UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 27, 1958

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0125213.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125213.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0125213-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0125213-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125213-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0125213-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0125213-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0125213-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0125213-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0125213.ris

Full Text

 BRING
YOUR
FRIENDS
VOL. XL
VANCOUVER ,B.C, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1958
No. 53
Jairus Takes Seat
-4>
Alberta
Increase
In Fees
(CP) — A general increase in
fees charged to sludents of the
University of Alberta was announced Tuesday by University
Vice-President, Dr. W. H. Johns.
The new levels affect all faculties and schools of the University in Edmonton and Calgary
and will come into effect in the
1958-59 University session.
In some instances graduate
fees will be increased almost
25%, Dr. Johns said. He declined to state exact figures on, this
increase.
First year arts fees increased
to $200 from $170, while Engineering jumps to $270 from
$235.
First year medicine will be
$350, an increase of $40. Law
climbed to $250 from $210 for
first year fees, but subsequent
years will increase only $15.
HELP   NEEDED
Girls lo act as OPEN
HOUSE guides and male
students to direct traffic
are still required. Come to
the OPEN HOUSE office.
Room 201, Brock.
f^*\ i ■nfr*>»>snV|i^.,*h<»f >».'
ALEX MACDONALD, CCF federal, candidate and M.P. for Vaneouver-Kingsway, loudly
and clearly expostulated his socialistic ideas in Arts 100 on Wednesday.
— photo by Dave Vawter
"Tough Election'
States CCF. MP.
"This federal election is shaping us a.s a sharp and difficult
fight between the CCF and the Conservatives," according to
Alex Macdonald, CCF M.P.  for Varicouver-Kingsvvay.
W .,     Macdonald,   speaking   to   stu-
Open House
No Books
Cars Or
Banners
• Library Closed, Lectures,
Labs Cancelled Friday afternoon, Saturday—The Library-
will be closed and all lectures
and     laboratories     cancelled
all   day   Saturday   for   OPEN
HOUSE  19;') 8.
• Malls Closed to Traffic Bar-
dents in Arts 100 at noon Tuesday, said: "political parties in
Canada had come to the great
divide."
He stated that the division of
parties to 'right' and 'left' was
Heroming more pronounced and
closer to the situation existing
in Great Britain.
The main reason MacDonald
gave for calling the coming
election a contest between CCF
and the Conservatives was the
fact that "the Liberals are in
decline and the Social Credit, is
in bad odour."
MacDonald  dealt    in    detail
with the issue of campaign and
other  'party'  funds.    He stated j
that   in   this  election   campaign s
the CCF would spend just over
$25,000, while the figure for the '
from   12.30   p.m.  Friday,   and   Conservatives would run as high '.
as five million dollars. !
"The only difference between ,
bribing a  Cabinet Minister and ;
iving   money   secretly   is   that
one  i.s a  crime and  the other  i.s
rier.s   will   be   placed   at   both | ,.lk(,n  f(),. ^..inled in Canada to-
c-nl ranees   to   the   Main   Mall J ,|;is-," he said,
and Easl  IVIall at 4.4a p.m. on '      When  asked by Ken  Hoclkin-
Friday   and   0 30   a.m.   Sati.ir- | sou, CCF Club member at UBC,
dav.     Sludenis   must   remove! what,   he   considered   to   be   the
WUS WAD ELECTIONS
MEETING TODAY
There will be a general
meeting for all women on
campus today at 12.30
in Engineering 200 to elect
the executive of the Women's Undergraduate Society and the Women's Athletic Directorate.
Speeches will be beard
from candidates seeking positions of vice - president,
treasurer and secretary of
both WUS and WAD and
for the PRO of WUS.
Nominations will be accepted from the floor and
the speeches will be followed by secret ballot.
One ol the larger Open House
exhibits is this slrimluro
erected by Ihe Architects on
the  Main   IVtall.
I'holo In   !\like Smic
their cars From all roadside
| parking places, and, unless
1 they plan to remain for OPEN
•      HOUSE,    remove    cars    from
parking areas within the barriers   by   these   limes.
• No   Banners     Permitted     On
Campus Area All  outdoor
banners must be removed
Irorn Ihe campus for OPEN
11 O U S E. Buildings a n d
Grounds have been instructed
to remove all banners not
down by  Friday  noon.
|i • O P E N     HOUSE     TRAFFIC
Needs Men--The Open  House
Commit Ice     needs      la   lo   20
men   lo   direct   I ra If ic   on   Sal
urday  evening  from  6 p.m.  to
10   p.m.     If  you   can  assist   at
I ins   I ime,   p'onse   leave   \ our
name   and   phono   number   al
die Open  1 "louse office.    Your
cos ipcrsis ion   is   essenl i.'il   it   a
serious   traffic   lieup   is   lo   be
asoidod,    aceordins;    to    Open
I tuiise   Comniil lees,
most important issue of the
election campaign, MlucDonald
replied: " employment a n d
pi ace".
