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The Ubyssey Nov 27, 1924

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 "*WP,*Sf
(Sty Ibgaa^
Issued Weekly by the Students' Publications Board of The University of British Columbia.
Volume VII.
VANCOUVER, B. C, NOVEMBER 27th, 1924
No. 9
Hi-.'BRav/H—
■Iffr: OLi3loiDY^o^fyfe^^tn-'^5~
^faTjalWL
CHRISTMAS PLAYS ARE
^> ENJOYED BY CROWDS
Enthusiastic Reception Accorded Well-Acted Performances
Splendid Interpretations Rendered By Students
In spite of the fact that nearly three
hundred Freshmen were denied tickets, the auditorium was crowded to
the limit—and over the limit (according to any unfortunate ones who were
not there when the doors opened)—
last Thursday, Friday and Saturday
nights. It would be false to say that
the ever-popular Christmas plays excited more interest than usual—that
would be impossible. It is sufficient
to remark that every bench, chair,
corridor and aisle was filled with a
most sympathetic and appreciative
crowd.
This year's bill included two features of note—first, a prize play, written by a U. B. C. student, winner of
the Players' Club competition, and
second, a Barrie play, considered by
many to be his best one-act production. Added to this was a charming
little fantasy and a satiric farce. The
latter was the least successful performance of the evening, the fault lying, however, with the play, not the
players. As a satire on the universal worship of the almighty dollar, it
did not strike a responsive chord in
the hearts of a Canadian student audience.
After a few words from the popular
director of the Club, Mr. F. G. C.
Wood, emphasizing the fact that nineteen out of the twenty-three players
were nraking their first performance
on the University stage, the curtain
was raised on the first play. "Figureheads," by Louise Saunders, has its
setting in the royal court of far-away
Ponderay. As the story unfolds, we
learn that, for political reasons, the
Prince of a neighboring country is
asking in marriage the hand of the yet
unknown Princess Felicia of Ponderay;
she persistently refuses his envoys
because she is "temperamental," and
will not be treated as a figurehead.
But, disguised as a common fisherman,
the Prince woos and wins her, and
brings the play to a satisfactory conclusion. Throughout the atmosphere
of romance which brought into the
realm of fantasy a quite possible play
was well sustained. The part of the
little Princess was performed by Miss
Milla Alihan, and in every detail —
voice, appearance, and gesture—was
one of the most satisfactory pieces of
acting of the evening. As the Prince
of Dondometer, Mr. Peter Price was
perhaps a little unconvincing and expressionless at times, although, of
course, his part was intended to display a contrast to the ever-changing
impetuous Princess. Miss Avis Pumph-
rey gave a quite satisfactory interpretation of Gertrude, while Messrs.
G. Anderson and F. Painter took the
(Continued on Page 8 J
HUNDREDS AT
FIERY DEBATE
^ASTMONDAY
Oxonians Are Well Received In
Keen Discussion
Witty sallies, pointed retorts, dry
humor and sprinkling of horseplay
were the light features of the style
of the Oxonians and University of
B. C. debaters who met Monday night
at Wesley Church to discuss the merits of a practical form of socialism.
The largest audience that has ever
assembled in Vancouver to listen to a
debate was treated to a battle royal
in jyrhich Malcolm McDonald, son
of/ the former Prhjfe Minister of
Great Britain, S.U'Kobe and James
VCraig proposed an ill-defined socialistic condition, and M. G^Hbllis, J. D.
Woodruff and MurrayVJTunter defended the present capitalistic system.
The vote of the audience taken
after the debate gave an overwhelming majority for the socialist plan according to the rough estimate immediately following the collecting of the
ballots. The visitors were entertained in a trip to Chinatown at the conclusion of the speeches so the official
count was not made until after the
Ubyssey went to press.
Wesley Church was taxed to the utmost and all seating and standing
room was taken. Hundreds of late
arrivals were turned away and police
were called to stop the threatened
rushing of the door. The topic debated was such a far-reaching question that all strata of Vancouver society was represented in the throng.
The three Victoria college men who
met the U.B.C. debaters last week
came to Vancouver to hear the Oxonians.
Two distinct types of debating were
displayed by the teams, the Oxford
style being opposed to the American
tactics of the Varsity men. The dry
humor of the visitors, their lack of
definite statistics, and the personal
element in condemning their opponents added to the keenness of the debate while the familiar appeal of the
American style with its directness of
argument and logic as used by the
B.C. speakers carried much force with
those accustomed to the debating on
this continent.
Malcolm MacDonald, well known to
most Vancouverites through his distinguished father, opened the debate
and won the hearts of the audience
with his free and easy style which
carried no ear marks of a prepared
speech. His remarks were confined
to condemning the social organization of to-day. He told of conditions
in the industrial sections of the Old
Country. Those of the audience who
were unaccustomed to the Oxonian
speech had difficulty in catching parts
of the early section of his address.
This was also the case with the other
speakers.    '
Murray Hunter was the first of the
opposition speakers and declared that
socialism was contrary to human nature. Mr. Hunter was handicapped by
a cold which interrupted his talk by
making him decidedly thirsty. He
appeared to be nervous, but this was
(Continued on Page 2)  .
E. J. KNAPTON
WINSdRHODES
SCHOLARSHIP
Victoria Student, Arts '25, Will
Attend Oxford Next Fall
Ernest John Uinapton, twenty-two,
of Arts '25, has been chosen the 1925
Rhodes Scholar for British Columbia,
from a field of six applicants.
Mr. Knapton came to U. B. C. from
Victoria last September, bringing with
him an enviable scholastic record. He
attended Victoria High, was editor of
the school paper, and took his senior
matriculation with high standing in
1918. Mr. Knapton then attended the
Victoria Normal, was editor of the
Normal Annual for the year and made
a name for himself in all phases of
student activity. His next four years
were spent in teaching, in the public
schools, and at the Victoria University
School, and devoting his evenings and
spare time to University Studies. So
successful was he in this that he was
able to take the first three years of
Arts through the extra-mural courses
offered by Queen's University, and entered U. B. C. to take his degree with
the class of '25.
Although only identifying himself
with the U. B. C. during the last term,
Mr. Knapton is already a popular
member of his year, taking part in
Intermediate Rugby and in the activities of the Historical and Economical
Society.
The sincerest congratulations of his
fellow-students are extended to Mr.
Knapton for the well-deserved honor
which has been conferred upon him.
-V THE   UBYSSEY
•November 27th, 1924
BADMINTON
THE JACQUES CLUB
RACQUET—Special	
THE JACQUES ASSOCIATION RACQUET—Special
.75
$6.00
THE  JACQUES  SPECIAL A^   C|*
RACQUET-Special «)>/ .Oil
THE JACQUES MAGPIE
RACQUET-Special....
$12.00
JACQUES ECLIPSE ASSOCIATION
SHUTTLES. — These shuttles are
specially reinforced in the centre,
making the life of the shuttle 100 per
cent, greater than the average.   Special, each	
45c.
JACQUES  1R SHUTTLES.—Same as
Association, only with rubber
centre.    Special, each..
JACQUES BADMINTON
NETS—Each	
BADMINTON RACQUET
PRESSES.-Each	
55c.
$2.00
$1.00
-Sporting Goods Dept.
**
David Spencer
Limited
J
LUNCH      TEA      SUPPER
Household and Vegetarian Cooking
Phone, Seymour 2940
The Cosey Corner
MRS. DANBY SMITH
Rooms for Private Parties, Etc.
