UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 31, 1958

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0125240.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125240.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0125240-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0125240-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125240-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0125240-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0125240-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0125240-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0125240-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0125240.ris

Full Text

 THE UBYSSEY
VOL. XLI
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1958
No. 19
Fashion expert Marie Moreau and chairman Ben Trevino faced a barrage of comments
from clothes-conscious students at nooon hour lecture Thursday. Brian Johnson
Burhans, Moreau Agree —
"Scraggy Lot" Describes Coeds
CHISHOLM:
Our Culture
"Accidental"
North Americans are raised in an "accidental culture" and
have to learn how to grow out of it.
This was the warning given Thursday to a packed Buchanan
106 by controversial Canadian Dr. Brock Chisholm.
"North     American     children
UBC coeds Thursday were described by professor Clint Burhans as "the scraggiest lot I've
ever seen."
Burhans was a member of a panel discussion, which included Vancouver Sun fashion
editor Marie Moreau, on campus clothing.
The discussion was held in
Brock Lounge before a capacity
audience.
Burhans also praised the coeds by saying that this year
there were more potentially
beautiful girls than he had ever
Seeger Sings
Terry Plays
UBC Awards
To Be Probed
Pete Seeger, one of America's
foremost folk singers, will be
at  UBC  on  Nov.  6.
Mr. Seeger, one-time leader
of the Weavers, will be accompanied   by   Sonny   Terry,   har-
moniclst , , ! that they "don't have a clue on
Equally at  home on the con-
cert stage and in the night club. how to make "P-
circuit,   Seeger   should   present:     Loud cheers from the females
an  interesting  program of folk j jn the audience followed panel-
seen.
COLORS  DULL
He acctised  the girls of dressing   in  dull  colors  and  added
Students' Council has formed an awards committee to
examine the present structure
of  award  systems  at   UBC.
Council   appointed   Dave   Ed-
grow up almost unable to believe that there are fine, decent
intelligent people living in other
parts of the world that do not
believe all the things these
children believe," he said.
"The children must replace
these ridiculous beliefs with
more worldly views."
UNWISE IDEAS
"In almost every North American home you can find that
ridiculous three-monkey symbol:
*'see no evil, hear no evil, speak
no evil." People growing up on
that simple rule have unwise
ideas about virtue. They must
learn that evil exists, and must
learn to do something about it."
WRONG HEROES
"Our children are taught to
have the wrong heroes. People
in south-east Asia find it hard to
understand why our greatest heroes are killers of defenseless Indians."
"The real heroes are the prophets we refuse to recognize,
those who can tell us what is
wrong with us today, China is a
nation that has made the mistake of looking only to the past
for authority."
"There is a certain room today for  martyrdom —  not  the
gar chairman of the committee, j stake and  bonfire kind of maraud   under   him   will   be   dele-|tyr — but the kind  of martyr
music   from   all   parts   of   the
world.
The Special Events and Fine
Arts Committee which sponsor
this concert will also present
Norway's leading actress the
following  day.
Tore Segelcke, an outstanding member of the National
Theatre in Oslo, Mme Segelcke
will give a lecture and demonstration for students only at
12:30.
For her public appearance the
same clay Mme. Segelcke has
chosen a brilliant programc representative of some of her
greatest successes. Ticket sale
for the evening performance is
at Modern Music or at the door,
Staffers, Arise
Ubyssey reporters and anyone interested in joining the
reporting staff are requested
lo come to The Ubyssey office
al noon today to examine the
newly - redecorated bulletin
board and hear a .short lecture
by the editor-in-ciiief,
ist Joan Fitzpatrick's comment
on Mr. Burhans yellow tie and
blue socks.
Miss Moreau did not change
her stand on remarks she made
earlier. She acctised the coeds
of having a "cult of carelessness
and added that time and patience are all that are needed
to be well groomed—not money.
REMARKS STAND
She aid that she did not mean
her former statements to be
insulting.
Her suggestion that bobby-
sox be left in high sch ' was
met   with   loud   hisses.
"PLAY UP BEAUTY"
Burhans said that he could
"forgive a woman anything but
lack of beauty. Every woman
rn the world has something
beautiful to play up and should
do it."
Miss Moreau's statement that
the men on lhe campus "looked
wonderful." brought a cry of
dismay from the girls,
gates from majof campus organizations including Peter Haskins
of USC, Theo Carroll of WAA,!
Don Shore of MAA, Bob Small i
of UCC, Gail Carlson of WUS, j
and     Jairus     Matambikua     of
of  HAA  and   Cheryl  White  as
secretary.
I €00111(11116 is attempting to
make known all the various
awards  currently  available.
One of the special objectives
of the committee is to examine
the Students' Council Awards
system with a view to suggesting  recommendations,
While examining all awards
systems on the campus, the
committee says it does not intend to dictate methods of distribution to any of the various
organizations  concerned.
Committee is circulating a
form which is lo be completed
:by any A IVS IS organization
which   has   an   awards   system.
Purpose of the form is to supply the committee with all necessary information about each
award.
NOTICE
Graduate studenls will
meet today at noon in Buchanan 214 to discuss common
room facilities.
i (Continued on Page 3)
See DR. CHISHOLM
Tween Closses
Khachatarian
Concerto Today
FRIDAY
MUSIC CIRCLE—Aram Kha.
chaturian's Piano Concerto will
be introduced and played today
at noon in the Music Room,
Brock  Hall.
* *    *
NEWMAN CLUB — TheologL
cal lecture series held at St.
Mark's Friday noon. Topic this
week: "The One God".
* *    *
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE —
Presents two pantomime films of
Marcel Marceau in Buchanan
202 at 12:30.
* *    *
VARSITY Christian Fellowship is holding a Bible study
conducted by Cathie Nicol at
noon in Bu. 216.
* *     *
UNIVERSITY BAPTIST CLUB
meets today at 12 30 in Physics
302. Rev. J. H. Plckford, M.A.,
will speak on "Will the Psychoanalyst replace the Pastor?"
(Continued on Page 5)
See 'TWEEN CLASSES
Labor
Fears
Minister Wicks
Great Bear"
Labour Minister Lyle Wicks told students "the Western
world has not a greater problem than labor-management relations," in a noon hour lecture Thursday.
"We are in danger of being
outrun by the totalitarians if
labor-amanagement relations
are not improved," he said.
"The threat of the Great
Bear (Russia)  is very real."