MacDonald stressed thc seriousness of the presold nuemploy
ment situation in Canada. He
staled thai nine per cent of the
working group in Canada is at
Ihis   moment   unemployed.
"Expcrl economists consider
10 per cent to be the critical
point," he said.
"The   Liberals  and   Conserva
lives   are   bankrupt   of   ideas   lo
deal wiih the situation," according lo MacDonald.
Schmidt  Today
Waller Schmidt, abstract
painter, will speak at noon today
in Physics 200. Tne event is
sponsored by lhe Lutheran Studenl Association on campus.
Schmidt will explain one ol'
Ids  works. "Adam and   Eve".
The address will be followed
hy a 'general  discussion  period.
Hayakawa
Tomorrow
"Why we don't behave as human beings" will bc the subject
of UBC's Open House special
speaker, Dr. Samuel I. Hayakawa.
Dr. Hayakawa will deliver
the free public loctu'v at 8.30
p.m. Friday in Room 100 Buchanan Building.
Author of the best seller ■-■
"Language In Action," lhc Vancouver born educator now teaches al, San Fracisco State College.
Birds  Athletics
Tonight-Gym
BASKETBALL
The UBC Thunderbirds meet
the Albenii Athletics in the
third game ot their current
series to determine who i.s fa
meet the winner of the C-Fun
-- Eilers series, tonight in the
Men's  Gym  at  8.30.
The Birds and Hie Alhlelscs
are lied al one game each following the first two games in
Alberni.
A-Cards will be honored at
the .name tonighl and al the
second  game   tomorrow   nighl.
Close Finish
Crawford, Edgar, Horsman
Elected On Final Slate
By MARY WILKINS
Elections Reporter
Jairus Mutambikwa was elected vice-president Wednesday evening in a close race with Pete Meekison.
On the first ballot, Mutambikwa polled 1,320 votes and
Meekison scored 1,215. Third candidate Graham Moseley took
534 votes, and was eliminated after the first count.
The second ballot showed little change in the relative
standings and Mutambikwa came out 107 votes ahead of
Meekison.
Commenting on. his win, Jairus said to The Ubyssey, "I'm
overwhelmed with the opportunity to serve the students of
UBC. I will certainly do all I can for the students of this
university. It shows that the studens of this university realize
the importance of an International University Community. In
this respect I shall certainly do all I can to help promote the
good will and understanding between Canadian students and
students of other countries."
Mutambikwa, 26, i.s a graduate of Capetown University,
where he served for two years on that university's students'
council. He is at present studying on a WUSC scholarship
working towards his M.A.  in the Social Sciences.
Defeated candidate Meekison stated, "I think Jairus will
do a very good job and that next year's Students' Council will
have a very good year."
Moseley commenting on hi.s showing said, "It in no way,
dampens my interest in student affairs. There are still jobs
to be done and I shall be available should I be asked to do
them."
In the election of the Co-ordinator, Jim Horsman and
Chris Heath fought it out on a second count, but Horsman
finished with a lead of 212 votes.
Bill McAllister was knocked out on the first count, when
he polled 840 votes.
Although Heath took six of the ten polls, he could not
overcome Horsman's heavy lead in both the Brock and the
Library. The engineering and VGH polls also gave Horsman a
slight edge.
Horsman stated that he fully intended to carry out hi.s
campaign promises to renovate the Brock Management Commiltee, to prepare a Special Events Calendar in time for Registration and to attempt to remove the speakers from Brock
Cafeteria. He also extended his thanks to all who helped on
his campaign.
Dave Edgar took a comfortable lead over Russ Brink to
win the Chairmanship of the University Clubs Committee.
He polled 1,675 votes to Brink's 1,259.
Brad Crawford succeeded in hi.s attempt for Executive
Member. He took all the polls except Acadia Camp, where his
opponent Dave Bremner had a slight lead. The final count
showed   1,721  for   Crawford   and   1,217  for   Bremner.
Crawford commented after his win, "I am very happy to
be elected and will do all I can to put into operation the
platform on which I ran,"
3,027 students, comprising 35 per cent of the campus voted
in the election, w'hich was described by the Returning Officer,
a.s ilvevy orderly."
