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The Ubyssey Oct 27, 1959

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 31
THE
BUZZARD
n
THE UBYSSEY
IS
COMING
VOL. LXVII
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1959
No.  1?
SOPRON FORESTRY STUDENTS carrying memorial
wreath Friday, commemorating those who died in the 1956
Hungarian Revolution. (See story, p. 4).
—Photo by Roger McAfee.
AMS Government
Investigated
By DEREK ALLEN
'■- **r%r-the fourth successive year, the AMS has arranged for
an investigation of UBC's form of student government.
"We know something is wrong •£
with  our  present system,"  said
Pete  Haskins,   AMS   vice-presi-
•dent,   "and  we  want to  decide
just 'what it is and what we can
"<lo about it."
'   Three Committees have made
investigations and submitted reports in the past three years, but
no action has yet been taken.
■.   This year the probe  will  be
somewhat  different.
,- Instead of a committee in private discussion, a body similar
to a Royal Commission will conduct open hearings  and  accept
-briefs from any interested sources on the campus.
Pete Haskins will head the
five-man commission and choose
the other four members.
The commission will be nonpartisan and yet will be broadly
enough based so that it will have
a comprehensive idea of what
is wanted by the campus as a
whole in the way of student government reform.
.:; Haskins stressed that individuals as well as groups are incited to present briefs.
, The commission is interested
in receiving ideas from all parts
■of the campus, and in hearing
"all shades of opinion. '
would   like   to   present,   drop
•around to Haskin's office- in the
South Brock any noon hour this
week and talk informally with
either him or the commission
members who will be there.
Haskins said the committees
meeting to discuss this problem
in the past had been hampered
in many ways.
The- first two committees
struck to look into the problem
were small enough to not only
be efficient but also to be limited in their exposure to the full
spectrum of campus opinion.
The third group, that was set
up last, term, was larger than
its predecessors. It would have
had more success in sounding
out widespread views and opinions if it had not experienced
difficulty in finding an acceptable meeting time.
The commission established
this year will be a five man
group for efficiency, and will
hold open meetings, at which
outside opinion will be presented
in an attempt to consider all
points of view.
"I want to stress that this
form of body will require much
more student participation than
others did," Hoskins said in an
interview yesterday.
"We are hoping for a good response   from    both   individuals
King's IV Will
Headline Meet
STAFF
LOST
Hey!!! Where did everybody
go?
At the beginning of the year
we asked for help. We said we
needed reporters, photographers,
and anyone interested in newspaper work. We said we needed
staff.    We called a meeting.
Sixty people turned out to
the first meeting. 	
Sixty people were divided into three groups, one for each of
the three editions we publish
weekly, and we were happy because we had a large staff. ;
So far we have lost fifty of
these people.
The Pub is empty, and we are
lonely.
Where did those fifty people
get to?
Only three of them turned up
to work on Tuesday's paper.
Only two helped today.
We want you, and we need
you. If you do not want to work
on the Ubyssey, come and tell
us why.
If you do want to work on the
Ubyssey, come down to the Pub
office in the basement, North
Brock, and speak to the editor-
in-chief or the news editor, who
wants reporters, or the features
editor, who wants feature writers, or the critics «ditor, or the
sports editor, or the senior editor, or even to one of the reporters who is trying to write three
stories because he is the only one
who showed up.
But hurry, we do not want
that reporter quitting because
he is overworked.
Come down at noon any day
to the Pub office in the North
Brock. Ask someone to show
you where the News Editor's
desk is, and come over and wave
this story under his nose. He
will give you a job.
No experience necessary. Apply now.
If  you  have- any ideas, youjAnd-. groups on campus," he ad
ded...
(Continued on page 3)
Pep Meet Will Kick Off
Homecoming Celebrations
The King's IV, acclaimed as one of the greatest acts in?
showbusiness today, will be featured at the Homecoming Pep
Meet.
Composed of George Worth, his brother Stan Worth, Frank
Ciciulla and 3ill Kay, the King's IV play more than 30 instruments.
They have appeared on many-^
network TV   shows,     including
COME BACK,
DAVIS HEAVE
"Pique, rollicking, fun filled,
star-spangled, tired old Pique,
needs you."
Gently laid to rest last year
after burning itself out in wild,
yet fun-filled, hectic, rollicking
dance around its own funeral
pyre, she is having her burns
bathed, her wounds swathed in
the gentle (if rollicking) care
of Baroque Kerry Feltham.
Feltham, sitting in his crowded, borrowed baroque office
(all the baroque belong to some
literate Architect) has crawled
out  front Under *the -portable
(Continued on^page 3)
the Red Skelton and Ernie Ford
shows, and many spectaculars.
They also appeared with Ken
Murray in his Blackouts of 1959,
and have been co-headlining at
the Sands Hotel in Las Vegas
with Judy Garland and Danny
Thomas.
Individually, each member of
the King's IV not only play a
number of instruments; but each
also- sings with professional
ease. Stan Worth has mastered
the piano, trombone and accor-
dian. George Worth performs
on the bass, trombone, tuba and
baritone, among others: Trumpeter Bill Kay also plays the tuba and trombone, while Frank
Ciciulla is an accomplished tenor
and alto sax man and a clarinetist. All four beat the drums and
bongos with skill.
They sing in harmony and
unison and can fracture each
other, as well as the audience,
with their hilarious ad libs.
The Pep Meet program also
includes the Booster Band,
Cheerleaders, and Majorettes,
who will put on a twenty-minute
show of music, cheers, dance routines and feminine pulchritude.
Professor At Cox, folk sang
singer and guitarist, wiH perform to show us just how talented our professors are.
The Homecoming Queen Candidates will be introduced at the
Pep Meet. At last report, at
least twelve campus beauties are
entered in the contest. Of these
one will reign as Homecoming
Queen and two others as Homecoming Princesses. VOTING
FOR THE QUEEN CONTEST
WILL TAKE PLACE AT THE
PEP MEET. AMS cards will be
required in order to get ballots,
so bring yours!
The Pep Meet will be in the
Armouries on Thursday, November 5, at noon.
ALUMS ALSO BUSY
Plans for the most ambitious
Homecoming ever staged at the
University of British Columbia
were announced today by the
Alumni Association.
The program will be buil$
around a series of lectures anej
panel discussions on November
6 and 7 under the general tjtle>
"The challenge of science to*
day." ■.': \),.
Opening the program will be
G. L. Hollingsworth, director of
research laboratories for the Boe»
ing Airplane Company in Seattle.
He will give the opening lecture
of the series in room 106 of the
Buchanan byilding on November 6 at 8 p.m. His topic will
be "The challenge of outer
space."
On Saturday, November 7,
Dean Gordon Shrum, head of
the department * of physics, and
(Continued on page 5)
Last Chance To Take
AMS Card Photographs
This is the last chance to
have AMS card photos taken."
Pictures will be taken in
Roonv L63A olthe Brock Extension al Ute following times
only:
.Wednesday.   Oct.  28:   12:30-
:30.
Thursday. Oct. 29: 12:30*
4:30.
Sigma Tau Chi
Gains. Members
Sigma Tau Chrr the Honorary
Fraternity for men on the campus, has invited seven new ri|en&f
bers"to join its ranks.
They are Boss Craigie, Dave
Edgar, Paul Terrrianseh; Erwooci
Dredger, Pete Peterson, Ju^
Horsman, and Jack Henwood.
It meets to discuss matters of
interest to the university.
'tween classes
LABOUR LEADER
SPEAKS FOR CCF
UBC CCF
Pat O'Neil Secretary of the
B.C. Federation of Labour, will
speak on "Why does labour support the CCF" noon today in
BU 102.
* *     * ',
SLAVONIC  CIRCLE
Elections, films and program
at noon in BU212.
* *     *
SOCCER     .
Soccer teams practice at 4:3®
to-day on Mclnnes' field.
* *     *
SAILING  CLUB
General meeting to-day in BU
203 at noon. Everyone please at?
tend.
* *     *
UKRAINIAN   DANCE
COMMITTEE ,
AH students interested |».
learning Ukrainian dancing
please come to the first praeticf
noon today in BU 226. ,    .
;     .   .   * ■,.
COMSERVATIVE CLUB
General meeting today at noon
(Continued on page 8) PAGE TWO
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 27, 195?
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
1 Published three times a week throughout the University year in Vancouver
by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C.
Editorial opinions expressed are those of the Editorial Board of The Ubyssey
and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
Telephones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 and 14;
Business offices, AL. 4404; Local 15.
