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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 11, 1923

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 •«■*< •,•'
Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
"Volume VI.
VANCOUVER, B.C., OCTOBER 11th,    1923
No. 2
Vile Atrocities
Committed By
Sophomores
Terrified Frosh Shout "Graft"
and "Boo"
Speeches were made to the Freshies by Tubby Shore and R. L. McLeod, of Arts '25; and W. H. Sparks,
1      Arts '26.    Harold Allen, Arts '26, informed the poor young things of what
; was in store for them. They would
have to wear till Christmas, at least,
green ties, the same to be purchased
from the A. M. S. (loud yells of
• "graft!" "Boo!" etc.), refrain from
using the auditorium at noon meetings, and do many other irksome dulses. They were to be addressed by
such people as A. E. Grauer, Jack
Grant, and Brick McLeod.
As for hazing, each Freshman had
Arts '27 painted on his forehead, and
then had the paint dried out by an
electric fan. As to the parade, it was
the most enthusiastic, etc., etc. The
bonfire came next. Unfortunately the
effigy of Arts '26 on the top of it failed to perform exactly as it "oughter."
But the fire was great, the sky being
so brilliantly illuminated that it was
seen from West Vancouver. The inevitable snakes were formed, and the
meeting adjourned to Purdy's.
Any doubts as to the success of
this year's initiation were most effectively dispelled on Saturday evening last. The bonfire was enormous,
the parade splendid, and the actual
initiation an unqualified success. Several innovations were injected into
this year's affair by the Sophs. The
Frosh were all compelled to wear
night-clothes, and the majority chose
pyjamas, although one daring soul appeared in a light blue chemise with
garters to match, and another inhabited a horrible red and black dressing-
gown. As soon as the interested parties had all assembled in the auditorium, two Freshmen staged a blindfold boxing match, with terrible results to themselves, and then another
sang "Yes, We Have No Bananas,"
with horrible results to the audience.
An innocent Frosh attempted to lead
a yell, but his education had been
sadly neglected, and he didn't know
the words. He will be dealt with by
his class executive. No Science men
are invited to the funeral.
NAMES AT POINT GREY TO
BE SELECTED BY
STUDENTS
Publications Board to Organize Competition for Naming of
Streets, Parks, Boulevards, etc.
A hundred years ago Captain Vancouver sighted Point Grey, naming it
after one of his friends, master of the
expeditionary ship Discovery. A little
farther around the peninsula the Spanish ships narrowly escaped being
stranded upon the sand flats extending to the right of the Point. These
were called the Spanish Banks. The
expedition proceeded a little farther
eastward, in the direction of what is
now Vancouver's harbor. Baker, third
officer on one of the ships who was
on watch at the time, sighted about
sunset, a great white mountain cone
over the trees and away to the southeast. That, mountain is now known as
Mount Baker.
And now if Captain Vancouver and
his expedition were to Round Point
Grey again the University authorities,
the city engineers, and the government would all unite in supplicating
them to find names for the streets,
parks, avenues, and boulevards which
will surround the new University.
But, unfortunately, Captain Vancou-
i ver is not at present in a position to
I lend his assistance.   In lieu of the discoverer, Mr. E. A. Cleveland, who has
been largely responsible for the planning of the districts adjoining the site,
ATTITUDE OF EASTERN
UNIVERSITY ON HAZING
University of Toronto, Oct.—A
regulation at Trinity College prohibits hazing in any shape or form. Their
model is the English system, and Americanization of the college must be
discouraged by the faculty. They
maintain that individuality is destroyed by hazing, and that freedom from
distraction is necessary to be successful in examinations and college life.
suggests that the students lend their
aid in the choice of suitable names.
As a result, the Publications Board
of the University of British Columbia
are, upon the advice of President
Klinck, organizing a competition
whereby the students will name the
aforesaid streets, parks, boulevards,
etc. The reward will be an eternal
knowledge of the fact that "You Did
It." Further information will be published later.
Everything is being done to make
the district surrounding the University site a complete urban unit. There
will be well defined sections for boarding houses, sororities, fraternities,
business sections etc. In short everything is to work like a dream. Tenth
Avenue is to be the main thoroughfare from the city, but Fourth and
Sixteenth will probably rival it in importance. The last mentioned avenue
is to be afforded a different approach
in order to avoid the ravine which
now intersects it. While speaking of
approaches and residential districts
it might be well to add that no houses
are to be allowed within three quarters of a mile of the University buildings. No crying babies, klaxons or
anything like that.
Varsity-National
Soccer Game
Is Draw
Scotty Dean Scores for Varsity
SIR GEORGE FOSTER STRESSES
VALUE OF IDEALS
Accumulated Experience of Past Utilized in Solving
Present Problems
The Right Hon. Sir George E. Foster, one of the Canadian delegates to
the Versailles Conference, and a vice-
president of the League of Nations,
addressed the factulty and students of
the University in the auditorium last
Friday. President L. S. Klinck introduced the speaker.
That university students should appreciate the opportunity that is given
them of utilizing the accumulated experience of the past in the study of
present and future problems, was the
keynote of the Canadian orator's address. He showed that ideals are a
necessity at the present time. The
students must be inspired by them to
achieve the highest results, both in
student life, and in the work-a-day
world. Their leaders, the faculty,
must also have ideals, though these
will be somewhat modified by a knowledge of the stern realities of life.
The splendid influence of the profes
sors in Canadian Universities today
is due to the fact that they still maintain their high ideals.
The speaker then claimed that a
knowledge of the present is not sufficient to solve the problems confronting the world. The students must
study the records of the past where
the accumulated wisdom of the ages
is stored. The University holds out
the key to this storehouse of experience and the students must enter and
use the treasures awaiting them in the
solution of their present problems and
in the preparation for the future.
In conclusion Sir George asserted
that the world is slowly but steadily
improving. There is no need today
of a pessimistic view, for there is a
steadily increasing surplus of good inherited by each succeeding generation.
Canadian students must do their part
in increasing the surplus to be bequeathed to posterity.
The First Soccer team journeyed
to New Westminster to play the opening league game of the present season on Saturday. A draw resulted,
both Varsity and the Nationals scoring a goal.
The game opened fast, Varsity forwards pressing hard. The inevitable
goal came after McLuckie and Lundie
had worked the ball to the penalty
line. Scotty Deans came in from the
wing and scored with a neat shot.
Varsity had the best of the play ensuing, and should have increased the
score, but in the second half Varsity
slowed down. The Nationals pressed
continually and after several unsuccessful attacks they scored.
