a.B«
MATHEMATICS CLUB
(in Thursday, January 14th, the
Mathematics Club held a meeting In
Room A 202, Mr. Harold Smith road
a paper ou "PI, and tho Squaring of
tho Circle."
At tho next meeting ot the Club,
on January 28th, In room A 202, at
3 o'clock, Mr. Christie will reud a
paper on "Modern Observatories and
Their Work,"
8TUDIO CLUB
Tho second mooting ot the club
will be held on Wednesday, January
27th, at the home of Miss Bollert,
1185 10th Ave. W. Miss A. E. Fraser,
of the King Edward High School staff,
will speak on Early English Music,
Illustrating her address with records.
ART8 '28
The yearlings of Arts '28 will mix
with the verdant ones of Arts '29 In
an Inter-class debate to be held during the noon hour of Monday, February 1st, In room A100. Arts '29
will take the afllrmatlve and Arts '28
the negative of tho question: "Resolved that one hour a week should
be compulsory In each course In
Arts."
Messrs. H. Leslie Brown and W. M.
Brown will represent the Sophomores,
mil will probably be opposed by
Messrs, McLean and 1). Murphy of the
Freshman class.
SCIENCE DANCE
The Annual Science Dance will be
In Id In Lester Court, Friday, February
51 h. Science men will take note that
tickets for this event will probably
be on sale, Tuesday noon, January
26th.
CHEMI8TRY  80CIETY
Members of the Chemistry Society
will meet at the home of Dr. E. H.
Archibald, 2036 13th Ave. \V„ on Wednesday, January 27. Ralph Ball will
give an address on "The Electronic
Theory of Valence."
CLA88IC8 CLUB
The Classics Club will meet today
at 4 p.m., in Room 204, Arts Building.
A full turn-out of members Is requested to greet Mr. D. Sturdy, who will be
the speaker of tho afternoon. His subject will be "Roman Education."
ENGINEERING   DISCUSSION   CLUB
Mr, Johnny Oliver will address the
Engineering Discussion Club at noon,
Wednesday, 27th, in Room 202 Applied Science. Topic: Sewer construct ion.    Everybody  welcome.
BASKETBALL   DANCE
Following the basketball game nn
Saturday, January 23rd, the Normal
School gymnasium was the scene of
a pleasant informal dance given in
honour of the College ot Puget
Sound's basketball squad. The music
was supplied by tho "Blue and Gold"
orchestra, composed of Fred Saunders,
John Currle, Art Steveuson, aad
Frayue Gordon, who dished up a
mean brand of Jazz. The affair broke
up at midnight after about two hours
of most enjoyable tripping.
Congratulations and thanks are due
to the Women's Basketball Club who
were responsible for the success of
the affair, and to Miss Sallee Murphy, who acted as patroness.
Moved by a sort ot spring fever,
1 hud been out running pretty late
(ho other night, hearing In mind the
near approach of thu Arts '20 Relay,
und found myself getting my breath
while seated on a log up by tho King
Ed. High School, with the old University shucks faintly silhouetted
ugulnst a rising moon. Suddenly 1
beard a faint Bound, and turned to
find a curlouB and venerable old
gentleman standing beside me. He
was tall and thJn, and on bis feet
were a pair of running shoes. 1 recognized him Instantly, and scrambled to my feet.
He bowed, and smiled wanly.
"Yes, I am the Ghost of the Arts '20
Relay," he murmured, "But I'm not
feeling at all well."
1 murmured my sympathy and enquired tho cause of his .distress.
"Well, for one thing, I've Just suffered the loss of a very young friend,
who I think was valued by both of
us. His name was Tradition." "Not
that others seem to care much," he
added, "but I do. And besides, the
new course is all lonely and strange.
Look at the laps! Then remember
the merry miles spinning off to these
old buildings, and the roaring crowds,
and the old shingle stain gleaming
in the sunlight."