Editor-in-Chief: R. Kerry White
Associate Editor .. Elaine Bissett
\ Managing Editor : Michael Sone
Acting News Editor Bob Hendrickson
C.U.P. Editor Irene Frazer
'        Club's Editor •_ Wendy Barr
Features Editor Sandra Scott
Head Photographer Colin Landie
• Senior Editor:   Allan Chernov
t Reporters and Desk:
! Art Powell, Derek Allen, Ed Lavalle, Allen Graves, Sandy
< Chowne, Robert Sterling, Gary Home, Irene Frazer.
Why Russia is Ahead in Propaganda
■Guest Editorial
, There is an old-fashioned word that used to be the most honoured in education, but isn't heard much in university circles
foiJay—which could explain a lot.
* We wonder if instructors, complaining of their students being
unthinkable herds, wouldn't see more repcnse if this word and
its meaning were given some attention m this grist mill.
* The word is wisdom.
Wisdom is a good word. You still hear it amongst old folks
and encounter it in literature. We still highly compliment a
man if we call hirri wise—and in Christian circles, where they
take their language and thought from the Bible, wisdom is a
very meaningful word.
* Why then is it so seldom employed in our campus thinking
today? Are we so befuddled that we are afraid to draw evaluative judgements which might count as wisdom?
Wisdom is the same as knowledge. Perhaps that is why the
word lacks usage. In an institution which chases after the facts
and processes of science, how best to use that knowledge receives scant attention. It would seem to be a weakness of the
philosophers who've got themselves so befuddled with semantical trivia and metaphysical uncertainty that they pay scant
attention to what their nane says they love. We need more true
philosophy—the love of wisdom.
There are those without much learning, but have great wisdom and are sought for advice by friends and strangers alike.
And there are others who deserve that contempt the world
often throws at university people: "educated fools". It isn't
knowledge, then, that gives wisdom, but a quality of judgement
in the use of knowledge, such that the end result is constructive
and good.
Wisdom is supposed to come with years; maybe it does.
Freshmen at about this stage ©f the acedemic year are usually
just emerging from awe into conceit that they are the educated
elite. But seniors are wondering how they could have learned
so little m four or five years with which to face the hard world
next spring. That is a kind of wisdom that grows perennially,
arid it has a broader reflection in all of life.
It is said "a wise man learns from the mistakes of others,
most learn from their own, but a fool never learns" and so age
is no sure cure for folly. Some kid's we know are wise little
people, and the papers are constantly reporting old folks gulled
out of their life savings.
Wisdom,, perhaps, is the difference between our knowledge
and surpluses feeding the hungry in Bengal, and sharing with
the great powers that fascination with the moon which gave
lunacy its name.
We might just straighten out a lot of the messes facing us if
we'd try Solomon's counsel. "Wisdom", wrote that wisest of
ben, "is the principal thing; therefore get wisdom: and with all
ithat getting, get understanding. Exalt her, and she shall promote
thee- she shall bring thee to honor, when thou dost embrace
her."
i    "And the fear of God is the beginning of wisdom," he also
ISecJared. —G.B.L.
(Concluded from last issue-
While their leaders profess
Scrviet alliance, not a few
among them subscribe to basic
Marxist doctrines of economic
planning and to Lenin's economic interpretation of imperialism.
Secondly, Soviet propaganda
is, on the whole, nihilistic
rather than constructive. So-
viet policy makers, because
their overriding objective is
to alter the existing world
order to the detriment of the
West, are not burdened by the
need to offer constructive proposals. Their chosen strategy
is to spur latent anti-Western
forces. It is infinitely easier for
the Soviets, for example, to inveigh against Western influences in' the Middle East than
it is for the West to extol.the
virtues of pro-Western governments or to sound the alarm
against Soviet imperialism.
The problem of American
propaganda and counter-propaganda is inextricably linked to
the broad problems of our society.
Only in wartime has our
propaganda effort approximated the scope and unity of the
everyday Communist psychological offensive. Our handicap
stems from one of the most admirable features of the American democratic system — freedom og expression, which
makes inevitable a virtually
uninhibited partisan debate
over foreign1'policy.
The answer to our problems
—problems of general policy as
well as of propaganda — does
not and, indeed, cannot lie in
institutional modifications. We
are what we are. But within
the limitations of our society,
we can take steps to' expand
and improve our existing program.
These programs have been
far from generous. It has been
estimated, for example, that
the Communists in one single
propaganda offensive — the
germ-warfare campaign during
the Korean conflict — spent
nearly as much as the entire
annual allocation to the United
States Information Agency. We
should increase the austere budget of the U.S.I.A. We should
give our information specialists
a greater voice in policy-making councils. We should attempt
to co-ordinate more fully and
effectively the propaganda programs of the Western alliance.
But we shall only move to
the brink of disaster if we
delude ourselves that these
measures by themiselves can be
a substitute for sound foreign
and defense policies. Our success in countering Soviet psychological strategy hinges not
so much on what we say as on
what we do in the way of
closing the gaps in our over-all
defense posture. We must recognize that Communist pys-
chological Warfare proceeds
from firm policy positions,
whereas the loosely coordinated
and all too often divided West
is uncertain of its' purposes
and the means of achieving
them. As long as the weakness
of Allied conventional forces
compels  the  western   powers
to contemplate the ultimate
choice between a nuclear holocaust and defeat in a limited
war, the Soviets will hold the
pyschological  advantage.
We must recognize, conversely the vulnerabilities of our
enemy. Soviet leadership face3
many serious problems within the Communist orbit-—
problems which offer openings
for a purposeful Western counter-strategy. Foremost is the
fact that the cohesiveness of the
Communist bloc is an image
of Soviet propoganda rather
than a political and ideological
reality. While we must check
the further advance of communism through effective foreign
and military policies, our transcendent objective must be to
reach the minds of the Communist peoples and to increase
public pressures upon the
Soviet dictatorship.
Mankind's best hope for
peace with justice and freedom
lies in the Soviet people's growing awareness of -the real*
world around them Only the
assertion of their freely expressed will can bring about
a mellowing of Soviet leadership The president's forthcoming visit to Moscow can
open a window through which
the Soviet people can behold
the true countenance of the
West. The President's visit
may thus do more to carry
the pyschological struggle to
the heart of the Communist
empire than any other feat of
American propoganda.
(from the New York Times
Magazine, Sept. 29, 1959)
LETTERS  TO  THE   EDITOR
BIRD   CALLS .... 50c
NOW  IN  AMS  OFFICE
Editor,
Dear Sir:
I have read with interest a
letter written by Len Geddes
dealing with my address to the
students on the 15th of October. I am grateful to Mr. Geddes for having taken the trouble
to write at some length about
this address and particularly
because he does point up one
of the continuing dilemmas of
a free society. I am wholeheartedly in favour of maximum freedom for each individual, and I am temperamentally
opposed to censorship and restrictions upon freedom. I do
insfet, however, that as long as
human beings live in association with each other they must
accept responsibility for the
useful and efficient organization of society and they must,
in their own interests, and for
the enjoyment of maximum
freedom, accept discipline.
This is as true of speech and
behaviour as it is true of traffic or sanitary regulations.
One of the objectives of an
education is the development
of human beings in a manner
which ensures that much of
this discipline and censorship
becomes self-discipline and is
exercised by the individual
himself on the basis of his own
judgment and his own standards of value. But, even in a
Utopia, where there may be no
laws and no government, these
basic facts or principles re responsibility and discipline will
remain true. The only escape
from them, as far as I can
judge, is to live the life of a
hermit in complete isolation
from all other human beings.
However, I hope that the discussion of this and similar matters will continueand increase,
for this, too, is one of the func
tions of education—particularly at a university.
I am,
Yours sincerely,
—N. A. M. MacKenzie.
Dear Fellow Students,
You probably all watched
the Ed Sullivan Show last
Sunday night and read the
"Sun" yesterday. We hope you
all understood that executions
are still being carried out in
Hungary. They are going to
execute 150 18-year old students in the near future. The
Communist Government has
not executed them so far since
they are juveniles; but they
have been kept in jail for three
years. We turn to you now for
help. Write to Mr. Khrushchev
asking him to stop these executions. Perhaps he will listen to
you.
The letters that you might
send will cost you a few cents
only but they might mean life
for these teen-agers.
Write, for we do not know
how   many other  hundreds   of
Hungarian   students   are   waiting their 18th birthday in jail.
Sopron Student Body
Editor,
Dear Sir:
DECLARATION OF INTENT
TO Messrs. J. Henwood and
B. McKerlick, the Football
team, the Rowing team, all and
sundry,
WHEREAS, certain rash statements appeared in the Ubyssey
on or about relating to the
alleged prowess of two athletic
groups Thursday, October 22,
Anno Dommi 1959,
AND WHEREAS, the Engineering Faculty has a sacred
obligation to chastise sinful
pride and immoral boasting,
THEREFORE BE IT KNOWN
that the said Engineering Faculty here challenge both afore
mentioned parties, to wit, the
Rowing team, the Football
team, jointly and severally, to
a trial of strength.