Curiously enough, it was Stibbs, a
former Varsity player, who scored for
our opponents. This reverse brought
out our team's fighting spirit, and
only bad luck kept them from scoring. Both McLuckie and Jackson had
good  chances,  but  shot  wide.
The score was a good indication of
the  run  of  play,  as  the  teams  were
very even.    Draws, however, will not
(Continued on Page 5)
QUARTER MILLION
STILL CREDITED
TO SIR HARRY
Players' Club   Tryouts
During the past week professors
state that they have been forced to
hold lectures in the corridors, so much
in demand have been the rooms for
the rehearsals of aspirants to the-
Players' Club. Open any door, especially between three and five o'clock,
and one could hear "I tell you I am
worth half a million," or "the prince
for whom I have been waiting so
long." However, this is now over for
another year, and the excitement of
meeting and practising with a strange
"Sir Harry" or "Kate" has subsided.
With the rehearsals of the Christmas
Plays, which will begin shortly, the
serious business of the Club will commence.
Meeting Thursday.
The Players' Club will hold a meeting for all members, both old and
new, on Thursday noon. At this,
those who have survived the try-outs
will be welcomed into the Club, and
also the Christmas Plays will be outlined.   All are asked to be on hand.
mm mmx^''^
y
THE     UBYSSEY
Oct. I 1th, 1923
•UtttergUg of SrtttBlj Qlolumbta
INFORMATION   TO   STUDENTS
GENERAL REGULATIONS.
1.    The sessional fees are as follows:
Registration and Class Fees
In Arts—
First Term, payable on or before
Oct. 6th $40.00
Second Term, payable on or before
Jan. 19th   35.00
In Applied Science—
First Term, payable on or before
Oct. 6th  $50.00
Second Term, payable on or before
Jan.  19th   50.00
In Agriculture—
First Term, payable on or before
Oct. 6th  $40.00
Second Term, payable on or before
Jan.  19th    35.00
In Nursing—
First Term, payable on or before
Oct. 6th  $40.00
Second Term, pavable on or before
Jan.  19th ..."  35.00
$ 75.00
100.00
75.00
Alma Mater Fee—Payable on or before Oct. 6th....
Caution Money—Payable on or before Oct. 6th....
For Partial Students
Fees per "Unit"—Payable on or before Oct. 6th....
Alma Mater Fee—Payable on or before Oct. 6th....
Caution Money—Payable on or before Oct. 6th....
75.00
7.00
5.00
7.00
7.00
5.00
For Graduates
Registration and Class Fees—Payable on or before
Oct. 15th      10.00
After these dates an additional fee of $2.00 will be
exacted of all students in default.
All cheques must be made payable to "The University of British Columbia."
At the request of the students themselves, and by
the authority of the Board of Governors of the University,
the $7.00 fee is exacted from all students for the Alma
Mater Society.
The Caution money is returned at the end of the
Session after deductions have been made to cover breakages, wastage, and use of special materials in laboratories,
etc. In case the balance of the deposit remaining to the
credit of a student falls below $1.50, a second deposit of
$5.00 may be required.
2. Immediately after October 20th the Bursar shall
send to the Instructors a list of the students who have
not paid their fees, on receipt of which their names shall
be struck from the registers of attendance, and such
students cannot be re-admitted to any class except on
presentation of a special ticket, signed by the Bursar,
certifying to the payment of fees.
3. Students registering after October 6th shall pay
their fees at the time of registration, failing which they
become subject to the provisions of Regulation 2.
Exchange News
University of Washington (P. I. N.
S.), May 1.—Barnyard golf, that fascinating game that is played so extensively in the outlying towns of the
middle west, has taken the University of Washington by storm. The
students in that institution have reverted to their ancestors' habits of
tossing discarded horseshoes at two
unoffending iron pegs. Although the
sport has not grown to intercollegiate
size yet, it is being played by the various student groups on the campus.
Competition is keen between the
Greek letter organizations, a silver
cup is to be given to the winner.
According to an enthusiastic reporter this will soon be a major sport
in this University.
Whitman College (P. I. N. A.), Oct.
—"Boomerang" has been chosen by
the sophomore play committee for
production on November 16th. Tryouts for the six major characters will
be held next week, and work will be
started immediately.
Members of other colleges also
know the shock of blundering into a
highly dramatic scene every time
they incautiously enter a room without giving previous warning.
LETTERS CLUB.
The Letters Club held its first meeting for the session on Tuesday evening at the home of Magistrate H. C.
Shaw. Vacancies caused by the resignation of three members of the Club
were filled by the election of Miss
Molly Jackson, Arts '25; Miss Florence Williams, Arts '24; and Mr. Walter Lanning, Arts '25.
Miss Mary Chapman, B.A., gave the
paper for the evening—a sympathetic
study of "Alice Meynell" as essayist
and poetess. Miss Chapman spoke
of Mrs. Meynell as one of the greatest writers of her day in extreme
delicacy and restraint of style and in
keen appreciation of the problems and
emotions of childhood.
Freshmen—Learn
These
KITSILANO—CAPILANO
Kitsilano, Capilano, Siwash Squaw—
Kla-how-ya,      Tillicum,      Skookum
Wah—
Hy-you   Mammook,   Mucka   Mucka
Zip.
B. C. 'Varsity Rip, Rip, Rip,
'V-A-R-S-I-T-Y
'Varsity.
»    •    •
SKYROCKET
S-S-S-S-S-S-S-Boom
Ahahahahahahahahah
(whistle)
'Varsity (or other name).
• •    •
CATFISH—DOGFISH
Catfish, Dogfish, Devilfish, Sharks
Atta boy, atta boy, raise some sparks
Eat 'em up, eat 'em up, eat 'em up
raw
B. C. Varsity—
Rah, Rah, Rah,
• •   •
Varsity Rah, Varsity Rah,
Give 'em Hell with a ziz, boom, bah,
Soak 'em, croak 'em,
Cover 'e,m with gore,
Sweep 'em away with a rush and a
roar,
Hold    'em,   Varsity,    don't   let   'em
through
Win that cup for the B. C. TJ.
GOWNS
Batiste
Specializes in Unity Gowns
Prices Reasonable
Fairfield Bldg.—Shop 52
Cor.  Pender and  Granville
Streets
Sey. 3775
PHONE SEYMOUR 1160
WM. TWEEDIE'S
ORCHESTRA
OPEN   FOR   ENGAGEMENTS
FOR 1923-1924 SEASON
Ensure the Success of Your
Social  Affairs
Have Good Music
Exclusive   Booking   Agents
SWITZER   BROS.  LTD. Qct. 11th, 1923
THE     UBYSSEY
SPALDING'S
Guaranteed Rugby
Equipment
Sweaters
Boots
Pants
Balls
Etc.