116 EMPIRE BUILDING
603 HASTINGS ST., W.
Opposite Bank of Nora Scotia
"Religion in Science"
Is Institute Subject
"Religion In Science, and Science
in Religion, by a Laymen," was the
topic of/a very scholarly And entertaining/address delivered^ Professor
WJSLDuckering at the^vancouver In-
"stitute last week.
Science is founded on fact established by observation, and in this respect
is somewhat related to religion, which
is a matter of a man's spiritual experience.
"Religion as I take it," said the
speaker, "is man's effort to understand
the inner purpose of the universe."
The majority of early religious beliefs of the so-called heathen races
of the world are similar in that all
recognize the presence of a Superior
Being.
The scientific theories of early days
in no way conflicted with the established conceptions of a deity. It is
since the coming of the Christian Era
that Science has been considered incompatible with Religion. This latter
contention can not be proved. In fact
scientists unanimously agree that the
efforts of Science must progress, step
by step with the findings of man's
spiritual experience, in order that
every field may be explored in the
great quest for ultimate truth.
The speaker effected an intimately
philosophical treatment of the subject,
and presented the vital issues in steady
convincing terms.
To-night in the Physics building, the
Hon. Justice Morrison, will present an
address entitled "Judicial Tribulations." /
<e£n
La *€auserie Meets
The last meeting of La Causerie was
held on the evening of Wednesday,
November 19, at the home of the
secretary, Miss Bertha Thompson.
The delightful French comedy "The
Deux Sourds," which the members
have been practicing was very adequately presented. Miss Alice Myers
as Eglantine, Miss Jean Woodron as
Boniface, Mr. A. B. Rayment as
Placide, and Mr. Charlie Mclntyre as
Damolseau, interpreted their parts
with great spirit and grace, the accent being very good.
After the play, games popular in
France were indulged in, and a great
deal of fun was caused by the prohibition of speaking English. Excellent refreshments were then served.
Brushed Wool
Coat Sweaters
The coat of real snap. Pure selected wool, in
a wide range of plain colors, heather or lovat
mixtures as well as the extremely popular check
fronts.    All sizes and a range of styles priced
at fi
rom as little as
ttle
Christmas Concert
y    Is Heard On Radio
L That the Christmas Concert given
by the Musical Society was very much
appreciated, is evident from the fact
that Mr. Rose of the Province has
asked that the concert be given over
the radio. It being impossible to produce the concert in its entirety, several numbers were chosen, with slight
alterations, and accordingly, on Tuesday, November 26, listeners-in enjoyed an excellent program.
PROGRAM
1. Violin Duet—"The Hird Girl's
Dream"     Sabitzki
Alice Wilma Metz and J. E. Kania
2. Vocal Solo—"Love Is The Wind"
 Alex. MacFadyen
Lillian Reid
3. Piano Solo—Peer Gynt, Suite
Nos. 1 and 4 Grieg
1. "Morning Mood."
2. "In the Hall of the Mountain
King."
Magdalene Aske
4. Vocal Solo—"How Many a Lonely
Caravan" 	
(From A Lover of Danascus)
 Amy Woodforde Fynden
Kathleen Baird
5. Violin Solo—Pierrot Serenade	
  Randegger
Alice Wilma Mety
6. Vocal Duet—"By the Waters of
Minnetonka"....Thurlow Lieurance
Kathleen Baird and Carl Bartow
7. Piano Solo—(a) Liebestraum
Nocturne No. 3  Lisyt
(b)  Staccata-Caprice  (By
Request) Max Vogrich
Rose  Marin
*vv
$3.50 to $8.50
WILLIAM DICK LIMITED
45-47-49 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
\Jh  Oxford Debate
(Continued from Page 1)
partly due to  the necessity of breaking   his    arguments  frequently  when
his  throat became too dry to speak.
James Craig was witty in pointing
out the faults of the capitalistic system and scored Mr. Hunter for implying that human nature could not
be improved. He presented his arguments clearly and with conviction
behind  them.
M. C. Hollis was the most efficient
Oxonian and brought roars of laughter and applause in his picture of
the Utopian state that he believed the
socialists desired. He entered into
personal jibes at Mr. MacDonald, and
sieved, that fce had an excellent
grasp of the whole economic situation. He was the most easy speaker
of the  evening.
S. Kobe, who closed the socialistic
case, was" eloquent and gave the best
display of the B. C. speakers. He
defined socialism as a constant, collective, and consistent effort to cure
the ills of capitalism and argued that
socialism did not necessarily imply
confiscation. His talk was well received for it was clear and forceful
and well arranged.
J. D. Woodruff had an easy style
which marked him as a shrewd debater. His dry humor was a feature
of the whole debate, and his attacks
on the methods of ttie socialists
brought  him    considerable    applause.
Would You Debate
With Lincoln ?
HE SAID: "I DO NOT KNOW
MUCH ABOUT THE TARIFF.
BUT THIS I DO KNOW: WHEN
WE BUY GOODS ABROAD WE
GET THE GOODS AND THE
FOREIGNER GETS THE
MONEY. WHEN    WE    BUY
GCODS MADE AT HOME WE
GET BOTH THE GOODS AND
THE MONEY."
Our ]CHRISTMAS CARDS
meet and beat competition.
Made here, made RIGHT
here.
Private Cards from $2.00
per dozen, in two days, if
necessary.
GEHRKE'S *
651 SEYMOUR STREET
(Near Hudson's Bay)
GBANTHAMi
RealRwitJuiceI
p4flTY PUNCH
PURE CONCENTRATED
FRUIT JUICES
and CANE SUGAR
Phone for Sample
Fair. 1250
F. C GRANTHAM & CO. LTD.
700-716 16th Avenue Weat
VANCOUVER. B.C.
B.C. Public Stenographers
  FOR 	
ACCURACY AND INTELLIGENT WORK
115 Bank of Nova Scotia Building
Phone, Sey. 2696    /   602 Hastings St., W
LAXANADIENNE
On Thursday evening, November 19,
LaCanadienne met at the home of
Mr. Baird, Gilford St., for the last
meeting of the year. A'small one act
play called "Rosalie" was given. The
part of Mr. Bol, a petty bourgeois, was
taken by Mr. K. Miller, Arts '25, Mme.
Bol, his wife was done by Miss Doris
MacKay, Arts '26, and Rosalie their
stupid servant was taken by Miss Alda
Moffat, Arts '26. The acting was excellent, the characters being interpreted with insight and delicacy and
the accent good throughout. The
splendid dramatic ability displayed by
the actors promises well for the bigger play which the two French Clubs
combined will stage after Christmas.
Phone, Fairmont 724
MISS J. EMSLIE
LADIES' *HD CHILDREN'S WE AH. GENERAL DRY GOODS
695 Broadway W.  (Cor. Broadway and Heather Sts.), Vancouver, B. C.
A splendid range of Christmas Goods at good buying prices.
Stamped Goods—Towels with colored hem put up in fancy boxes ready for mailing, at 65o each.
Clothes-pin Aprons, Fancy Bibs, Bread and Milk Ticket Holders, Combing Sacques,
Vanity Pets, in fact anything you wish in Stamped Goods, all at very easy
prices. A special in Stamped Pillow Cases at $1.25 per pair. Embroidered
Towels at 31.50 each. Fancy Plisse Crepe for Christmas Undies, special, 49c
per yard.
Just arrived.—A splendid assortment of Christmas Hankies (boxed and singles) at
very low prices.    Ask to see these.
A nice variety of Novelty Aprons at reasonable prices. Combination Work-bag
and Apron, made of pretty crettines at 45c and 75c each.