BE IT FURTHER KNOWN
that the proposed weapons and
instruments of the said contest,
to wit, a rope, are acceptable
to the Engineers. .
Given this day under my
hand,
—William S. Rodenchufe.
Shepherd.
The Editor,
Dear Sir:
Having just read the article
on the front page concerning
the case of the negro girl being refused admission to a'
sorority in Toronto, I must
commend the Ubyssey for its
courage and forthright intentions in reprinting the item.
For years, the Ubyssey has protected the best interests of
U.B.C. students by reporting
the truth about these odious,
undemocratoic  societies.
Allow me therefore, to add
some views which I believe
will properly solve the problem of removing these clubs
from our campus once and
for all. Force all fraternities
and sororities to give up their
chapter charters. This will
necessitate the sale of the existing frat houses. The University
could require the the houses
on campus be sold for $1.00
per $10.00 of appraised value
to the Alma Mater Society.
These houses could then be
turned over to the few sane
and useful clubs left on the
campus: International House,
Critics Circle, Dance Club, Etc.
Let us all join in voice to rid
the campus of these discriminatory bands of snobbish students.
Your truly,
Intelligent Imagination •Tuesday, October 27, 1959
THE      1TB YSSEY
PAGE THREE
Rowers
To Battle
Gridders
Wednesday at noon the Rowing Crew will meet the Football
team in a tug-of-war.
AMS President Pete Meekison will be present and so will
the Engineers, the Thunderbird
Booster Club Pep Band, and the
Cheerleaders.
These are the latest developments in the contest which was
arranged' through the letters-to-
-the-editor column of the Ubyssey.
Meekison took the initiative
over the weekend when he declared the event an AMS function and set himself up as the
sole judge.
The engineers got into the
act today when, in a letter to the
Ubyssey, they challenged the
winners of the first bout to a
further match.
Both Bill McKerlick and Jack
Henwood have accepted the Engineers' challenge on behalf of
their teams.
The Thunderbird Football Club
will be led into battle by Coach
iTrank Gnup, while Gordon
Green will command the Rowers.
The Engineers will be directed
by the president of their undergraduate society, Bill Roden-
ehuk.
Men's   Athletic   Association
Secretary    Chris   Webster    announced today that the following
rules had been agreed to by the
(Contestants:
1. There will be three pulls.
2. There will be eight men on
a team.
3. Average team weight will
'be 190 pounds per man.
4. Running shoes will be worn
'by all save the anchor-man on
each team, who is allowed boots.
The Men's Athletic Association
bas obtained a valuable prize
jfor the winning team, and has
turned it over to Dave Edgar,
AMS Treasurer, for safe-keeping, Webster announced.
Meekison will present the
#rize at the end of the contest.
The ' event occurs Wednesday
# at noon on the grass of the main
mall between the Library and
the Arts Building.
McGILL HOLDS
CONFERENCE
Students wishing to participate in the Third Annual McGill
Conference on World Affairs, are asked to submit written applications to AMS President Peter Meekison before November 5.
Applicants will then appear before a joint student-faculty
selection board.
NOON HOUR CONCERT
The regular Wednesday noon
;§tfour concert will feature Gideon Grau and Jack Keser, vio-
.fcrists, and Irene Rosenberg,
•piano, in Bu. 106 at 12:30.
They will play both a Bach
concerto and sonata for two violins and a piano. Between these
works Grau and Kesler will play
two violin duets by Bartok.
COME BACK
(Continued from page 1)
typewriter  case he  calls home
and thundered the above.
"Pique needs writers, artists,
and ukelele players from all
walks of life!" he reiterated
bands quivering with emotion,
brushing away the cobwebs
from the baroque cubicle high
up in the Brock attic he calls
his office. (South Brock)
"And   picture - takers - uh,
■lean photographers."
He weakly grinned. And
crawled back into the typewriter case.
Help nurse a young mag back
$o health. Pretty girls come and
flecorate the office. Bright young
inen' contribute verse, short
familiar essays and stories.
Artists come and illustrate. It's
»*all.
CHRISTOPER ALLAN and JEAN GORDON look
over the script and score of "Square Dance", Allan's new
musical which is to be produced on Thursday, Friday, and
Saturday, at Lord Byng High School Auditorium. Allan, an
Arts student, has had enthusiastic reviews and full houses
during last week's presentation at West Van. Community
Centre.
Press Conference
Condemns Censors
More than 40 delegates from 19 countries met recently in
Oxford, England, for the Ninth International Student Press
Conference. <S^ ~ ; •
Reports of delegates showed
the variety of conditions which
student editors are obliged to
work and reflected the differ-
A.M.S.   GOVERNMENT
(Continued from page ,1)
The first hearings of the com-
mission will take place early in
November, and are intended
especially for the presentation
of individual briefs.
Clubs, Societies and interested
opinion within their own groups.
A second round of hearings to
which groups will be especially
groups will get more time to
prepare their briefs, and to hear
invited, begins in January, 1960.
Briefs should contain at least
one of these ideas:
1. Changes in the present system.
2. Mechanics of a new system.
3. Merits of the present system
wh'ich should be carried over to
any new type of government.
The Undergraduate Societies
Committee, which is the present
link between the faculties and
Council, was asked at a meeting
Monday noon to study their present role, legislative powers, and
the future of the organization.
The commission will take into
consideration. the recommendations of previous groups reporting on the subject.
The most recent of these is
that drawn up by Ken Brawner,
1957-1958 AMS vice-president,
which was presented in February, 1958.
The Brawner report recommended Representative Assembly with members elected on the
basis of undergraduate society
enrollment.
Interested groups would also
have elected members.
Further suggestions were that
more non-councillors sit on com*
mittees, the Fall general meeting be abolished and the Spring
general meeting be retained.
ent backgrounds from which
they come.
The Conference formulated
a declaration of principles as a
guide to student journalists,
and adopted a Code of Ethics
for the consideration of student journalists.
The conference considered
a number of instances where
student press had occurred and
supression of freedom of the
and condemned all such suppression.
It particularly spoke against
the unwarranted censorship by
the South African government
of student (Coordinating Secretariat -of National Union of
Students) publications.
Structure of national student press organizations was
considered in detail and the
important part these organizations played in facilitating cooperation in the national and
international levels of student
press relations.
This year the conference will
discuss the subject of "Afro-
Asia: The Problems of Underdeveloped Countries" and relating problems.
For four days, beginning
November 18, 100 delegates and
observers fromj Canadian and
American universities will have ■
round table discussions and
panel debates.
In addition, three distinguished international statesmen will
speak at the evening sessions
and banquets.
The Rt. Hon. Lester B. Pearson, Opposition Leader in Parliament, Nobel Prize Winner,
and former Minister of External
Affairs will address the first
plenary session.
Later in fhe week, Dr. Arthur
Smithies, head of the Foreign
Aid Division of the United
States' State Department will deliver an address to the delegates.
Sir Leslie Munro, former president of the General Assembly
of the United Nations and currently New Zealand's Ambassador to the United States will
address the closing Banquet.
Invitations have been sent to
Law Students
To Convene
UBC will host delegates of the
Western Federation of Law Students at their third annual convention October 30 and 31.
The 30 law students and professors from the Universities of
British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba will be
the guests of the Law Undergraduate Society.
Topics for discussion at this
conference will include legal
publications, scholarships and
aid for law students, comparisons and improvements.
On Friday, there will be a public debate with representatives
of each university competing for
the Richard De Boo prize.
Speakers at the two-day meeting will include W. T. Lane, Municipal Solicitor for Richmond;
R. H. Tupper, Q.C., of the Vancouver Bar, and Dean Curtis of
UBC.
The conference will end Saturday evening with the Law Faculties' annual dance, the Law
Informal.
ESM H1B1FS3
DON'T FORGET THE REST OF ANNUAL
SPECIAL EVENTS WEEK
Today: Celebrated Classic Guitarist-
Ray de la Torre' - Auditorium - 12:30
Oct. 29:-Vancouver Symphony Orchestra
Auditorium - 12:30
Oct. 30:—Famed English Folk Singers
McColl & Seeger
Brock Lounge - 12:30
leading American and Canadian.
Universities and in keeping with
the spirit of internationalism,
the invitations have specifically
asked for a strong representation of Afro-Asian students as
delegates.
Peter Meekison stated to-day,
"We are pleased that McGill
University has once again invited U.B.C. to participate in
this conference."
"The discussion groups will
prove valuable to the community and reflect the high
calibre of university thought being exercised by students today."
