UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Daily Ubyssey Jan 7, 1949

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0125244.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125244.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0125244-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0125244-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125244-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0125244-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0125244-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0125244-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0125244-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0125244.ris

Full Text

 The Daily Ubyssey
Vol. XXXI
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 7, 1949
No. 44
^
DVA Squelches $1 Fee
Increase   For  Veterans
Beauties Vie For Mardi Gras Honors
SORORITY BEAUTIES will vie for Queen's position at Mardi Gras January 20 and 21 at the
Commodore Cabaret. Pictured left to right up the stairs are Gloria Phillips, Kappa Alpha
Theta; Nan Hardie, Delta Gamma; Evelyn Dunfee, Gamma Phi Beta; Betty Russell, Kappa
Gamma; Kay Woodhead, Alpha Phi; Shirley Bookman, Delta Phi Epsilon. The three beauties
down the stairs are Chris Windebank, Alpha Omicron Pi, Beth McEachen, Alpha Delta Pi;
Shirley Selman, Alpha Gamma Delta. Harry Fil'um Photo
Conference Judges
Ubyssey   Editorial
Newshandling 'Sprightly' Claim
Judges; Praised For Newsmatter
Laud
Page
Thunderbird
Now On Sale
On Campus
Culture Magazine
Gets New Format
Cultural spawn of the Publications Board, The Thunderbird, made its bow on literary
row when it went on sale in
the AMS office and the Quad
at noon Thursday.
The Thunderbird differs radically
from its brassy parent The Daily
Ubyssey, (rom which it sprang three
years ago.
This year's edition, in keeping with
the New Year has blossomed forth
in a brand new format and type face.
Editor D. K, Paul and Assistant
Editor Dean Bonney guarantee readers a bargain day literary lunch when
they feast on the starry contents. Purchase price is 24c plus that little 3'"'
government sales tax.
Six short stories provide the fiction fans with a sprinkling of light
reading.
Followers of UBC's favorite literary son, Jabez, will find a diverting
narrative of how Homer Quincy discovers women's perfumes.
For the poetry lovers ten poems,
including the works of Mario Prizek,
Ernie Perrault, Duke Scaldee and
Lionel Monteith have been included,
The "fourth estate", is represented
by the works of Jean Howarth, Eric
Broderick and Ace Williams.
Library Appointment
Still In Doubt
Successor to Kaye Lamb, recently
appointed Dominion Archivist in Ottawa, is still in question sa.v. officials
of the Board of Directors in charge
of   library   affairs.
T. D'Arcy Finn, editor of the Ottawa Citizen, told the conference of
Canadian University Press at Quebec
City that The Ubyssey's editorial page
had the best general content of any
of the 20 college papers.
In the judging of specific editorials
for the Bracken Trophy, The Ubyssey's widely quoted "Dropping the
Bar on the Reds" (September 28) wa.s
named second only to The Toronto
Varsity'.'' Remembrance  Day  message.
The honorary president of CUP and
chief judge of the competitions Mr.
Finn described the UBC entry as
■'.spiightly with skillful news handling".
Tho Ubyssey was named third in
the Southam Trophy Competition for
the larger collegiate papers, won by
the McGill Daily.
According to Mr. Finn, he and the
other three judges (including M. E.
Nichol, former Daily Province managing editor) were generally of the
opinion thai. The Ubyssey rated highest marks for content but the makeup was  too  flamboyant.
"If those people away out in the
west could reduce the size of their
headline.-: thoy would have po.-.sibl.v
the best paper in Canada," he concluded.
Busy
inds
F
Student journalists at the University of British Columbia
produce one of the finest collegiate editorial pages in Canada
in the opinion of a well-known eastern newspaperman.
_ <«>
Free Expression
CUP Conference
Makes Peace
Prime Concern
Peace was a prime concern
of the recently concluded Canadian University Press conference at Quebec City.
Delegates to the sessions which
were held in the eastern city Dee-
ember 29 to December 31 went on
record in support of a motion that
called for tree expression of opinion
in   college   papers.
University of Montreal, Le Quartier
Latin pointed to a "tendency on the
part of certain newspapers and certain politicians to create a desire far
war in the minds of Canadians".
The French language paper also
asked "in view of the fact thai war
i.s not inevitable" that the Canadian
government be required to act in an
el'tort   to   maintain   peace.
Billy Gove His OK
Homecoming lot em Goes
Up When Crane Secured
Employment Bureau
1400 Holiday Jobs
UBC's    Thunderbird    totem    polo
the  gift   of   Chief  William   Scow   al
the    HomccomitiK    cercmniues,    will i
be  erected   in   front   of   Brock   II.ill teams   to   ihe
as    soon    as    the    Fia\ nc    Maiumm, "Thiinderbii d
Construction      Cnmpa]i>       secuie      a lias   -incliou
crane   lo   lil'l'   the   polo   in   place. a  ,m.  wc o n
At  the October  I lomeeooiim: I due!' ■>     hem::   the
Scow  presented   ll.e  chiefs  Spoakei's e.ane.
Staff to  AMS  president   Dave  lliuii-a |       Indian    |i
Mil.
This  presentation   n;ai ks   I
•;.il      Ind'an      I ecoejul an      o
lie   exclusive   use
ii d" I'iMiii name
on had keen :;iv
- not off.chilly rei
he   lawful    nwnei
ol'l'i-
\X)C
f ike
I'nlil
CISC
UBC's employment bureau handled more than 1400 temporary pob placements during the Christmas holidays, according to a statement issued by the bureau director, Mr. H. O.
Hayes.
Bureau had  its hands filled  in the
exam  period  trying to keep  up  with
the   flood   of   job   applicants.
STAFF OF THREE
Staff of three registered over 1101!
students for Post Office employment.
All but 20 of those employed by the
Pest Office were veterans, who found
it necessary to eke out their DVA
allowances   with   temporary   work.
Besides the 1100 who found work
at the Post Office through the bureau,
over 300 received work in other capacities.
PONY  EXPRESS"
About 20 students were engaged in
"Pony Express", for thc Post Office.