424 Hastings St. West
The New Snappy
Overcoats have
Arrived.
Three-piece Belts — with raglan shoulders. Prices very reasonable.
Look over our new samples of
suitings — to Order —
$28.00 to $45.00
Thomas & McBain Limited
Semi-Ready  Service  Shop
655 GRANVILLE STREET
Get a
VARSITY PENANT
For the
FOOTBALL MATCHES
We have them in stock
SHAW &McGILL, LTD
SPORTING GOODS
658 Robson St.
Service Bldg., 4 Doors East of
Granville St.
THE GREAT-WEST
Life Insurance Co.
Head Office, Winnipeg, Manitoba
A gentleman connected with
the Bank of Commerce in Vancouver, on Sept. 1st, 1908, had a
20 Payment Life policy issued
to him by The Great-West Life
Assurance Co.
The quinquennial dividends
were accumulated to lessen the
number of payments.
On Sept. 1st, 1922, fourteen
years from the date of the policy
it was fully.paid up, and he received in cash $20.65.
It was really a fourteen Payment Life.
He will receive dividends on
this paid up policy as long as he
lives.
640 Hastings Street West
Vancouver  Branch  Office
SPORT NEWS
U. B. C. SQUAD
LOSES TO SHAMROCKS
The University Seconds made their
initial league debut on Saturday, and
incidentally received their first setback, the husky beef-slingers from
Daddy Burns' market being their conquerors. Varsity was away off the
form shown in the previous game,
and the contest could not be described as a good exhibition. U. B. C.
started like certain winners, almost
scoring on two occasions from mix-
ups in front of the Shamrocks' goal.
Then Ledingham, whose kicking had
been a feature, wrenched his knee,
and had to retire. Varsity defence
seemed to lose its usual effectiveness, with the result that Burns'
gradually assumed control, and would
have piled up a big score had not
Davidson been playing in magnificent
form. Towards the end of the half,
U. B. C. took heart, and came within
an ace of scoring twice, while forcing
three corners in rapid succession.
The second half saw play getting
faster, with the Shamrocks responsible for most of the play. Underwood got in the most dangerous shot
that Varsity had, but could not score.
Shamrocks came down viciously, and
following a spell of terrific play, registered the only goal on a shot which
gave Davidson no chance. Varsity
tried to fight back, but Shamrocks
gradually re-assumed control, and our
defence did well to keep the score
so low.
Davidson played a great game in
U. B. C.'s goal.
Mr. Armstrong's refereeing gave
evident satisfaction.
Line-ups.
U. B. C—Davidson; Disney and
Butler; Muylaert, Ledingham, and
Fanning; Hope, Newcome, Cant, Underwood and Evans.
Shamrocks—Martin; Sharp and Dal-
ziel; Stewart, Haines and Morgan;
Wright, Duncan, Harrison, Doxsy and
Martin.
RUGBY CLUB MAKES
PLANS FOR COMING YEAR
Plans for the coming year were discussed at a meeting of the Rugby
Club held on Monday noon. It was
decided that a team would be entered
in the McKechnie Cup series, one in
the Senior City League, competing for
the Miller Cup, and two in the Intermediate League to compete for the
Province Cup. There was considerable discussion over a proposed plan
to have two senior teams, using the
members of the McKechnie Cup team
to strengthen lDOth teams; but this
was finally turned down, as the players thought that it would not be good
policy to have the players in the two
teams working against one another.
It is comforting to reflect that whilst
many people are killed each year in
attempting to cross our city streets,
the number crossing without being
killed is greater.
"Will you marry me?"
"Oh!   Have you seen father?"
"Yes, and I love you just the same."
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
The Spencer Cup, now held by the
girls of Arts '25, is up for competition
this year. In previous years the
sports pertaining to this cup comprised basketball, swimming, and the
relay race at the athletic meet. This
year there is some talk of adding
other events to the meet, such as flat
races, throwing the basketball, etc.
f The first basketball meeting of the
year was held on Tuesday noon, when
the president, Miss Alda Moffat, gave
an outline of the plans of the club.
The practice hours this year will be
on Wednesdays and Fridays from 5
to 7. There may possibly be a second team playing in league games
this year. A secretary was elected
to take Miss Shorney's place till her
return. A curator was also elected.
Everyone is invited to turn out to the
practices, which start immediately.
All students, especially those interested in Women's Athletics, will be
glad to know that Miss Doris Shorney
is steadily improving. Miss Shorney's
illness at the beginning of the term
threatened to become a serious drawback. Happily, Miss Isabel McKinnon
has taken charge until Doris can return, and the Women's Athletics Club
is beginning its work.
CLASS NOTES
SCIENCE   '24.
At the first general meeting of the
class this year the elections, which
had been deferred from last session,
were held. The following officers
were elected:—
Honorary President — Dr. J. G.
Davidson.
President—R. C. Graham.
Vice-President—H. D. Wallis.
Secretary-Treasurer—F.  W.  Coffin.
Athletic Representative—Val. Gwyther.
Class Marshal—Wm. Smitheringale.
It has been decided, at the kind invitation of Dr. and Mrs. Davidson,
to hold the first Class Dance at their
home on Marine Drive.
ARTS '24.
Jock Lundie and Lloyd Edgett were
elected Marshal and Athletic Representative, respectively, in place of
Frank Marrion and Hee Cant, who
are no longer with the class.
Arts '24 contemplate having a launch
party to Cosy Cove a week from Saturday, and plans are also going ahead
for a class party to be held in the
auditorium on November 9th.
ARTS '26
Last week the members of Arts '26
elected  their  officers  for  the  coming
year.    Those elected were:
Walter Turnbull  President
Jean Faulkner  Vice-President
Agnes King  Secretary
Hilton Moore Treasurer
Freda Edgett  Deputy Treasurer
Kathleen Clark 	
 Women's Athletic  Rep.
Billy Murphy Men's Athletic Rep.
Sadie Boyles....Women's Literary Rep.
Louis  Smith Men's Literary Rep.
Russel Palmer  Marshal
T. Bentley Edwards Yell Leader
The Athletes' Friend
If you are interested in
sports—come in and have a
talk with Geo. H. Goulding,
successful Rugby, Hockey,
Swimming, Soccer and Track
and Field Coach.