The delegates will consider
such questions as, "As the
peoples of Asia and Africa gain
their political freedom and
emerge as independent states in
the world community,- what
goals do they seek? Is freedom
alone the primary goal? Is the
rise of living standards the main
goal?"
Economic problems, social
conditions, government and
politics, and foreign policies will
all be discussed."
Frat Discrimination
To Be Investigated   -
TORONTO (CUP) — The Students' Administrative Council's
Publications Commission is investigating possible discriminatory policies among the University of Toronto fraternities.
The Commission has been, empowered by the SAC to deprive
any fraternity employing discriminatory policies in selecting its membership, of special
student privileges in the U. of
T. publications.
33
>
'NEW    POLICY
Tuesday and Wednesday
Direct from their weekly
CBC television show
"JOHN EMERSON
PRESENTS"
NORAH HALU'DAT
ROMA HEARN
VAN TREIST
KARL NORMAN
Thursday. Friday and
Saturday
Ed Sullivan Show
Tony Martin  Show
Jackie Gleason  Show
Judy Garland Show
the goof ers
"MUSICAL  COMEDY
SHOW-STOPPERS"
Featured   on   Coral   Records
"The  Goofers'   solid  music pattern combined with fresh, bouncing  comedy,   is  a   combo   that
spells   great   entertainment   all "Sj
the way." mT
—WALTER WINCHELL
i' ... an uninhibited musical m
comedy team billed as The Goo- **
fers beguiled the guests by m
swinging back and forth over w^
the audience upside down, toot- W
ling on trombone or plunking ^
on a bull fiddle. Part of the re- v2
gular nightly floor show at ■*
Ciro's, The Goofers were gener- ■"
ally considered to "have put on
the most spectacular act of
the   evening."
—LIFE  MAGAZINE
Also
PLAYING ALL WEEK
Mark Dempsey's
production of
BAGDAD EXOTIQUE
Exotica in dance and song with
all the sensuousness of Bagdad.
Dance to
DAVE   ROBBINS
and his Big Band
Reservations:
MU 1-8728 ■ MU 3-9719
U.B.C. Rate
Monday - Thursday
with A.M.S. Card
DON'T   FORGET
1.25 PAGE FOUR
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 27, 1959
Soviet Student
Warns The West
By DOUG PARKINSON
President, Canadian University Press
Since the advent of sputnik there has been a growing fear
that Khrushchev may try to "bury" us under an avalanche
of textbooks.
The recent visit of the vice-president of the Students'
Council of the USSR did nothing to alleviate this.
Short,    friendly,    and   sharp-*  —
i MASS MARCH of Sopron Students Friday, marking the  anniversary of the  Hun-
t   garian Revolution of 1956. Students laid wreath at War Memorial Gymnasium.
' —Photo by Roger McAfee.
HUNGARIANS REMEMBER
THIRD ANNIVERSARY
A wreath was laid in the War Memorial Gym on the third
anniversary of the Hungarian revolution.
Sixty-eight under-grads, grads and staff members of the
Sopron Division of Forestry laid the wreath without ceremony
Don't Be Taken By The
"Vitamin Racket"
How many extra vitamins do
you really need a day? Can a
fpod supplement make men
more virile, women more receptive? November Reader's
Digest answers many questions
about vitamins and gives you
a chart to use in checking the
brand of vitamins you buy!
Get your November Reader's
Digest today: 35 articles of
lasting interest.
MEN
TWO BARBER SHOPS
TO SERVE YOU
inside the gates
• Brock Hall Extension
• 5734 University- Boulevard
varsity
theatre
4375 WEST 10TH
AL 0345
October 27th - 31st
Paul Newman in
"THE YOUNG
PHILADELPHIANS"
(Adult Entertainment only)
All the Boldness of the
Smashing Best Seller
On the Same Program
Walt Disney's Colorful
"SWITZERLAND"
One Complete Show
commencing 7:30 p.m.
3:00 p.m. Friday
they had marched in the rain
from the flagpole, near the Faculty Club, down the Main Mall
and along the University Boulevard to the gym.
The students and staff of the
Faculty of Forestry, University
of Sopron, fled to Austria following the Hungarian revolution
of October, 1936.
On New Year's Day, 1957, they
departed from Liverpool for Canada where they became part of
the University of B.C.
Upon graduation of students
now in their third year, the Sopron division will cease to exist
at the University.
New Building Named
For First Zoology Head
The new wing to the biological building will be named
for Professor C. McLean Fraser,
the first head of the zoology department.
This has been approved by the
board of governors.
Professor Fraser was an expert on the marine life of the
Pacific. He was educated at
Toronto and the University of
Iowa.
He came to UBC in 1920 and
retired in 1940, six years prior
to his death.
An office and research labor
atory will be named for Dr.
W. A. Clemens, who succeeded
Professor Fraser as head of the
zoology department. Dr. Clemens
retired in 1953.
An entomological museum
will be named for Professor
G. J. Spencer, a faculty member from 1924 until his retirement in 1953.
The museum contains 350,000
entomological specimens which
were gathered and classified by-
Professor Spencer.
Professors Clemens and Spencer are still active in the department as special lecturers.
STARTS MONDAY. NOV. 2
Winner of Grand Prix for
Best Comedy —
Cannes Film Festival
Ingmar Bergman's
"SMILES OF A
SUMMER NIGHT"
(Adult Entertainment Only)
Parents Note:—Not
Suitable for Children.
(Swedish Film with English
Subtitles)
THE FEDERATION OF PACIFIC FILM SOCIETIES
AND THE U.B.C. EXTENSION DEPARTMENT
presents
. CERVANTES
Don Quixote
Starring
NIKOLAI  CHERKASOV
(English Sub-titles)
Cinemascope     -     Sovcolor
STARTS MONDAY, OCT. 26
PARK THEATRE
Cambie at 18th
TR 6-2747
witted, Igor Biriukov calmly
warned a special assembly of
Saskatchewan university students that his countrymen are
trying to make the Soviet Union
"the most educated, and richest
country in the world."
Biriukov was the first student
representative to visit Canada,
and while he managed to visit
universities in Montreal, Toronto, London and Ottawa, his main
purpose was to attend the recent
NFCUS congress iri Saskatoon.
The 33-year-old vice-president
spoke with obvious zeal, "We
are going to overtake the United
States, and when we say this
we are quite right, for we do
this for the bettermen of our
country, and of the world."
His calm assertion that the
Soviet system will eventually
be the superior one, does not
stem entirely from the fact that
he is in the higher echelon of
student life. The Soviet education system has made great
strides, and is at this moment
undergoing  further revisions.
This is an age- in which .scientists are deemed to be of paramount importance, and the
Soviet Union appears to be outstripping us in the number, and
perhaps even quality, of scientists graduating from its 800 universities and institutes each year;
some 90,000 engineers a year
compared to 30,000 in the United
States, and 2,100 in Canada last
year.
Hard on the heels of tangible
Soviet success in science came
the North American movement
for education reform. But no
sooner had a frustrated public
cried for regeneration—with an
eye to the Soviet system—than
Khrushchev began to change his
own system, claiming it to be
inadequate.
EDUCATION   REVISED
Following the twentieth party
congress in 1956 education was
revised in the Soviet Union. A
certain number of hours a week
were set aside for students in the
last three years of the ten-year
schools so that they might receive practical training in agriculture, and industry. Compulsory ten-year schools located in
the larger cities—providing combined lower and secondary education—taught the students they
were ready for university at 17
or 18. Compulsory eight-year
schools — formerly seven-year
schools—were restricted to smaller towns, and villages.
In 1957 this plan was broadened on an experimental basis
so students could spend three
days a week in school, and three
days in agriculture or industry,
specializing in their particular
interests. The ten-year school
education was then extended by
one year furnishing the student
with . a three-year labor-poly-
technical or labor-vocational
education. Apparently the results of this experiment proved
satisfactory. Soon all schools will
be run on this eleven-year basis.
Polytechnical schools provide
a very general branch of studies
after the eighth year, whereas
vocation schools are more specific and delve deeper into technical aspects of such subjects as
industrial sculpturing. Graduates
of either school may enter university or institutes which are
on the same level.
LABOUR REQUIRED
At one stage of this revision
all students—without exception
—were required to indulge in
some form of manual labor for
a set period, after completing the
eight-year school. Protests made
by the students, and parents —
some of whom were influential
— caused modification of this
step, so that the system of eleven
year schools was maintained
with the final three years split
between class, and practical application in industrial and agricultural subjects.