They were the plutocrats of "His,
Majesty's Mail", since a car was necessary for parcel  deliveries.
Some students drove taxis over the
busy holiday rush. Their earnings
ihis year were considerably reduced
aver normal years due to thc inclement  weather,
Returned Observer
Speaks January
United Nations Club begins the
New Year with an initial meeting on
Tuesday, January II in Arts 100 al
kk.'lO wilh the speech of Mr. Henry
Kemp, the president of the Vancouver
branch of the United Nations.
Mr. Kemp has recently returned
from a trip lo Lake Success where he
acted as an observer at the Security
Council.
Mr. Kemp's talk will he: "The United Nations Today," and United Nations Club officials emphasize that
he is a well.known Vancouver speaker.
Oilier than his United Nations activities Mr. Kemp is a u e|!-known
Vancouver busine-s man, a member
of h'olary Internal mnai and ihe Va.i-
i mu er  Heard  of Trade.
Cheques Bounce
California U
Plagued With
Rubber Cheques
University of California students
have discovered the ideal way to beat
Ihe usual lack of money. At least
that is what they thought until the
ASUC brought in a new ruling.
lt -was explained that over 2.200
cheques bounce at the campus store
each month. To avoid this and also
the cost of recovering the money
involved the student union passed a
motion to fine the "grafters" one
dollar each time they give a rubber
cheque,
University officials said that the
.same system was used with all their
transactions.
lt, .seems thai California sludents
aren't   quite   he.nesl.
UBC"
.Irof  b
Thunderbird
sure lo come. <
',-( ived    the    b!
,   this act.    Pi ci
totem    pole,
i e tin-  loams
ss ne.   of    the
c f  this  may
the
Greer-Belkov Program Depleted
$3500 By DVA Increase Refusal
Department of Veterans Affairs has refused to contribute
to UBC's unique "dollar a student" German exchange scholarship plan.
Non-Veteran students will pay an extra one dollar with
second term fees to establish a pool for the foreign scholarships,
but DVA has told UBC authorities it will not pay the extra
levy for student-veterans.
The   plan   was   conceived   by   UBC <v-  —    	
students Cliff Greer and Gregory Bel
kov and approved last year by a general meeting of UEC students.
Refusal of DVA to contribute to
the automatic checkoff depletes immediate contributions by almost $,'1500.
APPEAL
Student president Dave Brousson
hopes, however, to recapture most of
the lost revenue by appeals for contributions from veterans at the February pay parade.
Veterans will be asked to contribute
one dollar on tha same basis as non-
veterans when they receive DVA
cheques.
Greer and Belkov hope to offer
four $1500 scholarships to German students. They would be brought to UBC
for one year on condition they return to Germany,
With all students paying the additional fee the total fund would have
amounted  to $7500.
SECOND TERM FEES
Dollar fee rises will be tacked
onto second term fees, payable before
January 15. A late penalty of $2 will
be charged against tardy students.
Dollar rise will make second-term
fees look like this: Arts. $91: Applied
Science, $116; Agriculture, $91; Law,
$116; Nursing. $91; Occupational Agriculture, $46; Social Work, $90.
Greei' hopes to expand the plan
until every Canadian university offers
at least one overseas scholarship for
every 2000 students.
ADOPT HAMBURG
UBC's four scholarships will be offered at University of Hamburg, recently "adopted" by UBC. Administration of the fund would be undertaken by International Students Service.
Greer hopes Canadian universities
will combine to offer scholarships
where "democracy is not firmly established,"
If the plan is successful the Canadian government will be asked to
supply funds for two scholarships
fo'' every one supplied by the students.
UN  SUPPORT
United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organizations also
will be asked to support the scheme
both through monetary contribution
and through propaganda urging other
nations lo take up the project.
Students accepting the scholarship
will undertake to return to their
homeland after studying in Canada
tor a  year.
Only previous instance of thc Board
of Governors raising fees was in connection with the war memorial gymnasium.    DVA   consented   to   this   fee
Snow, Ice Costs
Administration
More Than *800
Cleaning campus thoroughfares of snow and ice has cost
UBC slightly more than $800
so far this year.
J. Lee, UBC building superintendent, reports that all available men
in his department have been working
continuously since December 19.
Equipment   in  action  has  included  a
Thirty additional men,'many of them
UEC students, and one bulldozer
had to be added to the regular crew.
The bulldozer was called in on December 29 to clear parking areas
for students returning for the second
term.
Roads and sidewalks have been
sanded nearly every morning since
clearing operations began.
No accidents attributable to road
conditions' have been reported to
Lee's  office.
Radsoc Announces
Dates For Casting
Casting for the Spring series of
radio drama shows will be held in
the studios of the University Radio
Society, Thursday, January 13 at 3:30
p.m.
These shows will be released as
aeon as they are ready over British
Columbia   stations.
Any person on the campus who
wishes to have a chance to take part
in these productions is welcome. You
need not be a member of the Radio
Society.
Spring productions are under the
direction of Don Cunliffe.
PRE-MEDS WARNED
TO FILE FORMS
BY JANUARY 24
Pre-meds wishing' to write the
Medical College admission test to
be given at the University of British Columbia on February 7, 1049,
must have their application forms
in Frhu'etou, New Jersey by January 21. 1919. Application terms may
he obtained from Dr. W. G. Black
at the Counselling Bureau, or from
the Tre-Med Office in Hut B-2.
McDonald Gets Western
NFCUS Vice-Presidency
a an   looll
held    111
d   Mi
Jerry   Macdonald   is  the   newly   appointed   western   regional    vice-prc
d..nt   of   NFCUS.    He   replaces   Ti
Miller of  the University  of Albert:
During the past year Maedon
served as the UBC representative
NFCUS.
Now as a  member of  Ihe exoeiit
of  NFCUS  ho will   be  responsible
and  co-ordinate  the  work  of  ihe  h
Western   provinces.    "NFCUS,"   sla,...,
Macdonald.   "is   out   on   a   programme
lo  strengthen   its  organization   and   to
bring   the   east   and   west    into   closer
co-operation."