All Wool Hose, plain, heather; regular $1.35 for 99c. Ribbed Wool Hose, heather;
regular $1.25 for 85c. November 27th, 1924
THE   UBYSSEY
Special Prices
ON OVERCOATS, ALL THIS WEEK.
THIS IS YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO
PURCHASE A REAL HIGH-GRAOE
OVERCOAT AT THE PRICE OF AN
ORDINARY COAT.    DON'T MISS IT!
TURPIN BROS., LTD.
Men's Outfitters
629 GRANVILLE ST
LET'S GO!
To thoroughly enjoy yourself you want to dance
with snap and pep.
Gracefulness, of course,
is a feature of our tuition.
Private Lessons any time.
LET'S GO !
VAUGHN MOORE
— FOR —
Better Dance Instruction
518 HASTINGS ST., W.        Seymour 707
Opposite Standard Bank Building.
DRINK—
"SQUEEZE"
Grape, Lemon,
Lime and Orange
X
Bottled by
THORPES'
THE LESTER
t   Dancing Academy
SATURDAY  EVENING  SOCIAL
DANCE (by Invitation)
Instruction by Appointment
—^—
LESTER COURT
Seymour J 689
Ed. Da Motta
HAIR CUTTING a Specialty
Expert Attendant
2558 Heather Street
WE STOCK
Varsity and Science
Pennants
SWEATERS made to order in
any color or design, at specially
low prices to students.
SKATES        SKATING BOOTS
McGill-Sparling Ltd.
Sey. 4653     718 ROBSON ST.
4H*-*~*-««a-*~«~«~*~*~«~«-«.>*~«~»~i
SPORT NEWS
HOTEL ELEVEN
DOWN 1st TEAM
DOWl
Varsity first soccer eleven was defeated by IIotcTTancouver 3-1 in the
second round of-4he~0. -fir Allan Cup
series last Saturday. The game was
played in a sea of mud at Recreation Park. The Varsity soccer men
have no alibis, as they put up a very
poor exhibition and the Hotel fully
deserved their victory.
Varsity started out with a rush and
soon scored through Bobby Jackeon.
After this the students rested on their
laurels with the result that no more
goals were scored during the first
period. The Varsity forwards passed
up many opportunities to score with
indifference. Bobby Jackson was injured and was a passenger for the rest
of the fracas.
Upon resumption of play the collegians continued in a lackadaisical manner and Hennessey evened the count
for the second division squad. This
reverse wakened the Varsity forwards
up somewhat, but they became wilder
in their shooting. Emery diddled
around with the ball continually, and
when he did send over a cross there
was nobody there to score. Rex Cameron thought he could play inside better than out and the combination was
broken up by his playing inside to
Butler. When Auchinvole was in
shooting distance of the Hotel goal
he promptly sent the ball out to the
wing where it was lost. Hennessy and
Dugan each scored one and put the
Hotelmen in the lead.
The Varsity defence were a way off
form. Buckley proved a poor substitute for Phillips at centre half. Ledingham was responsible for at least
one goal. Huestis worked hard but
accomplished little, and Baker and
Crute were either in each other's way
or Kings. Crute went up on the forward line in the last fifteen minutes
but did not improve matters. Varsity's
supporters and manager almost wept
at the exhibition put up by their pets.
But everybody just had an off-day and
they should do better next Saturday,
when they stack up against Vancouver
City in a league encounter.
Varsit^Third and
p^i^^shmen Draw
In a hectic and fiercely fought contest at Strathcona Park on Saturday,
the Varsity_tJiiiid_Eugby team held the
unbeaten Freshmen to a three-all
draw.
The first half of the game was fairly
even, the Freshmen if anything having the edge. Their scrum followed
up well, while the three-quarters got
away more than once, only to be halted  by faulty passing.
The second period was fast despite
the ground conditions. Shields, who
throughout played stellar Rugby, got
the first try as the culmination of a
series of rushes. The converter hit
the uprights. The Varsity thirds evened the count through loose work by
the Freshmen backs. The try was unconverted and the final whistle found
both teams battling hard. For the
Thirds Hockin, Mulhern, Hill and Todd
played consistently, while the Freshmen stars were Shields, Ballantyne,
Eaton and Bridgman.
Will the person who exchanged running spikes with H. Thompson at the
Track Meet, please see him at once.
He has now a pair of size 6, or thereabouts, instead of his own pair of
size 5.
SPORT READING
MADE EASIER
Over-confidence lost a game for the
Varsity first soccer men last Saturday. It never pays to take a team too
lightly in any line of sport. With one
goal up, and Varsity bombarding the
Vancouver Hotel net minder from all
angles, nobody dreamed that the Blue
and Gold would be defeated, yet such
was the case. Varsity seemed to go
off form all at once and they were
finally beaten by a team that Varsity's
second eleven should be able to account for.
In the first stanza the Students were
shooting down hill yet the forwards did
not seem to be trying to get a good
lead and were apparently satisfied to
be one goal up at the interval. The
crowd gave Varsity the razz and they
deserved it. This should be a lesson
to them and to other Varsity teams,
never to take the opposition lightly.
TJ. B. C. improved on their league
standing in the Miller Cup series at
Varsity's expense last Saturday, and
now stand second in the league table.
One Varsity team had to win and it is
gratifying that the team with the best
standing should get the two points.
Varsity provided lots of opposition
however, and may be counted upon to
put a crimp in the championship aspirations of some of the other fifteens
before the season is over.
The Frosh are to be congratulated
on their showing in the Intermediate
rugby league as they have yet to taste
defeat. The Freshies are justly proud
of the fine showing of their team, but
they should be willing at all times to
part with any of their players who are
called on to take part in senior games
without any show of bad feeling. The
intermediate league is the training
ground for the Miller and McKechnie
men, just as the second and third
soccer and basketball teams are sub-
survient to the first teams.
In some other colleges the frosh
have teams of their own and no freshman is allowed to take part in outside
competition with the regular college
team, and hence gets no letter. At
TJ. B. C. a freshman can take his place
on a senior team and win his big letter, which is given to him in his
sophomore year. Thus he should be
willing at all times to play on a
senior team and his team mates should
part with his services in the proper
spirit.
When asked what was wrong last
Saturday at Recreation Park one of
the soccer men replied too much recreation and not enough work.
Badminton
Tournament
BADMINTON TOURNAMENT
The inter-cJass^Bjdminton Tournament w'aB_pIayed-onron Tuesday, November 18, at King Edward Gym,
Arts '27 gained first place by winning
the doubles from the Freshmen and
making a place in the singles. Science
'28 obtained second place by winning
the singles from Agriculture. The
Frosh and Agriculture teams tied for
third place. Arts '28 took second
place in the doubles and Agriculture
second place in the singles.
Full-Fashioned
Chiffon Hose
at $2.50
Perhaps you will appreciate
this excellent hose all the
more when we tell you that it
comes to us from the makers
of the celebrated Ruby Ring
hosiery. This chiffon hose
has the narrow slipper sole,
which is a most desirable feature when one considers that,
no matter how low the cut of
the shoe, there will be no unsightly seam showing. New
shades include sombrero, lariat, French nude, racquet,
cinder, Oriental pearl or gunmetal, at    -    -    $2.50
— Drysdale's Hosiery Shop
First Floor.
LIMITED
575 Granville St.
pOLLIN'PiN
Bake shop
CAKES, SANDWICHES
for the
Dance or Party
2415 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Bayview 4076
Basket Balls
and Jerseys !