"Yes," I retorted, "and the roar-
lug exhausts, and the crowds of motors. Why oue could hardly run!
The new course will be splendid.
Away with the old! What do we
care about the run to tbe Old Shacks.
They're dono with! Look to the new
future .old man, und forgot!"
He smiled once again, with an infinite sadness. "Yes," he said,
"you're young, und I urn prematurely
old. But I can't help feeling sad, for
you've killed my Tradition, and he
was the only ono we had."
The moon was rising higher now,
flooding the old buildings in a glory
of white light. There came a faint
sound, like the distant patter of a
thousand running feet, a faint mur
mur, like the cheer of a distant
crowd. For an instant Tenth Avenue seemed fretted with the shades
of countless runners. I turned to
tho old man, but he was no longer
there, aud once more 1 was alone beneath the white moon.
 ••» —-
EXCRESCENCES GO
Only men who are seniors will be
permitted iho luxury of moustaches,
according to an edict of the "I" Club
ut the University of Idaho. The
statement declares that tho members
have been viewing with alarm the
growing number of hairlips among
Juniors and lowerclassmen. Even
freshmen were found guilty of the
insidious practice, according to complaints.
Silk Stockings Banned
Silk stockings for freshmen girls
have been banned on the West Virginia University campus by the Student Council. The Council has changed the style of hosiery for the first
year girls to plain black cotton.
Freshman boys likewise adopted
black cotton hose In compliance with
the freshman code.
Class Draws
Y/
m. A. GOOFY
AliSS
ure itipir
HAPPINESS
That priceless possession —
an easy mind — is the immediate reward of insuring
the happiness of your dependents against the day
when you can no longer
help them with your living
presence.
&ssausm*m WLjn
34
eteJUt UVVaVS
mm
Demote—
"What's   the   matter?
Can't you   read  your
notes of the lecture P"
Pythias—
"No—doggone li    I
skipped  over  to clasa
this   morning   without
my Dixon's Eldorado I"
IT lead*—all deatere
ELffibO
IfoMeasterasw^/Htetr
The University
Book Store
Open from 0:30 a. m. to 12 noon.
1 p. tn. to 4 p. m.
Saturdays, 0:30 a. m. to 12 noon.
Loose-Leaf Note Books,
Exercise Books aad Scribblers
At Reduoed Prices
Also, Graphic and Engineering Paper-
Biology Paper, Loose-Leaf Refills
Fountain Pen Ink
Pencils and Drawing Instrument*
ALL YOUR BOOK SUPPLIES Sola Mere
Xic Service
a basic need
THE electric power companies
of this continent generated in
1925 68,000,000,000 kilowatt hours
which were supplied to 19,000,000
customers.
Never in its history has the electrical industry recorded a decrease
in its annual revenue.
The B. C. Electric on its part supplied 390,000,000 kilowatt hours in
1925 to 85,000 cuntomer- this also
constituting a record performance.
British Coidmbm ^E^cTHicRfimraFCo
VANCOUVER
VICT'"'-*'' A ■¥■»*
THE   UBYSSEY
uAiNuAm 4uiH* i7^u
Ptey Popular Music
on the Piano
Beeome a musician so quiekly ae to astound
everyone. Learn by playing REAL muoic instead
of tiresome flngsr eserdsei and scalei. You will
soon bacome tho most popular perion in your
entire crowd.
NEW EASY METHOD
Is a revolution.   Nothing like it for thorough*
nosa and rapidity.   So simple that young and old
find it easy to play with amaalng skill.   NO trlek music, but actual notes.
Learn quickly by our fast and easy mathod.
Come In, and talk it over.   You will be astounded, thrilled, fascinated,
by our easy, rapid way, and remember, your aucceee la guaranteed.