Television Won't
Replace Newspapers
William   C.   Hogg,   of   the CBC   con-
Iral   new-room,   in   an   address   lo   lie
i
I  University    of    Western    Ontario   sai:
j thai   television   will   nol   replace  newspapers   hul    that    it    will    suppleni
them.
'      Mr. Tlogia, recommended  thai  Can-
, l,i',    < ill I    of    the    field    until    da     in
.irmsY M< im\vi,i> Page 2
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Friday.   January   7,   1949
The Daily Ubyssey
Member'Canadian  University   Pi'e.ss
Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscriptions—$2.50 per year.
Published  throughout  the  university  year   by   the  Student   Publications  Board   of  the   Alma
Mater   Society   of   the   University   of   British   Columbia.
* -Y< •?•
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of The Daily Ubyssey and
not necessarily   those  of  the  Alma   Mater  Society   nor  of   the  University.
* H- *
Offices in Brock Hall, Phone ALma l(i!M For displav advertising phone ALma :i2a.'l
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF - - -  - RON HAGGART
MANAGING  EDITOK  -  .  -  -  VAL SEARS
GENERAL STAFF: News Editor, Bob Cave, Novia Hebert
Features, Ray Baines; CUP Editor, Jack Masserman;
Photography Director, Ellanor Hall; Sports Editor Chuck Marshall
if, if, if.
Senior Editor This Issue — JIM BANHAM
SIGNBOARD
Rides
The 'Birds Come Through
The sportswriters were a little breathless the other day, and understandably so,
when they chronicled the first win of the
season for UDC's American football team.
The wide-eyed young men who cover
locker room doings for Thc Ubyssey left their
bag of cliches untouched. The peculiar, tortured logic of the sports desk didn't even
lead them to call the Thunderbirds "atomic
powered," and Bill Sainas, who ran 32 yards
for a touchdown, had his miraculous playing
recorded without once being linked in simile
with jet propulsion. Since the Thunderbirds
were playing a team of Mexican all-stars
any veteran sport page reader might have
expected at least one twisted metaphor tell
ing him that "the Thunderbirds siesta is over.''
But with the restraint of real awe the
sportswriters said simply: "UBC Thunderbirds have won a football game."
The most secluded stack dweller knew
what it nieanl. After a season of defeat in
every game, the Thunderbirds own Joe Bfstx
had lifted the rain cloud from the unhappy
team.
Thunderbird fans weren't around for that
Los Angeles tide turning but 8469 sile*nt
cheers greeted the news.
Aisle seat coaches knew that UBC wa.s
beginning to breed an American squad comparable to iis oilier star studded teams,
A Nebulous Commodity
UBC will be faced in a few weeks with
a monster selling job that would make the
strongest ad man weep. The austere cluster
of buildings at Point Grey that produces supposedly better people "by degrees," big words,
dancing professors and Communists will be
selling itself.
The campaign is called "Open House"
and its purpose is to unhinge those stone gales
at Tenth and Blanca to the people who foot
the bill for the sprawling, mushrooming university.
UBC wants to show its shareholders that
there is no ivory curtain between a university
and the community it serves. The university
is out to prove that it is an essential part ef,
not a luxury addition to, the growing, prospering province,
No producer of soap flakes or under-arm
deodorant ever faced a tougher advertising
jot). A university won't lessen kitchen drudgery, ot' stop razor burn, or make you wanted,
desired, sought after, A university education
won't protect you from B.O., A.O. or five
o'clock .shadow. A university's chief production i.s a nebulous commodity known a.s bettor
eiti.'.ens.
Wild the possible exception of singing
commercials, however, the university needs
to compete for the taxpayer's money on just
about the same level as the other products
he buys. Let's hope then that UBC's Open
House planners put some huckster hell-fire
into their program.
After all, they're selling a hustle-bubble,
super-charged, high octane, multi-course,
strone-as-tho-rock-in-the library university.
And it's a new, radically-improved postwar
model.
Signboard
Meetings
MEETING OF STUDENT PROGRES-
sive   Conservative   Club   in   Hut   LI
A    GENERAL    MEETING    OF    THE ' B. ,,,-k   tdiMimO
CBC   Film   Society   will   be   held   Fri.
aeon. Jan, 7 m Arls 108.
EXCERPTS    FROM    THE   "BARBER
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZA- ''f Sevil!c" W!" f<»'m the M.AC, pro-
tion cordially invites you to attend '-'laniine. Friday noon. Monday count
its   Friday   noon   meetings   wldch   in-' will   consist,  of  Prokoficff's   'Classical
4051   Pine   Crescent.    New   members ' chide testimonies of healing in Chris- j S-. mphony" and  'Loves of Thru  Oi-
welcome. | tian   Science.    Hut   H.B.   .'I    (rear   of i aan/es".
Friday, Jan. 7th.
LE CERCLE FRANCAIS WILL HOLD
a soiree on Fri., Jan. 7 at 8 p.m. at
WANTED RIDE FOR 8:3(1 LECTURES
every morning from vicinity of ,17th
.and McKenzie. Phone Kay. KE.
3.107-R.
I.i; 30 RIDES WANTED BY TWO
(jirls, Monday to Saturday, from vi-
cnii'y of 16th and Wallace. Phone
■Kay"  AL.  2220-L.
RIDE! CAR CHAIN! TWO MEMBERS
wanted. Vicinity of 57th and Blvd.
Phone Jack, Kerr. 6147-L.
I-LDE WANTED FOR 8:30 LECTURES
Monday to Friday, from vicinity of
Stanley Park Gateway, Alex. TA.
1714.
PASSENGERS WANTED FROM VI-
cirity 41st and Dunbar. 8:30 Lectures,
Monday to Friday. Jimmie. KE.
1178-L.
WANTED: SEVERAL PASSENGERS
for 8:30's daily. Route follows Marine Drive from Patterson Avenue,
Burnaby. John. DE. 0414-Y.
WANTED BY CO-ED FOR 8:20 LEC-
tures, transportation from vicinity of
'3rd and Blenheim St. BA. 1382-R.