A real Basket Ball for a whole
lot less—that's what the Scotch
made Highland hide, American model, at 1020 Granville,
actually means.
And, while we are so near the
subject, 1020 has a bunch of
the best tailored, best quality
Basketball Jerseys the store
has ever seen, at $1.00 each.
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods
1A/)A   GRANVILLE
1UZU  STREET THE   UBYSSEY
November 27th, 1924
(Member   Pacific   Inter-Collegiate   Press
Association)
Issued  every  Thursday by  the  Publications Board of the University of
British Columbia.
Extra Mural  Subscription,  $2.00 per
Session.
For Advertising Rates,  apply
Business Manager. Phone Fair. 2093
EDITORIAL STAFF
Editor-in-Chief T. W. Brown
Senior Editor Miss Helen MacGill
Associate Editors Miss Sadie Boyles
A. Earle Birney
William C. Murphy
Exchange Editor John Grace
Literary Editor Miss Doris McKay
Sporting Editors H. Les. Buckley
Laura Mowatt
Copv  Editor    Marion   Smith
Chief   Reporter Kenneth   A.   Schell
Reporters — Florence Williams,
Dorothy Arkwright, Mary Esler,
Jean Fraser, Janet Watson, Margaret
Smith, Les Graham, Donald Gillingham,
David Warden, Francis Stevens, Robert
Wright, G. W. Ashworth, James Dunn,
Dave Taylor, T. S. Byrne, F. W. Dimmick, Peter  Palmer..
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager H. A. Thompson
Circulation  Manager E.  J.  Eades
Business Assistants....!!.  G. McWilliams
J. Stanley Allen
W.  F. McCulloch
EDITOR   FOR   THE   WEEK
W.  C.  Murphy.
THE VICTORIA TRIP
Now that the Christmas ordeal is at
hand and activities have practically ceased, we have observed the
general atmosphere of gloom which
hovers over the University. The
Freshmen in particular seem to be infected with melancholy. They are
warned, no doubt, by the fate of many
of their predecessors, and have came
to regard the approaching examinations as a terrible menace calculated to
overshadow their young lives. We
would like to offer them a few words of
conciliation, and also to remind them
that one of the most enjoyable events
of the college year is yet to take place.
The annual Victoria trip, placed as it
is between the Christmas examinations
and the commencement of the Spring
term, serves as a much-needed relaxation from academic worry and strain.
It is the only occasion in which the
students may enjoy a holiday together,
and those who have participated in
previous years are looking forward to
the trip with considerable expectation.
Although much diversion can be derived from the Victoria trip, it was
not this motive primarily which caused it to become an annual event. The
various athletic teams at the University obviously find it inconvenient to
travel to and from Victoria during the
year, and the trip affords an excellent
opportunity for all these teams to compete with those of the Island city.
Such a valuable asset as rooters is of
course not to be ignored, and in practically no other way can an equal
number be insured. Our pleasure is
thus turned to our profit, and those
who go on the trip will experience the
gratifying sensation of helping their
college as well as enjoying themselves.
ORIGINALITY
Bear with us while we add one more
to the ever-increasing list of desiderata for a model student of the University of B. C.
This time it is the habit of thought
of the average student concerning
which we have the temerity to suggest
an improvement.
We students within this University
are too apt to think by proxy. We
refuse to develop our individualism.
We mouth platitudes and repeat the
popular criticism of the hour. If some
individual is so abnormal as to express an opinion of his own, we of the
herd catch it up and toss it triumphantly about for weeks afterwards.
Not only do we fall into meaningless
monotony in the conduct of our activities, but in the more important field
of studies we are content, year after
year, to return, unblushingly, the exact words and cherished bon mots of
our professors. We look at our courses
from no other viewpoints than those
required to pass the exams. We limit
our outside reading to Punch.
We know, of course, that several
honest students—as well as numerous
representatives of the genus insipidi
—will, pained by the futility of our
tirade, hasten to explain that originality wins no credit here, that new
ideas are looked upon with the dark
eye of suspicion, and given second
place to hoarier facts by inexorable
examiners.
Dear reader, we don't believe it, but
we do believe that we are expressing
the viewpoint of the majority of the
faculty when we state that an original wording or presentation of ideas
in an examination, if not accompanied by meaningless paradox or other
artificial extremes, would be welcomed
by examiners as bringing freshness
and force to bear upon the subject.
Of course we must always remember, in discussing such a vague quality, that commendable merit lies not
in saying something in a new way, but
in a manner that reveals individual
thought, true comprehension of the
subject, and a sincere interest in the
course.
As Carlyle said: ''The merit of originality is not novelty; it is sincerity."
Whatever the merit, the fact remains that originality is a quality to
be desired and even expected in University students, and a quality, unfortunately, not often found amongst
those who are presumably following
the scholastic gleam in this institution.
BY THE WAY
The cynic says: even the fresh glory
of a junior's gown takes wing and
flies before the puffings of an idle
breeze.
Zenobia whispered to me that she
was sure they had made poor Peter
Price go without dinner so that he
would be able to bite into his che«se
sandwich realistically. We reserved
judgment.
 -O	
To-day's bright thought: only nine
days, twenty hours and fifty-five minutes to the first examination.
 O	
To make this tomorrow's bright
thought, subtract one day and keep
your head.
After we had been put quite at ease
concerning Laura's future as an
artist, somebody with a morbidly
mathematical mind suggested that Al-
thea's funeral would undoubtedly
complete the flattening of the family
pouch—and the evening was spoiled
for us.
There's something in this psychology of disobedience, after all. We
wonder if so many students would
semi-annually dislocate their neck in
first day that the time-table is posted, if the memento mori in question
an effort to copy down clashes on the
was headed: "Please copy."
We take this opportunity of wishing our fellow students at least double
the success we expect in the coming
inquisition and not more than half
—since more would be dangerous—
of the number of kicks which we are
going to get out of the subsequent
holiday festivities.
First Business Man—Well- old man
I hear you've been away on a holiday.
Hope you had a good change and rest!
Second B. M.—The railroads got the
change and the hotels got the rest.
Chinese Students
x    Banquet Oxonians
One novel and interesting feature
of the entertainment provided the Oxford debaters during their stay in Vancouver was the banquet given in their
honor Monday evening after the debate, by the Chinese Students' Alliance of Canada. In one of the most
picturesque of the down-town chop
suey parlors fifty guests sat down to
a sumptuous nine-course repast of
Chinese delicacies served in Chinese
style. The guests included, besides
the Oxford debaters, members of the
Faculty of the University of B.C., Varsity debaters, and men and women
representatives of the Chinese Students Alliance. This is the first time
in the history of Vancouver that the
Chinese students' organization has
entertained a visiting body, and the
spirit which prompted such a display
of hospitality and good feeling was
much appreciated by all who had the
privilege of attending. Both hosts and
guests in the toasts stressed the feeling of goodwill which exists among
students the world over, and expressed the hope that such goodwill
might be carried further into international relations.
"Ubyssey" Dormant
This is the last copy of the Ubyssey
to be issued before Christmas. While
the student body should know that the
conscientious staff would be quite willing to work right through exams, to
give everyone his copy of the rag once
a week, they feel that they perform
a higher duty by refraining from such
delightful effort, and giving the students every chance to concentrate on
examinations without the tempting
distraction of the Ubyssey on Thursday noons. The next issue will be
published the first week of the next
term provided that examination results do not carry away more than
their fair share of the Editorial Board.
y.
ATTENTION—THOS. HARDYS!
Christmas Holidays will soon be here
and every student will be faced with
the problem of how to fill in time.