"The real threat of Russian
expansion is its economic power, not armies or submarines",
he said.
He suggested an "International commodities clearing
house" where Canada would
trade its surpluses for their
currency   or   goods.
The currency would be kept
in a central bank and would
be given back to a foreign
country when they had goods
to  sell   to   us.
Ho charged lhat by not supplying China in their need we
gave  the  into  the   Russians.
THE  HON.  LYLE   WICKS
Bellingham Invasion Planned PAGE TWO
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, October 31, 1958
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Student subscriptions $1.20 per year (included in AMS fees). Mail
subscript'.ons $2.50 per year. Published three times a week
in Vancouver throughout the University year by the Student
Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of
Britisli Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed herein are those
of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of
the Alma Mater Society or the University. Letters to the Editor
shou.-j not be more than 150 words. The Ubyssey reserves the
righ' to cut letters, and cannot guarantee publication of all letters
ret^ved.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF,   DAVE ROBERTSON
Acting City Editor . . . Judy Frain
Managing Editor, Barrie Cook       City   Editor,   Barbara   Bourne
Chief Photographer, Mike Sone     Features Editor, Mary Wilkins
Asst. City Editor, Kerry Feltham    C.U.P.  Editor, Judy  Frain
Editor, Special Editions — Rosemary Kent-Barber
SENIOR EDITOR . . . BRUCE TAYLOR
Reporters and Desk: Judy Copithorne, Mike Sone, Patience Ryan,
Ken   Lamb,  Pat   Macgregor,   Kerry   White.
Turn The Universities
Over To The Slobs
Students Must
Oppose Fee Hike
A fee increase at UBC of anywhere from $50 to $150
has been rumoured for the past few weeks.
That there is truth to this rumour is evidenced in many
ways: President MacKenzie's annual address to the students
in which he said students would soon have to begin paying
for a larger proportion of university expenses than they do
now; the very possible increase in faculty salaries for which
there is no apparent or proposed method of financing other
than an increase in student fees; the planned expansion of
UBC*s athletic programme announced Wednesday by the
Senate committee on recreation, athletics and physical education, which recommends that the Board of Governors
accept financial responsibility for the operations of the
athletic director's office and other athletics expenses—it
asks also of the Board of Governors to make subsidiary
grants during the initial years of UBC's participation in
Western Canadian intercollegiate competition; and most important, B.C. Minister of Education Leslie Peterson's intimation in his speech here last week that the provincial
Lovcrnment ih nut likely to increase its operating grant to
UBC.
So, the rumour of a fee increase i.s certainly not without foundation. Indeed, a fee increase appears to be to some
extent justified.
But no one can justify the deprivation of a university
education from any student who can benefit by it, as will
be the case if the university's increasing expenses are defrayed by a fee increase.
A university negates its purpose if it increases its facilities by limiting enrolment to those students who can afford
increased fees. Ideally, fees should not exist at all, but under
the present political and economic structure of the country,
Mich a Utopia i.s unrealistic.
However, a fee increase should be avoided at any cost,
even if the alternative is to limit enrolment to those students
with the highest academic qualifications. President MacKenzie has publicly announced he is opposed lo this sort of
of limited enrolment, but his position is untenable if his
only alternative is to limit enrolment to those with the
highest financial qualifications.
The worst aspect of the looming fee increase is that the
students themselves have not yet gone on record as opposing
iL * t i*
Not enough of them to form a quorum at last Thursday's
AMS general meeting showed up to vote on a resolution opposing in principle a fee increase. And Students' Council so
far has avoided committing itself one way or the other, manifesting a most unwholesome lack of interest.
It is UBC students who will suffer most if a fee increase
is implemented. The very least they could do is to petition
for another AMS general meeting in order that they can
voice publicly their protest of the move.
Unless, of course, they favor the unfair limitation of enrolment that a fee increase will bring.
By JAMES BUAKE
In recent months I have
heard many a despairing re-
mark on the state of Canadian
education, and of universities
in particular. The government,
the churches, the P-TA associations, and other well-meaning
groups have unleashed their
pious wrath on the educational
system. It appears that articles
on education have supplanted
that cherished position in the
women's magazines once held
by sex articles.
Even The Ubyssey has succumbed to the trend, and instead of the articles on free
love and similar topics of interest that usually grace the pages
of a college newspaper, has
substituted a tired rehash of
the so-called crisis in education,
which includes a remarkably
unoriginal suggestion for the
solution of the problem.
The educational crisis is
threatening to replace politics,
religion, and perhaps even baseball as the staple of polite conversation, and since everyone,
no matter how ignorant and/
or insincere, is expressing his
views on the subject, I feel justified in presenting mine.
''Why," says Babel, "don't
we do more for our intellectual?" May I suggest that the
Canadian public has complete
justification in doing nothing
whatsoever Cor this underfed,
overworked, and suspiciously
incredulous being.
Thc intellectual i.s almost always against, noi for, the current way of lite, oolitically. socially, morally. Mo is the enemy, not thc saviour, of society,
for in his search for truth he
must as a first step reject tiie
particular set of fallacies upon
which his society happens to
be based, and which its citizens
hold dear.
Moreover, the public has no
need for the intellectual even
as a source of entertainment.
Why does it need new paintings, new novels, new thoughts
when it remains in self-imposed
Incomprehensive
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear  Sir:
The Ubyssey has once again
come through in typical fashion.
I refer to the totally incomprehensive manner In which
the frosh elections were covered. Two specific instances immediately come to mind.
On   Friday,   October   10,   an
article was printed giving the
locations of polling places,
names of candidates, and so on.
There were three people elected by acclamation. The public
was informed of the names of
two of them, and for the third,
the following statement was
made: "The treasurer was also
elected by acclamation." What
kind of reporting is this?
Since I am the person con-
ignorance of what has already
been done?
The trenchant comment that
emanates from the sidelines
presses uncomfortably on the
philistian little world that we
fellow Canadians are privileged
to enjoy, where art, like religion, is deferred to that far
distant future time when we
shall have nothing better to do.
Unable to achieve that bliss-
full illiteracy in which it once
so peacefully -slumbered, the
Canadian public has adopted
the substitute phenomenon of
indifferenece, in defense against such screwball ideas as
may from time to time be allowed to creep into print. From
the social point of view the
creative thinker is useless.
The public seems concerned
with the welfare of this pariah
because it has confused thinking with tinkering, and associates the intellectual with the
applied scientists and engineers
who will save us from the Russians. These scientists, sad to
say, do not spring full-grown
from the forehead of John Diefenbaker.