4 PASSENGERS WANTED FROM
23rd and Main for 8:,10's 6 days' a week.
Phone FA, 6835-L.
RIDE AVAILABLE TO 8:30's DAILY
fiom vicinity 37th and McKenzie
along bus route to 12th. Phone Doug,
KE, 4125-R.
4 PASSENGERS WANTED FROM
23rd and Main for 8:.10's G days week.
Phone  FA.   6835-L.
WANTED: RIDE FROM VICINITY
cf 49th and Main. Classes 8:30 Mon.
to Fri. C. W. Elliot. 6494 Quebec St.
WANTED: RIDE FROM 33RD AND
Dunbar Mon. to Sat. for 8:30 lectures
Phone Sylvia.   KE.  5254-M.
Lost
GLASSES IN BROWN CASE. PHONE
KE. 5553-L. Ask for May.
REWARD. $1.00 (ONE) FOR RETURN
of pair of black, fur-lined leather
gloves. 1349 E 2d. HA. 2031-R.
ZIPPER LOOSE LEAF (BLACK) IN
Field House Dec. 16th eontainin Labour Law notes and case lists. Phone
KE. 4092-Y.
DRAUGHTING SET, 1 FLAP TORN
off, 1 extra ruling pen, 2 bow compasses missing. Reward. R Freed.
FA. 1525-M.
NAVY BLUE BURBERRY FROM
men's entrance to Caf. Finder please
return to lost' and found or phone
David Kerr at KE. 2887-R.
WILL THE PERSON WHO TOOK A
blue top-coat from a hanger outside
the cafeteria please return it to the
lost and found.
DRAUGHTING SET. ONE FLAP
loin off. one extra ruling pen. two
bow compasses missing. Reward. R.
Fired.   FA.   1525-M.
For Sale
G E N U I N E "CONN" TROMBONE.
i-all evenings. 4657 W. 15, or Phone
AL.  044.1-L    Ask   for  "Mike".
Accommodation
BOARD AND ROOM FOR LADY
student in return I'or services, Cioorl
home.   KE.  2083-R.
COZY, QUIET BEDROOM FOR A
male student. Close to McDonald bus
2736 W. 37th. KE, 0527-L.
ROOM AND BOARD FOR MALE
student sharing, three meals, $48.00,
Dunbar district.   Phone  AL.  2896-R.
WARM SLEEPING ROOM, PRIVATE BED-SITTING ROOM AVAILABLE,
entrance; ground floor; 4595 W. (ith. | ^-slc beds, 2 male students; in good
AL.   1547. j honie near University with other stu-
l dents.   Reasonable.   4000 W. 10th.   AL.
FOR  RENT:   SINGLE  ROOM   WITH   3(|59_l.
breakfast; near University gates. AL. ' WAKM SLEEPING ROOM. PRIVATE
1559-M, I entrance,   ground   floor.    4595  W.   6th.
BOARD   AND   ROOM   FOR   LADY   AL' 1547'
student in return for services.   Good   COZY QUIET BEDROOM FOR MALE
i   .,       w   nno'j r> student'.   Close to McDonald bus.   2736
home.   KE.  208.1-R.
',W. 37th.   KE. 0527-L.
In This Corner
The Best of '48
1948 was a notable year lor the movie
industry. On the one hand it produced
some of the finest picture entertainment ever made and on the other it
committed some of the greatest atrocities ever perpetrated.
To Hollywood's credit wore several
motion pictures which are among the
finest ever produced. The art that went
into a seemingly slight picture entitled
"Treasure of Sierra Madro" wa.s due
to the father-son combination of John
and Walter Houston. John wrote the
screenplay and directed the picture
while his father Waller gave the best
performance of his long acting career
as an aging prospector.
"Call Northside 777" was a documentary film of a young newspaperman
who became convinced of a Chicago
murderer's innocence and set ot.it to
prove it. The story i.s a true one and
under able guidance and a steady steering away from senlimenlalism which
quite easily eonld have erepl into Ihe
picture, it stands nut as ,,:h of die
finesl  of all documentaries.
Other Hollywood pictures tl;,i( deserve a clap on the back were: "The
Naked City," "Key Largo," "1 Remember Mama," the .short "Candid Camera," named after the radio .show, :i
slight comedy, "Sitting PrdU," a,.. |
John Steinbeck's  novel,  "The  Pear!. '
A good many La."J; ;h pieiia ■• , ;>.;..,-,.
HP  to high  standard  ,a:d  ,,,,   In,.   ■.< |., T
were consistently better than American
films.
No one will deny "Hamlet," adapted
for the screen by Laurence Olivier, a
space among the greats for its bcauti-
lul   performance  and  high  art.
Charles Dickon's, "Oliver Twist" was
made into a fine movie by J. Arthur
Rank, managing to capture mood,
character and atmosphere as it wound
through the slums and high society of
Victorian London.
Little recognized but highly entertaining was "The Tawny Pipit," the
story ol what a rare bird nesting in a
field in Britain in the middle of tht;
war did to a small community.
•      •      *
And The Worst
The best way of gauging the worst
motion pictures of the year is to take
a look al which films drew the largest
crowds during the year.
In such a light the year's worst atrocities wore such slush and bad taste as:
"Casa Timberlane," "Croon Dolphin
Sired," "Mother Wore Tights," "Un-
conquered," "Blanche Fury," "Th"
Pake Rinh Story" and "Homecoming'."
"Pi'incho Fitly" was an English film
kill of lalalislie claptrap that went
down like so much rock salt. The
Iiolh wood "Biibo Ruth Story" deserves
, me.'a,, -■ lor slobbering sentiment
.' :'. I an unbelievable dory. There was
al a.), ol course, |he usual n?ut if
i1     '<      '< > '•■'     'i   I i lem   in   11 ie   poi irosl
by jim banham
•    •    *
'Red River'
"Red River" was made under the
wing of the man of much money and
many women, Howard Hughes, and
tlie picture was notable because it
shows that when Hughes wants something to go over he shows considerable
talent as movie-maker.
