UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 8, 1960

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0125265.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125265.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0125265-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0125265-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125265-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0125265-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0125265-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0125265-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0125265-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0125265.ris

Full Text

 f UJ
S UBYSSEY
Vol. XLIII.
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 8,  1960
No. 24
Laval  Councillors  Resign
Editors
Deplore
Expulsion
OTTAWA (CUP) —University newspaper editors across
Canada have all expressed the
opinion that the punishment of
the Laval editors who printed
"Dora", the story of a prostitute, was too severe.
The original article concerned
the visit of a university student
to a prostitute. The writing—
similar to the style of Fran-
coise Sagan—is not considered
of the best quality. However,
English versions in university
papers, having lost much of the
feeling in the original, do not
do it justice; conseqently it has
been difficult to analyze the
story on its literary merits.
(Ubyssey editor Fred Fletcher's
comments appear in today's
editorial.)
University of Manitoba president called it "literary garbage"
and Winnipeg city police termed
it "suggestive but not obscene,"
after the Manitoban printed a
translation for which the editor
was almost expelled. Later the
editor declared he had published
the article "to"; allow students
to judge if the expulsion of the
Laval students was justified. We
have attempted to point out
what we consider an injustice
to three Laval students."
The Sheaf in Saskatchewan
dismissed the article as "a not
particularly well written account of a young prostitute's
love affair."
It made no recommendations
as to what should be done, but
offered to send "I am pure"
buttons to all readers offended
by the article-
The Toronto university paper,
the Varsity, called the expulsion
"nothing more or less than
sheer vindictiveness," and
claimed the university had subverted the right of the Students'
Council to control the paper.
The University of Western
Ontario paper said, "We cannot
condone the editors of the Laval
newspaper for their action, but
v/e do suggest the Laval authorities find a better solution to the
problem than expelling student
editors every time they overstep the bounds of Laval's policy."
J. Bascom St. Johnr of the
Toronto Globe and Mail, stated
in his columin that students who
publish a newspaper must consider the good name of the uni-
with The Varsity stand on the
versity and that he disagreed
issue.
New Outburst Occur
In Dora Story Row
QUEBEC (CUP)—Three members of the Laval University
Students Council resigned this week because council has yet
to take a stand on the expulsion of three editors of the Laval
student newspaper.
No Paper Friday
There will be no paper Friday due to Remembrance Day.
Anyone wishing notices for
the weekend please have them
in to the office by Wednesday
Photo  by   G.   Fielder
TWELVE    HUNDRED    PEOPLE    attended    International
House   fair   Saturday   night   when   they   saw   dances   from
twelve   countries   including   this   "Lion's   Dance"   done   by
Chinese students attending UBC.
Campus Milksops Boat
Race With Moo-Juice
Milksops of the Intellectual Stunt Committee and Students
Council participated in a Boat Race at the Saturday football
game.
The Boat Race however, had
a new twist.
In place of the usual malt beverage (censored), milk was used.
Clouds of inconclusiveness
seem to hang over the decision
as to the winner of the event.
The Ubyssey was told by reliable sources that the match,
which had to be run twice, was
conceded by Council President
Dave Edgar, whose unfamiliar-
ity with the drink led to an illness from sudden over-consumption.
Vice-president John Goodwin
appealed to The Ubyssey, which
he termed "the last bastion of
justice on the campus," to denounce and investigate this "untruth, lie, blasphemy and incorrectness."
Mr. Goodwin continued by
stating that Council had accepted the challenge because they
realize that cleanliness is next
to godliness . . . ("and Council," he maintained, "is clean")
and because Council realizes
that milk is nature's most perfect food. He did not comment
in Mr. Edgar's strange and sudden illness.
Alter Council had their required warm-up exercises, the
first race was run. Judge Ricker
decided the race had to be rerun when it was disclosed that a
(Continued on Page 4)
See BOAT  RACE
Administration
Condemned For
Firing Editors
The Laval university administration was condemned for expelling three student editors, after they had been fired by the
student council for printing a
story describing an episode in a
prostitute's room.
A resolution condemning the
principle of this action was passed at the Western regional conference of Canadian University
Press held at UBC this weekend.
The conterence, held to discuss the common problems of
student newspaper editors, was
attended by delegates from the
Universities of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.
In an attempt to receive increased funds for the irnjirove-
ment and extension of CUP services, it was suggested that they
try to solicit money from large
publishing firms, who will be
eventually benefitting from the
services of present student writers.
They also passed a resolution
that the Canada Council be approached for a grant to facilitate the operation of CUP and
to foster creative writing in Canadian university newspapers.
In an effort to improve inter-
provincial communications it
was resolved that CUP ask the
Federal Government for statutory provision to allow news
communication via amateur radio.
CUP support of a national
magazine proposed by the National Federation of Canadian
University Students was withheld until further investigation
of CUP's role in the project.
NFCUS proposed a national
student magazine to be published quarterly at a cost of $80,000.
Max Perle, Laval councillor,
stated that the coucil was divided into three groups: sheep,
hypocrites, and ambitious. "I
have lived under Hitler in Belgium and I have never seen the
Belgiums as frightened of the
Nazis as this council is- of the
authorities."
Max Perle, Roger Guy, and G.
Girard handed in written resignations. Marcel Hamelin and
Louis Savard said they were resigning but have failed to do
so in writing.
Hamelin, asking the president
to accept his resignation said,
'I could not stay any longer as a
member of a council which does
not take itself seriously and I
could not associate myself with
the decisions of such a council."
Prior to this statement Ham-.,
elin had presented a motion ask-.:
ing that a sum of $700 be distrib,'
uted to each of the expelled stu-
For the UBYSSEY'S translation of I'M ALONE, see
. page 4.
dents. It was pointed out that
they had been members of the
student executive, had been expelled as such, and were suffering financially. Also, the council considered the punishment
inacceptable.
Council president Michael
Doyle said this would be a "magnificent proof of student" solidarity."
A member of the council asked if students who meet with
the university officials would be
treated on an equal basis. No
definite reply was received. At
this point the council chamber
door was opened and an egg
was hurled in.
Although the administration
had agreed in principle to an
arbitration board of three university officials, three professors, and three students this
this body has yet to meet
Winnipeg Police Seize Dora Story
WINNIPEG (CUP)—A
storm of controversy has followed the printing of the
Dora story by the University
of Manitoba's newspaper, "The
Manitoban.",
U of ly! president Dr. H.H.
Saunderson described the article as "literary garbage," and
The Manitoban has been attacked both by radio stations
and  city  newspapers.