GEORGE GOULDING
Sporting   Goods   and   Bicycle
Dealer
Granville Street
Chocolates
Home-made
Candy
Ice  Cream  and
all  Fountain
Drinks
(Afternoon
Teas)
We will be
pleased to give
special rates for
private parties,
special classes,
etc.
English
Flanola Shirts
$2.25
a great wearing
and super quality
fabric.
WEAR A MANN'S SHIRT
Importers of
English  Hosiery
Manns Men's Wear
SHOPS
411-474 Granville St.
rENUS
PENCILS
UkUa^tsem^QaHtf
Jrtnal in the world
FOR the student or prof., the
superb VENUS out-rivals
all for perfect pencil work.
17 black degrees—3 copying.
American Lead
Pencil Co.
220 Fifth Are.
New York
-50\-
Write for
booklet on
Venus Pencils and
Venus Evhrfointbd
Mechanical Pcncfls THE     UBYSSEY
Oct. 11th, J 923
Freshmen!
Here's some good advice.
If you want to have an easy
time Sophomore, Junior and
Senior year, make a hit with
the Profs, your first term.
You can do it if you turn
out neat Corona-typed notes,
themes, and reports. Now
is the time you need Corona, and we've got one for
you.
$69.00 for the  latest model.
Graham Hirst Company
Sole Agents for B. G.
812  PENDER  ST.  W.
Sey. 8194 Vancouver, B. C.
The    VARSITY    SHOP
SEE
OUR
BIG
RUGGED
OVERCOATS'
Before buying.
They will save you money.
$29.75 and up
FASHION CRAFT
Thos. Foster & Co.
514   Granville  St.
One Store Only
The Palm Garden
Fruit, Confectionery
Ice Cream and
Tobacco
Hot Lunches  Served,
Also Afternoon Tea
Phone Fair. 377
Cor. 10th and Heather St.
(Member Pacific  Inter-Collegiate  Press
Association)
Issued every Thursday by the Publications
Board of the University of British Columbia.
Extra  mural   subscriptions,   $2.00  per session.
For advertising rates apply
Advertising   Manager.
EDITORIAL   STAFF.
Editor-in-Chief    A.   L.   Wheeler
Associate Editors  C. H. Dowling
Miss Jean Faulkner
Miss Grace Smith
T. W.  Brown
Feature   Editor   Ralph   Mathews
Literary Editor  Miss Lucy Ingram
Exchange Editor Miss Gwen  Stirling
Sporting Editor  J. Cowx
Chief Reporter  H. C. MacCallum
BEFORTORIAI.   STAFF.
Laura S. Mowatt, John Grace, Dorothy Arkwright, A. Earle Birney, Florence Williams, Eric Dunn, Doris McKay, Ralph Mathews, R. O. Norman,
Dave Taylor, Sadie Boyles.
BUSINESS STAFF.
Business Manager  T. J. Keenan
Assist.  Bus. Mgr W.  H.  Sparks
Circulation  Manager  F.  J.  Brand
EDITOR   FOB   THE   WEEK
Jean   Faulkner
IDEALS AND THE LEAGUE.
Many of those who had the privilege of hearing Sir George Foster's
address, on Friday noon, came away
feeling somewhat disappointed. It
had been announced that Sir George
would speak on the League of Nations. He spoke on the value of
ideals.
But are not the two topics closely
related? The League is essentially
the creation of idealists. And on this
account there was some doubt as to
its ability to fulfil the position for
which it was designed. But, in solving many of the problems of the new
Europe, it has proved itself equal to
its task.
Now the League is not solely a
European organization. It is worldwide in its aims, and if those aims
are to be achieved the ground must
be prepared for the cultivation of the
spirit of the League. And by what
other manner than by the dissemination of high ideals throughout the
world through the medium of the universities, is this preparation to be
made?
ADVERTISING
The Business Staff of the Publica-
itons Board is putting forth every effort this year to make the Ubyssey
as nearly self-supporting as possible.
It hopes to attain this much-desired
end by securing enough advertising
matter from various Vancouver firms
to cover the expenses of publication.
But these firms cannot be persuaded to
place their advertisements with us, and
certainly cannot be expected to continue advertising in our columns, unless they find that by so doing they are
gaining the patronage of the students.
The Business Staff cannot be successful in its objective of making the
Ubyssey pay for itself unless every
student co-operates with it, by patronizing those firms advertising in our
paper.
INITIATION.
Last week this journal made editorial comment upon the advisability
of abolishing initiation and replacing
it by something of a more sane and
civilized nature. We feel assured that
the lack of interest displayed in last
Saturday's demonstration amply justifies us in the stand which we have
taken. Less and less interest has
been evinced towards initiation each
year, and we believe that it has only
been the novelty of the affair which
has recommended it to the freshman
years. Once again we express our
hope that Arts '27 will do away with
initiation, as it now exists, and draw
up a new and original program for
next year. Just what that program
will be, it remains for them to decide.
NOT AN EDITORIAL!
Since the smoking habit seems to
be gaining in popularity among the
women of today, the question naturally arises of whether the women students of this University will hold
their own smokers during the coming
year. To some, this will appear to
be among the class of events which
are "possible, but not probable,"
while to others it will seem one of
the most vital questions to be dealt
with.
It has been suggested by some one
that the follies of High Jinks be-'done
away with and a first-class^fimoker
be held instead. Of course much
can be said on either side of this
suggestion. First of all, think of how
it would eliminate that awful mental
struggle which is involved in the effort of thinking up something to "go
as." Yet again, think of the terrible
expense which would be incurred in
the purchasing of smoking-jackets,
cigarette-holders, ash-trays and other
necessary material.
HoAvever, we shall see what we
shall see. There is no telling what
the women will do, 'specially when
they assemble in one of their enthusiastic undergrad meetings.
LAUMO.
BALLADE    D'UN    AMATEUR.
Alone I wander through the Park,
And watch the moony couples stray
Who carve initials  on the  bark
Of  silver birch  or alder gray;
I love to watch the creatures play—
Sub-normals with a mental twist—
You see my very words betray
I  am a  sentimentalist.
The denizens  of Noah's Ark
Went  two  and  two—the   bear,  the
jay,
The wolf, the nightingale, the lark—
And ever since that far- off day
All living things the rule obey,
And though the cynics will persist
In saying, "Love is brain-decay,"
I am a sentimentalist.
"But," now I hear some fool remark,
"What are you trying to convey?
Haven't you kept us in the dark?
So you approve of flirting, eh?"
In  theory, but not as  they
Who practise what they preach;    no
tryst
Have I to keep—still, en effet,
I am a sentimentalist.