Rex School of Popular Music
422 RICHARDS ST., Cor. HASTINGS Phone, Seymour S7S8
Point Orey 134      We Deliver
Woollier'* Grocery
Tenth and Trimble
mil LINE Of GROCERIES
AND PROVISIONS
Service
Oisllty
li|»l » ilium i|iHii«ii«.ii|iiar«n|ii>iiaiil iaiiaii«.ainii|«|i-|i
wsa
HIGHEST GRADE
MEATS
FRESH DAILY
Your Patronage Solioited
POINT GREY
MEAT MARKET
Phone, Point Orey 14
- Varsity Lunches -
aaaa-aaa,-ap  AT     TIJK     a.    ■
SASAMAT ELECTRIC BAKERY
Near 'Bus Terminal
Phone, Point Grey 507
Phone. Bay. 5152
- FOR-
YOUR DRUG WANTS
Magasinea, Stationery, Films,
Chocolates, etc
PROMPT DELIVERY
Lamey's Drug Store
Cor. Broadway & Alma
Leader Beauty Parlor
4447 Tenth Avenue, West
Phone, Point Grey 616
HAIR CUTTING and MARCEIING
B. C. E. R.
WAITING ROOM
And Ticket Office
CANDIES, CIGARETTES,
SOFT DRINKS,
GLACIER BARS, Etc.
ON SALE HERE
ALL FRESH STOCK
For Your Convenience
4'»"«". .'■ i t a, »-<-«.■«-
]    Correspondence
To I ho Editor of the Ubyssey.
Dear Sirs—
In your editorial entitled "a plea
for courtesy," published In the Friday
edition of the Ubyssey, you point out
the lack of courtesy and good manners shown by some members of the
student body during the recent lecture by Dr. Akagi. It might be Interesting for you to know how apt
your remarks are.
As 1 have beeu a resident of Japan
a good part of my life, 1 can assure
you that In that country good manners are considered of the highest
Importance, and the lack of them the
height of Ill-breeding, and I am sure
that Dr. Akagi, who Is a real Japanese gentleman, must have felt as you
did, only much more strongly, that
the students who left the meeting
were directly insulting him.
Under somewhat similar circumstances a few years ago, the Japaneae
consul of this city remarked to a
Canadian friend, "It Is quite evident
that this Is a new country, for the
people do so lack refinement."
It Is Just theso trivial things, which
give transients a bad impression of
us. Certainly such conduct as was
shown on Tuesday will not aid in
creating international goodwill, and,
as you say, must cease.
Yours sincerely,
CAROL COATES,
Arts '29.
 •«-•	
FROSH RUGBY
The Tenex fifteen suffered a slashing defeat Saturday afternoon at the
hands ot the Freshmen, the scorn being 11*6.
Some fine playing was noted in
each team. Dave Roe excelled in Varsity's team, scoring twice for the collegians. Ralph Farrls also scored a
try for the team, which was converted. Tommy Flanagan starred for the
opposing team, making a halr-ralsliiK
dash from centre field and by straight-
arming and dodging Varsity's opposition, gained a touch.
The Tenex men put up it splendid
light hut were unable to outclass the
Kreshnieii. They .succeeded, howewr,
in scoring another try Just hei'ore th<
flnlHl).
Teams.- Al[ien; MeQuarrle, Chap
elle, Malum, Kastabrook, Stevens,
Pierce; Voting, and Heliner; Funis,
Shields, Chambers, Meredith, Rao,
McCallum.
BUCK'S DRY GOODS*
Men's Wear
KANT KREASE COLLAR
3 FOR A DOLLAR
Tate, Kipp, Varsity,
% sizes,   nyt to I6#
I Oth AT TRIMBLE
Phons, Point Grey SS4
•**•>-«•< i   4^*m^^,%m*"*,^M*****^^*"*^m**^^*t^me^e>te4i^s>ei»e>'e'*ere)et»
. <>M>-M"l><M"t-M-+*+-H<*S-*+^^ •
ANATOMICAL BOOT-MAKING and REPAIRING
4388 TENTH   AVENUE, WEST
PHONE:  POINT  OREY  604
T. WIGGLESWORTH
ORDERS CALLRD  FOR   ANO  DELIVERED
, ,++^,44M^.+^.^.++.!.++++•f++*^.++^.++++4.++^..^s;.+^.+ ^++.^.^■n.++^.++++J,
THE   AMBASSADOR
610 Seymour Street
Headquarters for Service	
Club Luncheons, Dinners and Banquets
Prlrate Dining Rooms for Private Parties.