One* of. the reasons for this
work-as-you-learn scheme might
be the lack of space in universities and institutes. New workers
require training which takes
time, and there is no excess of
skilled men to help with this
task. Now experienced recruits
will enter full-time jobs. Because
so many people—who could not
read a few years ago—are now
being educated, Khrushchev
must pacify those who cannot
enter universities because of the
limited facilities. He has told
them that they are not inferior
to those who go on, but are aiding in constructing a Communist
society.
To aid in qualifying students
for such work, course changes
are being made. There will be
more training in foreign languages, geography, history, and
natural science, as well as increased attention given to mathematics and physics. In schools -
outside of the Russian Republic
both the native and Russian languages are compulsory, as well
as a choice of English, German
and French. Graduates of the
eight-year system may take evening or correspondence courses
which'are the equivalent of the
three-year labor-polytechnical or
vocational day school education,
(Continued on page 8)
FOR ALL YOUR CAR REPAIRS
ALL YOU NEED TO REMEMBER
is
MAINLAND MOTORS
.7
TRIMBLE ST. & 10th AVE.
AL3864 Tuesday, October 27, 19)59
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE FIVE
Frats Engage
In Boat Races
It begins again.
Once more, lusty young
fraternity men with particularly flexible gullets are being
given the opportunity to exercise their peculiar talent.
The Inter-Fraternity Boat
Race competition for the coveted Boat Race Cup begins this
week, with round one due for
completion before 0?t. 28.
The present holder of the cup
is Beta Theta Phi, who edged
out Phi Kappa Sigma at the
IFC stag last term.
Past regulations called for a
five-man team, but now this has
been enlarged to six men.
Fifteen fraternities are
scheduled to compete.
JAZZSOC TO SPONSOR
TWO NOON EVENTS
Jazzsoc will sponsor two
events this week, today and
Wednesday.
Today at noon, Doug Parker,
the pianist and arranger who
leads his own band for Van-
couvers New Jazz Society will
give a lecture on "Piano in
Jazz."
Parker was formerly a side-
man with both Harry James and
KING'S FOUR
(Continued from page 1)
Dr. William C. Gibson, head of
the department  of neurological
reserach, will chair panel discussions.
Dr. Shrum will chair a panel
which will discuss the question
"Is the artsman educated for the
scientific age?" Dr. Gibson's
panel will discuss the subject
"Nuclear fallout—hazardous or
harmless?"
More than 500 graduates are-
expected to return to the campus for faculty coffee parties,
the annual Homecoming luncheon and the Homecoming ball
on Saturday.
Sports events to be held in
conjunction with Homecoming
are a basketball game on Friday night when graduates will
tangle with the 1959 Thunderbirds and the Homecoming football game in the UBC stadium
on Saturday at 2 p.m. against
the University of Saskatchewan.
Students events will include
dances on Friday and Saturday
night featuring a name band
from the United States and presentation of the annual "Great
Trekker" award to an outstanding graduate at the football
game Saturday afternoon.
Ray Anthony. The lecture will
be in Bu. 106.
Wednesday, there will be a
concert at noon in the auditorium, featuring Fraser Mac-
Pherson on alto saxophone.
*• STATISTICALLY SPEAKING
.. This is an-age of statistics and'we will concede at the
outset that thes statistics below are' wholly assailable, but
the conclusion is one with which'we sometimes find ourselves in agreement.
Population Balance Sheet
Population of U.S. , .175,000,000
Population over age 65  ...,.  57,300,000
People left to work 117,700,000
People under age 21  «.  64,700,000
People left to work :........  53,000,000
Government employees ....f ~  24,000,000
People left to work 	
People in armed forces
29,000,000
12,000,000
People left to work ...17,000,000
City and state workers ,  16,800,000
People left to work 	
Insane and in hospitals
People left to work
Bums and drunks ..
200,000
126,000
74,000
62,000
People left to work ...
In jails and prisons ...
12,00a
11,998
People left to work
*You and me, and you better get busy because I'm getting tired of running this country alone.
—Chicago Sun Times
FILMSOC'S
The First of Four Film Classics
" HENRY   V "
STARRING
Sir Laurence Olivier and Robert Newton
ON
|Tues. & Wed., Oct. 27-28, at 8:00 p.m.
IN THE
AUDITORIUM
ADMISSION
By Series Pass - Obtained at Door
$2.0<J for Students and Faculty
$3.00 for Adults
Student and Faculty Passes must be presented
Guitarist To Perform
At Noon Hour Concert
Special Events and Fine Arts
Mommittees are presenting a
classical guitarist at noon today
in the auditorium.
Ray de la Forre, an international first-ranking classical
guitarist, will perform a programme of standard and lesser-1
known guitar pieces, as well as
contemporary music, including
works especially written for
him.
The guitarist was born in
Havana, and emmigrated to
Spain at the age of 14, to study
under Maestro Miguel Llobet.
He made his concert debut iri
that country at 16.
Reports on WUS
Summer Seminar
W^rld University Service
(WUS) summer seminar participants will report on the seminar
on Thursday at 12:30 in Physics
200.
The Seminar was held at the
University College of the West
Indies in August 1959. After the
Seminar the students and
faculty members participating
had a chance to travel in the
West Indies and learn something of the West Indies way of
life.
Prof. Charles Bourne was the
faculty member who represented UBC. The students participating were Norm Gish, this
year's WUS chairman, Rod Dobell and John ]Vfuhro.
There will be opportunity for
student discussion at the meeting on Thursday.
CLUB NOTES
By WENDY BARR
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
The UBC Conservative Club
is bringing Gerald Coultas,
President of the B.C. Young
Progressive Conservative Association, to campus today to
speak at a general meeting
in Bu. 202.
His topic will be "The Role
of the Young Conservative in
B.C. today."
Gerald Coultas was formerly president of the Vancouver
Center Young Progressive
Conservative group.
All members and others interested in the Conservative
Club are invited.
It was Earl Grey, donor of
football's Grey Cup, who suggested that the battlefield of the
Plains of Abraham should be
preserved as a national historic
site.
ALPHA OMEGA SOCIETY
The Alpha Omega Society is
going to give instruction in
Ukrainian dancing, and hopes
to form a Ukrainian dance
team.
Students interested in this
first practice in Bu. 226 today
colorful and enjoyable folk
dance are invited to attend the
at 12:30.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FEDERATION
There are going: to be some
changes in the Varsity Christian Federation's schedule of
meetings.
From now  on   the regular
weekly meetings will be held
on Fridays instead of Tuesdays.
B i h\ e   study   sessions   with.
Miss Cathie Niooll will be on
Monday instead of Friday, but
the   Prayer   Service   will   be
held on Wednesday as before.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Sports car enthusiasts and
other pioneers will be glad to
hear that the Sports Car Club
will hold its annual Totem
Rally November 8.
Driver and "navigator"
teams will compete in following a complicated course over
one hundred and fifty miles of
out-of-the-way roads at prescribed speeds.
The  teams'  ability  to  follow
instructions will be tested at
checking points, at unannounced locations along the route.
The  winning team will be ;
the  one' that  has  been  most
successful   in   getting to  various points on schedule.
Trophies will be given for.
two classes of cars, sports cars
and sedans.
If a number of girls decide
to compete there will be a
prize for the best female team.
There will toe a meeting in
Bu. 227 this Thursday to explain the rules of the rally to
novice competitors.
Volkswagen OmetAl
We are happy to announce the addition to our staff
of an OUTSTANDING
VOLKSWAGEN MECHANIC
He has been trained in Germany on this model. You may
safely trust your car to us for expert servicing and repairs.
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
ALma 17G7 10th Ave. and Discovery St.
PICK-UP SERVICE AND DELIVERY
Oakridge
Down Town
Park Royal
New
Westminsiei
OE#4Dlf EEAE PHONOGRAPH
The beautiful tonal quality of Stereo comes to you in
this portable Seabreeze. Tuck it away in the corner
when you're through, see how easy it is to travel with.
Come in and see these features:
Compact and portable
Fully automatic record changer plays Hi-Fi
Stereo
Dual speaker sound
Dual-channel amplifier
EASY BUDGET TERMS
NO DOWN PAYMENT
Drop in at the Woodward's Store nearest you
| and see the many new 1960 models in Hi-Fi and
... stereophonic   phonographs.    You'll   see   many
famous makes "including:
FLEETWOOD R.C.A. VICTOR
MOTOROLA ELECTROHOME
and many others
From popular to   classical. Woodward's  record department caters to all music lovers.
Choose from many famous labels in the new "Stereo Discs" with.
a price starting as low as .y.......... J..r	
Breeze through language courses with the help of language record.
RUSSIAN   - .SPANISH   -   FRENCH   -   GERMAN
SWEDISH   -   ITALIAN
Model RP-12
1.98
SINGLES 4.20
40-LESSON ALBUM 11.95
Woodward's Record Centre PAGE SiX.