L'Envoi.
O Prince, no matter what they say,
The  cynics  know  what they  have
missed,
And therefore in my humble way,
I am a sentimentalist.
y*-
STOP!   LOOK!   LISTEN!
$2,000.00
Will be paid
into
Alma  Mater Funds
This Year
by
Advertisers
the
*<
Ubyssey '
They offer the best
Patronize them loyally
''Tuum Est"
—SHIRTS—
This week it's Shirts—the
best Shirts at $2.45 in
British Columbia
Look Them Over
Turpin Bros. Ltd.
MEN'S   OUTFITTERS
629 Granville St.
Vallona Cloth
Coats at $49.50
Sizes for Women  and   Misses
Those seeking coats of good
quality and good style at a very
moderate price will find these
garments particularly to their
liking. The models are splendidly tailored, are made along entirely new lines and are most
carefully finished throughout.
Colors such as beaver, mallard,
taupe and tans are available.
Collars are of beaverine and
some have cuffs of same.
All are well lined and interlined—wanted sizes—$49.50.
Drysdale's  Garment   Shop
Third Floor.
LIMITED r
Oct. 11th, 1923
THE     UBYSSEY
YOU HAVE
FRIENDSINTER-
ESTED IN THE
UNIVERSITY
Tell Them About the
Published every week during the College Term; contains bright and interesting
reading.
If you know any students in
their Matric year in high school
who intend coming- to the University niext session, let them
know how it would benefit them to
become acquainted with all the
various University activities and
organizations. This information
is found in the "Ubyssey."
EXTRA  MURAL
RATES ARE
$2.00 PER ANNUM
For those connected with the
University, but who do not pay
Alma Mater fees the rate is
$1.50 PER ANNUM
*$»
Send all subscriptions to
Circulation Manager, Publications Board, U. B. C.
This column is maintained for the use
of students and others who wish to express themselves on any topic of general interest. The Ubyssey does not assume responsibility for any of the views
expressed.
All contributions must be written
legibly, in ink, on one side of the paper
only. They must not exceed two hundred words in length, and must reach
this office not later than noon Monday,
in order to appear in the issue of the
following- Thursday.
GOWNS
The  Editor,
"The  Ubyssey,"
Sir:
in your last issue a somewhat astounding statement was made with regard to the action of the class of Arts
'25 in expressing their antipathy to
donning the full and proper academic
dress for which provision is made in
the   Calendar  of   the   University.
It comes as a painful blow to those
of us who have watched with suppressed
gratification the strenuous efforts of the
new Junior Class to maintain the high
standard of deportment and efficiency
to which they so obviously aspired in
the first and second years of their college   career.
Surely a class with such elevated
ideals and objectives — provided it is
genuinely sincere in the pursuit of such
objectives—cannot fail to appreciate the
necessity of assuming at least the outward and visible signs of "academic
dignity"!
There are also economic and aesthetic
considerations.
Yours truly,
LUCRETII.
Editor  of  Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
During our recent campaign one of
our slogans was "we're packed, let's
move!" but evidently that slogan was
not quite true at the time, though no
one who knows the facts would deny
its veracity today. The proof of this
condition is not far to seek, for when
it is necessary to requisition for general use a certain little "cubby-hole"
5—10% ft., things must certainly be in
a bad way. This "office" has been for
years the undisputed and only retreat
■ot our genial friend Mr. Tansley, the
man whom we all respect so highly, but
consider so slightly.
Surely Mr. Editor, this much abused
and overworked gentleman is entitled
to at lea.st sufficient room to eat his
lunch with some degree of privacy.
The . niche that Bill has occupied,
though miserably small and unheated,
was yet some place that he could call
his own, now that too is gone, or rather
locked up. I think this would bear investigation.
Tours for fair play,
FILIUS '23.
EXCHANGES.
New York—Through the efforts
of the newly organized interfra-
ternity house association, a nineteen story hotel for fraternity men is
being erected here. The completed
building will contain 625 furnished
rooms, and a private club room for
each fraternity housed. It will contain, in addition to the rooms mentioned, a large and a small dining
hall, cafeteria, billiard room, gymnasium, roof garden, reading rooms, writing rooms, and a library.
A block of rooms will be permanently reserved for each fraternity
represented, each block containing approximately one hundred rooms. This
will enable each fraternity to house
their visiting brothers.
University of California—The land
just north of the Greek Theatre has
been chosen as the site of the first
dormitory on the campus. Later two
units will be constructed to the west
of the Greek Theatre, and if these do
not prove sufficient to take care of
the situation, more units will be added east of the Greek Theatre.
Finances and plans for these buildings will probably be arranged in time
to start excavations for the foundation of the first unit before the end of
the Spring semester.
University of Utah.—The sophomore class at the University of Utah,
says the Utah Chronicle, has just
awakened to the fact that it is the
custom in university circles for each
class to be distinguished from another by some form of noticeable
dress. So far the second year men
have been known as the "class without a colour," and have been marked
by the absence of such things as
freshie caps and upper class corduroys. After a grave discussion they
have decided it is better to be known
because of a thing, than because of
not, something, and so have chosen a
tailored blue shirt as a tasteful, dignified means of letting people know
who they are. The purpose of the innovation is the aforesaid class distinction, to facilitate acquaintance
among sophomores, and to unite and
express class spirit.
Of course a Freshman would never
be taken for a Senior, or vice versa,
but still It might be advisable to have
distinguishing marks for the various
classes.
FIRST DIVISION SOCCER
(Continued from Page 1)
satisfy the Varsity squad, and from
now on better results may be expected.
The defence put up by Varsity was
very good, and when Wilkinson takes
his place on the forward line, that,
too, should be good. On Saturday
the wings, Emery and Deans, sent
over several nice crosses. Baker, although playing in a strange position,
and with a game leg, did well. Lundie got few chances, but enlarged on
the few he did get. McLuckie is a
comer if his game on Saturday is
any criterion.
The first real chance of the students to support soccer will be next
Saturday. At Athletic Park, Varsity
will play the Vancouver Elks. A good
game should result, and with student
support the team will put over a win.
The Varsity line-up: Mosher; Wilkinson and Crute; Jackson, Phillips,
and Buckley; Deans, McLuckie, Lundie,  Baker, and Emery.
PRINTING
We give the  very Best in Service
and Quality
Dance Programmes, Letterheads,
Envelopes, etc.
also        Personal   Stationery
COADE & DAUBNEY
628 Beoadway West
PHONE   FAIRMONT   5181
Phone:  Fairmont 3.