Following printing of the
;Story, Winnipeg city police
searched United College at
the U of M for Manitoban
editor Peter Herrndorf and
copies of the edition in which
the story appeared.
PETER HERRNDORF
Police seized a copy of the
paper after parents of some
students registered complaints. They later described
the article as "suggestive, but
not obscene."
Dr. Saunderson said Herrndorf placed his rights before
his responsibilities in printing
the story.
Herrndorf has since been
summoned to meet with Dr.
Saunderson to explain the reprinting, but the president
did not say whether any disciplinary action is planned. Page 2
THE    IJBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 8,  1960
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year
In Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed are those -of the
Editorial Board of the Ubysey and not necessarily those of the Alma
Mater   Society   or   the   University   of   B.C.
TELEPHONES: CA 4-3242, locals 12 (news desk), 13 (critics-
sports), 14 (Editor-inChief), 15, 6 (business offices).
Editor-in-Chief: Fred Fletcher
Managing Editor Roger McAfee
I News  Editor Denis   Stanley
Features Editor    . Ed Lavalle
[ Photography Editor Byron Hender
t Senior Editor Ann Pickard
Sports Editor Mike Hunter
' Critics Editor Dave Bromige
K CUP Editor Bob Hendrickson
Dora editor       - . _       Bob darling
Layout: Nick Close
STAFF:  Bob  Hendrickson,   Sharon   McKinnon,   Sharon
Rodney,  George   Railton,   Judy   Roberts,   Christine
Chester, Fred Jones, Maureen Covell.
La vol Expulsions
Rights Denied
j Student rights have  once  again been  violated  at a
,    Quebec  University.
j The action of the Laval  administration in expelling
| . three student editors without consulting the Laval student
council is a gross violation of student responsibilty.
j The editors  involved printed a  story   describing   an
j    episode in a prostitute's room and were fired by the student
j    council for this action. Not content to leave it at this, the
I    administration stepped in and expelled the students.
I We feel that the misdemeanour was not serious enough
\    to merit expulsion.
! The administration had no moral right to interfere in
\    this student matter.
| : Regarding the story itself, we feel that such material
i has no place in student newspaper. We are reprinting the
story (see page 4) so that our readers may judge for themselves as   to the equity of the Laval action.
We defend the right of the student council to fire the
editors, but we condemn the interference of the administration. Students should be responsible for their own affairs.
US. Elections
Today, the American public decides who shall lead
the free world for the next four years.
It is not unreasonable for the other western nations
to be a little uneasy. They will be stuck with the decision
of the Americans, for there is no question, whether we like
it or hot, that the American president is the leader of the
free world bloc.
A great deal of publicity has been given to this campaign. People have been given every chance to inform
themselves.
All the issues have been aired. The religious issue,
which both candidates say is not an issue, has been used
skillfully by both sides.
The only question is: Is all this worth while?
We doubt that people vote rationally. Kennedy's smile,
Nixon's wife; these will probably have more influence on
voters than the issues.
We'll know tomorrow who the next president will be,
hut we'll never know why.
Football Fiasco
An editorial from the EUS Newsletter condemning
AMS President Dave Edgar for his stand on the events
at the Homecoming football game was reprinted in The
Ubyssey, November 3. We would like to comment briefly
upon it.
We do not think that Edgar was defending his friends
(presumably the Greeks, or Brock-types), as the editorial
charges. We know that Edgar is sincere in his desire to
serve the students of this university without bias.
But we do agree with the main point of the editorial.
We feel that his statement on the vandalism at the Homecoming game was the worst sort of drivel. And we are
sorry to read that the President of this university took
much the same attitude, although that may have been just
for publication.
Edgar said: "Homecoming is traditionally a place for
both students and graduates to let off steam . . . Everyone
is making too much of it all."
Yes, it's good to let off steam. But not at other people's
expense, Mr. Edgar. Not at other people's expense.
Letters To
The Editor
'Off-Beat Attitudes'
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
I will freely admit that as
a Second Year Education student I am attending this place
of learning for the first time
but I cannot leave unanswered
some of the off-beat attitudes
recently expressed here.
Primarily I am tilting at the
so-called Student government.
Frankly I have neither felt nor
seen any governing in progress.
I have heard of Evening Council Meetings but. when a very
large proportion of the student
body lives off the campus, this
time becomes inconvenient to
all but a few, perhaps for a
purpose. The AMS takes my
$10 ($24—Ed.) each year but I
don't think that the Student
Council is worth its share. It's
not even an effective grievance
committee. Let's face it, the
students are governed by the
seven-eighths attendance rule,
the Deans of the Residences,
and Busters.
We are also exhorted to
show more spirit, which is fair
enough! until you look a little
closer. 1 suppose that if one
comes here because one just
drifts on from school with no
particular aim, or if one has
the definite aim of a husband,
and one is taking a fifteen unit
course in a five and a half day
week, then this kind of thing
is normal. But when one is
taking eighteen units in a four
day week and the spirit shown
is that used at the Homecoming, I don't want any part of
it.
Mr. Edgar says that he expected this kind of thing, but
if he expected it, surely he is
one of those who COULD have
done something beforehand. If
he, of all people, petrifies in
office then there is no value in
Crocodile tears when even the
prima facie student government goes with the birds, out
the window.
Furthermore,   if   the  activities at the Homecoming dance
were "to be expected" on this
campus then I do not consider
a   campus   dance   to  be  a  fit
place for me to take my wife.
Yours   very truly,
Roger F. Behn,
2nd   Year   Education.
Forbidden Fruit
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Mr. Frank Findenigg, writing on "Drunking" in Friday's
Ubyssey, throws up a smokescreen of sophistication, but
makes is patently obvious that
he does not understand what
he is talking about. Not only
is he unaware that punning is
in poor taste, but also he seems
ignorant of the TANNER IN-
VERSE RESPECTABILITY
LAW, which states that the
amount of pleasure obtained
from an activity is inversely
proportional to its respectability and legality.
We in Vancouver may feel
privileged to be living in one
of the last strongholds against
the evil force of Respectability. But we are not invulnerable. Dr. Kinsey has done his
dirty work by cleaning up our
sex attitudes. Agents like Mr.
Findenigg are among us, working to have us repeal our liquor
J ABBERWOCKY
By DEREK ALLEN
I have discovered an infallible method of drawing fire
from all Brock-minded individuals. It consists in making
a radical suggestion.
Like, for instance, "What this campus needs is a good
shot of Athenian Democracy."