THE    U BYSSEY
Tuesday, October 27, 1959
Co-Editors -___ Ann Pickard, Ernie Harder
Fred Fletcher, Mike Hunter, Alan Dafoe, Ian Campbell
Tony Sheridan, Bruce Mitchell
SPORTS
SHORTS
Sports Car Club
Wins Trophies
By TONY SHERIDAN
Two members of the UBC Sports Car Club racing team
received trophies in Seattle on Saturday.
The presentations were made at the International Conference of Northwest Sports Car Club awards banquet where class
.victors in the 1959 racing championships were feted..
Only three Canadians won first
place trophies in the eighteen
classes of the championship.
Bill Radelet won class I production in his Morris 1000. Bill's
polished cornering technique
gave him the victory over six
other contenders, four of whom
were driving faster cars.
Long hours of careful preparation on his five-year-old Tri-
TR 2 and consistent fast driving,
earned Geoff Mott top spot over
seven other drivers, in class F
production.
The third winning Canadian
was Bill McMillan of the Victoria Motor Sport Club.
Team member Diana McColl,
one of two girls who race cars
in the Northwest, finished seventh in class H production.
Diana's fast and steady motoring
proved that motor racing is hot
a sport exclusive to the male sex.
Ivar Keddis and Tony Sheri-
sdan, the other two members of
the team, finished seventh out of
*nine in class G production, and
sixth out of sixteen, in class E
production, respectively. Both
of these drivers were able to
center only three of the five
Championship events.
The club's hopes for a successful team next year are high. Six
new club members have begun
a novice drivers' training course
with the SCC of B.C., while new
member Bill Allday, an experienced driver from England,
plans to race his Lotus VII next
Reason."
WOMEN'S SKI TEAM
Dry ski practice will be held
every   Thurs.   and  Tuesday . at
4:30 in the Women's Gym.
BIG BLOCK
Next big block meeting Wednesday at 12:30 in the Women's
Gym.
GOLF
Golf  practice  4:30  -  6:00 in
the Field House. Equipment will
be provided for interested women.
SYNCHRONIZED   SWIMMING
Practice   Thursday   12:30   to
2:00 in Empire Pool.
MEN'S  INTRAMURALS
Managers meeting Nov. 2 at
12:40 in room 216 of Memorial
Gyra.
INTRAMURAL  BOWLING
Alex Drdul (Phi Kappa Sigma)
topped qualifiers in the Intramural Bowling tournament with
704.
There were 56 entries.
Other qualifiers were Anderson 690, Mitchell 682, Henderson
677; Begg 672, Anderson 669,
Robertson 668, Maden 659, Brail
654, MjcLarty 653, Sanderson
650, Meyers 639, McArdle 630,
Mitchell 632, Welters 618, and
Brown 613.
F/O ELAINE FORBES, the daughter of Mrs. J. A. Forbes
of Regina, Sask., graduated from the University of Saskatchewan in 1947 With a degree in Household Science. Prior to
enrolling in the RCAF she was employed as a Dietitian with
the University of British Columbia.
She enrolled in tne RCAF in 1955, and after completing
Officers' School at London, Ontario, served at Number Two
Fighter Wing at Grostenquin, France, as Food Services Officer, and is now at RCAF Station Cold Lake, Alberta.    .
F/O FORBES will address UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH
COLUMBIA Home Economics gludenis in Room 100 of the
Home Economic* Building at 12:30 p.m. on THURSDAY,
-OCTOBER 29, 1959.
Rugby 'Birds Lead
Cup Chase
GERRY McGAVIN
Captain leads Birds
SPORT
MENU
WEDNESDAY
Tennis—12:30
Intramural   Tennis   Final—
Fieldhouse or Memorial Courts.
Basketball—8:30
Thunderettes vs   Hastings—
Winston Churchill Gym.
THURSDAY,
Volleyball—7:30
Womens'   Volleyball   vs   Vancouver Teachers—
Women's  Gym-
Basketball—8:30
UBC "B" vs Crystal Freeze—
King Edward Gym.
SATURDAY
Women's Grass Hockey—2:0Q -
Varsity   vs   North   Van.   and
UBC vs. Tech Lions—
Trafalgar Park.
Rugby—1:30
'Birds vs North Shore—
Confederation Park. ■
Braves vs Barbarians—
Brockton Oval.
2nd division:
P.E. vs Kats—Douglas East.
Tomahawks vs  Barbarians—
Aggie Field
Basketball—8:00
'Birds vs Alberni Athletics—
Alberni Gym.
SUNDAY
Football—1:30
J.V. vs Seattle Cavalliers—.
Campus.
Women Wm
Hockey, Ball Games
HOCKEY
The Varsity Women's Hockey
team trounced Alums 2-0 Saturday at Trafalgar Park.
Last year Varsity and Alums
tied for the City Championship.
Alison Gourlay and Jackie
Wilson lead Varsity scoring
with a goal each.
The second team lost to North
Van by a 2-1 score.
BASKETBALL
The Women's Senior B Basketball team won their first
season game by a decisive 35-.
14 score, over Hastings.
Jacque Maartmann lead the
Winners with ten points. Paddy
Stubbs and Sandra Sankey followed with 7 and 6 points respectively.
This week U.B.C. meets Cry*-
tall Freeze in the King Ed Gyra,
Tntfrsday at «:3tK
By FRED FLETCHER
UBC rugby teams were undefeated in five outings on the
weekend.
In the big first division game the 'Birds rolled into a first
place tie with Kats by blasting Richmorid 30 to 0. The UBC
squad has a game in hand.
Neal Henderson, powerful outside center, had a field day.
counting for 15 points with three tries and three converts. Ian
Rankin, 'Birds' starry wing, picked up nine points on three tries.
The scoring was rounded out by Bill Miranda and Russ Chambers
who each scored one. try.
PETE PLAYS FIRST
,   Veteran Peter Bugg, playing his first game this season, showed
strongly at scrum half.
The excellent teamwork shown by the 'Birds in this, their
third straight win, prompted observers to feel that they have a
strong chance to walk off with the Miller Cup.
The Braves, who also play in the first division, played their
finest game of the season tieing powerful Rowing Club 1st 11 each
at Brockton Oval.
Stewart Smith, Fraser Evans, and Perry Robertson scored tries
for the Braves. Smith converted once.
ALL THREE WIN
All three of UBC's 2nd division squads emerged victorious.
The P.E. squad whitewashed Ex-Brits 8-0, Tomahawks rapped West
Van 12-5 and Frosh knocked over Trojans 11-6.
The winning line-up for the victorious 'Birds was: Phil Willis,
fullback; Bill Miranda, wing; Neal Henderson, outside center;
Ralph Bagshaw, inside center; Ian Rankin, wing; Ted Bryan, five-
eighths; Peter Bugg, scrum half; Don Shore, front row; Dave
Gibbs, hooker; Russ Chambers, front row; John Lecky, second
row; Gerry McGavin, captain, playing in the second row; Bob
McKee, break; Jonathan Phillips, eighth man; Mike Chambers, „
break.
SATURDAY ADVANCE
Next Saturday 'Birds have a chance to take over sole possession of first place. They take on North Van at Confederation Park
while Kats meet Trojans at Balaclava. A combination of a win for
UBC and a loss or a cancellation for Kats would give 'Birds undisputed control of top spot.
Men's Hockey
Beat Grasshoppers
By ALAN DAFOE
Varsity shut out Grasshoppers A 1-0 in a B.C. Mainland
Men's Hockey League A Division game on Saturday at UBC
No. 2 Field.
 —~§    Nelson Forward at inside left
tallied  Varsity's  lone  goal and
Runners
InWCIAU
U.B.C.'s team of cross-country
runners is getting into shape
for what appears to be one of
the greatest seasons ever.
The team has already run in
a dual meet with VOC.
Though the UBC team lost
one of its top performers
through graduation of Jim
Moore last year, a stronger team
than ever is expected to line up
for this season's racing events.
RETURNING TEAM
Returning with the team this
season are Jack Burnett, Mike
May, Bernie Barton, Doug Van
Nes and John Moncrieff of last
year's first team.
W.C.I.A.U.
The Cross-Country team's
racing agenda for this month
includes the WCIAU Championships at Saskatoon October 31.
Feature events during November include the Inland Empire
Championships at Spokane, the
Pacific Northwest Championships at UBC, the AAU and
FNW Championship run at
Seattle and the Vancouver Island Championships at Royal
Roads.
MULLINS  COACH
The team is coached by Peter
Mullins, assisted by John Mini-
chiello. .
sparked the winner's offence
throughout the contest. Coach
Malcolm McGregor noted that
Varsity's defence had improved
a great deal and he predicted
that it will soon be one of the
best defensive units in the
league.  '
Over on Chris Spencer Field,
India A outclassed UBC Golds
8-1.