The picture is the story of the first
cattle drive over the famous Chisholm
Trail from Texas to Abilene, Kansas.
The cattle were driven this tremendous
distance in the post-Civil War period
when the market in Texas stumbled-
over  it's  own shoestring's.
There is also a character duel between boss John Wayne and his foster
son Montgomery Clift which ends up in
some skillful fist and gun-play.
Toward the end of the picture Clift
walks into an office in Abilene and
remarks about there being a roof over
their heads, This is about the best way
el summing up the picture for one gets
the sense of men fighting their way
aero s tremendous distances, al Ironic noons odds to rebuild something dial
means   their   very   livelihood.
The picture i.s notably absent of
women and the amount that they do
intrude into Ihe story is at least convincing. Young Joanne Dru, who falls
in leva' with Clift has an interesting
occupation. She is obviously a woman
oi ill lame headed for the greener
Ileitis   of   the    west
ft)
9'
Wx -'
\
§T4TE (XP^ESS
JJwtmq "IM
liottwa
$fp.^,^ ~ (N ^ .^*7
/
Xj
TATE rXPRESS
AT POPULAR
PRICES
rfnauttd t&e (famfett&   Xs t
4MfA^^ . . "Well, they mid you
iT    had rooms to rent".
When it comes to finding a place to
stay, Egbert is finding out that "things are
tough all over" . . . all because of too
much demand and no supply — exactly
the way things can get with Egbert's
pocket-book.'
That's why he's decided to start accumulating a reserve at "MY BANK". Why not
try Egbert's recipe and start cooking with
gas. Open your 13 of M account today —
be another, start ticcnmulutiii  brother.
Bank of Montreal
WORKING      WITH      CANADIANS
"t ,. I  N       EVERY      WALK       OF    'tlFE.SINCE       1817
'^,
V3-Z
«*?■„
^i'V»'J«
oia,'.'."**'
You
r SS.tnk on the Campus —- In (he Auditorium Building
Merle ('. Kirbv, Officer-in-Charce 1
Friday,   January   7,   191!)
« the
« caf
* crowd
By LONI FRANCIS
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Pu«u 3
Well thc climate has become too
much for even Old Man Winter and
he is making a slushy exit'. Which
will mean that we no longer have
to worry about our own undignified
exits. If you're a sadist you must
have found the broken less and
arms as a result of slippery falls
very amusing.
Of course the
w ea the r did
have it's bright
sides too. All
the little kiddies
had V'neir dream
of a white
Christmas fulfilled and spent
their playtime
<^1( ighmg into innocent old ladies.
WOMM'S PAGE
Women's Editor     .     .     .     Loni Francis
Beauty   and   Brains
In Queen Candidates
A combination of beauty and brains is wrapped up in the
nine candidates for Queen of the Mardi Gras, an event which
is sponsored annually by the Greek Letter Societies of the
university.
Skaters' Waltz
And for the big kiddies there was
skating on Lost Lagoon with crack-
1 he-whip and crack the ankles all
thrown in together. And even more
fun for the boys Vhan crack the
whip, so I've heard was watching
pretty young things in brief skating skirts whirling about the ice
The boys haven't had a thrill like
that since the New Look made its
debut.
However, the day I was down at
Vhe Lagoon I didn't notice anything
over six years old wearing such a
costume—but then 1 was wearing
slacks.
While skating around the pond in
(he very brisk cold air I saw Dick
Penn cutting a neat figure or two,
Also ran into (I mean literally)
Lois Gunn. Gretehen Mathers, Deen
r'etherstonehaugh, Enid Sinclair, Di
llesbrisay. and in fact almost half
\he Caf Crowd.  .
And now here we are all back
at the old grind after two weeks of
dissipation and riotous living with
marks and growling professors facing us.   Oh joy.
Repercussions
Speaking of dissipation, I often
wonder how anyone can have the
nerve to get up in the late hours of
New Years Day looking like death
warmed over and gleefully greet
one with ''Happy New Year". If
there's anything happy about the
flay after New Year's Eve I have
yet to see it. Most people spend
their whole day thumbing through
the recipe book of "Helpful Suggestions  for   the  Morning  After".
Now the main talk in tin Caf U
llie Mardi Gras. Should he a really
grand  and  glorious;  party.
This and That
While we're at' it I'm getting just
a little tired of this raffle ticket
business. I'm as good as saleswoman
as the next person but frankly it's
easier to sell a bottle of Jockey Can
a' a WCTU convention than peddle
reffle tickets t'o a person who already has two books to sell himself, *'/' S
It's good to get back to the good
old Underhill coffee after two weekly
of demi-tassing. "Genial Frank"
must be putting a weaker brand of
iye in it, the stuff Vastcs different
somehow.
There's a very good reason why
the social wing of thc library is
looking a little empty these days.
Seems some bright Jacks and Jills
have discovered that it's possible
to sneak up onto the roof of the
new wing to look at' the stars and
"chat". This "love nest in the sky"
i.s going to bc increasingly popular
as the nights get warmer we Suspect. | f ;f
WM&  lea 2>ance
First Tea Dance of 19-10 will be held
this afternoon in Brock lounge, from
,'!:!!0 to ai.'iO p.m. It is sponsored by
the Women's Undergraduate  Society.
Dancing will be to Al MacMillan's
orchestra. The Snack Bar will be
e'len,
Candidates are: Beth McEachren,
Alpha Delta Pi, Christine Windebank,
Alpha Omicron Pi; Kay Woodhead,
Alpha Phi; Shirley Selman, Alpha
Gamma Delta; Ev Dtimphec Gamma
Phi Beta; Nan Hardie, Delta Gamma;
.Shirley Bookman, Delta Phi Epsilon;
Gloria Phillips, Kappa Alpha Theta;
nnd Bette Russell, Kappa Kappa Gamma.
All the candidates are interested
.11 'sports and shine in at least one.
Skiing is Beth McEachrcn's main in-
.erest outside of her university life.
Al UBC she is secretary of Panhellenic.
A musical young lady is Christine
Windebank. She is also interested in
.wimiriing and tennis. Christine has
m delletl in several fashion shows.