T. J. Kearney & Co*
Funeral Directors
Private   Ambulance  Service
302 Broadway W.   VANCOUVER
'At J. N. Harvey's  Clothing Stores '
Fellows!
IF YOU NEED SUITS
or Overcoats, we can save you
money just  now.
We have put one hundred Suits,
mostly sizes 35 to 38, in our bargain  basement to  sell
$10.00 OFF REGULAR PRICES
NEW OVERCOATS
at $15, $19.50, $25 and
$29.50
Remember our new address—
J. N. Harvey, Ltd.
417  HASTINGS  ST.  W.
__      Look for Big Red Arrow Sign   *
Wed.—Night.
Thurs.—Mat.  &  Night
Fri.—Mat.  &  Night
Sat.—Mat. &  Night
October   10-11-12-13
Week   by   Week   Orpheum   Shows   get   Better   and   Better
GEORGE NASH
The Distinguished Actor, with Julia Hal, in "The Unexpected"
MR. HYMACK
at "Bogey Villa"
D. APPOLLON
In  "BI-BA-BO"
Demarest &  Collette
"Strings & Stringers"
Harrison & Sakln
Also Billy
JACK GEORGE
Assisted by Mae Normandie
THE   STANLEY BROTHERS
Danish Phlegmatics
"Billy" Filling' and the Original Orpheum Concert Orchestra
ALWAYS
POPULAR
PRICES.
GATHER  THE   GANG   FOR  A
STUDENT    NIGHT    AT    THE
ORPHEUM—MUCH   FUN!
BOOK YOUR        ^5
SEATS. §=§
Phone Sey. 852     55
11115
mm THE     UBYSSEY
Oct. 11th, 1923
Miss Emslie
has removed to the middle store
at the corner of Broadway and
Heather Streets and solicits
your patronage.
Phone Fairmont 724
695   BROADWAY  WEST
CHARLTON & RATHBUN
Photographers and Miniature  Painters
2044   GRANVILLE   STREET
(Cor.   5th   Ave.)
PHONE   BAY.   178      -    VANCOUVER
"A Good Photograph speaks a
Language all Its Own
J. W. Fooler Ltd.
345 Hasting* St. West
All the Newest Models
in College Suits and Overcoats at Prices that are
right.
&
See   us   before   Buying
Halloween
Decorations
Come, saintly vampires
Come, graceful Mephistoph-
eles!
Haunt our store.
Brownies, Elves, Spooks,
Goblins, produced as if by-
Magic
IT  IS  SURPRISING WHAT
50 CENTS WILL BUY
Always   Something   Delightfully
Mysterious  at
J GEHRKEGo
w.
Ltd.
651   SEYMOUR   ST.
(Adjoining Hudson's Bay)
The
Royal cleans
everywhere
thoroughly.
Freshettes Hold
Delightful
Kids' Party
Little Ones  Have Heaps of
Fun.
What delightful children the Freshettes were last Friday evening with
their curls and ribbons, their little
frilly dresses, and their socks!
Promptly at 7.30 a whole bevy of them
came tripping down the hall to the
auditorium in exuberant spirits, clasping their money in one hand and their
toys in the other. Gracious Sophs,
went forward to receive them, and
assured some bashful ones that there
would be all sorts of nice little girls
to play with.
When all the children had arrived,
Miss Bollert welcomed them, to the
party, and complimented them on
coming down from the third floor in
the conventional manner and not on
their hands and knees, as former
Freshettes had done. The little ones
then indulged in a few childish games
supervised by the Sophs., and lined
up for a grand march through the
Arts Building.
On their return they were fed with
bulrushes and animal biscuits, and
seated on the floor to take vows to
their Alma Mater and to the Seniors,
Juniors and Sophomores, whom they
must "love, honor, and obey," and
give up their lives for if need be.
Miss Lillian Cowdell, of Arts '24,
read out the rules for their behavior
throughout the rest of the term, and
Miss Jean Faulkner, vice-president of
the Sophs., explained to the children
exactly what was meant, in case some
might be confused by the big words.
The rest of the evening was enjoy-
ably spent in dancing, but at ten
o'clock, as the children were getting
sleepy, the Sophs, judged it best to
send them home to their mothers and
to bed.
W. U. S. ENTERTAIN
AT PREFECT TEA
On Saturday afternoon the auditorium was the scene of a delightful tea
given by the Women's Undergraduate
Society to the Freshettes. It was difficult to believe that these fashionably
gowned women of Arts '27 were the
wild, galloping youngsters of the previous evening.
Mrs. Klinck, Miss M. L. Bollert and
Miss B. Somerset received the guests,
after which Miss Somerset and Miss
Maclnnes tendered speeches of welcome to the incoming women. The
presidents of the various organizations then gave outlines of the aims
and work of their different fields, and
solicited membership. To complete
the program, Miss Rosie Marin and
Miss Lyness entertained the guests
with delightful solos.
The pleasant afternoon terminated
with refreshments, Mrs. Klinck, Miss
Bollert and Miss Maclnnes presiding
over the tea tables.
B. C.   ELECTRIC
A CONVINCING YARN
Prisoner: "But I would rather tell
my own story. Don't you think it
would be believed?"
Lawyer:    "Yes, that's  the  trouble;
it would  carry conviction with it."—
—New Haven Register.
Literary Corner
THE DOVES
(Translated  from  the  French  of
Albert <£amain.)
The lone sea holds the bleak horizon
pressed,
A line of doom where yet the old
Ark quivers,
And low beside the straining mast,
Hope shivers,
With numbed arms crossed upon her
guileless breast.
When night has % come,  from year to
changeless year,
The Soul, a pilot steering fixedly,
Has seen in sobbing darkness disappear
Her doves  that seek  the  port of
mystery.
Ah! there they go, their plumage rent
and torn,
Through  the  mad  wind  that  foam
upon  them flings,
Exulting in their souls' sublimity.
The Ark  beholds,  each  mocking pallid morn,
Their sweet  white  forms upon  the
scornful sea,
Poor   corpses   floating   with   yet-
outspread wings.
vG.  B. R.
LITERARY   NOTES.
The purpose of the Literary Corner
is to draw out undiscovered literary
talent among the students. It seeks
to encourage those undergraduates
who write either prose or verse. Each
week one contribution appears in this
column. All contributions should be
addressed to the Literary Editor,
"Ubyssey."
WILLAMETTE DEBATE
HELD THIS YEAR
Among the various questions which
the Women's Lit. has to consider
every year at the opening of a new
term, that of debating is not one of
the least. The Debates Managers
have no easy task in choosing subjects which will be both interesting
and instructive.