To this there have been two distinct reactions. Firstly,
from the more credulous innocents: it won't work, it can't
work, it isn't practical, it is subversive, it mocks the attempts
of the University Students Activities Committee, it is treason,
it is tripe, he who suggested it is to be commended for his
idealism and condemned for his foolishness. Secondly, from
friends trying to protect me: I am fooling, I was hard up for
material, I have tongue-in-typewriter, I'm joshing, I am to be
commended for my attempt to liven things up and condemned for stabbing USAC in its formative stages, not to mention
its back.
You take me seriously and think I'm a fool, or you think
I'm a fool and don't take me seriously. I'm not sure which
attitude is more annoying.
* * #
People tell me that Athenian Democracy will not work.
Apathy, they say. Students will not come out to the
assembly. A small clique will run the campus. How about
that, hey? A small clique will run the campus.
The thing I like about an Assembly is that it will completely shaft the intellectual table in the caf. Those sour
types who sip their sour coffee and mutter complaints will
immediately be challenged to put up or shut up — either
they get out to the Assembly and be heard or they quit their
bitching.
Not that this will make any difference — it won't get
them out — but at least a perfect comeback will be supplied
the Brock-types that get driven in utter confusion from arguments with intellect table-types.
Be that as it may, let me assure all and sundry that I
do think a form of Athenian Democracy could be applied to
this campus, and before they zip their little minds up tight
and commence their ostracization of Jabberwocky, they might
remember that I advocate only a form, not the form, of
direct democracy. I too realize that the average Greek citizen was much better qualified to take part in this sort of
thing than the average UBC student. One of the main qualifications is a determination to have a voice in one's own
government.
%. %. }(.
This weekend saw the hosting by the Ubyssey of the
Western Canadian University Press Conference, and as
at the end of every conference people are asking just what
good came out of it, what justification it had, what it
accomplished.
Actually the best thing about this sort of meeting is
that editors of the host psper get to pick the brains of the
top editors of other college papers and find out just why
their organization operates as it does.
Conforming to this grand tradition I found out how
Peter Herrndorf, Leader of the Manitoban and WCUP Chairman, gets the inspiration for his editorials.
He uses pretty girls and backrubs.
How does he do it? Well Herrndorf, you see, is quite the
operator. He personally interviews every beauty queen elected or otherwise chosen to represent University of Manitoba
students, and somehow manages to talk them into working
on his editorial staff. This makes male staff members happy
and livens up Manitoban parties (we must not call them
bashes).
So he has himself a stable of beauties. And late on the
press night when he has been working pretty hard getting
his paper into print, he finds he must have his tense shoulder
muscles loosened up so he can bang out an editorial. So he
appeals to the sense of duty he has carefully cultivated in
attractive female staff members, applies a bit of sweet talk,
and  gets  himself   a  backrub.
Any UBC beauty queens interested in a similar position
on the Ubyssey drop into the Pub. Offices and apply. Jabberwocky offers free instruction in the art and science of the
backrub.
laws, haul our bottles out from
under the tables, and creep out
from our dark, subterranean
drinking holes, into the bright,
harsh, atmosphere of taverns
with interiors like public washrooms, bringing our jazz musicians, blinking in the unaccustomed light, behind us.
We must realize our precious
situation, and hang on to it.
There  are   places   in   the  Far
East Toronto, Montreal and
such—where, in public, people
actually drink good liquor,
dance and are entertained in
the same place without breaking a single law! Howevet their
eyes betray their excessive
boredom. They remem(ber the
good old days, the secret jazz
dives, the days before they
took the thrill out of sex by
uncovering its mystery, the
days of clandestine bottle par-
ties; where rotgut tasted like
Canadian Club. These people
should come and live in Vancouver. Come, Mr. Findenigg,
you can't tell me the wine of
sucking babes of France gives
that kind of a kick. What a
waste of Bacchus'  talent!
As it is now, we can have
our cake of respectability, and
eat it. As fellow traveller Mr.
Ogden Nash said, when restating the Inverse Respectability
Law in more poetic terms:
Home is nice,
Orgies are vile;
I like orgies,
Once in a while.
Yours,
Adrian  Tanner,
Arts I. Tuesday, November 8, 1960
TH€    UBYSSEY
Page 3
CUP Capers
UBC Students
Have Autonomy
By BOB HENDRICKSON
After reading through the university papers from the
different parts of Canada I am forcibly reminded of the great
amount of freedom granted to UBC students and their paper.;
Right now there is a basic conflict raging over the rights
of students, particularly students working on the university
papers in Eastern Canada.
WrtfcN  THEY COME  this  big  it takes  two  to   handle him but a
for the "Dogpatch  Drag" Thursday night.
east they wiii "nave a date
Photo  by  Clint   Pulley
Watch Out Men —Sadie Hawkins
Sadie Hawkins Day will be marked this year by Thursday noon hour shenanigans where the girls of the campus will
take on the boys in feats of strength and endurance.
Here are just two of the challenges which have gone out.
We, the magnahimously esteemed Nunpes and Engineers,
having graciously condescended
to be outleapt last year, hereby
challenge the lowly, downtrodden Faculties Of Home Economics and Agriculture, to bring
forth their puny team for a leapfrog race across the Library
Lawn at Noon on Sadie Hawkins Day,. November 10th.
3> * *•
O robust, virile, fun loving
and fair dealing engineers, hear
our challenge! We, the cunning,
shapely and eager lovelies of
the Education Faculty do hereby
challenge your faculty to a tug
of war which shall take place
this Thursday noon on the Library Lawn.
We request that you provide
a 1 1/16" manila rope 152,400,-
000,000 angstroms long (unlearned ones that means 50'), with a
minimum tensile strength of
70,400 ounces, maximum elongation of 12% and elasticity recovery of 5 %.
Furthermore, we do specify
that a large ribbon be placed in
the middle of the rope.
You would further agree that
each engineer could handle
three shapely teachers, would
you not? We mean for the purpose of this tug of war! So be it.
The rise ye noble chariotsmen,
ye strong red-clad giants, ye
brilliant slide rulers—respond
to our challenge!
The women have organized
certain faculty projects for the
prime purpose of pleasing men
. . . here they are:
# Pan Hellenic .... F-enny
Manicures . . . South
Brock . . . 11:30-2:30.
# Nurses . . . Leap Frog
Race and First Aid Booth
. . . Library Lawn . . .
12:30.
Flying Officer M. Barbara LaBerge, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. M. T. Laberge of Red Deer, Alberta,
graduated from the University of Alberta with a
degree in Household Economics.