A UBC Esther Williams is Kay
Woodhead who teaches swimming and
belongs to the Life Saving Society,
"ihe  is also active  ih  intra-murals.
In fourth year is Ev Dumphee. The
irst three candidates were all in third
/ear Arts. Ev is from Winnipeg and
tttended U of Manitoba before coming
o UE'C. Mardi Gras enthusiasts will
emember Ev in thc chorus the last
iiree years. Her ."-ports are .skiing and
aw miming.
Another swimming enthusiast i.s
ahirley Selman. .second year Alls.
She has modelled in many fashion
shows.
Taking time out from her course
ai Animal Husbandry Nan Hardie
'rains horses and paints in oils. She
ilso   does   clay-modelling.
Shirley Bookman belongs to the
iiillel Club. She is very musical end
-tuclies piano. Her sports activities
are centred on swimming.
From south of the border comes
Gloria Phillips. She attended U of
Washington before coming to UBC.
She has done a little modelling -and
"-   interested  in skiing and swimming.
A    Home   lu'oiioiiiie.s   girl    is'   Bette
hiissall.   She  is  active  in   ititramurals.
'. njt.ys   sluing   and   has   won   a   gold
medal  for .swimming, Bette has mod.'
oiled  several   times.
Queen Candidates will parade both
nights of the Mardi Gras during the
i loorshow.
Silex Silences Society
MONTREAL, Out. (CUPl.-Presi-
dent of the Evening Faculty Women* Society at Sir George Williams
College blew a fuse at a meeting
shortly   before Christmas.
The prexy plugged a Silex in with
a tape recorder and the wires just
couldn't stand the strain.
:^*^*wr*m%zrzz?^.'*i*mm*w^:"r~
Courtesy Service
24  Hours
Metered Kates To And From
UBC Area
10th & Sasamat
AL. 2400     AL 2400
Film Society
Gives Dance
Something new in basketball dances
will be held January 15 with the Film
Society  as sponsor.
Famous dance bands will be projected onto a screen on the stage and
those present will find themselves
dancing to the music of such well-
known artists ns Count Basie and
Artie Shaw.
The dance will be held in thc Brock
; tier the UBC-Whitworth game.
Carleton Girls Can
Really Play Ball
OTTAWA. Ont. (CUP)-Tho first
university to back up its claims to
having an all-girl football team is
Carleton College.
A recent issue of Tire Carleton carries a large economy-size picture of
half the team in action.
All the girls wear smart uniforms
which look as though they were tailored t'o fit.
Mardi Gras
Harlem Show
Greek Letter Societies' annual Mardi Gras will take place January 20 and
21. Decorations and floor show are
based on a colorful Harlem theme.
Tickets will go on sale at $6.00 a
couple on January 14.
The floor show will include a fashion show of the raffle prizes. Models
are Joan Vivian, Barbara Effinger,
Beverly Smithson, Ruth Livingstone,
Joan Park, Gretehen Mathers, Loni
Francis, Margaret Hodson, Daphne
Stuart, Mary Pat Crowe, Beverly
Roberts, Nancy Wells, Vivian Lat-
seudes, Joyce Fawsitt, Shirley Chis-
holm, Shirley Waldeman, Bette Heard.
Raffle tickets may be brought from
any fraternity or sorority member,
___y_ico.n,aUaiU
banned 9h  Gaff
At a meeting of the Mardi Gras
committee yesterday it was announced that Caf decorations would be
tabooed this year for Queen candidate
campaigns.
A   car   parade  followed   by   a   Pep
Meet  in  the  Armory  will   take place
January 17 or 18, the date to be an
nounced  definitely next  week
\ I
By THELMA  BARER
Hucksters Prom
January 13
Ledgers and bank books will be forgotten on January 13 for commerce-
men when they gather in the Commodore Cabaret for ihe "Hucksters'
Prom" sponsored by the Commerce
Undergraduate Society.
The theme of the prom will be
advertising and thc Commodore will
be decorated accordingly.
Tickets are on sale at the Commerce
UndorgBtiiluatc Society's offices near
Brock Hall or from society executives.
Al MacMillan's orchestra will provide the music during the evening.
According to the latest statistics on
the subject, skiing is fast becoming
ihe country's most popular winter
sport. And do you wonder? Take a
good long look towards the north to
these glistening white peaks—Grouse,
Hollyburn, Seymour, and to the south,
even Mt. Baker. At any rate if you
do ski, then I'm certain you understand just what it i.s all about; but
if you don't ski then perhaps some
of your friends can talk you into it.
"Skiing is believing!" So if you're
new at this sport, then read on, and
even if you are an old hand at it,
there is sure to be some information
that you will be glad to know.
Actually the matter of ski clothes
has. been greatly commercialized, to
the extent that we find rank beginners appearing on the slopes dressed
in (he ultimate elegant' and usually
expensive ski outfits. Needless to say,
they usually attract considerable attention, (in the form of laughter)
and they return home very disillusioned over the "t'hilrS" of skiing.
They hide their ski outfits in the
depths of their closet, and that is that.
But this need not happen . . . the first
time you go skiing, wear any pair of
skeks, a waterproof jacket, a helmet
01 kerchief, and a pair of rubber boots
with cleats. Take along at least two
changes in wool gloves; and do wear
light'  warm .underwear.
Certainly you won't look glamorous
in such an outfit, but you will have
a good time and you will be comfortable. In these old clothes, a fall
in the snow will give you no embarrassment or worry about how you
look. Your whole stay up the mountain will be concerned with learning
how  to SKI.
When you do make the decision
that skiing i.s the sport for you . . .
and I am sure that you too will be
bitten by the "ski-bug" . . . then save
all that you can and invest in the
best ski boots you can find. Of course
if thc budget will allow, then perhaps you can make an even larger
investment that is—in a pair of skis,
and poles too. Remember that thc
skis should reach the tips of your
fingers when you stand with your
aim stretched above you; and the
poles should reach your ribs.
After you have purchased the tops
in equipment, then you can consider
ilie fascinating ski clothes. If you
have not already got one, then you'll
need a zippered water-repellent parka,
preferably with a matching hood.