We thus realize that the educational goal of every responsible citizen is ignorance, total
or at least outside some harmless specialty like engineering.
As fellow Canadians, we want
a university to train students
in certain essential specialties
(like medicine and basketweav'
ing), while encouraging their
ignorance of everything outside these specialties, and we
also want to be assured that
non-specialists, like little girls
faking B.A.'s, will learn as
little as possible.
We arc getting exactly what
we want. This system can afford to tolerate a few thinkers
on the periphery, because indifference i.s a more effective
weapon than downright persecution.
What docs the intellectual
feel about all this? He could
not care less. The educational
crisis is no danger to him. because he who truly thirsts after
corned in this oversight, this,
no doubt, sounds like sour
grapes. It is. I can think of
no plausible reason why my
name was not immediately obtainable. If it wasn't it would
not have taken much research
to unearth it. Therefore, the
only conclusion I can draw is
that The Ubyssey was not
willing to expend a little effort to present the entire news
to  its   circulation.
The next item is the piece de
resistance. Generally, after an
election, the resulls are carried
by the press in order that the
voters be informed of the fruits
of their labor, Apparently the
Ubyssey has considered the
election of such insignificance
that it chooses to give priority
to a pictorial exposition on the
merits of a toilet bowl as op-
understanding will not be deterred by the obstacles in his
path.
Usually, he will find money
to get to a University library,
and time to learn, and the number of dodos that wander about
the campus makes no difference
to him because they are so insignificant as to be completely
outside his field of thought.
He has his own standards and
is not content merely to measure up to the ones that the
educational authorities expect
of him. It is only the weaklings who cry out that they
cannot afford to go to college,
that the extra-curricular life
distracts them, that too little is
demanded of them.
Even if a budding intellectual could not go to college, he
would not be defeated. How
many of the world's great artists went to university?
The average civic-minded
citizen needs many a prop to
his intentions, and thus can not
see how any student could acquire knowledge without the
elaborate aids that he proposes, and would himself require. If in North America
there are fewer intellectuals
than in Europe, it is the society,
not the educational system that
is at fault.
And so let us turn the universities over to the slobs, as their
rightful heritage and as a fulfilment of the public's educational aspirations, for in a democracy the people rule, and
we do not want to be undemocratic,
Let us, however, allow th-".
intellectual free access to the
labs and libraries, which cannot be entirely obliterated in
the deluge of clubs, rallies,
football games, cabbages and
comic books which will accompany the new hiers.
But above all let us not. attempt ihe impossible. Let us
not trv to make of a slob anything iv.it a slob, and let us net
try to give to our Canadian
citizens an education thai: they
neither desire nor deserve.
pose;!  to  the    lilv    pond as o
swimming hole.
I. :or one, can't sec tha' this
deserves precedence over the
in teres-ts of the campus' largest
student division.
When frying to foster apathy,
The Ubyssey is extremely generous with its space and its ai-
fronts. We were given headlines when there was a poor
turnout for the first nomination meeting and were labelled
"anaemic" when the response
to the blood drive was not overwhelming.
I suggest that in the future,
The Ubyssey should make a:i
elfort to adopt a more open-
minded policy.
Sincerely,
NICK OMELUSIK,
F.U.S. Treasurer Friday, October 31, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
LITTLE MAN ON* CAMPUS
Heron Appointed
To Prepare Brief
Council Monday ratified the appointment of Peter Heron,
past chairman of NFCUS, to chair a committee preparing a
brief to be presented to the Royal Commission on Education.
The   appointment   of   Heron
UM9S!? mo THAT WB F66L VOU COULPNf feS5l0LY Pf
TSACWN'G 5TJ06MTA Ttf? 6U3EI6S OF CAPITALISM ANP
the p^c?5;p0ieiTV of F£££ eNneRreW
Frosh Hazing Part Of
The Past At McMaster
HAMLITON (CUP)—Students' Council at McMaster University has passed a motion prohibiting any form of freshman
hazing during initiation week.
IHA Fair
Saturday
East Indian fortune tellers,
exotic foods and novelty entertainment will be featured at the
annual International House Fair
to be held November 1.
Proceeds from the affair will
be used to purchase furnishings
for the new International House
on the campus.
Official opening for the building will be sometime next year.
Saturday night a party will
be held at the West Point Grey
United Church at 8th and
Tolmie. The 50 cent admission
charge will include movies and
dancing.
CSC To Seek
Employees
The Civil Service Commission
has announced that the federal
government is seeking 1200 students for summer work.
The recruiting program is not
yet under way. As a first step
senior officers will be sent by
the Commission to the universi-
tie to speak to the students on
the opportunities and conditions
of government employment.
Under-graduates will receive
from $243 to $305 a month depending on the amount of their
university training. Post-graduate students will receive more,
The motion stated that there
is a definite possibility of injury
and that hazing fulfills no need
that cannot be met by an adequate orientation program designed to give the freshman an
idea of "the society to which he
has been admitted."
The motion added that should
this ruling be violated the Student's Council will take disciplinary measures in dealing
with  the students.
IFC WORKSHOP HELD
TONIGHT, SATURDAY
1958 Workshop, sponsored
by the Inter-Fraternity Council, will be held today at 7:15
p.m. and Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
in Buchanan 224.
Workshop was iniated last
year and will be attended by
51 representatives from the
fraternities and 9 from the
sororities.
Purpose of thc Workshop is
to discuss the current year's
activities,
was suggested by the Academic
Symposium Committee.
Heron has prepared a questionnaire which will be given
to all members of the graduating class wsho received their
education in B.C.
The form of the questionnaire
is similar to that being used by
the Royal Commission.
Verigin
Leads Panel
Discussion
John Verigin, grandson of former spiritual leader of the orthodox Doukhobors, Peter Verigin
II, will take part in a panel discussion Saturday at 8:15 p.m.
The discussion, which will deal
with the Doukhobor question, is
the third lecture in the fall program of the Vancouver Institute.
It will be held in Buchanan
106.
MacKenzie
Off To Paris
President N. A. M. MacKenzie
leaves today for Paris where he
will attend the 10th anniversary
of UNESCO as head of the Canadian delegation.
UCC ELECTS SMITH
NEW VICE-PRESIDENT
Harvey Smith was elected
vice-president of UCC ai the
general meeting held Thursday in Buchanan 205.