Last year, considerable enthusiasm
was displayed by debaters and their
supporters, especially in the int ;r-
class debates, which were carried on
with keen competition. The girls of
Arts '25 have been victorious in this
competition twice in succession, and
it is wondered whether they will carry
off the Inter-class Debating Shield
again this year.
It is to be regretted that last year,
owing to certain circumstances, the
international debate was cancelled;
however, this year, in all probability,
debaters will be sent down to Willamette University. It is hoped that all
those interested in debating and public speaking will come forward and
help to make the year a successful
one  in  this  line.
D
Get Your Next
HAT or CAP
at
LINFORTH'S
Formerly
Richardson & Potts
417 Granville St.
Mt. Pleasant Methodist
Church
Tenth Ave. and Ontario Street
Minister—Rev.  O.  M.  Sanford
Out   of   Town   Students   Specially
Welcome
Good Music      Interesting Sermons
Friendly Greeting
RADIO
SETS
PARTS
LOUD  SPEAKERS
Drop in and ask for our
new price list.
RADIO CORPORATION OF
VANCOUVER, LIMITED
Sey. 3814    605 Dunsmuir St.
Ed. Da Motta
Hair Cutting a Specialty
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Dancing
Private and Class Lesson's
Lady and Gentlemen
Teachers
W.E.Fenn's School
COTILLION HALL
SEY. 3058-O or SEY. 101
ancing-
Alexander Dancing Academy
Wednesday and Saturday Evenings
Our   new   Augmented   Orchestra   playing   14
instruments features all the latest dance hits.
804 Hornby St., Opposite Court House- .!V!'    .11    II UM!.!,,,!!..^.*.! 5,11
Oct. 11th, 1923
THE     UBYSSEY
NUOK-A-IiUCK
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Gabardine
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David Spencer
Ltd.
U.B.C Loose
Leaf Note Book
□
Bound and lined in leather.
Specially adapted for Penning
Monogram or scrolls. Button
Pocket for Gloves, etc., and hook
for Fountain Pen.
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We Invite your Inspection
a
CLARKE & STUART
Co., Ltd.
JSducational Stationers and Printers..
S50   SEYMOUR   ST.
Telephone Seymour 8000
POLICY:    Bad.
WEATHER:     Worse.
Extracts From Vanilla
The Muckitorial staff has been reorganized, and a muckier Mr. Muck
is trying to muck along under the cognomen of Chief Muck. Being Chief
Muck is certainly a soft job; all one
has to do is write these foolish ditties
each week and expect them to get by.
After reading some of them, a Freshman informed us that he had been inspired to write a critical analysis of
"Muck Ado About Nothing." We feel
highly flattered that our attempts have
been so appreciated.
The Pyjama Parade on Saturday
night was an unlimited success.
Wouldn't it be curious if some of our
ancestors could suddenly come to life
and view the spectacle. We are sure
Shakespeare would have rubbed his
eyes and thought of "The Twelfth
Night" (in a bar-room).
Yes, we have no Pyjamas. We have
no Pyjamas today. The unpardonable
plea.
THE    DEVIL'S   OWN.
There's always room at the top, but
look out somebody doesn't kick the
ladder from under you.
We have an inkling that some of
those green ribbons are out of taste
with some hair and complexions.
One of the Faculty of Science has
explained the recent murder of "God
Save the King" at the close of Sir
George Foster's lecture, as due to the
travelling of sound.
An American chemist has discovered a radio-active light, in liquid form,
which, poured into a bowl, will give
light for years. We hear that the
man who accidentally drank some in
mistake for bootleg whisky has now
obtained a job walking round the balcony of a lighthouse.
Hirewater's Proposal
By the shore of Cuticura,
By the sparkling Pluto water,
Dwelt  the  Prophylactic  Chiclet,
Danderine,  fair  Buick's  daughter.
She was  loved by Instant Postum,
Son of Sunkist and Victrola,
Heir apparent to the Mazda
Of the  tribe  of Coca Cola.
Through the Tanlac strolled the lovers,
Through   the   Shredded   Wheat   they
wandered,
Were the fairy words of Postum:
"Lovely little Wrigley Chiclet,
No Pyrene could quench the fire,
Nor any Aspirin the heartache
Of my Prestolite desire;
Let us marry,  little Djer-kiss."
—Ex.
"TALKATIVE."
"When I was shipwrecked I came
across a tribe of wild women who
had no tongues."
"Good gracious! how could they
talk?"
"They couldn't! That's what made
them wild."
'«— »u_ «—1
^^^^^y*^r
EGOTIST
I is all,.
All am me;
Whoever are us
Is we.
Hannah H. (gushing as usual)—"I
believe I've danced with you before,
haven't I?"
Freddie—"I dunno, if you have; why
don't you do it now?"
"•*^^**^r^*^p
Social—He is one of the most altruistic men I know.
Service—What has he been doing
now?
Social—He spent all of the afternoon telling hair-raising stories to a
couple of bald-headed men.
SOME   SPRINT.
Junior—"How do you get such a
nice complexion?"
Sophette—"I run a mile every morning!"
Junior—"My gawd, you live a long
way from the drug store!"—Ex.
fe\ Viifar
Freshie, in barber shop—"How long
have I got to wait for a shave?"
Barber (looking him over critically)
—"About five years, sonny!"
fr\fr\fe\!
"JARRING."
Bill—How did  you feel  when  she
threw the vase at you?
Will—Slightly jarred.
^■^t^"t^*t"
She—A penny for your thoughts.
He, Mr. Staylate—I was thinking of
going.
Her  Father   (at head  of  stairs)—
Give him a dollar, Viola, it's worth it.
—Lafayette Lyre.
The trouble with the modern dance
is that, by the time you have learned
it, it isn't.—Punch.
M-rs-11—"I dreamed last night that
I proposed to you. I wonder what
that is a sign of?"
Edith '24—"It's likely a sign that
you have more sense when you're
asleep than when awake."—Ex.
Wilbur G. Grant
A.  T. C. M.
TEACHER OF PIANO
Organist and Choirmaster
First Baptist  Church
Studio:       2213  Granville  Street
PHONE BAYVIEW 3140-R
DANCING
has returned to her studio
after an absence of three
months, and has taken over
the classes, assisted by lady
teacher. Call for appointment
or phone Seymour 22.
learn to Tango In two of three
lessons
DANCING  SCHOOI.