After graduation and acceptance of a regular
force commission in Sep 58, she completed her internship with T. Eaton Co. Ltd., Toronto, Department of Veterans' Affairs Hospital in London,
Ontario, and at R.C.A.F. Station Rockcliffe near
Ottawa.
She received her first transfer as Station Food
Services officer in September, 1959, to Station
Namao, Alta.
F/O LaBerge will address UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA Home Economics students
in Room 100 of the Home Economics Building at
9:30 a.m. on Wednesday, November 9, 1960.
Education . . . Mock Marriage and Tug-o-war . . .
.  . . Library Lawn . . . 1:00
Matz&Wozny
548 Howe St.     MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted, suits
modernized in the new
single breasted styles.
Special Student Rates
I doubt that there is one UBC
student who believes that it is
not his right to obtain a higher
education.
I would like to know if anyone has seen any evidence that
the UBC administration has to
accept anyone, or cannot expell
anyone they  wish.
The cry of "Student Rights"
is false. It is in fact only the
good will of the university powers which suffer students to obtain a higner education.
U RTP
A limited number of vacancies   are   available   in   the
University Reserve Training'
Plan to First Year Applied
Science students
For   further   information
about     pay,    commission ;
and   employment   contact
F/L J. BINCH
The RCAF Support Officer:
at the UBC Armouries
DON'T BE A "SORE HEEL!"
BRING YOUR FOOTWEAR TROUBLES TO
JOEY'S SH0F SERVICE
GRAND OPENING SPECIAL—
Men's—Topling Rubber Heels :75c
Women's—Leather  Heels       25c
4607 West 10th — 1 Block from U.B.C. Gates — CA 4-5556
Discount for U.B.C. Students Very Reasonable Rates
You will Tbe graduating in 1961. You are young and ambitious.
Now is the time to find the company that will offer you mora
than a job: a career . . .
But even the security of a career isn't everything. Life is
exciting, full of possibilities, challenges, problems . . . waiting
for you to solve. Right?
Alcan is looking for people who want more than Just 'a JobVi
That's why we offer excellent salaries, one of the best pensioa
plans in any industry, security — plus the opportunities of
growth and responsibility you want.
Interested? Then tell us about yourself, your course, you»;
plans for the future. Write to:
ALUMINUM COMPANY OF CANADA, LTD.
Personnel Department,
*>.0. Box 6090, Montreal 3, P.Q.
ALCAN Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 8, 1960
I'm Alone
—   By Dora   -
Ed. Note: Three of the editors of Le Carabin, the student newspaper of Laval University, were relieved of their
positions and expelled for running the original French
version of the following story. Peter Herrndorf, the editor
of the Manitoban, was sought by police when that paper
ran a translation of the story.
We feel that it is necessary to read a translation in
order to understand the stories printed today on page 1,
and to grasp the significance of the issues involved.
I  put  the   rusty   arm  of  the
record player onto the worn-out
jazz record. The pulsating music
licked against the walls shrouded
in a soft heat. I was hot, terribly
hot. I trembled with joy, my
insides churned and tickled my
whole body. I laughed, I screamed with laughter, and I leaped
and gamboled like a drunken
little she-cat.
You arrived. Your head was
aching from those hours of hypocrisy during which you were
learning to embellish life, as
you said. You were a student. I
felt strange at the thought of
seeing your face in a classroom.
You said that you wished to
become a teacher in order to
make others suffer as you had
suffered. You must have changed now that you're married.
I gave you a drink. Never
strong enough you always said.
I tried my Utmost to prepare
novel mixes. And I watched
your lips lap hungrily at the
liquid. In your contentment you
clucked your tongue and licked
your  lips.
. Your hands on mj&ywaist, 1
slid onto the indifferent mattress which you. filled with the
weight of your heavy body. The
hard against each other murmured from our long-awaited
embrace; you traced my breasts
heated by your heavy movements, our murmurs continued
to the rhythm of our amorous
spasms. Sometimes you jumped
up from the bed, turned the
music up and fell drunkenly
back into my arms.
I learned to adjust to you. We
laughed at our efforts which
were increased by the sweating
of our irritation. Our flesh melting together, moulded the spasmodic movements of your
stomach on mine. You shook
yourself brutally like a tree
dropping its fruit.
1 was ecstatic. A velvet shudder enveloped my thighs, en-
flamed by alchohol, and you fell
with a dull friction onto the
hot lather of my hips . . .
I wilted like a dead flower.
A heavy stupor engulfed my
flesh. Sleep . . .1 slept, you left.
Left . . . yes professor yes,
married man . . . yes, you are a
bastard. All the others are bastards, I have seen a hundred of
them, twb hundred and they
have not your looks and they do
it better than you ... I like
them a lot  down deep. Is that
music whistled and crushed our | you Bob? Come in darling
ears with its  power. Our skin) DORA
PLASTI-SEAL  KITS — JUST ARRIVED
Two  sizes ,  -..79c and 35c
FACULTY SWEATERS — EDUCATION,
ARTS, AGRICULTURE
TEN CARAT GOLD UNIVERSITY RINGS,
MUGS, UMBRELLAS, FACULTY
JEWELLERY,  LADIES NYLONS
AND NEW LINE OF POGO BOOKS
 2
wned and Operated by the Alma Mater Society
Japanese Garden
Designer Dies
Kanoshuki Mori was stricken
with a brain hemorrhage October 17 and died. He was 66.
A lecturer at the University
of Chiba, Mr. Mori worked at
UBC from March 1959 until July
of this year, planning and supervising construction of the
three acre Inazo Nitobe Memorial garden.
The garden was formally
opened in May of this year by
Japanese consul, Dr. Muneo Ta-
nabe, and was intended as a
symbol of Japanese-Canadian
goodwill.
Mr. Mori was uuried in Tokyo Nov. 4. He leaves his wife.
Flags at UBC were flown at
half mast to mark the funeral.
Elections Next Week
Arts and Science Grad class
elections will take place next
week.
Nominations must foe turned
in to Bu. 115 before Saturday.
All fourth year Arts and Science students are eligible to
vote. Two representatives will
be  elected.
•J.      ff.      if.
Arts and Science Undergrads
Society refused to hear any more
complaints about the Grad photos which should have been
taken last week.
"It is not our fault that there
has been such a mix-up with
the photos this year," said a
spokesman from ASUS.
"Arrangements are usually
made through  the ASUS  exec-1
utive for these shots but this
year, the Student Counsellor in
charge took it upon himself to
sign a contract without consulting the Faculty.