Smith is also vice-president
of the Parliamentary Council.
Missed In
Blitz?
See AMS
A one-hour blitz was held this
morning to raise funds to aid the
residents of Springhill, Nova Scotia, scene of last week's mine disaster,
If you weren't around at 10:30
but would like to contribute to
the fund, a collection box has
been set up in the AMS office
for your convenience.
It is hoped that everyone will
I give his support.
DR. CHISHOLM
(Continued from Page 1)
who will stand up for an idea
against public opinion."
PATIENCE
In answer to a question, Dr.
Chisholm said that the wise men
in most countries believed that
ideological conflicts could be
settled if all have patience.
"There are many fields in
which all governments can cooperate. If we keep calm, we
may find the ideological conflicts will have died in 20 or 30
years," he said.
Excellent comfortable furnished room and good board
with University couple. Very
quiet; close to University
gates. Call at 4584 West 1st,
or phone ALma 2410-Y in the
evening,
AUTOMOBILES
Call FRANK FRAZER at Collier's Ltd., MU 1-2311 or residence BA. 8089. New Chev-
rolets and used cars of all
makes.
I
Tuesday, November 4 —
Friends of Chamber Music present 1ho TRIO DI
BOLZANO, Georgia Auditorium fLU), Free Student
Tickets at A.M.S.
Wednesday, November 5 —
LLOYD POWELL plays Piano Concerto in D-lVIinor
by Bach, 12.M0 in Buchanan 106.
Thursday, November 6 —
PETE SEEGER, leading American Folk-Singer, and
SONNY TERRY, self-taught Harmonicist, perform
in Auditorium at 12.110.
Friday, November 7 —
MADAME SEGELKE, famous Norwegian actress,
.gives play readings in Auditorium, noon presentation
Free;   Evening, 8.30, Admission $1.00,
SHIRTS
Professionally Laundered
3*r59f::
He says he does it by Steady Saving
at the Bank of Montreal*
*The Bank where Students' accounts are warmly welcomed,
Your Campus Branch in the Administration Building
' MERLE C. K.I.RBY, Manager
OSCAR the OSTRICH
Who says:
Why should people always
express amt::emenl at the
size of our eggs? After all,
we're not exactly canaries,
you know. Before 1 shove my
head in the sand, I'd better
tell you , . .
About the new Ivy Print
Sport Shirts that just arrived from Forsyth, The smart
brown and green tones,
should meet with your approval. Now on sale at
the . . ,
shirt 'n
tie bar
592 SEYMOUR
(at Dunsmuir)
"QomsL in, atuL im,
cn& on." PAGE FOUR
THE   UBYSSEY.
Friday, October 31, 195ft
Ubyssey Editors At
Edmonton CUP Meet
Two Ubyssey editors left this morning for a conference in
Edmonton where they will discuss problems of student newspapers with editors from four Canadian provinces.
Managing Editor Barrie Cook
and Assistant City Editor Kerry
Feltham   will   attend   the   fifth
Raven Flies
November 20
The great god of the Raven,
Desmond Fitzgerald announced
Thursday that his magazine will
go on sale November 20.
He said that the typography
will be of a "very new and novel
description and from an all round
point of view, the contents are
better than anything we've had
before."
He added that contributors
whose manuscripts were rejected
will be given the opportunity of
having their work criticized by
the editors of the Raven.
annual Western Regional Canadian University Press Conference today, Saturday and
Sunday.
They return Sunday evening.
Host paper of the conference
this year is the University of
Alberta's  The  Gateway.
At last year's western regional CUP conference a resolution was passed condemning
the lack of ethics of certain
downtown newspapers.
Moved by The Ubyssey's delegation, the resolution received
publicity and comment from
newspapers, magazines and radio across Canada.
The conference last year was
held in Saskatoon.
Accounts of this year's con-
|ferjence written by delegates
Cook and Feltham will appear
in Tuesday's Ubyssey.
PITMAN OPTICAL
LTD.
Complete Optical Services
• NEW IVY LEAGUE HORN RIMS
• CONTACT LENSES
• OPTICAL REPAIRS WHILE YOU WAIT
• IMMEDIATE APOINTMENT
734 GRANVILLE ST .
Main floor Vancouver Block
MU.   5-0928
^^giSKSj^EKiSS-SSi;!:
pps^ppps^ppyimy
ASUS HOMECOMING Queen candidate Monica Loewi
kicks ball held-by*Thunderbird tackle, Bill Crawford.
Congregation And Open
House Held By College
A leading Korean churchman will receive an honorary
degree from UBC's Union College tonight at 8 p.m.
The special congregation will be held in West Point Grey
United Church.
He is Professor C. C. Kim,
vice president of Hankuk Theological Seminary in Korea, the
training school of Korean army
chaplains.
The congregation address will
be given by Rev. Dr. R. M.
Clark, missionary of the United
Church in India.
In connection with the congregation Union College will
stage an open house from 2:30
to 5 p.m. on Thursday. Visitors
will have an opportunity to see
| the renovations carried out to
the interior of the college and
the newi residence block for
married students training for
the ministry.
ASUS To Hold
Election Wed
Election of members to the
ASUS Council will be held Wednesday,  November 12.
All members of the Arts and
Science Undergraduate Society
are eligible for election providing they hold ASUS Student
Cards. These are available from
the ASUS office, Buchanan 113.
Nominations must be signed
by at least 10 Arts and Science
student. They are to be left in
Box 151 at the AMS office or in
Buchanan 115 by Friday, November 7.
THE PROCTER & GAMBLE CO. OF CANADA
Hamilton, Ontario
has management positions open in
• INDUSTRIAL   ENGINEERING      • PRODUCTION • DEVELOPMENT
•ENGINEERING        • PRODUCT   RESEARCH      • TECHNICAL PACKAGING
for graduates and postgraduates in
Engineering and Honour Science Courses
PERSONAL   INTERVIEWS
may be arranged
through the
University Placement Office
COMPANY   REPRESENTATIVES
will be present for
campus interviews
November 6,7, 10
There ore also summer employment oppor tunities for men from the
1960 Engineering and Science Classes.
Nf cus - Labatt
Photo Salon
By MICHAEL SONE
The display of prize-winning
photographs, currently being
exhibited in the South Brock
foyer should prove interesting
to both amateur shutterbugs and
campus art-lovers. The contest,
sponsored by NFCUS and financed by John Labatt Limited,
is an annual competition open
to all University students across
Canada.