Cardinals Beat UBC
At  Hillcrest  Park,   Cardinals •
edged   UBC   Blues   1-0.   Blues
showed a good defence but were
still generally weak on the forward line.
Pedagogues Lose
In B Division competition,
North Shore B roared back in
the second half to beat an im-
proved UBC Pedagogue team by
a 2-1 count. Ped's captain Don
Carter fired in a beautiful flip
shot to give the eventual losers
a brief 1-0 lead in the first half.
Saturday Forecast
The UBC Golds will face a
big test in the young season of
A Division men's grass hockey
play when they meet India A
at UBC No. 1 Field (Chris Spencer Field) this Saturday at 2:00
o'clock. Meanwhile Varsity will
tangle with Grasshoppers on
UBC No. 2 Field. A final first
division game will see UBC
Blues playing against Cardinals
at Hillcrest East Park near Cap4<
lano Stadium, Tuesday, October 27, 1959
THE    ' UBYSSEY
PAGE SEVEN
1    >     -
is
Us
^
?<«S*t   *
CHRIS SCOTT and IAN CAMPBELL show their
at a Squash Club practice.
powers  with  a  squash racquet
ers
Gnihilated
It was Thunderbirds' first defeat in sejj&I starts. -
The 42-0 score in favor Whitworth made it look bad.
Actually, Frank Gnup's gridders weren't as decisively outplayed as the score might indicate.
What  they  were  up   against
was the hottest team in the
Evergreen Conference. What
beat them was the long aerial
passes of a respected quarterback named Denny Spurlock to
his pet receiver, Bil Cole.
"Pass interceptions hurt us",
stated Gnup. The Spokane club
picked* off seven of Jon Morris'
spirals.
Only once in the 60 minutes
of football did the WCIAU
Champions fly within scoring
distance.
Fine catches by Dave Barker and Wayne Osborne put
them there. The alert Whitworth
defence snuffed  out the drive.
"They really played us tough"
added Frank. "Our defensive
line played a hard, "socking
game,—it was those long passes
that hurt us."
COMMENDS MITCHELL
Coach Gnup commended lineman Doug Mitchell for his performance up front.
Birds played without Bruce
Allardyce, Ray Towers and Roy
Bianco.
Allardyce, who injured a
knee on the first play of Birds
last home game against PLC
may be out for the remainder of
the season.
In Saturday's outing at Spokane Ken Craig required three
stitches to close a cut in his
mouth. He also came home with
several broken teeth.
BROKEN ANKLE
But Thunderbirds came out of
the game healthier than Sam
Adams' Pirates, who lost the
services of one of their stars on
the opening play of the game,
when he received a broken
ankle.
Score at half time in the
game was 21-0 in favor of Whitworth.
Thunderbirds have never won
a game in Spokane. "Guess it's
r"the climate there," concluded
"CJnup.
Swimmers
Break
Records
Three Canadian and five
U.B.C. records fell in the U.B.C.
Thunderbird swim team's first
meet of the season.
A series of time trials held
in conjunction with the opening
of the new wing of the Vancouver Y.M.C.A. saw a strong
U.B.C. team prove that it is
indeed a record breaking group
this season.
CANADIAN RECORD GOES
The Canadian record for the
40 yard butterfly was broken
by Ed Cazlet of the Vancouver
Amateur Swim Club. He set
a new record of 18.8 seconds.
The old record of 20.7 was held
by Bert Peterson who started
swimming for U.B.C. this fall.
Bert's Saturday time of 20.9
sets a new record for U.B.C.
U.B.C.   RECORD   BROKEN
All five who attempted the
event broke the old U.B.C. record of 26.4 held by J. Hawthorne since 1948. The five
speedsters were; Dio Creed,
Dave Sanger, Bert Peterson,
Gerry Nakutsaka and Bill
Stark.
In the 160 yd. individual
medely four U.B.C. swimmers,
Dennis Page, Bert Peterson,
Bill Stark and Dio Creed broke
the old U.B.C. record of 2:04.7
held by D. Kilburn since 1956.
Dennis Page bettered the Canadian record of 1:53.4 but failed
to set a new Canadian record.
ED SETS MARK
On Friday night Ed Cazlet of
V.A.S.C. brought the mark down
a full 9 seconds to set a new
Rowers; Football
Pull Tomorrow Noon
In some circles it has already been billed as the "Pull
of the Century". It's the tug o'
war tomorrow at noon between
the Thunderbird football team
and the Rowing Crew—with
the Engineers to take on the
winners.
One of the largest crowds
ever to witness a noon hour
sporting event is expected to
line up along the Main Mall for
the event, slated to start at
12:30, Wednesday.
Student president Peter Meekison will officiate.
It is not known just what
"ground" rules have been laid
down, but teams will likely be
limited to eight apiece.
Squash Attracts
New Members
By IAN CAMPBELL
The formation of the Squash Club on campus is the first -
step towards making squash a major sport at UBC.
It is one of the best ways of solving the athletic problem at
UBC, since it will give everyone the chance of a complete workout
in half an hour. The tremendous interest already expressed in the
Eastern colleges is sure proof that the popularity of the game is
growing in the West. At McGill, more students play squash than
any other sport: fifteen courts are'kept in constant use.
NEED COURTS
We need courts on the campus. The authorities tell us that
Squash courts are going to be built on campus sometime—as usual
no dates are mentioned..
If facilities are available, will students use them? Take a look
at McGill. And women enjoy it as much as men. Members of the
Faculty have expressed interest in playing.
The forty students playing this year have plenty to interest.
Competitionwise, there are eight tournaments in which UBC will
be represented, four of which are held in Vancouver.
CITY LEAGUE FOR UBC
A Vancouver Squash League is starting out with UBC, the
YMCA, and the Vancouver Racquets Club competing. In addition
we are sending a five man team to play the University of Washington late in November. Intramurally, competition will be keen for
vthe top spot in the Squash ladder.
BEGINNERS GET HELP
The beginner will find the game quick to pick up. In the
tournament there are four classes ranging from beginner to expert,
and he will be playing people of his own ability. The competition
should quickly raise the standard of squash at UBC.
Anyone who is interested in playing the game is asked te
contact Squash Club captain Chris Scott at AM 6-8471 about ff:30
any evening.
Volleyball Starts
Practices This Friday
Volleyball coach Frank
Kurucs reminds all UBC players
that there will be a practice at
War Mjemorial Gym tomorrow
from 6 p.m. to 8 o'clock and
also another practice on Friday
from 4:30 to 6 at the Gym.
This UBC volleyball team
captured the B.C. senior men's
^championship for the second
straight year in May, 1959.
Come From Behind
Victory For Soccer
Varsity came from behind to
defeat Labatts 2-1 in a Second
Division soccer game at New
Westminster's Sapperton Park
on Sunday.
After trailing 1-0 at the half,
Varsity turned on the pressure
in the second 45* minutes to
keep Labatts in the latter's own
end for most of the half, Pat
O'Brian kicked in two goals
from rebounds to account for
the Varsity scoring.
COACH GIVES PBJVISE
Coach Kurucs praised the
complete effort of halfback
Frank Iacobucci and the second'
half work of centre half Frank
Sealy. However he added that
this game was not one of Varsity's better team displays.
Varsity, whose league record
is now three wins and one loss,
will meet B.C. high school soccer champion King Edward in
an exhibition contest at Mclnnes
Field on Tuesday at 3!30 p.m.
The Eddies, unbeaten this season and looking for competition, are coached by former
Varsity star Bruce Ashdown.
At Mclnnes Field on Sunday*
Vancouver Italians soundly defeated UBC 6-1 in a Third Division encounter.
Canadian  record   of   1:44.4  for
this event.
AND ANOTHER FALLS
The third Canadian record to
fall was the 160 yd. medely relay record of 1:32.0 set by Victoria Y in 1958. The U.B.C.
team bettered this record by
3.9 seconds but was in turn defeated by a strong V.A.S.C. team
who set a new Canadian record.
However, the team's time of
1:28.1 is a new U.B.C. record.
The two other U.B.C. records
to fall were the 40 yd. breast-
stroke and the 160 yd. freestyle
relay records. Dennis Page set
a new U.B.C. record of 25.9 for
the 40 yd. breaststroke event.
The time, of 1:19.3 turned by a
team composed of Bill Stark,
Mike Overholt, Bert Peterson
and team Captain Bob Bagshaw
is a new U.B.C. record.
LUSTIG  COACH
Coach Peter Lustig feels that
this years team will be unbeatable. The team is well rounded
and needs only more training to
achieve perfection.