Water repellent mitts with leathw
palms are ideal too, especially if viu
wear a pair of wool mitts i|nd'i'r-
neath.
Only when you are really quite
expert' should you consider tr)e purchase of a pair of "downhills", or
tapered ski pants. In some categoi»y
are such items as water repellant ski
shirts, fancy sweaters, belts with attached purses and special ski weskits.
The latter are all nice, but not in tho
least necessary. So let your budget
and your good clothes sense be your
guide.
Above all remember that skiing is
a vigorous sport, and that in a very
short time you get warn, so don't
bundle up. Wear simple well tailored
clothes, in neutral shades that make
the most of you. Some protection for
your skin is a good idea too, because
the cold and the wind will dry even
th<? oiliest skin.
In fact I can almost see you now
. . . schussing down the long smooth
slopes, the sun casting long gold
shadows through the snow-laden trees
. . . you, a picture of grace and confidence, now and then breaking your
speed with a flawless turn. Then towards the bottom of the slope, where
a group of friends are proudly watching, you make one turn too many. . , ,
A few minutes later finds you moving
off a little slowly, dusting the fine
powder from your well chosen ski
outfit, trying hard to be gay in the
face of "friendly" laughter. The only
clue to your miscalculation being a
little well in the snow, commonly-
known as a . . . sitzmark. Oh,
well. . . .
VERN'S TOGS
STOCK REDUCTION SALE
English All Wool
Sox
only
DOLLAR
VALUE
49c
3000 Pairs
Our Entire Stock of fine
Dress Sox
ALL
LESS
20%
Our Second In Four Years
YES
FALL and XMAS trade were good.
But we were still too ambitious in our
Fall buying
so
Our Loss Is Your Gain
We take inventory on Jan. 20 and before that date we are cutting our stock
in half
REGARDLESS OF COST
SOX
300 PAIRS
Selected
from our
regular
stock
reg. Land 1.50
69c
SPORT COATS
Over 200     all less
LtS 20%
100 TOPCOATS
Imported     all less
gabardine QKQfk
coverts       ^O A*
etc.
NECKWEAR
200 only
were
1.00 and 2.00
50c
ALL WOOL
McGregor Sweaters
were
5.25
$1.95
ALL WOOL
Longsleeve Pullovers
only
were fr*
4.95 4>l
SLACKS
Over 200 Pairs
gabardines
coverts       all less
worsteds       Af\CtL
flannels        IV/7D
etc.
RAINWEAR
Double-Breasted     q\\  \qs§
Single-Breasted      ZO 7O
models
NECKWEAR
Neckwear       20 A?
LESS
SWEATERS
Our Entire Stock
LESS
20%
REMEMBER
During the entire period of this sale, you may purchase a made-to-measure
Suit, Topcoat, Slacks, or Sport Coat at a reduction of 10%
SALE STARTS THURSDAY, JANUARY 6th, 9 A.M.
13 BIG DAYS
4571 W* 10th Ave.
ALma 1863 r
Page 4
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Friday, January 7,  1949
Marshall
The
Armchair
Athlete
By  CHUCK MARSHALL
Tonight is the night for UBC's
basketballing Thunderbirds.
This evening Jack Pomfret's young
charges launch the university into
Evergreen conference competition
and in a matter of hours all the
world will know whether or not
athletic officials on the campus were
presumptious in entering UBC in
the tough American  league.
«   The football sit-
uation    has    been
patched   up  as
well   as   possible,
oi   the   time   being   and with any
luck   next   year's
■*gi id season should
show    a    win    or
two;   probably
non-conference games.
Unknown Qauntity
However, the patience of the other
schools in the league has been
stretched as far as possible and
from now other Blue and Gold athletes will have t'o stand—or fall, on
their own  merits.
Consequently a lot of responsibility rests on the slim shoulders of
the 'Birds cagers. It is up to them
to prove to the world that UBC
athletes are of Evergreen conference calibre.
The test will begin tonight when
the 'Birds tangle with St. Martin's
College in their first league tilt of
the season.
Actually the Pomfret men have
a lot to be thankful for with the
scheduling of their Evergreen debut.
Although the initial tilt is an
"away-from-home" a f f a i r#. the
Thunderbirds will be meeting the
team that held a death like grip on
thc bottom rung of the league hoop
Jedder all last season.
No Alibis
Consequently there can be no.excuses made for anything the 'Birds
do tonight. If they lose by very
much it will be time to ask ourselves just what we are doing in
the conference.
Actually, the 'Birds could be a
lot worse off if they had to bow
into the conference against some
outfit like Central Washington College or the College of Puget Sound.
CP.S. for instance has performed
the remarkable feat of trouncing
the University of Washington and
University of Oregon, both coast
conference clubs, in pre-season exhibition cage tilts.
Do Or Die
Cther than (hat little or nothing
is known about the strength of thc
other Evergreen teams this season,
so that it will be a matter of wait
and watch to see what the opposition has in store,
Up to date the record of the local-
ites has been particularly inspiring
but they have had a lot of ground
to cover and the improvement especially among the younger members, has been more than gratifying.
It is a recognized maxim, particularly in college athletic circles, that
teams pass through cycles of good
and bad playing as a competent
organization is built up and then
gradually disperses as the members
graduate only to be built up again
in a couple of years.
Such has been the situation at
UBC. After the "wonder" hoop
squad of 1946, the playing here has
gradually gone down until it reached the bottom of the cycle at graduation last spring.
Now it is on the upswing again,
and the young 'Birds with several
years of playing left will soon develop into a powerful outfit, equal
te any in the Evergreen conference.
BIRDS ENTER E.I.C. TONIGHT
PACIFIC LUTHERAN "GLADIATORS"
ST.MA*T!N5 COLLEGE
"RANGERS'   i-ACEv
EASTERN
COLLEGE
WASHINGTON
"SAVAGES"
PAKKI.AHD
CMENEy
Plankmen Leave For
Inter-Collegiate Meet
Coach Vajda  Names
Thunderbird   Ski   Team
By   PETER  VAJDA
The University of British Columbia Thunderbird Ski Team
gets into battle this weekend at Rossland in the Red Mountain
Invitational Intercollegiate Ski Meet.