University of B.C. is well represented amongst last year's
prize-winners. Joseph Hejjas
walked off with first prize in
the pictorial category with a
fine study entitled 'Poor Fellow'. Contrasting strong, sunlit
and shadowy lines against two
small figures of children in a
technically perfect picture,
Hejjas comes up with a stimulating and creditable effort.
Another UBC student, Milton
Hicks, using a Super Balda
camera copped second prize in
the sports section and also a
second in the pictorial. Hicks'
'The Only Way' shows two
lonely figures in a boundless
expanse of snow. Possibly the
picture was made a little more
moody through good darkroom
technique rather than good
photography, Either way, Hicks
is to be complimented for a
good effort. His other prize
winner, 'Mojave Spectre' is an
interesting study in effects of
red filters against a unique
cloud formation over the steaming desert.
Denes Devinyi won second
prize in the animal division
with a fine silhouette study.
Printing with an overbalance
of sky produces a fine background for the motion-conveying blurred figure of the animal.
The grand prize was won by
'.Michael Liu To Hin of St.
Dunstan's University on Prince
Edward Island. Shooting with
a Rolleiflex and available light,
Liu To Hin has produced a
moody and meaningful study of
a strong character. The picture
is entitled 'The Helping Hand'
which  to me is a puzzle.
This year's photo contest,
again sponsored by NFCUS in
conjunction with Labatts is
open and the NFCUS office in
the Brock Extension will be
accepting entries. Deadline date
is November 30.
ExportA
FILTER TIP
CIGARETTES Friday, October 31, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE FIVE
'TWEEN CLASSES
(Continued from Pago 1)
PSYCHOLOGY   CLUB     presents  two   films   "Angry  Boy"
and  "Shyness" Friday at 12.30
in HM2.   Non-members 10c.
* *    *
INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE—
Hallowe'en Party at 8.30 p.m.
this evening in the Club House.
Wear costume if you can. All
kinds of games, dancing and refreshments.
* *     *
CAMERA CLUB — Tony Ar-
cher will speak on Portrait Photography Friday at noon in Bu.
203.
* *     *
FILMSOC — "Battle of Britain" will be shown today at
12.30 and 1.30 in the Auditorium. "Intolerance" will be
shown at 8.30 in the Auditorium.
Pass for next three films available at door, $1.50. Single admission, 75c.
RAMBLERS ATHLETIC Club
general meeting to be held today at 12.30 in Physics 301. Fall
schedules for touch football, volleyball, ping pong and tennis
will be distributed. New members welcome.
LUTHERAN STUDENT Association — First fireside will be
held at home of D. Vinge, 3376
W. 34th Ave. Topic will be:—
"The Poet's Question — Christianity Answers", led by Rev. D.
Voigts. For transportation call
Marvin at LA. 1-9428. Regular
meeting today in Hut L3 at noon.
Pastor Meyer will lead discussion on: "What Is Gambling?"
All welcome.
GERMAN DEPARTMENT —
presents Film: "Germany, Key
To Europe". Short talk by Dr,
J. Conway. History Dept., and
discussion.
says
"You'll pay sales tax
on your ticket to Mars!
We're on the threshold of space travel! Wonderful visions of the future are drawn on every side.
Even our staid economists predict exciting days
within the reach of all. But, hold on! Some things
won't change, and we'll enter that brave new
world with many of the unromantic features that
•e with us today,
Your beautiful plastic dome of a house will have
a mortgage, a heating bill and plumbing problems.
Your clean-cut Canadian kids will outgrow their
shoes and require dental care. You'll still pay
income tax, and certainly sales tax on your ticket
to Mars.
Yet, just as our scientists are exploring the future,
you can prepare for these known problems because you can anticipate them, with the help of an
expert. Planning for the future is the absorbing
job of your North American Life & Casualty
representative. He will have a keen understanding
of your problems, and will help you work out a
program of "planned income" for your family.
He'll tell you about NALAC plans for paying ofl
the mortgage, sending your children through
college, and paying off bills when you're laid up.
It's the key to confident living. Call in and see ut
soon, won't you?
Confidently.
JtfifcU
H. P. SrfjOGLUND,
Pres id At
North American
S^'/*    tr h */ *+£? /j 4 ft fl P~('tf w^P/i in n n ti m
LIFE
SICKNESS
GROUP
ACCIDENT
R. D. GARRETT-Provincial Manager
519 Burrard Bldg. Phone MU 3-3301
PLAYERS' CLUB — General
meeting Green Room 12.30 today.
* *    *
SATURDAY
NEWMAN CLUB — All Saints
Day,  Nov.   1st.    Masses in  St.
Mark's  Chapel,   715,   8.30  a.m.
and 12.35 p.m.
* *     *
WOMEN'S ATHLETIC Tennis
—Practice in Field House on
Saturday at 12.30.
* *     *
THUNDERBIRD     BOOSTER
Club — Invasion to Bellingham
for UBC vs. Western game, Sat.,
Nov. 1st. Buses leave Brock
Hall 10.30 a.m. and return 6.30
p.m. Tickets, $1.25 return on
sale at AMS office or Thunderbird Booster Club office. Game
tickets half price with AMS
card. Boaters have arrived!
Those who ordered them please
pick them up.
MONDAY
HIGH SCHOOL Conference
Committee general meeting in
Men's Club Room upstairs in
Brock Monday noon. All people
wanting to work on this year's
committee, please attend.
* *     *
CCF presents a discussion of
policy the Winnipeg Declaration
at 12.30 Monday, Nov. 3, in Bu.
214. General Meeting Tuesday,
Nov. 4, 12.30 in Bu. 212. Very
important.    All out please.
* *     *
VARSITY FLYING SAUCER
Club general meeting 12.30 on
Monday in Bu. 223 at which a
tape recorded statement by Mr.
W. R. Smith, former head of saucer project "Magnet" for Canadian Govt, will be heard,
* *     *
HILLEL FOUNDATION presents a Monday noon hour series
of lectures   by  Rabbi  Bernard
UBC
RADIO
First with>
—Campus News
■*%
—The Latest1 Music
—Student Activities
UBC
RADIO
Ate 1/cu a (jemiuA?
Most of us are not, but almost everyone can
improve their reading. Our training gives
practical help with reading and study problems from the first lesson. Individual tuition
allows you to progress at your own best speed. You save
hours of study time wiih taster reading, fuller comprehension
and easier recall. For further information, or a free Reading
Skill Survey, with no obligation, return the attached coupon,
or phone CH. 7513 clay or evening.