The studio was very inconvenient for most grads and the
deadline was hard to meet so
150 missed their  photos.
Mr. Krass has consented to extend the deadline for two more
weeks.
"If students have any more
complaints about ■ their photos
and the arrangement they'd better take them to the AMS office
and not to us," said the ASUS
spokesman.
"Our hands are clean of the
whole mess," she concluded.
"Only the choicest
Virginia Tobaccos
are used in
du MAURIER
says FRED DAVIS
TV's top panel moderator.
"There's something extra special about a
du MAURIER cigarette; two things, in fact.
One is the-choice Virginia tobacco. The other is
the "Millecel" super filter. Together, they give
you the best cigarette ever."
7%e tfaid'&a&g.... U- "to"
du MAURIER
a really milder high grade Virginia Cigarette
Filmsoc
presents
TEAHOUSE
OF THE
Glenn Ford
Machiko Kyo
Auditorium
ENGLISH DIALOGUE,
TODAY
AUGUST
MOON
Paul Ford
Marlon Brando
3:30 and 8:30
THANK GOD Tuesday, November 8,  1960
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Dismal Situation
In China Today
"The situation in China today is like  an oversize slave
camp, with    the people rising to bugle calls,  eating meagre
amounts and sleeping in dorms."
Mr.   Yin  Shou  Chi,   Council
General of the Republic of
China, used this as the theme
for his noon hour lecture yesterday.
"This is a dismal picture and
no Chinese can feel proud," he
said.
Red China has taken a backward stumble in face of their
boast a few years ago, he claimed. The people of the country
are no better off than before.
"The situation is worse, since
they have exported food for
arms. The people are deprived
of the fruits of their labor,"
said Mr. Yin.
Even such basic food stuffs
as salt and soy beans are being
rationed. Although the ration
cards are issued it often takes
weeks to get the ration of food.
"If the Communist government hadn't taken over, other
countries would not be in their
place today," he commented.
"The fall of China tipped the
balance of power in the world
today."
With  the Nationalist government on Formosa, .70%  of, the.
:«:farp>e*s ^^n||^e^Vpwn;vl||Kid,;
7"5%of tthe .^people   are   literate
and 95% of the children are in
schools.
Talking on the repossession
of the mainland he commented,
"Taking over of the mainland
depends on the free world attitude to the threat of international communism.
"The free world is not as it
should be, and there is still time
to hold Communism in check,"
he said.
Apply For
McGill Conference
Applications are now being
received for delegates to the.
McGill Conference on World
Affairs, to be held in Montreal,
November 21-24.
Letters of application must be
submitted before noon, November 14, to the AMS secretary,
Box 73 in the AMS office.
A combined faculty-student
committee will choose two delegates who will have their fares
and expenses paid.
Preference will be given to
graduates and undergraduates
:ih tbo fields of political science
and economics.   ..
MR. HAROLD WINCH, CCF MP
and Canadian delegate to the
United Nations, will speak
Wednesday noon in Brock
Lounge; his topic will be
"UN" Report." A member of
the CCF National Council,
Winch is B.C.'s leading opposition MP.
NOW    PLAY ING!
CREATES? JVEDtffi. COMEDY IN YEARS
Frank Sinatra — Edward G. Robinson
Eleanor Parker — Carolyn Jones
"HOLE IN THE HEAD"-(9:10)
COLOR
added feature
Sammy Davis Jr. — Eartha Kitt
"ANNA LUCASTA"-(7:30)
One Complete Show — 7   p.m.
Hollywood Theatre
3123 WEST BROADWAY
THE ATOMIC AGE?
Did you know that the 20th century may also go down
in history as the Age of Music?
Statistics show that more people, particularly young
people are discovering a whole new world of music through
the modern application of electronics, than at any previous
time.
The continuous display and demonstration facilities of
Hi Fi Sales are of noteworthy interest to University Students. Here the emphasis is on new products designed to
meet the criteria of intelligent choice — the best that is
technically available within the limits of the individual
budget.
Of course we have a special 10% discount to all bona
fide U.B.C.  Students.
hi fi sales
LTD.
2714 W. BROADWAY
RE 3-8716
McGoun Cup Trials
Trials will be held to select
a four-man McGoun Cup debating team.
Applications should be left in
Box 31 in the AMS office before 5 p.m. Thursday.
The selected team will represent UBC in competition with
the three other western Canadian Universities.
Ball Honors Sweden
"Swedish Rhapsody" is the
theme for the annual formal ball
to be given by members of the
Student's Club of International
House.
With Sweden the honored
country, this year's entertainment will be provided by the
Scandinavian Cultural Society.
In charge of ball arrangements
are Mr. Hans Christoph Mundel,
chairman; Miss E|l i z a b e t h
Brown, Miss Mela Tempelman
Kluit, Miss Elfriede Richter,
James Ward and Mr. Hans-Hen-
ning Mundel. Tickets may be
obtained at International House
or from club members.
BOAT RACE
(Continued from Page  1)'
member of the Council team
had not even sipped the minimum one mouthful of the champion-building beverage.
The Dairyland driver then
awarded a special prize (c o n-
sisting of wholesome milk) to
the ISC team. ISC members then
distributed milk to some of the
spectators who jammed (?) the
stadium.
ISC will hold a General Membership Meeting on Tuesday,
November 15 in Buchanan 106
at noon.
THIS SUNDAY
at 8:30
The brilliant  1959 Russian production
of
SHAKESPEARE'S
TWELFTH NIGHT
In Color — English Subtitles
plus Cannes Film Festival Winner
THE RED BALLOON
HOLLYWOOD THEATRE
3123 W. Broadway
Tickets  $1.00 from Owl Books.  4560 W.  10th
or HK Books, 750 Robson
or Admission by Donation al Door
"OTHELLO" will be shown early in December
cw*wn
Sure Santa!.Remington outsells
them all—'cause it outshaves
them all—even razor bladesl
Only Remington Roll-A-Matic
offers these shaving extras:
• Six rows of diamond honed,
man-size shaving heads.
i* Exclusive Comb-Like Rollers-
adjust for razor close shaves!
."• Always operates at
top speed — the best speed
t for any shaver!
IXQUSIVE comb-like
rollers adjust to
tvery beard
and skin. /
Raise   comb like   rollers   for
tender skin — lower for tough
beard— unlimited tattings
In between.
ii'Mi ?<H,V
Skin is rolled down — whiskers
combed up — protects skin yet
{gives shore of 0 lifetime!