COLLEGE SHOP
JUST ARRIVED!
all sizes of
UBC and AGGIE
CARDIGAN SWEATERS
DROP IN AND SEE OUR
• PINS FOR ALL FACULTIES AND CLUBS
• UBC COPPER COASTERS AND PLAQUES
• UMBRELLAS AND UBC SCARVES
• CRESTS FOR BLAZERS AND SWEATERS
• UBC LIGHTERS, PENS, PENNANTS
• LOST AND FOUND
OPEN DAILY IN
THE BROCK EXTENSION
11:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.
OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE A.M.S. PAGE EIGHT
THE      UB YSSEY
Tuesday, October 27, 1959)
SOVIET STUDENT
' (Continued from page 4)
as well as evening courses on
"the university level.
EVERYONE   ELIGIBLE
Everyone is eligible for university entrance once they have
- completed the lower school, although there are two main requirements: entrance exams,
conducted by professors and representatives of the students,
and work experience in industry.
This latter point is not a necessity, but is a definite aid to entrance, as a certain percentage
•of entrants must come from
youth   with factory   experience.
Biriukov gave a reason for
this, "It is important that the
student should know what he is
going to do, and not enter biology, only to discover that he
should have been a musician."
He agreed that preference would
Toe giyen to those with full-time
work experience of at least a
year. "If I, and another fellow
were taking the exams, and we
both had the same marks, but
he had worked, he would get
in." __
At the university level there
is another split in the study curriculum. Those in heavy science
•courses receive a special study
dispensation to allow two or
three years of initial work-free
time at university, but must gain
practical experience following
the introductory study of theory.
Exceptions are also made for
talented students who receive
their formal education as soon
as possible, and then concentrate
on their specific interests.
• General courses at university
are five years in length. In the
first year students spend much
■ol their time on humanities, but
by the  fourth  year   they   take
i more technical subjects pertaining to their specialization. Historical and dialectical materialism
are compulsory in all years. In
-the last year; they, write a thesis
;, while holding, a job»in their, specific area, be it teaching or engineer ing. At present not all students hold jobs while attending
S^hpcii, btit plans are being made
to increase this working time, so
"most students will work part-
time during first two years.
The school term begins September 1, and there are no holi-
FOR RENT
2  Single Rooms
Newly Decorated
Privileges
3825 W. 21st Avenue
AL 0433-M
Dunbar District
FOR RENT
2 single rooms - newly
decorated - privileges
3825 W. 21st.       AL 0433-M
Dunbar District
days until a study period which
starts January 1 prior to the
mid-year exams. Following the
end of these exams on January
28, there is a ten-day vacation
period, and then back to the
books until the June 20 exams
which last until July 3.
STUDENTS AIDED
Russian students pay no tuition, and almost 90 per cent—
only those with high marks—
receive aid in the form of a
stipend, which takes care of the
basic needs such as accommodation, laundry, and meals, as well
as organization dues and personal luxuries. A student may pay
15 roubles monthly for a room,
and 175 roubles for meals. There
is no need to buy books for
these can be borrowed on a
yearly basis from school libraries. At the end of the year students must present a card showing that all books have been returned, else they will not pass
into the next year.
In the first year students receive 3Gu roubles a month with
a possibility of a 25 per cent
increase in the second term, for
those with extremely good
marks. During the following
years there is an increase of 50-
58 roubles a month until the
fourth or fifth year when the
student may be receiving 400-
500 roubles, depending on his
academic success.
Students at Moscow University pointed out that if the stipend was. not enough to keep
body and soul : together, they
must rely on relatives. Since the
stipends are given for high
marks, not every student gets
one.
Biriukov's only comment was,
"They should study harder."
ESSAY TYPING
Reasonable Rates
Accurate Work
RE 3-3780 - Evenings
FOR SALE
Ski Poles and Boots (size 10)
Original Price $60.00. Sell fox
$35.00. Used Twice. Call Miss
Orno, AL 0589-R after 5 p.m.
Matz & Wozny
548 Howe St.       MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted suits
modernized in the new
single breasted styles.
Special Student Rates
ifMabih (Jawcoiw&i
Accommodation from 25 to 4,000
-fr   SMORGASBORD
ft   HOT MEALS
ft   COLD BUFFET
ft   LIGHT REFRESHMENTS
Prices ranging from $1.25 to %'i.Wt per person including all
1 1 m ft r K—
€a$0*u of %uU*cUm lid.
5802 Fraser Street
FAkfax 5^7*11 . TRinity 6-5143
'TWEEN   CLASSES
(continued from page 1)
in   BU.   202.   Gerald   Coultas,
President   of   the B.C.   Young
Conservative   Association   will
speak.
* *    *    *
HUMANIST SOCIETY
General meeting in BU 224
noon to-day. AH those interested
are welcome.
.'■ . *    *    •
PLAYERS CLUB
Auditions for the players
club workshop production of
"Medea" by Robinson Jeffers
will be held Tuesday and Wednesday, 12:30 - 2:30 in the Green
Room.
* *     *
PLAYERS CLUB
Tickets for the fall formal to
be held on Oct. 31 are on sale
now from all members of the
executive.
* *    *
PRE-MED   SOCIETY
Attention! Because Dr. Phil
Ashmore is operating on Wednesday, his lecture will be held
on Thursday noon in WES 100.
There will also be elections for
1st and 4th year reps. All members please attend.
* *    *
DEBATING UNION
General meeting Wed., Oct.
28th: in BU. 212. New members
welcome.
*'**■•
UNIVERSITY BAPTIST
CLUB
University Baptist Club meets
Wed. noon in Phy. 302. Rev. F.
Skaar will speak on the topic
"Who Should. Be Church Members?"
* *   ■ *
BRIDGE AND CHESS CLUB
Regular meeting Wed. evening 7:30 in the South Brock
Basement.
* *     *
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Christian Science Organization meeting Wed. noon in HL-4
(behind  library).   All  welcome.
* *     *
GAMMA DELTA
Meeting Wed noon in BU 227.
Rev. C. Guebert will speak on
"The Reformation Becomes a
Movement."
* * ' *
NFCUS PANEL
Panel discussion of "There is
no such thing as a Canadian"
Thurs., Oct. 29th, BU 100 at
noon. Audience participation.
* *     *
BIOLOGY
. Meeting of the Biology Club
in Bio — Sciences 200 at noon
Thurs. to hear W. H. Holsworth
speak on "Large Ungulates in
Elk Island National Park."
Another special speaker will be
on the program.
* *     *
NEWMAN CLUB
Friday, Oct. 30th in St. Mark's
College there will be a talent
night. All members and non-
members are invited. There are
Newman newsletters available
in the lounge.
CLASSIFIED
INDIAN Students' Assoc, general
meeting. Tues., Oct. 7, 1959.
B4-227, 7:00 p.m. Impt.
LOST — A black, lifetime
Snorkle pen. Sheaffer's.
WANTED -r- A tenor sax and a
string bass player for a small
dance band (age 17 to 19 pre-
ferrably). Phone Colin, AM.
1-7828 or Ralph, RE. 1-8573
after 6 p.m.
WANTED — will pay reasonable sum for english translations to "French Civilization Through Fiction." Call
HE. 3-8439, after 6:00 p.m.
LOST — 1 ^air glasses between
Lot A and Physics Building.
Thursday, Oct. 22.
FOR SALE — Northland competition skis, permacite base,
steel edges, etc., including
thongs. WA  2-6037. Mike.
•M
RENTAL & SALES
• Full Dress
• Morning Coats
• White and Blue Coats
• Shirts and Accessories
• $1.00 discount to
UBC Students.
E.A.LEE Ltd.
623 HOWE MU 3-2457
TRAIN FOR THE BEST]
OF TWO WORLDS
Develop your leadership ability, acquire new technical skills,
benefit financially and continue your university courses by enrolling
in the tri-service Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP).
It provides for:
• university tuition fees paid by the     • allowances for board and room,
Department of National Defence books and instruments
• a monthly salary » free medical and dental «ara
• and a career Ux the Canadian Army
Then, on-graduating, you will have not only your «hosea
professional training, bat alsa the QufteH?s.G«HBB^sion
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A LIMITED NUMBER OF CANADIAN ARMY VACANCIES IN THES1
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If you want tbe best of both worlds, find oat what thifl_plan can offer yoa today*
Foe further particulars, contact year UniTersity Safpert Officer (Atny)*
MA J. REYNOLDS 1
Armoury, UBC I
Tel. No.: ALma 1922 I
V*
Buy   Birdcalls   Today!
TYPING
ESSAYS, THESES, NOTES
MIMEOGRAPHING
MRS. F. M. GOW
4456 W. 10th Ave.
AL 3882

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