TO: THE WESTERN READING LABORATORY LTD.
2594 W. Broadway     -     Tel. CH. 7513
r~\    I am interested in further information.
r~j    I wish to arrange a free Reading Skill Survey.
I understand I am under no obligation.
Name    Tel. No.	
Address      	
Goldenburg concerning the basic,
value tools that make up the
Jewish religio cultural heritage.
The topic for Monday, Nov. 3, is
"God as Creator, Judge and Redeemer." Hillel hut immediate*
ly behind Brock. Everyone wel«
come.
*     *     *
STUDENT LUTHERAN Asso.
ciation — Monday Bible study
in office, Brock Extension 361.
Pastor Meyer will lead study on
"What the Bible Says About
Christ."
Drawing of Illustrations —
(Charts, Graphs, etc.) and all
Photographic assignments —
Contact JOHN WORST, licensed Photographer, 3250 Heather Street. Phone DI. 3331
or U.B.C. Local 266.
Lef£ face it..
Ti« Stud ttyatetet
Who'll Finance The Coffee Shop?
Talk today about the Law
Undergraduate Society seceding from AMS. Apparently at
the LUS meeting the future
leaders decided that they could
save money by seceding.
We're going to miss you in
the Brock, Fellas ....
Direct quote from a high-
ranking official! "ASUS is a
cover-up organization", he said.
What's  up?
Managing editor Barrie
Cook and his cohort Kerry
Feltham are on their way to
Edmonton for a CUP conference as you read this. I hope
they don't hit Mount Slesse . . .
Anyone who has an old picnic bench contact any member
of the Blue Cow . . ,
At Marie Moreau's Fashion
panel this afternoon, AMS
if i - : ' '• •  ■■ ' '
treasurer was defending young
ladies' "sloppy" dress. English
prof Clint Burhans who lean-
en over and said, "I'd like to
see your girl friend, John".
Should have — she's a doll . . .
Hey, who's been doing all
the work on the homecoming
committee this year? There's
been a lot of delegation of
authority there . . .
We've got a bold statement
for the CUS executive — "The
CUS executive feel that . . .
mining is a dangerous occupation". You said a mouthful
men . . .
But it' you're on the ball
men, you'll hit the Cavalier
Shoppe on 41st and Dunbar
to bet one of those tremendous
four   button   cardigans   in   all
ni'   il   f.iiiUiT  il   '   '   Innii   "   "   "    i  '  i '
$f
those  ivy colors  .  , . They're
just  in  Vancouver  now.
Or a Frat decal for your
windshield. They've got 'em
all.
Cavalier   Shoppe   has   some
fine   tab  collar  shirts,   colored.
striped,    in    fine    threads,    all
sizes, yet, and only $5 to $7.95 PAGE SIX
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, October 31, 1958
WEEKEND SOCCER ACTION will feature Varsity of the
Second Division playing Sons of Norway in an Imperial
Cup game at Kiljarney Park, Sunday at 2 p.m. In other
action, U.B.C. hosts New Westminster Legion in a Third
Division game. Game time, 2 p.m., Sunday at the UBC
Gym Field.
TOUCH FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
Following is the schedule, date, time, place and teams:
Oct. 31, 12.30, Field 1   Zeta Psi vs. Psi U.
Oct. 31, 12.30, Field 2  Medicine 1 vs. Forestry 1
Oct. 31. 12.30, Field 3 Newman 2 vs. Dekes
Nov. 1, 12.30, Field 1   - P.E. 1 vs. Fiji 2
Nov. 1, 12.30, Field 2 C.S.A. vs. Ramblers
Nov. 1, 12.30, Field 3 Ramblers 2 vs. Eng. 4
Nov. 1, 1.30, Field 1 - _ Phi Delt 1 vs. St. Andrews
Nov. 1, 1.30, Field 2 Beta 1 vs. Commerce
Nov. 1, 1.30, Field 3 Ramblers 3 vs. V.C.F.
Nov. 3, 12.30, Field 1    Kappa Sigma vs. Alpha Delt 1
Nov. 3, 12.30, Field 2   Ramblers 4 vs. D. U,
Come In and see our
SWEATERS
-U.B.C.
-FACULTY
-SKI
-TENNIS
SPECIAL OFFER:
FREE  UBC   Ballpoint  Pen   wit':i   evos/y  sweater
purchased   (As lonq as  the pens lasl),
ENGINEERS:
HAVE A LOOK Al" THE
Slipstick Cuff Links
T-Square Cuff Links & Tie Clips
Crested Engineering Lighters
LOCATION:   BROCK   EXTENSION
HOURS: 11:30 - 12:30
OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE A.M.S.
Mens Grasshockey
Teams In Action
UBC men's grass hockey teams
will participate in three league
games, all of which start on
Saturday at 2.30 p.m.
Varsity faces North Shore 'A'
in an 'A' Division contest at
Memorial 1 Park.
Meanwhile, in 'B' Division
action, UBC Blues tangle with
Blackbirds at UBC No. 2 Field,
and Juniors meet UBC Golds on
UBC No. 3 Field.
SPORTS EDITOR,   BOB BUSH
Deskmen: —Irene   Frazer,   Elaine Spurrill, Flora MacLeod,
Audrey Ede, Mike Sone, Alan  Dafoe, Tony Morrison, T. Smith
is
UBC will be competing with
Alberta, one of the teams that
will be encountered in the new-
Athletes Honored
For B.E.G. Feats
''Proud and pleased" were some of the words bestowed
upon UBC Athletes attending a dinner held in honor of the
part played hy them in the 1958 Empire Games.
The dinner, sponsored by the
CROSS  COUNTRY  TEAM
TRAVELS  TO  SPOKANE
Competing in the Skyline Meet in Spokane this weekend will
be the UBC Cross-country Team. The meet, to be held Saturday,
will feature athletes from Idaho, Washington, B. C. and Alberta.
An   interesting   fact   is   that {^trnmcdVle^ern Canadian Intercollegiate Union.
Last week, UBC runners
placed third and fifth in the
B.C. cross-country championships.
The strong UBC contingent
has consistently placed well up
in five meets already held locally. The mainstays for the
Thunderbirds being Jack Bur-
| nett and Jim Moore.
Mbore is perhaps enjoying
one of his best years to-date in
competition, The strong, wiry,
fourth year student has been
hampered by illness and injuries earlier this season but is
now starting to hit his stride.