Here is a suggestion. Write a short
story, poem or description for the Literary Supplement. This Literary supplement has a wide circulation, so
here is the chance for a start, which
authors in the past have found the
most difficult problem on the road to
fame. The only stipulation is that it
be original. So think hard, or else
bring down that old manuscript from
the attic and hand it in to the Literary Editor at the beginning of next
term.
One of the
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Prices from   -
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Henry Birks & Sons
UMITED
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Christmas Gift
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able to choose from a wide variety—if you call soon.
MURPHY & CHAPMAN
The House of Distinctive
Greeting Cards.
LIMITED
569 SEYMOUR STREET November 27th, 1924
THE   UBYSSEY
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For U. B. C. Students
Men's Brogues,
Black or Brown,
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or Pumps,
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<*„»*« i
This column is maintained for the use
of students and others who wish to express themselves in moderate language
on any topic of general interest. The
"Ubyssey" does not assume responsibility   for   any   of the views expressed.
All contributions must be signed and
written legibly in ink, on one side of
the paper only. They must not exceed
two hundred words in length, and must
reach this ofBce not later than noon
Monday, in order to appear in the issue
of the following  Thursday.
Editor of the Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:—
Surely courtesy has not entirely disappeared among the more boisterous
sex of our University. On several occasions lately I have attended noon-
hour lectures in our auditorium. May
I here express my experience at one,
the lecture last Thursday noon, by Dr.
Vogt, Dean of Music at the Toronto
University. Certainly such a distinguished man should receive the closest
attention from his audience. The students showed their Interest in his great
work by coming in large numbers to
the lecture. Yet fully two-thirds of
that audience missed a great deal of
what the speaker said. Why? Primal lly because of some thoughtless boys,
who put on a "Cat Concert," or something worse, in the halls surrounding
tht auditorium. Let us hope that the
next time these "boys" wish to practise yelling, or running around the
halls, or throwing furniture around,
they chose some noon hour when an
important address in which many are
interested, is not taking place.
Yours hopefully,
Attentive Freshette.
SECOND SOCCER PLAYERS
BOOST LEAGUE STANDING
Shamrocks, the tail-enders of the
thtid UivisionT were taken into camp
to the tune of 3—1 by the Varsity sec-
ond soccer team on Saturday, at Mar-
pole.
Varsity played a very poor game in
the initial stanza, and McLuckie obtained the only goal when he converted a doubtful penalty. The greasy
condition of the ball nullified what
few efforts Shamrocks made in this
period.
Both teams settled down to business
in the second half, some good football
being served up. Shamrocks soon
scored on Max Evans from a corner,
thus tying the count. Cant scored the
second and then the third goals for
Varsity,  largely  on  his  own.
Shamrocks' centre forward, outside
right and right fullback played very
well. Warden was the pick of the U.
B. C. defense, ably assisted by Gibbard and Robertson. Hee Cant was
the best forward, while Macintosh and
Alsbury put many good crosses to
Reid and McLuckie. Evans substituted for Sutherland in goal and handled what few shots he had well.
X
AT THE CAPITOL
'Wages of Virtue" now showing at
the Capitol is a feature as thrilling as
Harold Lloyd's comedy of last week.
But in this masterpiece thrilling adventure, throbbing romance, and sparkling comedy are all combined. The
two-reel comedy is a dashing adaptation by Mack Sennett, entitled, "Wandering Waist Lines." Lovers of good
music will be entertained by the two
Continental Vocal Favorites Anderson
and Stanton in their first appearance
in Vancouver. To complete the pleasing bill a novelty, "In a Clock Shop."
Next Week, Rodolph Valentino ijj
his second production since his long
absence from the screen the "Sainted
Devil." (Advt.)
AGGIES PROVE
/ENTERTAINERS
Provide Amusement At Friday's
Pep Meeting
A noise as„of muffled thunder filled
the corridors of Varsity on Friday
when hundreds upon hundreds of students wended their way to the auditorium, for the much heralded powwow presided over by the Faculty of
Agriculture. The weak struggling
rays of the winter sun bathed the
muuitude, and the gothic pillars beneath, in a golden glow, and high
above they fell with pleasing light
upon the alcove of the great dome.
The novel opening of the meeting
took place when Yell King Brick
McLeod, leapt on the platform and
with unerring skill and sympathetic
movements of interpretation conducted the vast assemblage through the
intricaties of "Kitsilano."
The curtain of the stage was then
drawn aside and the Aggies orchestra
played two familiar numbers. These
were received with great applause by
the Arts Men who proceeded to "Gaza-
goroo" the meeting. They had barely
ended their yell when the Science
Men rose to promulgate their feelings
in their energetic declamation of the
advent of prohibition.
Tommy Taylor next called upon
Walter Turnbull to address the meeting about the Oxford Debate. Walter,
however, was unceremoniously interrupted in his remarks by the arrival
of the Faculty of Agriculture en masse, who paraded into the hall headed
by one of their number, unnecessarily
disguised as a goat, which bore placards on its sides attempting to blame
both Arts and Science for the apparition.
The Aggies then showed what remarkably good entertainers they were
when Mr. Gough sang a comic song
descriptive of the possibilities present
in a dead cat. Brick McLeod led a
war-whoop for the Aggies and was followed by a quartette composed of Aggies. Nelson, Wilkinson, Bowman and
Gougu with Ferguson at the piano.
They were loudly applauded for their
singing of "Finnigan's Ball." After
this Bert Smith led the combined
faculties in a short song service.
From time to time the different faculties rose in the meeting like long
roosts of birds, spread their wings,
crowed jibes at the other birds, folded
their wings and resumed their perches. Throughout Aggies had the better
assortment of yells, although the Arts
men out-gazood all gazers. Tommy
(Continued on Page   8)
yf    AT THE STRAND
You have all read of Potash and
Perlmutter, but very few have seen
them in actual life. Their latest escapades occurred in Hollywood and
the First National people were right
on the ground so as not to miss anything. A laugh in every scene. The
Strand is featuring this production
this week. Also a big Special, Miss
Isabel McEwan, Dramatic Soprano.
(Advt.)
For Women
"IMPERIAL"
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Standardized Line.
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YOU WILL FIND IN THE
s
PROTT
HAW
CHOOLS
-OF-
COMMERCE and TELECRAPHY
Courses of Instruction which are
advantageous for almost everyone.
Not only have we prepared many
University Students for fine Secretarial positions, but we have a
first-class
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT
in charge of J. B. Fleming:, M.A.,
in which we coach students of the
first and second years in Languages, Mathematics, Science and
Economics.
If we can b* of any service to you,
give us a call.
pL._„ 1 Seymour 1810; Fairmont 41
nne8l Seymour 7125; Seymour 7451
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Manager
BREAKFAST AFTERNOON TEA
LUNCH DINNER
Phone, Seymour 8403
Open 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.    Closed Sunday
KRGYLE TEK ROOM
717 DUNSMUIR STREET
Just around the corner from Drysdale's
Afternoon Tea Parties for Students
by arrangement.
Mrs. Agnes Orr Robinson, Proprietress
Home Cooking.
Entire Staff Canadian Women.
AMBASSADOR CAFE
610 Seymour Sxreex
  Headquarters for Service 	
Club Luncheons, Dinners, Banquets and Conventions
Private Dining Rooms for Private Parties.
Suitable for Meetings and Socials. Fraternity Banquets a Specialty.
music, Dancing, Entertainment
EVERY EVENING - - 9.00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m THE   UBYSSEY
November 27th, 1924
Gift Stationery <£
BEAUTIFUL
and
ARTISTIC
Wonderful Assortment.