603 Hasting* West
DANCE
Programmes and  Tickets
Crepe   Paper  Decorations
Dennison   Bogie   Book of  Party
Suggestions
MURPHY & CHAPMAN
LIMITED
STATIONERS, PRINTERS
569  SEYMOUR ST.
EARN   MONEY   IN   YOUR   SPARE
TIME.
Sell   Private   Greeting   Cards.     We
have  a  splendid  assortment and   pay
good  commission.
MURPHY   &   CHAPMAN
569 Seymour St. 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Oct. 12th, 1923
BOYS!
Patronize Canada's Finest Barber
Shop. 18 Chairs. All First Class
Barbers  and Manicurists.
The ROGERS  BUILDING
WM. BRENNAN, Proprietor
464 Granville St.      Phone Sef. 78S8-0
"Down the Marble Stairs"
Midway
Pharmacy
Cor. Brodway and Heather St.
W. H. Caldwell, Prop.
Phone &air. 840
PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY
Exercise Books
Looseleaf Covers
and Refills
Waterman's Pens
Eversharp Pencils
QUALITY
PRINTING
Invitations
Dance Programmes
Announcements
Printing for all
the Social Functions
of the School
Term.
The
Sun Publishing Co.,
Limited
Printing Department
137   PENDER    STREET,   WEST
CONSTITUTION OF MEN'S
LITERARY SOCIETY
/
Name and Objects.
Section 1. The name of the organization shall be the Men's Literary
Society of the University of British
Columbia. The objects of the Society
are to give its members the opportunity for practise in speaking and debating, and to provide for the free
discussion of matters of public interest.
Membership.
Section 2. Any undergraduate student of any faculty shall be a member of the Society. Any graduate may
attend the meetings and speak on the
same terms as a member of the Society.
Method   of   Procedure.
Section 3. The regular method of
procedure will be as follows:—
The general subject for discussion
will be announced in advance (two
weeks before the date set, if possible).
The principal speakers may be designated in advance. The precise resolution to be discussed will be announced not more than three days before the meeting. The principal
speakers will be alloted a time not to
exceed twenty minutes. After they
have spoken, the meeting will be
thrown open for discussion. The
Chairman shall have the right to call
upon any member present to speak,
and may limit the length of the speech
as he considers expedient.
A vote shall be taken at the end of
each meeting on the merits of the resolution, and will reflect the general
opinion of the Society as to the question at issue, and not an opinion on
the merits of the debaters. Visiting
graduates may vote, but other visitors
may not vote.
The Society may receive visitors,
who may speak either as principal
speakers or in the subsequent discussions, as may be arranged. The time
alloted to such speakers shall be arranged by the chairman. Any visitor
shall be accorded the same courtesy
as is due to a member of the Society.
His remarks may be made the subject of attack or controversy, as in
the case of any member of the Society.
Visitors (members of the teaching
staff, and others) may be invited to
criticize the debaters—either the principal speakers or any of the other
speakers, as may be arranged—but in
no case the visitors of the Society.
Such criticism will normally be made
either after the principal speakers
have spoken or at the close of the
debate, and before the vote—as the
ehairman may direct.
RHODES SCHOLARSHIP
\      ANNOUNCEMENT.
The following notice has been received from Prof. H. T. Logan regarding the appointment of a Rhodes
Scholar from this province:—
The annual election of a Rhodes
Scholar to represent the Province of
British Columbia at Oxford University will be made not later than November 25th of this year. The Scholar
elected this year will go to Oxford
and take up his studies there in October, 1924.
The following are conditions under
which candidates are eligible for the
Scholarship: A candidate must be a
British subject with at least five years
residence in Canada, and unmarried.
He must have passed his nineteenth
birthday, but not have passed his
twenty-fifth birthday, on October 1st,
1924. He must be at least in his Second Year in some degree granting
university of Canada.
Under the terms set forth by Mr.
Rhodes in his will, the Committee of
Appointment must have regard not
only to scholastic ability and attainments of candidates, but also to their
physical vigour, capacity for leadership, force of character, devotion to
duty, courage, sympathy, and other
moral qualities.
The Scholarship is of the annual
value of £350 a year, and is tenable
for three  years.
Applications should be in the hands
of the Secretary of the Selection Committee, H. T. Logan, University of
British Columbia, not later than October 20th.
New Appointments to
x Ubyssey Staff.
Miss Gwen Stirling has been appointed Exchange Editor to succeed
Miss Helen MacGill, who with her sister Elsie is now studying at Toronto.
Hugh C. MacCallum will act as
Chief Reporter in place of K. A.
Schell.
T. W. Brown has been appointed
Associate Editor.
R. B. Mathews will take over the
duties of Feature Editor.
Wise Ones
After playing "IF"  Nelson  Maple,  Director  of
Paul Whiteman 's S. S. Leviathan Orchestra writes
a
IF
>>
has Melody and Harmony far above the average."
Get Your Record or Sheet Copy Now
Officers  and   Duties.
Section 4. The Officers shall consist of a President, Secretary, Treasurer and Publicity Manager, elected
from and by the members of the Society. Their duties will consist of
those usually attributed to such officers in other societies in the University.
In addition, it shall be the duty of
the Executive of the Society to compose a list of good speakers. From
this list recommendations may be
made for debaters or speakers to represent the University. Members
shall be eligible on the list if: (1)
they shall have been recommended
by the judges at any trial for the purpose of selecting speakers or debaters
to represent the University; or (2)
they shall have been especially recommended by a member of the teaching staff because of their performance
in a debate of the Society of which
the member of the staff may have
been a critic. Any member placed
on this list must have intimated his
willingness to participate if chosen to
represent the University.
Amendment.
Section 5. This Constitution may
be amended by a written motion
which passes by a two-thirds majority at an open meeting of the Society,
and notice of which has been made
at the previous meeting.
BRUCE
OVERCOAT
is your best buy
"The Prices are Right"
$19.50    $25
$29.50
C. D. BRUCE
Limited
Cor.  Homer and Hastings
If Athletes make
Men, then good Athletes and Sports
Equipment is almost
as      important      as
Books
lisle fraser
Sporting Goods
Wholesale   and  Retail
1020   GRANVILLE   ST.
EVANS & HASTINGS
Better Quality
PRINTERS
We make a specialty of:
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., Etc.
Students would do well to give
us a call before going elsewhere
578 Seymour-St.
PHONE SEY. 189
LIONEL. WARD Oi COMPANY. LTD.,
PRINTERS,  318  HOMER ST., VANCOUVER,  B.  C.
t»     >■

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