Burnett, the faster of the two,
will be a big challenge in the
Skline meet as he is at his best
over a four mile or less course.
Along with Burnett and
Moore, five other UBC runners   will   be   competing.
Doug Van Nes, the most improved member of the team,
w>ill be competing for the second time in the Spokane meet.
Bernie Barton, Stan Joughin
and John Montcrief will al3o
be making the trip. The seventh man will either be Mike May
or Bob Bush, who is bothered
by knee  trouble.
Coaching the Thunderbirds is
Mr. Peter Mullins.
PETER MULLINS
. . heads for Spokane
Men's Athletic Committee, was
held in recognition of the UBC
Rowers and two track athletes
Bob Reid and Doug Clement.
coach of the UBC Rowers, John j
Warren. [
Special  guests  included  past
rowing coach, Frank Read, Dean
Chairman Dean Matthews ! Andrews and Mr. Jack Carver,
spoke for all when he stated . . . ' Vice-President of the Vancouver
"hearty congratulations of all. It ; Rowing Club.
Ls with a sense of pride that we ' The list of Athletes from UBC
associate your achievements and ; present included: Bob Reid,
the way in which you conducted ! Doug Clement, Don Arnold, Ar-
yoursolves and represented fei- i clue McKinnon, Walter d'Hondt,
low Canadians," | Tom Bitin, Dave Helliwell, Bud
Special guests, members of the j Staplcton, John Madden, Dick
radio, press, and television and \ McClure, Bob Wilson, Bill Mc-
members of the Men's Athletic i Kerlich, Wayne Pretty, Lome
Committee paid tribute to the ; Loomer, Glen Mervin, Glen
athletes   and   especially   to   the . Smith and Malcolm Turnbull.
Puff after puff
of smooth
mild smoking
Sportsman
Bellingham
Invasion
RUSH, RUN, RIDE! Hurry to
Bellingham this Saturday, November 1, to cheer our UBC Football Team on to victory!
UBC meets Western in Bellingham at 1.30,
Buses will leave from Brock
Hall at 10.30 a.m. Saturday,
Return fare is only $1,75. and
tickets are being sold at the
AMS office, and at the Thunderbird Booster Club office, 384
Brock Extension,
Tickets to the game are half
price (:")()c) with AMS card.
Students are advised to get
thoir bus tickets now, while
there arc still some left!
LF.T'S ALL, TURN OUT!
This will probably be our last
invasion, as next year wo will
be playing in the WCIAU.
CIGARETTES
PLAIN   OR   FILTER
The choice of sportsmen everywhere
Your Amazing Glands
Eight ductless glanda, weighing
altogether 2 ounces, control
your growth, turn you from
child to adult, determine you*
body's well-being. In November
Reader's Digest is a fascinating
review of what we know about)
these tiny chemical 'factories*
and what they do to you.
Get your November Reader'n
Digent today: 38 helpful article*
of lasting  interest. Friday, October 31, 1958
TH*.   UBYSSEY
PAGE SEVEN
1958 UBC THUNDERBIRDS
33*8^
-Photo by  Sone
TOUGH GAME EXPECTED WHEN
BIRDS INVADE BELLINGHAM
By MIKE SONE *  	
The UBC Thunderbirds travel to Bellingham on Saturday ; T/NlttdOtetteS  Wui
where they will tangle with the league leading Western Wash- j
ington Vikings in an Evergreen Confereence exhibition game, j Qlfgf ClIfiFS 33'2S
in   the   Thunderbirds'  " "  "
Back
"  !     UBC  will  have a real tough
line-up   will   be   their   leading j baUle on Ug hands   Said Coach
ground-gainer and scorer Don ; Gnup, "The team is getting too
Vassos. Vassos sustained a shoul-i damn complacent and we have
cler injurv in last, week' losing   nothing to be complacent about.
effort against Whitworth, but We havo lhrce gamPS lcft and
indicated   today   that   he    was   the season isn't quite over yet!
n.acly to go against the Vikings. ;
PLAYERS   RETURN
Also back in strip for the
Birds will be linemen John Hu-
c!ak and Paul Donald. Coach
Frank Gnup said today that line
man George Turpin and halfback Gary Bruce will bo dressed but are doubtful starters.
T h e Western Washington
squad has been a powerhouse in
the Evergreen Conference so far
this year, winning all three of
their games. The Vikings feature a stone-wall defence and a
■diversified offensive machine.
Their strong roster features six-
(mn Canadian players including eleven   Vancouver boys.
UBC SUPPORT
The Birds should have some
support from their own fans
who will be making the trip on
the annual Bellingham Invasion.
Since the Thunderbirds' entry
in the all Canadian Western
Intercollegiate Conference has
now been approved, this Invasion will in all probability be
the last one.
UBC Thunderettes downed the
Eilers 'B' in Boy's rules basket- I
ball Wednesday in a game play- ■
ed  at   John  Oliver   Gym.     The •
final score was 33-25 for UBC.     !
Pressing the Eilers most of the
game, UBC kept up a fast and
steady game.
The Thunderettes had most of
the control of the ball.
LED SCORING ATTACK
Leading the UBC scoring attack was Heather Walker with
14 points. Walker also shone
on rebounds, both offensively
and defensively.
Pat Power added live points
in the winning cause.
The Thunderettes, a very fast
team, show that with more experience they can develop into
a very strong squad.
FRANK GNUP
. . . get the lead out.
Even if the Birds can get over
this air of superiority, it should
be a rough, tough battle for
UBC playing a team which drubbed them 39-7 last year in a
regular   Conference   game.
P
I
z
z
A
PHARMACY
KBPOffiR
By J.& M. BURCHILL
r ■~^&^*
at the SNACKERY Granville at 15th
Question:—What was vinegar once used for?
Answer:—Vinegar was once
prescribed as a rubdovvn
instead of alcohol!
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY
V/% Blocks East of Pool
AL, 0339
MEN'S VOLLEYBALL SCHEDULE
"B"    LEAGUE
Oct. 31, 12.30, Court 6  Eng. 1 vs. Kappa Sigma
Nov. 3, 12.30, Court 1 D.U. (Pledge) vs Psi U.