THE
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550 SEYMOUR ST.
PHONE. SEYMOUR 3000
Yellow Cab Rates
FOR THE FIRST THIRD
OF A MILE   -    -    -     -
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THIRD OF A MILE  -
HOURLY
RATES
25c.
10c.
$2.50
All Cabs Heated
For Christmas Parties, Dances,
Social Functions
You pay only from the time you step into
the Cab until you reach your destination.
Yellow Cab Co.
Phone. Sey. 4000
Phones : Fair. 77, Fair. 5660-R
WILLOW HALL
806 17th AVENUE, WEST
One Block West of Heather Street
This Hall is for rent to Clubs and
Private Parties.
For terms apply to F. S. LOCKETT,
Proprietor.
The Palm Garden
FRUIT, CONFECTIONERY,
ICE CREAM and TOBACCO
HOT LUNCHES SERVED,
Also, AFTERNOON TEAS.
Phone, Fair 377
Cor. 10th & Heather St.
Little Mary: "Mama, I don't have
to eat the egg, do I? It doesn't smell
good.
Mother: "Mary, how many times
have I told you not to complain about
the food.   Eat that egg."
Little Mary (after a brief pause):
"Mamma, must I eat the beak too?"
i.*..,..,.*..,..!
CO-ED ATHLETICS 1
SVLyfA THRUPP HONORED
Lasrr Wednesday, the Royal Life
Saving Society's Board of Examiners,
composed of Messrs. P. Borrows, J. A.
Parsons and H. H. Duggan, granted
to Miss Sylvia Thrupp the Award of
Merit and the Instructor's Certificate.
This is the second highest award for
life saving, and Miss Thrupp, one of
Varsity's best women swimmers, made
84 points out of a possible 100.
Four other members, having successfully passed the primary examination,
were awarded the bronze medal and
certificate of proficiency. These were
Misses Frances Gignac, Fern James,
Marjorie Kirk and Hester Thompson.
It is expected that there will soon
be other members ready to take the
examination.
jGRASS hockey
The Grass Hockey Team met a serious <§feat last Thursday afternoon at
the hands of Britannia High School,
the score being 7-0. According to the
President of the Hockey Club, the Varsity Team has suffered through lack
of practice owing to weather conditions. Another practice will be held
on Wednesday, prior to a game on
Thursday to be played against King
George High School.
?s
GYM. CLUB ON VACATION
?he Gym Club has discontinued its
activities for this term. As the gym
is large, there is still room for a
certain number of new members, and
the new term, these vacancies will
be filled.
Senior Girls Defeat
*mpr
7\
Up-Country Team
The Senior A Varsity women came
off with" flyIug_colors in their encounter with the ^Missionites, Saturday
night. They hSrl—tire—upper hand
throughout the game, finishing with
a score of 38-1. Doris Shorney netted the ball for 17 points and Florence Musgrave, Centre, played an
equally good game, netting 11 points.
The Varsity women gave an excellent
display, though they frequently missed
opportunities  to shoot.
During the game candy was sold,
and at the close, dancing was the centre of interest until  12 o'clock.
Varsity Basketball
Yen Take Two Games
rarsity_S£nior—A—basketball men
jroved too fast for theMjsaion-taam
and won by 39-9. 'Tne game was
fairly fast and at times rough. The
Varsity men excelled in combination
and speed. The Henderson brothers
and Fred Newcombe starred for Varsity, McLean being the pick of the
Missionites.
The   Teams:
Mission—McLlean (6), Ogles, Galli-
ford (1), Eckardt, Hopkins (2), Albie,
Donaldson.
Varsity—H. Henderson (8), Newcombe (12), Hartley (4), Peck (3),
Grauer (2), A. Henderson, Wilkinson
(2),  Arkley (4),  Buchanan,   (4).
In   the   first game   of  the evening
Vytrsity  Intermediate     B     team    won
/   fronTExIxeneral Gordon. 50-16,   Ernie
(/Lee and J.  Swanson"sTafred   for the
TJ.   B.   C.    team.     Shannon   was   the
best man for the losers.
The Teams:
Varsity—E. Lee (26), Swanson (18),
Turpin, Arnold, Williams, Stewart, 2.
Crawford  (2), Thurston (2).
Ex-General Gordon—Shannon (6),
Alpin (2>, Webster (4), Wallen (4),
Fraser,  Yarchow.
LITERARY CORNER]
Unspoken
But I will lie convincingly,
And you must never have a doubt—
So we hold happiness, you see,
And this is better far, my dear,
Than questioning.    If you found out
In some swift answer's mockery,
That I was never quite sincere
Could that help you, or yet change me?
There was a world of stars and leaves
And sleepy bird song   . . . long ago . .
And if a foolish heart still grieves
Remembering   this—why   should   you
know?
Be glad that now with tender eyes,/
I tell for you my truest lies. /
^S.M.
ILBfc. Scores Win
^   OveivVarsity In
Miller Cup Game
TJ. B. C. defeated Varsity on Saturday by 8 points to nil. The remarkable feature of the game was the difference in the play of the respective
periods, the first half being very slow
and the last very fast.
The sole feature in the first half was
Sparks. He scored after a TJ. B. C.
forward rush; Price converted.
Throughout this period the TJ. B. C.
pressed, being prevented from scoring
only by hard checking.
Varsity started the second half well;
following a scrum the forwards heeled
cleanly, and the threes were in possession of the ball in a good position
to score, but failure to pass to the
wing man spoiled this pretty effort.
U. B. C. retaliated with a nice forward
rush, in which Sparks and Ramsell
combined, but Varsity rendered this
attempt useless when the threes"" obtained the ball on their own twenty-
five and some brilliant combination by
Buchanan, Purdy and Cameron gained
fifty yards for them. For the next
few minutes Varsity tried several
three-quarters but fumbling rendered
these attempts futile. Buchanan
once broke through and passed to
Casselman, but the latter was effectually nailed by Warren before !he was
ten yards clear. TJ. B. C. then took
the play up-field and Lowden eventually scored with a dribbling rush. Price
failed to convert. The game ended
with the teams fighting on even terms.
TJ. B. C. will gorge at Varsity's expense. ,■
.MATHEMATICS CLUB
Ameeting of the Mathematics Club
was held on Tuesday, November 18th,
when Dr. Buchanan spoke on "The
Three Body Problem .in Celestial Mechanics." The speaker traced the history of the subject and gave a short
outline of the "Two Body Problem."
Then, proceeding to the subject of
"Asympototic Orbits," he outlined the
field of his own research work, illustrating his explanations by diagrams.
In conclusion, Dr. Buchanan suggested
an interesting theory concerning a
possible application of the theory of
asymptotic orbits to the internal structure of the atom.
The meeting was well attended and
a hearty vote of thanks was extended
to the speaker for a most interesting
and instructive address.
:lassics club
On Nov. 15th a meeting of the
Classics Club was held at the home of
Prof. H. T. Logan. Dr. Todd was the
speaker, his interesting subject being
his recent tour of the Classical world.
Refreshments were served and the
meeting adjourned after passing a
vote of thanks to Prof, and Mrs.
Logan.
Midway ^
Pharmacy
Cor. Broadway and
Heather Street
W. H. Caldwell, Proprietor
Phone, Fair. 840
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PHONE. FAIRMONT 3
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Nothing conveys thoughtfulness
and cheer like
A CHRISTMAS PORTRAIT
x
Charlton $ Ratbbun
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Specialist* in Colour Portrait*
X
711 Holden Bldg., 16 Halting St., E.
(Jutt Eut of B. C. E. Rly. and Carrall Sr.)