REMINGTON R0LLA MATIC
ELECTRIC
SHAVER
Product of Tmmvington. "WXamL Limited, Electric Sfiaver Division, Toronto Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 8, 1960
Pennel Gobbles Yards;
Wolves Gobble 'Birds
By BERT McKINNON
A dead Bird team took the field against the Oregon College
Wolves and came out on the short end of a 19-6 score.	
Playing  without  the  services  ~ thg  afternoop>  to  make  the
score 13-0.
Finally the Birds started to
come alive. Jim Olafson took the
bail on a handoff from Knight
and plowed from his own 45 to
the Wolves' 35. Knight then tossed a pass to Osborne on the two
yard line. On the next play a
pass was picked off by an Oregon defender and the drive was
stopped.
The third quarter was a defensive battle with Bruce McCal-
lum playing standout ball for
the Birds. McCaUum, playing
the safety slot, was in on the
majority of the defensive plays
and was one of the main reasons
the game wasn't a complete
rout.
In the fourth quarter the game
opened up again with the
Wolves dominating the play.
With two minutes gone in the
quarter they started a drive
that moved from their own 20
to the Bird end zone. The final
Wolves' major was scored by
Pennel on a drive over tackle.
When the Birds finally managed to sustain a drive it was in
the dying minutes of the game
and was mainly due to the efforts of Jim Olalsori. Olafson
ground out yardage to the Oregon 2 where Schriber took the
ball and drove for the TD. The
convert was wide and the score
was 19-6 for the Wolves.
The Birds outpassed the Wolves by 60 yards but on the ground
they were outplayed by 110
yards.
In the dressing room, coach
Gnup was moaning. "We haven't
got. anyone to start the big
play," he sighed. "Olafson
grinds out the yards but we need
a spark."
of Tonis Tutti and Doug Pi-
tou, the team lacked fire and
w a s unable to mount an offense.
Stan Knight, directing the
team, didn't get pro.tection from
the Wolves' front line and was
continually being trapped in
the Bird backfield and forced to
eat the ball.
For the first ten minutes of
the game the Wolves dominated
the play with their offense showing fine blocking and running
the Birds into the ground. However, they couldn't find the big
play and were unable to score.
Then with one and a half minutes left to play in t h e first
quarter Bob Pennel turned the
trick by crashing over tackle
for the Wolves' first major. The
convert was good and the score
stood at 7-0 Wolves.
Taking a bunt on his own 20-
yard stripe he knifed through
the weak Bird defense and
rambled   for his   second   major
T-Bi
Bounce
Barbarians
The Thunderbirds turned the
full force of the pent-up energy
of two weeks lay-off on the West
Vancouver Barbarians, when
they bludgeoned them into a
29-3  loss Saturday.
UBC teams, as a whole, batted
.800 over the weekend, with all
teams except the PE Majors winning their games.
As usual, Fullback Neal Henderson was top scorer for the
Birds; this time tallying 14
points on one try, one penalty
goal, and four converts.
Proof of the effiency of the
back's passing is the nine points
scored by wingers Bob McKee
and Bill Dubois. Peter Bugg
and Dave Gibbs each added a
try.
" The Braves sneaked by the
North Shore All-Blacks 9-8, scoring 6 points in the last half. Russ
Chambers kicked two penalty
goals, while Ian Rankin got a
try. ,
The PE Majors lost 3-0 on a
penalty try to the Rowing Club
Seconds; the only black mark
on the UBC scorecard.
The' Frosh team slaughtered
Richmond's second team by a
one-sided 25-0 score. Frosh B
downed Trojan Seconds 3-0.
Laff, Dam You!
"She was 'honey child' in New
Orleans,
The hottest of the bunch;
But on the old expense account,
She was gas, repairs, and
lunch."
W)ljAA£lf
SPORT
Editor: Mike Hunter
Hockey Has
Ice Troubles
By DIETER URBAN
UBC has entered into a partial hockey schedule this year
with the condition that next year
they  become full   members.
This in itself is nothing extraordinary but when it is considered in the light of the fact that
this campus has no rink and has
to compete with prairie teams,
one inevitably feels some admiration for this enterprising
group.
At present hockey players
practice three times a week; at
the interesting hours of ten, ten
thirty, and eleven at. night.
Furthermore, home, games will
have to be played in Chilliwack
—which creates spectator problems.
Yet one of each home series
will be played at Kerrisdale and
this costs a fair sum. Last year's
Hamber Cup series cost UBC
three hundred dollars  a night.
I Locker Room Closed |
All male team players and
students are reminded that
the Memorial Gym locker facilities will be unavailable Nov.
11, 12, and 13. Strip desired
for the weekend must be removed Thursday.
Countrymen!
Your  Friends Will Meet
For  Coffee, Steaks'    '
and Other Treats
at
Deans
4544 W. 10th
Open until 11:30
Beauty Clinic
'  by   :  ■
ZsA-Z
SA
We know the ART
of Beautifying You!
OUR
• HAIR CUTTING
• European HAIRSTYLING
• PERMANENT WAVING
• COLOURING
• SCALP TREATMENTS
• FACIALS
WILL THRILL YOU!
Are you ready for a change?
4395 W. 10th AVENUE
For appointment:
Phone CA 4-1231
GO SOUTH, YOUNG MAN!
Two members of the UBC Thunderbird Soccer squad use
their heads in game Saturday. UBC won, 1-0, and now head
south to California to play Stanford and Cal.
Photo   by   George   Fielder
11
ATTENTION!
UBC Students Only!
Special Reduced Priced Ticket Vouchers
to see
Vancouver Opera Assn.
production
LA BOHEME
11
$5.00 SEATS FOR ONLY $1.00
when accompanied by Gift Voucher and presented after
8:00 p.m. at the theatre box office on Tuesday Nov. 8th
only.
Obtain your gift voucher at the office of
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
§Note:—Seats must be available at 8:00 or vouchers are
not good—you pay at the theatre box office.
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
HOURS:   -
SATURDAY:
-   9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
-   -   9 a.m. to Noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS
EXERCISE BOOKS AND SCRIBBLERS
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER,
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS and INK
DRAWING PAPER
Owned and Operated by   .   .   .
THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
The    Fall-Winter    Edition    of
Beautiful  British  Columbia
contains six pages in full color on U.B.C!
See new color pictures of the university in this new, better-than-ever edition
of B.C.'s own picture magazine
OTHER ITEMS INCLUDE:
• Vancouver — in story and photographs
• Autumn in B.C. — color studies in the most
colorful of all seasons.