SPORTS EDITOR   —   CHUCK MARSHALL
Editor This Issue - RON PINCHIN
The 'Birds will be competing against
the skiers of the University of Washington, Washington State and Montana
State.
The team spent the Christmas holidays at Rossland preparing for the
invasion   from   below   the  border,
TEAM PICKED
After a series of trial races coach
Vajda selected the following men to
represent UBC. The team is Doug
fraser, John Frazee, Gar Robinson,
Arnie Teasdale, Gordie Cowan, and
Dave Gunn.
Bet To Hold
Gunn   i.s  a  newcomer
from  Wells,  B. C, and
do    well   in   the   cross
jumping events.
to the team
s expected to
country   and
The U, S. teams pulled into Rossland
yesterday with such big guns as
Gustav Raum and Johnny Lee, skiing
for Washington and George Thrane
t.ncl the Fohrland brothers carrying
Washington   State   colors.
IMPORTED STARS
All of these men are imported
Norwegian stars, skiing on scholarships, and have represented Norway
at various times. Thrane was on the
1948 Norwegian Olympic team and
won the Norwegian jumping thamp.
ionship in 1947.
Against such stars the UBC terna
will have trouble protecting its usual
second place among the Pacific Co.r.t
st hools and hopes of beating the
hitherto unbeaten U of W team atoms
to  be fading fast.
However the 'Birds are raring to
go and are determined to give tho
Scandinavian imports a real battle.
The jumping event promises to be
the most .spectacular evei' seen in
Western  Canada.
Mitchell Still
Confident Of
'Bird Success
Thunderbird hoopster Reid
Mitchell, who earlier in the
year was willing to bet that
nis team would come out on
ihe top half of the Evergreen
Conference this season, is still
sticking to his guns as the
'Birds prepare to bow into conference competition tonight,
Between gasping breaths, at the
final practice yesterday in the UBC
gym, Mitchell declared that he is
still confident that the boys will do
■ veil.
The 'Bird cage veteran earlier in
the year entered a wager with sports
editor Chuck Marshall, who seemed
somewhat doubtful as to the teams.
ability to come out on the first half)
of the roster. I
Ever since the resumption of lectures, the hoopsters under the watchful (ye of mentor Jack Pomfret have
been practicing several hours a da"
In preparation for the Evergreen
debut tonight in Olympia Washington.
Several hundred interested students
were on hand in the gym yesterday
to watch the "Birds wind up their
practices and see how the team is
developing.
TENNIS NOTICE
Tennis Club will meet every Saturday afternoon in the field house from
1:30 to 4:00 p.m. Get balls at Gym
Equipment room before 12:30 p.m.
Thunderbird Ruggermen
To Play In Victoria
By  RAY FROST
UBC Thunderbird ruggermen, the campus entry in the
McKechnie Cup Finals, will definitely travel to Victoria to
play for the possession of the cup, it was announced today.
Originally, the plans were' to hold^'"
the  championship  series  in  Vancou,
UBC Meets Rangers
At Olympia
By GIL GRAY
UBC's debut into the Evergreen International Conference
takes place tonight when the
Rangers of St. Martin's College
battle the Birds in the armories
in Olympia, Washington.
The casaba fracas will be tbe first
in the basketball loop of the Ever*
green set-up for both the Birds and
the Rangers, even though teams have
been going through extensive pre.
season prepping for the tilt.
Very little information has been
received at the office of the Graduate
Manager of Athletics at UBC concerning the Rangers at St. Martins
and so the E'irds will be going into
something unknown when they invade
the Washington city for. the game
tonight.
After the initial tussle at Olympia,
the Birds continue their road trip to
Tacoma where they are to meet the
big guns of the league, the College
of Puget Sound Loggers.
According to reports about the Loggers, this will be the team to deal
with in the Conference this year.
The CPS group has always managed
to place a hoop team in the first
division of their league.
With regard to the unimpressive
reocrd of three wins in fourteen
starts, in pre-season tilts, it is very
definitely felt that the Birds have
been showing marked improvement
in recent weeks. High sporting circles
at UBC said that the reason for the
UBC losses on the road through the
holidays was the result of lack of
conditioning.
Thc two week lay-off for the exams
was blamed for beatings that the
Birds were forced to take on the road.
The boys from UBC kept right up to
their opponents to a point, and then
just faded because they were out
of condition at a time when the other
teams were really putting their best
efforts forward.
ver, as is the usual case, but extreme
weather conditions in this town will
prevent  it from taking place here.
Arrangements were finished yesterday to have the first encounter between the Birds and Island City's
Crimson Tide on January 15 at Victoria,
Tlie series is composed of G games,
each team playing the other two
entries twice. In the event of a tie,
the top teams .will match off in a
sudden-death play to determine the
next holder of the coveted McKechnie
Cup trophy.
Al Laithewaite, coach of the Varsity
fifteen, has been driving his charges
hard to toughen them up for the
coming contests. The way his players
have been shaping up in the recent
practises, Laithewaite is confident that
the emblem of rugger supremacy
will rest again in the halls of UBC.
3 Ws Add Another-
R for Refreshment
TYPEWRITING
Essays, Theses, Notes
Manuscripts
Mrs. A. O. Robinson
4180 W. 11th Ave.        ALma 0915R
FOR FAST
PRINTING
SERVICE
For  Any  Campus  Activity
College
Printers
Printers of The Ubyssey
4436 W. 10th ALma 3253
Half  Block  From  Sasamat
ma
wartime taxes
and orders.
s Coke
COCA-COLA, VANCOUVER
Ask for it either tvay/i t. both
trade-marks mean the same thing.
171 x
IT PA YS
TO ROLL YOUR OWN WITH
British Consols
Cigarette Tobacco
MILD,     SWEET,     BRIGHT     VIRGINIA
mmtmatmnumm^

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0125244/manifest

Comment

Related Items