Phdne, Seymour3369
Have You Tried
Our Hot Beverages
After the Show ?
■+..«.<§)■«■.»■
Burns Drug Co., Ltd.
Opposite Hotel Vancouver
The Heather
Formerly Cusick's
Try us for
FRUIT
CONFECTIONERY
ICE CREAM
TOBACCO
AFTERNOON TEAS
Phone, Fair. 2881
Cor. Broadway & Heather St. November 27th, 1924
THE   UBYSSEY
J.W.Foster Ltd.
345 Hastings Street,   West
FIT REFORM CLOTHES
All the Newest Models in
College Suits and Overcoats,
at Prices that are Right.
BURBERRY COATS
See US Before Buying
For your next
Haircut
Why not try the
Pacific Barber Shop
="3
PACIFIC BUILDING
744 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Phone, Sey. 4863
C. SMALLEY, Proprietor.
Best Productions direct from
New York at the
Strand Theatre
Excellent features and artists
that can be seen or heard
nowhere else in Vancouver.
Hand Painted Boxes
Of High-Class Candy
Make Ideal Presents
If you want to send something quite
out of the ordinary to your friends for
Christmas, why not select one of the
beautiful hand-painted boxes of Purdy's
confectionery? Lovely mountain
scenery of such famous beauties as
The Lions, Lake Louise and The Three
Sisters are painted in oils by a well-
known Vancouver artist on the covers
of these handsome boxes. They can
be had in any size you desire and at a
remarkably low price. They are filled
with Purdy's world-famed confectionery, the one and only kind in the city.
The well-filled tea-room under the
capable supervision of Mr. Hunter
testifies to the service at your disposal
when staying down-town for a light
lunch. (Advt.)
THE   MODERN   VERSION
"Where do you hike to my saucy
co-ed!"
"Off to lectures, old thing," she said.
"Shall I jazz with you my snappy
coed?"
"If you've a limousine Boob," she
said.
STRAW FROM THE STACKS
♦
RACE   CHARACTERISTICS.
THE SCOTCHMAN keeps the Sabbath, and anything he gets a hold of.
THE IRISHMAN does not know
what he wants, and he will fight till
he gets it.
THE ENGLISHMAN is a self-made
man, and he is very proud of his
maker.
A gushing young lady, banquetting
beside a successful medical man,
struck  up a conversation as follows:
"I hear you're a real lady-killer,
doctor."
"Well, no. I make no distinctions
between the sexes."
Prof, in History—Henry the Eighth
had many of his courtiers executed
on flimsy charges.
Dumb '28—He must mean skinny
horses.
Brucie—What would you do if you
were in my shoes?
Lilly Fraser—I'd send out an alarm
that I was lost.—Ex.
Margaret—Avery, do you know how
to dance?
Avery—Well, I know the holds but
I don't know the steps.
If you don't laugh at the jokes of
the age laugh at the age of the jokes.
"Where ya going?"
"To the chapter house."
"I didn't know you were a. fraternity
man."
"F'm not, I"m going to the Library."
An English paper says preparedness is the act of wearing spectacles
to the table for breakfast when you
know there is going to be grapefruit.
A FLAPPER is a female between
the ages of sixteen and twenty-one,
who paints, smokes, swears and goes
anywhere unchaperoned. There used
to be another name for this species.
TWO IN ONE.—The only two who
can live as cheaply as one are a flea
and a dog.
GOOD OLD DAYS.—The reason
there were fewer wrecks in the old
horse and buggy days was because
the driver didn't depend entirely on
his own intelligence.
Dick Gosline—"Ho-hum! There's
nothing new under the sun."
Esther Rickley—"No, and there's a
lot of old stuff pulled off under the
moon."
AT THE ORPHEUM
"Herb" Williams (formerly Williams and Welfus), whose screamingly
funny comedy concoctions in classical nonsense are well remembered, is
again touring the Orpheum circuit
with a company, in which is included
Miss Joan Halpin, popular "English
dancing commedienne, and several
other people. This act headlines this
weeVs bill of vaudeville at the Orpheum which opens Thursday for
three days,   with a daily  matinee.
"Taxi Please," a vaudeville cameo
featuring William Frawley and Edna
Louise has second place on the bill
and is sold to be a very pleasing
comedy skit enhanced by lively melodies. Mr. Howard Kyle, eminent dramatic artist, comes to vaudeville with
high prestige gained by long years
of service upon the legitimate stage
and is reckoned as one of the foremost   character   actors.
GARTERLESS SOCK
STEPS INTO PROMINENCE
Files Suit For Non-Support
It is rumored that the Collegiate
Sock has filed suit for non-support
against the delinquent Disorder of
the Garter. The Whole-proof committee of investigation has been set to
work to gather evidence and to
straighten the coils in the recent hose
controversy.
The committee has already discovered that the fluctuation in the stock
market on wool, silk, cotton and lisle
is not responsible for the drop in
socks. Men on the campus who go
about with the leg apparel draping their shoe tops almost to the
point of immodesty claim that it is
the latest wrinkle in socks. But working on the rational theory that there
must be a cause the investigators
have a clue that the balloon type of
trousers  might be to  blame.
As this type of garment, which
piles up around the man's feet, prevents the cold from entering and supposedly shuts off the vision of the
critical observer from the telescoped
sock, therefore it seems unnecessary to employ the elastic apparatus
which some claim is detrimental to
health. Some say that this new elimination has -ihelped many a man to
make  his eight o'clock on time.
Needless to say everyone has noticed this epidemic of Sagging Socks
that has afflicted nearly every male
leg on the campus, and it has aroused no small alarm. Though it is hoped that the "Eds" may be uplifted,
cured and forgiven, forbid it that the
co-eds yield to the downfall of this
f h c rtccfc-iing! —Universdty Argonaut,
University of Idaho.
Overheard in the Corridors.
"You kids are always putting -one
another in your place."
"Yeh, it's a transparent, white, colorless mineral."
"It's a kind of flesh color—just like
beef, you know."
Navy
Herringbone
Suits
Fine quality worsted, tailored
in a smart-fitting young men's
double-breasted model. Unbeatable value.     Sale Price
$27.65
C. D. Bruce
LIMITED
Cor. of Hastings and Homer Sts.
MOUNT PLEASANT
METHODIST CHURCH
10th Ave. and Ontario St.
•   Minister, REV. O. M. SANFORD
Out-of-town Students
Specially Welcome
Good Music, Interesting Sermons,    I
Friendly Greeting. i
■••-•"•-•"•••i
Dr. L. F.MARSHALL
DENTIST
CONVENIENT TO THE UNIVERSITY
WORK CAN BE ARRANGED
IN STUDY PERIODS
BETWEEN CLASSES
AND IN THE EVENINGS
2520 LAUREL (Cor. Broadway)
Phone. Fair. 896-Y
Man's
Greatest
Servant
ELECTRIC current is serving mankind today in a million ways—
lightening tasks, extending his sphere
and lengthening his day.
It transports him, horizontally* and
vertically, lights his houses, runs his
newspapers, does housework, cooks
meals, heats him and cools him.
Electric current would be of little use
if it were not supplied as a SERVICE.
It is because you may obtain it at any
time, night or day, on a moment's
notice and practically any place in city
or suburbs that makes it one of life's
greatest boons.
British Coitimbm ^IwmcMaraYCo.
HEAD OFFICE \^y VANCOUVER* B.C.