Suitable for Meetings and Socials. Fraternity Banquets a Specialty.
LUNCHEON, Served Daily, 45c.
MUSIC and DANCING &™ .XTC^
4fe3
^77W?..'iAwaaa.SflfVeaa.
•/55R
ItvQ
•^■►•■■■Jl
C^WjBu]T*Sr^
^vl!*»«IHl}>*'"'*'gTOi"*
%!essam%
flKUj|MBSiVW™y
<r%Ja*M,r" I'linaU |
ys* Wm><
T***^iC
.     _OTSK .,,,£■■
Students Reply
To Recent Letter
Editor Ubyssey:
"Criticism, like chprlty, begins at
home." Thus begins Mr. Brown In
his article In Friday's Ubyssey.
Yes, Mr. Ilrown, that is right, but in
all fairness to American football l
think you do not understand the Issue as It Is up before the Student
llody. You assume that the exponents ot the game in this college
are asking for assistance from the
University funds to the extent of a
paid coach and complete equipment
lo be supplied by our hard earned
money. That Is far from the case.
What they do ask is to be allowed
to operate under the sanction of the
University and to be allowed to wear
those colors which we all admire.
You cannot relish playing with
teams which are representing colleges smaller than our own. Did you
ever consider that it is juBt as honorable to play these institutions aa
to Play clubs and lumber companies
that have not near tho prestige we
have.
Is it that the fame of the Sorrel
Top youngster of Illinois has cast the
game down la your eyes?
Boxing is the most commercialised sport In the world, yet terrible to
say we allow the good boys of this
aeat ot learning to dare don the
mitts.   Absolutely unforgivable.
Soccer football Is the most commercialized sport in Great Britain,
but that does not detract from the
value of the game. You encourage
basketball as an inter-colleglate aport
(not on tho merits of the game) because you see in that argument a
little economy.
Why not go farther and advocate
everybody playing handball as It is
cheaper to send a team outside, Besides, Mr. Brown, the American football team paid its own expenses last
year outside of tbelr paltry grant
from the Student Body. I hopo, Mr
Brown, that this will straighten out
Nome of your misguided thoughts as
to just what tbe issue demands. Be
fair at least and do not prejudice
yourself on matters that have not
eutered Into the affair.
P1NKEY   STEWART,
LES BUCKLEY.
Grass Hockey News
In a hurly gume at llrockton Point
on Halunlay afternoon the Varsity
nine oti(|iluyeil the I'.D.C. team, run-
uiiiK up u "hi viiiory. Though Les.
Drown, the I'.H.C giiiilkeeiier played
a H|iiM'iiieiilur game, he showed too
iiiuel! ih'slie iii wander limn his
chari'e. I'has Waiiiiiiaii shot lliree
goals, while l»'\rr\ Marsh and Tom
itn: ■ es each in onleij one, Doth the
rnivei'i'lly teams are In belter shape
(han last linn and promise to give a
good account of themselves for the
remainder of the season.
LOST.—-A pair of tortoise shell glasses In a case hearing the name and
address of the owner, Jean Faulkner, Finder please return at once
to the Ubyssey office,
During January and
February you can get
$50.00
Navy Serges
FOR
$40.00
Up-to-date Tailor
D.S. BEACH
10th Ave., at Trimble
Phone, Pt. Grey 131
Also, Dry Cleaning and
Pressing.