• Rockhounds of B. C. — fascinating story of men and
women who explore our majestic mountain country.
From all news-stands now - Single copies or subscriptions
Plan to send copies of Beautiful British Columbia to friends and relations
particularly those abroad.
__j_g__ Tuesday, November 8,  1960
THE      U B,Y S SE Y
Page 7
FOR THE BIRDS
By MIKE HUNTER
O; all the possible occupation si alternatives, the man who
chooses the job of a referee must surely te acclaimed the most
unlikley to succeed.
The world over, there is no one sport fans love to hate more
than the official with the whistle. He is the man charged with
the duty of stopping athletes from fulfilling their code of ethics
—to do unto others before they do unto you.
Everywhere, the toot of a referee's whistle incites mass excite*
ment among what art referred to as "fans." Thousands charge after
him like herds of cattle, eager to voice a whole bunch of beefs.
On this continent, the penalty for murder is usually sufficient
to restrain hysterical mobs, but in other countries, moats, barbed
wire, tear gas, and police dogs are common sights at sports
events.
All-Canadian Flag
In North America, the football referee is usually the most
picked-upon. This official-looking breed, decked out in baseball
cap, black-snd-white striped shirt, white pants, and the inevitable
penalty flag in their hip pocket, seem strangely to become hypochondriacs when they visit Vancouver.
They break out with colds and all too often that little "hanky"
is in constant use. Indeed, one referee, we hear, has been approached to do a commercial for Kleenex.
This little piece of cloth, thrown in the right (i.e., wrong)
places, forces coaches, players, and fans into an uproar. Such
incidents of hanky-panky on the part of officials can result in a
permanent blur on the name of the head referee — "Dojack" is
now a household word in B.C.
The strange thing is, when a referee makes a decision, exactly
half the players, and fans are jeering, and the other half cheering.
And, as quickly as you could drop a hanky, the cheerers become
jeerers, and vice-versa (and the more vice, the versa).
A good example of this was the Saskatchewan scout at the
Homecoming football game. Angry at a Husky penalty, he hurled
verbal threats at the man in black and white.
Men Of Good Jeer
No sooner had his tongue stopped wagging when the Birds
were assessed a roughing penalty. "Whoopee! Attaboy, ref.! Come
en, give 'em a talking penalty!" Even B.C. weather doesn't change
that fast.
And among the most notorious ref-haters are coaches. UBC
football coach Frank Gnup, not notorious for sensational quotes,
lets himself go when it comes to referees.
The usually mild-mannered Gnup was steaming at the Homecoming game. During the action, Gnup gestured angrily in the
direction of the suspected Saskatchewan conspirators, uttering
utterances. (This is rather difficult, if you happen to have a cigar
in your mouth at the time.)
"Hey, Gnup!" yelled a fan. "Tell the boys if they're gonna
get a penalty, to kill the other guys."
This is what the man in the striped shirt is up against—and
it's a wonder some of them last as long as they do. And all at
the drop of a hanky!
H- * *
GOOD DAY to everyone especially referees with T.B.—
tired blood.
TAKE IT'TO
SPOTLESS
SHIRTS 19:
5 or
More
FOR SALE
Man's   evening  suit.
Hardly worn,  size 40
Army Officers overcoat,
almost new, size 42
Phone CA 4-7838
ACADEMY AWARD
WINNER
SIMONE SISNOBET
JEAN FAIR SARTRE'S adaptation of ARTHUR MILLER'S
Yves
Monfan
French
Dialogue
English
Subtitles
STARTS
TUESDAY   *C
VARSITY
Mtthat TRIMtLE CA 4-3730
NfcAL HENDERSON
.... led Rugby Birds to a
29-3 win over Barbarians.
Henderson scored 14 points
for the winners.
Cross-Country
Finishes Third
UBC's cross-country squad
returned with third spot from
Saturday's Inland Empire Championships  in  Spokane.
In the absence of team-mate
Geoff Eales, last weekend's
WCIAU champion, Jim McKay
was the Birds' best man. John
Montrieff was UBC's second
best with a thirteenth place finish.
FOR  THE  BIRDS
Next Saturday the 13th annual
Pacific Northwest Championships will be  run  off  at UBC.
The meet will be divided into
three sections: high school, junior, and open. In the open division, Tom O'Roirdon of Idaho
will show his stuff. He is the
USA's number 5 distance runner.
Geoff Eales and VOC's Paul
Hendon are expected to be the
top   competition.
"PERFECT MILDNESS
IN YOUR PIPE"
BraHaoi's
.. . Brahadi's smoking
"tobacco is a special
"Cavendish" blend of
Mild tobaccos. Comfortably satisfying... a mild
smoking tobacco with a
delightful aroma.
Brahadi's is available
at select tobacco stores.
53$ for 2 ounces
Suggested price, all taxes included
SPORTS SHORTS
WRESTLING
UBC wrestlers won a dual
meet with YMCA Thursday,
taking seven out of nine matches.
Bob Irvine was tops for UBC,
taking the three matches. The
total time for all three was an
amazing 65 seconds.
Doug   MacLean,   Bruce   Wallace   (2)   and   Dave   Thompson
supplied UBC's other wins.
ARCHERY CLUB
Weekly shoot Wednesday evening  7-9  p.m.   in  the  Field
House. All interested archers invited to attend.
VARSITY   OUTDOOR  CLUB
General meeting of interest to
all members Wednesday noon
Bio Sc. 2000. John Taylor, M.P.
Vancouver Burrard will speak
ind answer questions on t h"
proposed Whistler Mt. Olympic
development. He will give details of a planned trip to t h e
area on Friday. Mr. Taylor will
also have information on how to
save $$$ on equipment.
SOCCER
UBC Thunderbirds defeated
Pilseners 1-0 Saturday in a
rough game at UBC. The Birds'
only goal came from Ed Wasy-
lik. The Birds leave Thursday
for a tour in California.
The Jayvee soccer side lost
their first game of the season
to Firefighters "B" at Clinton
Park Saturday.
BADMINTON
UBC's 'B' division badminton
team lost their first match of
the year 7-5 to a strong Vancouver Racquets Club team.
Rolf Paterson, Ed Paterson,
Ian Lamont, and Keith Tolman
picked up double wins, while
the womens' team was unable to
salvage one victory.
The team must now go undefeated in all its remaining
matches to win a playoff spot.
Photographs
for Christmas
To the discriminating student who knows and appreciates fine photography, we are pleased to
offer our personally created, expertly finished portraits at special student
prices.