62
aiiiiigfiilfiiyafiajiiy^^ '*"fK^-r^
THE   UBYSSEY
November 27th, 1924
*'«■ IN CAN''0*
MO QUESTION ABOUT IT I
SPALDING
Blue Streak Skates
are Leaders in
Quality and Price.
j' Blue Streak Racing
Skates
are very light, made of special
steel, reinforced at every joint.
Blade very finely tapered.
Blue Streak Hockey
Tubular Skates
made exactly the same as the i
Racing Skate, but shorter, for [
Hockey or Pleasure.
None Better!
M f OF CANADA /UMITEO
424 Hastings Street, W.
VANCOUVER. B. C.
BAGGAGE
XO       FROM
ALL TRAINS AND BOATS
ROYAL  TRANSFER
PHONE,  SEY.  6
A TTEND
m COMMERCIAL
SCHOOL
Standard Commercial Courses
H. C. DUFFUS, Prop.
709 GEORGIA STREET, W.
Opposite Hotel Vancouver
DANCING
x
Private and Class Lessons
Lady and Gentlemen
Teachers
W. E. Fenn's School
COTILLION HALL
Seymour 3058-O or Seymour 101
Christmas Plays Featured
By Clever Interpretations
pa^l of the guards. The play left the
audience very much delighted, and in
a receptive mood for the other offerings of the evening.
The second play, "The One Deserving" by Miss Dorothy Taylor of Arts
'25, sounded the first tragic note of
the evening. The final effect of the
play was perhaps a little blurred, as
the sympathy of the audience was
divided between the two sisters. At
first, Laura held It; but when one realized just what health means to Alhea,
it seemed hard that she should be
denied the possible chance of recovery. Also, at the close of the play,
Launa's final action seemed scarcely
decided enough for an audience to
realize its meaning. Apart from this,
the play was both well-written and
well-acted. Miss Joan Meredith gave
a very good rendering of the warmhearted Laura, driven to distraction
by the limited scope allowed her artistic talents. The part of Althea,
the invalid sister, was convincingly
taken by Miss Gladys Harvey; while
that of the mother was filled in a most
satisfactory manner by Miss Gwen
Musgrave. Mr. W. J. Masterson, as
the family doctor, completed the cast.
After the performance of this play,
repeated calls for the author brought
Miss Taylor to the stage for a brief
moment to receive a much deserved
ovation.
The third play, "The Old Lady
shows her Medals," a delightful mixture of laughter and tears, was the
gem of the programme. The atmosphere of the "What-Care-I" street
basement, was excellently reproduced,
even to the folding bed and collapsable bath. In every detail, the characters fitted the Barrie conception.
The two "Charmwomen and," the Hag-
garty   woman,   "a   charmw.oman   but
(Continued from Page 1)
nothing else,
were each perfect in
the portrayal of common, nosey, lower
class Cockneys, elevated, however, by
a certain sympathetic tact when such
was necessary. These parts were
most delightfully filled by Misses H.
Kidd, L. Morrison, and I. Barton. This
play saw the two best pieces of acting
of the evening—that of Miss Bice
Clegg as Mrs. Dowey and Mr. H. L.
Brown as Kenneth. Each part was a
masterpiece in itself, mingling in the
inimitable Barrie manner, a just right
proportion of comedy and pathos. As
the self-satisfied "Oxford graduate"
type of slum clergyman, failing to
adapt himself to his work, Mr. R. C.
Harris was quite satisfactory. Altogether, this play was one of the best
pieces of work ever produced on the
University stage.
As for the last play, "The Dollar,"
by David Pinski, it utterly failed to
"get over." The intended satire lacked point and interest. Of course, any
play, coming after the Barrie production, would have been as an anticlimax, still, "The Dollar" was inherently unfit for acting, and would not
have been a success in any position
on the programme. It is a pity that
the undoubted talent of the players
was wasted on such an effort. Those
taking part in it were Misses M.
Brown, R. Marin, D. Baynes, H. Warren, E. J. Anthony, D. G. Marsh, G.
Vincent and W. Kelly.
The thanks of the club go to the
Orchestra, who gave their very welcome services on the three nights.
Mention must also be made of the
hard-worked scene-shifters, Messrs. T.
Taylor, K. Caple, J. Bennett, W. Matthews, H. Gartshore, P. Palmer, D. B.
Charlton, L. Atkinson, L. A. Murphy,
I T. Wilkinson, G. Telford, E. Eades, and
I R. Norman.
Aggie Pep Meeting
(Contmued from Page 5) \
Wilkinson and Lefty—Noloon ■ favored
the audience with a clever parody on
the French "Hinky, dinky, do you
speak?" song. Their fair admirers,
quite overcome, presented them with
cabbages which the disguised member
devoured.
Walter Turnbull spoke briefly on
the Oxford Debate, emphasizing the
fact that the U. B. C. representatives
had devoted much time from their
studies to defend the laurels of their
Alrra Mater. Brick led a sky rocket
for the debaters.
After hearing the rendering of another selection by the Aggie orchestra,
the meeting closed with God Save
the King.
Everyone, while agreeing that the
Aggies had covered themselves with
glory in the best pep meeting staged
this term, deplored the lack of life In
the Science camp. The Scientists,
however, aver that they will be heard
from before long.   Let's go, Science!
The Christmas Problem Solved !
Your Graduation photographs will make "enviable gifts" at the
specially favorable prices quoted.   Arrange an exchange of your
personal portraits amongst your
special friends. Place your orders
at the studio early and you may
take delivery any time before
Christmas.
rf
STUDIOS
553 Granville St.
v^sa
Prominent Musician
Lectures at Varsity
An interesting address upon Musical
Conditions in Canada was delivered by
Dr. A. Sw/Vogt of Toronto before a
large~numbei -of students in the auditorium on Friday noon.
Dr. Vogt, the Dean of the Faculty of
Music in the University of Toronto,
pointed out the necessity of a wider
interest in music in the west; eastern
Canada, he said, has more of the old-
world culture, and therefore is more
advanced in the arts, and music is
given greater prominence. In the University of Torbnto there is a large
number  of  students   who   take   only
Som/me/rk
556 Granville Street
Phone, Sey. 5330
Where you can
select Gifts of
rare beauty at
reasonable
prices.
"it Costs No More to Shop
at Sommers"
music, and the advisability of giving
credits for music in the University of
B. C. was dwelt upon. In looking over
the programme of the Christmas concert of the Musical Society, Dr. Vogt
was impressed with the high standard
in the choice of musical selections, and
he commended the society as one with
fine possibilities. A great stimulus to
the work of the club will be the unrivalled new auditorium at Point
Grey, which he pronounced to be the
finest in the world.
The recent conditional purchase of
the Toronto Conservatory of Music by
the University of Toronto is a sign of
the times and of the increased Interest in music. He declared that If the
other provinces likewise took a vested
interest in the musical life of the people, a bright future is in store in the
musical realm. Canada, in Dr. Vogt's
opinion, is capable of doing great
things for the cause of music if only
the people would make the best of
their oportunities, and the university
interest along this line can be very
great.
ff«wwwsiimra^mriffir^^
Expert Instruction
is what counts when taking Dancing Lessons. We
find that the average U. B. C. student learns so
quickly that they only need a few lessons. You
may start any time, afternoon or evening, and remember, we teach you to dance in ONE course of
lessons.    Terms arranged.
Phone, Bayview 5834. Office Hours :  1 to 9 p.m.
Broadway Dancing ftcademy
1400 BROADWAY, W. (One Block East of Granville St.)
Just a step from the  University.

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