~v
THIRD TEAM WINS
Varsity third soccer men grabbed
their first victory of the New Year
when they trounced the white shifted
warriors of Christ Church to the tune
ol i!-u at (Danville Park on Saturday,
llit* blue and gold men presented a
strange array. Anderson was In goal,
ami that famous new sweater got Its
baptism of fire. Andy was on his
toes whenever he was called upon.
Allan Todd, erstwhile fleet and fragile
outside left was seen In a new and
glorious role of full back, while Scot-
ty Allan, new recruit, was easily tho
star of the contest on the left, Max
Legg showed decided promise In hla
first attempt at right half, with New-
all working well In the centre. Ridley starred at Inside loft, notching
both the schoolboy markers, his second effort being easily the best thing
he has done since he laid asldo the
bottle of milk for the leather oval-
Dave Taylor essayed to start at Inside left, but after skidding In the
slime with the goal at his mercy, retired to his wonted looation at loft
half, Yolland at outside left showed
promise, while Burgess on the other
flank played his best game of the season. Brown was at centre, and the
only man to hold hla old place was
Duffell.
The game was fast and clever,
and both goals had narrow escapes,
though the Collegians were superior
at all times, and when they tightened
their grip had little difficulty tn securing the necessary tallies.
The reverend goal keeper waa the
star of the losers eleven.
-eete-
BADMINTON
On Saturday the first team met the
7th Battalion Club, A Division, losing
by the odd match. The mixed doubles
were shared equally and Varsity won
the majority in the men's events but
failed to take any of the ladles'
doubles, though In most cases tho
matches went to the three full games,
The team was weakened by the absence of Joyce Hallamore who was
unable to play owing to a strained
ankle.
Against the Kerrisdale Club the
second team lost badly by a score of
21-3. They were, however, playing
under very difficult court conditions.
The team looks forward to a revenge
on our own courts, where they are
confident of winning.
Teams were as follows:
First—O. Woodman, 0. Marrlon; J.
Shakespeare, 0. Carpenter and Misses
V. Milliner, J. Creer, O. Harvey and
M. Craig.
Second—I. Stevenson, M. McFar-
lane, J. Dalton, R. Noble; antl Misses
.1. Partington, B. Mathoson, A. Hopkins aud I). Porteous.
Or Wednesday ho'li teams play the
Till Hattiillon, II. Division, and on Sal-
unlay the Women's luteiclnss takes
place. Altogether It la ihe club's
busy week.
 «•>  —
Soccer
(Continued from Page 1)
well, although Oray was obviously
not at home on left wing. Varsity,
however, should remember to keep
thoir positions, their failure to do so
being the only thing to mar their
play.
TRADE
Mww
«U |N e*H**
A Good Sweater
Is Essential !
New Varsity
PULLOVERS
V-Neck and
Roll Collars
are just in.
Finest Quality.
Made in our own factory.
A kind for every
personal need*
yf-y.d/ialWttio K/fo
Vtun&gt*
This Is the
School That
Really Teaches
tnnnnnnnnl   anntMaSaPnl SnnMnf   *\*%
'tost *»•*»*# ft*,
stits stsss
Our sMtali sty
Msy Issfs satf s SsfS
sssslMf.    Rssstts
TWtfVtl
yss.
VAUGHN MOORE
PRIVATi DANCE STUDIO
S1SHAITtNllST.,W.   ley. 7«?
semlte David Spenser's
Pt. Grey Pharmacy
H. W. Warner, Druggist
Your Patronage Appreciated
Phons, Point Orey tSO
10th Avenue and Trimble Stveet
A Gift always appreciated—
Your Photograph.
McKenzie Studio
619 Granville St.
Phone, Sey. 110*
ft
High-clat* work at moderate prices
Special Attractions
For the University Boys
AT
Our January Clearance
OF
SUITS and OVERCOATS
The Shop Of   .    .
j^iSorl-eBAtt
Thos. Foster & Co., Ltd.
 ONE STORE ONLY	
608 GRANVILLE STREET

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