Phone for an appointment
RE 1-8314
Atlas Studios
Photographers
3189 WEST BROADWAY
Vancouver 8, B.C.
f       GIRLS
WITH
THE
RIGHT
FASHION
ANSWERS
KNOW THE
STYLE QUOTIENT
OF A
GLENAYR
Maybe you don't rate "A-plus" in math . . . you'll still
create a fashion furore in this exciting "girl-on-the-go"
Kitten jumbo-knit "Shetlantex" Shetland and mohair
. . . grand for sports car jaunting, wonderful for
weekend skiing, fabulous, on or off campus.
Coiffure-protecting hood forms cowl collar when down . . .
vibrating young colours . . . silhouette relaxed and
easy as fashion dictates, for Fall and Winter.
Sizes 36-40 . . . $14.95
Without this label \$iJsuL%$\ it is not a genuine KITTEN   \\ Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 8, 1960
'TWEEN CLASSES
Dr. Okulitch To Discuss Moon
FILMSOC
"Teahouse     of     the     August
Moon," Auditorium, today 3:30
and 8:00 p.m.
•I*     •*•     •*•
ROD AND GUN CLUB
Mike Crammond, -outdoor editor of The Province will speak
and show films Wed., 12:30, BU.
313.   Everybody   welcome.
!f.    if.    >{.
SCM
Education students interested
in forming an SCM study group
on "Religion in Schools," meet
Thurs. noon, Ed. 101.
* *  *
ARTS AND  SCIENCE  GRADS
Final deadline for grad photos
has been extended to Sat. at
Krass Studios.
T*     T*     •**
STUDENT'S   WIVES  CLUB
..Student's Wives Club will
hold their monthly meeting
Wed. 8:00 p.m., in the Mildred
Brock Room.
•f*   •¥*   •¥•
-BRIDGE  CLUB
Meeting in the Card Room,
Brock Hall, Wed., 7:30 p.m.
Everyone welcome.
3p      ff.      rf.
MUSIC DEPT.
Noon hour concert tomorrow, Bu. 106. Music for pianos,
four hands by Poulenc, Satie,
and Hovhaness, played by Frances Adaskin and Genevieve
Carey.
CLASSIFIED
BEACH.-FRONT furnished bachelor quarters, suit one gent,
$65. 2525 Point Grey Road.
KE 8-6498.
COMFORTABLE room near
UBC gates, suit 1 or 2 male
students, sep. ent. & shower,
electric kettle & snack facilities, $30 mo. each. CA 4-3648.
LOST—Set of 4 keys on gold
ring, Alberta licence tag (red
and white) CT5904. Finder
please call CA 4-0951.
WILL the person who found my
brown leather wallet please
return the keys and driver's
licence to the bookstore lost
and found.
URGENT—Ride wanted from
56th & Fraser. Call Marion,
FA 5-6371.
URGENT — Cellist wanted for
"The Flies" Nov. 17, 18, 19
nights and rehearsals. Phone
i Denis at WE 9-7508.
trOULD theiperson   who  took
« ~    my    btsefcase    by    mistake
J '   '   from,  the $S>rary  please  call
Jim Hill at WA 2-7788.
GEOLOGY
Talks, discussion, and slides
on geological features of the
moon, by President V. J. Okulitch, Geology, today, Physics
201.,   8:00   p.m.
UNITED NATIONS ASSN.
Professor G.O.B. Davies will
speak on "India, 1960 Facts and
Fiction," color slides, at a public meeting in the Christmas
Seal Auditorium, Tenth and Willow, Wed, 8:00 p.m.
^.   if.    if.
SOPRON FORESTRY SOCIETY
Dr. J.L. Robinson will show
color slides of Hungary and
Czechoslovakia today, 12:30, FG
100. Everyone welcome.
"For Everything in
Drugs and
School Supplies"
University
Pharmacy
5754 University Blvd.
(In the Village)
RIDGE
THEATRE
16th and Arbutus
RE 8-6311
Nov. 7-8-9
Mon.  Tues.   Wed
Sloan Wilson's Best Seller
A SUMMER PLACE
Color
(Adult Ent.  only Not
Recommended for Children)
Richard Egan
Dorothy  McGuire
Sandra  Dee
SKI CRAZY
Color
A Ski Crazy Comedy
Starring former Olympic
Champions
News
ONE COMPLETE SHOW 7:30
Nov. 10 -  11  - 12
Thurs.   Fri.  Sat.
Ouida's Classic Novel
A DOG OF FLANDERS
Color
Donald Crisp Theodore Bikel
David  Ladd
plus
DANGER WITHIN
Richard Todd
Michael Wilding
Cartoon
HUMANITIES   ASSOCIATION
OF  CANADA
Harold Livermore speaks on
'Moslems in Medieval Spain"
tonight at 8:00 p.m. in the Upper
Lounge,  International House.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Le groupe de conversation de
mardi si rassemble aujourd'hui
Bu. 222.
V     *T*      *t*
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
Devotional meeting Wed., Bu.
2202.
if*      rft      rft
PRE  MED  SOC
Lecture by Dr. P. Ashmore on
open heart surgery, Wed. noon,
Westbrook  100.
PRESENTS
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9
Harry Adaskin's Noon Hour Concert
(Duo Piano Music)
Works by Satie, Poulenc and Stravinsky
Francis Adaskin and Genevive Carey
12:30 BU 106
THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 10
Vancouver Symphony Concert1
12:30 AUDITORIUM ADM. 52c
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE
Glasses Fitted
24-Hour Service OPTICAL Repairs
VANCOUVER BLOCK
MU 5-0928 — MU 3-2948
Main Floor
734 GRANVILLE ST.
Immediate Appointment
NEW WESTMINSTER - 675 COLUMBIA STREET
LA 6-8665
EATON'S
for the BIRDS
Whether you cheer your favourite Thunderbirds on to a win, or take in all the
thrills and excitement of the W.I.F.U. games at Empire Stadium, one thing
appreciated as much as a long, smooth pass, perfect catch and touchdown,
is a coat to keep you warm and comfortable throughout the game. EATON'S
has the Stadium Star for you (as illustrated). Made of polished Cotton, Orion
pile interlined, with that bold masculine styling that tells you instantly . . .
this is the finest!
Featuring smart jumbo knit shawl collar, slash pockets, Frencn cuffs and side
vents with tab. Choose from Beige, Olive,  Antelope or Charcoal.   Sizes 38
to 4b.
EACH
24.95
Sony Transistor Radios — Each 39.95 to 199.50

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0125265/manifest

Comment

Related Items