Nov, 3, 12.30, Court 2 Phi Kappa Sigma vs. Fort Camp
Nov. 3, 12.30, Court 3  Alpha Delt vs. Kappa Sigma
Nov. 3, 12.30, Court 4 Phi Kappa Sigma 2 vs. Aggies 2
Nov. 3, 12.30, Court 5 Pharmacy vs. Union College
Nov. 3, 12.30, Court 6   V.C.F. vs. Eng. 2
Cheerless leader
Not a "rah rah" left in him! He's just
discovered there's no more Coke. And
a cheor leader without Coke is aa sad
as a soap opera. To put the sparkle
bark in his eye—somebody!—■
bring him a sparkling cold Coca-Cola!
DRINK
SIGN OF GOOD TASTE
SAY 'COKE' OR 'COCA-COU—BOTH TRADE-MARKS MEAN THE PRODUCT        «
OF   COCA-COIA   ITD.-THE   WORLD'S  BEST-LOVED  SPAWNING  DRINK. PAGE EIGHT
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, October 31, 1958
CLUB NOTES
Booster Club to Bolster Birds
With Finat Bellingham Invasion
The Thunderbird Booster
Club is sponsoring a "Bellingham Invasion" on Saturday,
November 1, Buses will leave
Brock Hall at 10.30 for Bellingham, where the Birds clash
with Western Washington at
1.30.
The Thunderbird Booster
Club was started on campus in
1950, then called the "Kika-
poos", and after several changes of name, finally becoming
what it is known today. The
purpose of this club is to promote spirit on the campus.
It is responsible for all on-
campus publicity of the Thunderbird games — football, rugby and basketball. It is behind
such projects as pep rallies,
and all majorettes and cheer
leaders are club members.
Club membership is, this
year, over 150, and the general
meetings are the scene of songs
and practice cheers.
Thunderbird Booster Club
will be doing a flash card section at the Homecoming game,
and will be doing the AMS
float at the Grey Cup parade.
These "Invasions" have been
held every year    since    1950.
There is strong rivalry between
Western Washington and UBC.
The invasion will probably
be the last of its kind, because
next year the Birds are entering the Western Canada Inter-
Motz and Woxny
548 Howe St.       MU.3-4715
Custom Tailored   Suits
for Ladies and  Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted suits
modernized in the new
single    breasted    styles.
Special   Student   Rates
jbu&tfa&
dtii/in£/
drive the
smart new
A- 55
GORDON
BROS.
10th and Alma
Collegiate Athletic Union,
Bus tickets are $1.75 return,
and there will be a 50c admission to the game, on presentation of AMS cards. Everyone
who attends is asked to wear
some sort of UBC insignia, such
as hats or scarves.
Tickets can be purchased
from the AMS office, any Thunderbird Booster Club executive,
or at the club's office, Room
364, Brock Extension.
CAMERA CLUB
The Camera Club is holding
a meeting for all those interested in modelling on Sunday,
November 2, at 7 p.m. in the
Dance Club Room in the Brock
Extension.
This modelling session is to
supply members who are available for portrait sessions. Danica d'Hondt, this year's Miss
Canada, started out her model
ling with the Camera Club.
Sunday night there will be
lighting setups for the girls
who are modelling, so both the
girls and the photographers can
have an idea of what modelling
is like.
All the photography will be
supervised by Rollie Ford, from
Rollie Ford Lightin, and the
best pictures will be shown in
the Camera Club Salon in the
middle of November.
Ella-Mae Sharp, this year's
Frosh queen, will be handling
this Modelling Section.
On Tuesday, November 4,
Camera Club is presenting Mr.
Stan Rogers of the Lee Hodgson School of Modelling, in
Buchanan 315. Mr. Sogers
will be demonstrating posing
techniques.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
On Tuesday,    November 4,
Alliance Francaise is presenting two pantomine films of
Marcel Marceau in Buchanan
202 at 12.30.
These films were obtained
through Mrs, R. de la Duran-
taye of the French Ambassador's office in Ottawa, and one
of them is the well-known
"Dakar", filmed in Techni-
colour.
Marcel Marceau is universally regarded as the world's
greatest mime artist and his
sketches of "Bip" have won
him worldwide acclaim, as was
evidenced by his great success
at Vancouver's First International Festival this summer.
*     *     *
MUST BE .RETURNED
NOTE:—&H eligibility forms
must be returned immediately
to Box 1 in the AMS office, as
they are urgently needed by
Student Council Eligibility
Committee and by U.C.C.
ARTSMEN TO DEBATE
AGAINST ENGINEERS
The firt Interfaculty Debate
of the fall session will be held
November 4th at noon in Arts
100.
Topic to be discussed by
teams from Arts and Engineering Faculties is: "Resolved
that an Artsman is Educated
whereas an Engineer is Trained."
Sketches
On Display
An exhibition of 300 sketches,
the work of 50 students of the
school of architecture, is now on
display in Hut 0-16.
Filmsoc To Show
Shorts On Monday
There will be a showing of
short features at 6 p.m. Monday
in the Filmsoc clubroom, Brock
Extension, it was announced to*
day.
i 1-iAJL., o.c....
University town!
Queen's, U.B.C, McGill, Saskatchewan, Dalhousie — name the University and we'll find
you alumni at Trail, Kimberley or some
other Cominco operation,
Ves, there are men from every major
Canadian University here at Cominco. We've
got B.Sc.'s, B.A.'s and B.Com.'9, M.A.'s and
Ph.D's. You'll find them in all phases of our
operations from the new grads in the mines,
plants, laboratories or offices to the most
senior men in our organization.
At  Cominco   they've found  interesting and
THE CONSOLIDATED MINING AND SMELT!
COMPANY OF CANADA LIMITED
Head Office and Sales Offices:   316 St. Jam«« Street, W««t Montreal, Qu*b*«? 6«nera1 Offleti TmW, 8rW«* ©OtumW*]
TADANAC   BRAND   METALS      •      ELEPHANT   BRAND   FERTILIZER »j
H9S   - .... COMINCO _ 8 A t U  T « • _ • R I T I • H . « O L ¥ M • « A^« «L»i* #_..• « H T ,f « * • ».A«l._< 8 8 •,
rewarding careers In their chosen fields*
They live in pleasant communities in magnificent western scenery where opportunities
for sport and relaxation are unexcelled.
Perhaps some of the members of your class
will join us in the big job of running one of
the world's largest metal and chemical enterprises. In any event, we're looking forward
to years of close association with all of you ,,.
because metals and chemical products from
Cominco enter almost every facet of bust*
ness, industry and every day living.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0125240/manifest

Comment

Related Items