The full voting Students' Council for 1958-59 has now been
i elected. The Editor-in-Chief of The Ubyssey and  the Public
Relations Officer, both non-voting members of Council will be
announced at a later date.
ELECTION SCOREBOARD
o, i
in
U
J.C,
\
*~f
2 i
•**■»
4)
0
0
1
o
.if i
0
rt
3
T5
nl
2
.0
rs
'6i
fi
X
O
I-
.0
'1,
1
*-*  !
(-4
^3
H  |
1
w
w
Q
cq |
*~\
w
>
h.,
***,
GEORGE SWINTON
George Swinton
Today - On Eskimos
Canadian artist, George Swinton, will speak in Physics 202
at noon today on "The Art of
the Eskimo."
Swinton was sent to the North
in 1957 by the Hudson's Bay
Company to report on Eskimo
art activities. While there he
tape recorded and photographed
the Eskimos, gaining some insight into their living conditions
and the new problems arising
out of recent developments in
the North.
'Tween Classes
VIC'K-PKESIDKNT
1
iVlul.ambikwa
.   1321)
230
118
98
178
517
120
9
7
115
98!
2nd   Ballot
240
67
25
25
21
58
.15
5
0
14
10
Total
15«0
297
143
123
199
405
135
14
7
129
108 !
Meekison
.  12.15
20.".
79
61
165
257
324
27
v.,
51
43!
2nd   Ballot
228
64
27
20
14
46
27
(i
0
9
15!
Total
1443
21)7
106
84
179
34)3
351
V
CO
58 1
Mi ise ley
534
152
56
49
39
127
43
12
1
21
51 !
CO-ORDINATOlt
j
Horsman
1136
256
91
66
122
304
168
19
')
41
55 i
2nd   Ballot
411
Kb
26
22
48
101
76
5
1
20 :
Total
1547
3-12
120
88
170
408
241
21
3
64
75:
Heath
1002
.140
101
85
133
219
154
8
4
Ml)
6! is
2nd   Ballot
')•)')
)).'•>
65
21
27
49
68
57
10
1
26
9
Total
13,'35
205
122
112
182
277
2 11
18
5
11 5
78
McMli.sl'.T
840
168
54
52
HI
191
146
18
, t
55
39
UCC CHAIRMAN
Edgar
i«7.i
147
107
191
423
243
20
6
Jl)9
96
Brink
32511
225
98
98
173
286
218
• )•>
3
71
61
FXHCITIVE
M'IKIVIBl'.'Ii
Craivlortl
1721
328
129
127
229
419
279
27
5
100
78
Bremner
1217
235
112
77
137
293
177
18
4
84
80
Filmsoc Shows
'Doctor at Sea'
THURSDAY
WUS   -   WAD     ELECTIONS
today at 12,30 p.m. in Engineering 200. All girls urged to
come out ard support both WUS
and WAD.
ff*      ff-      ff*
FILMSOC   will   be   showing
"Doctor At Large" in the Auditorium at 12.30 today.
ff* ff* W
FINE ARTS COMMITTEE
sponsors "The Art of the Eskimo" — a lecture by George
Swinton, School of Art, University of Manitoba, at 12.30 in
Physics  202.
ff.      tf.      tf.
DEBATORS  WORKSHOP  —
This evening al 7.15 in the
Double Commiltee Room. All
wc Iconic.
tf.      tf.      tf.
UN   CLUB Panel   Discus
sion on "The Future of the
Baghdad Pad in the Middle
Fast." Dean Soward, Dr. I,a-
ponce, IVTr. Favsv.i Asadi, noon in
Arts   100.
ff* ff* ff*
CARIBBEAN Students Association panel discussion on —
"Theme Federal ion in West Indies on event of Swearing in of
tiovornnr-Conoral in W.I.." The
speakers are from CSA and UN
Club in Fne;iimoriiii; 202 at
noon.
•>"'•       •»*■       ff,
CIVIL   LIBF.RTILS  UNION—
There   will   lie     an      important
meel iii!.:,    in    Ail;   20 1    today   al
noon.     Kloelion   id'  officers.
■Y,        .'{■       ff,
PHILOSOPHY  CLUB Dr.
Avi'smi Siroll will speak on
"Lii/pcai Pmsiimi.-an" in TUVL2,
loday al   I 2.30  p.m.
SCM Ted,is   al   "I 30,   ' 4'he
I,: fe and (Mission nt Ihe Church"
led hs" lies . ,1, linclianan, 312
Aud   lUiiidim;
ff.       ff.
NEWMAN CLUB Kleclinns
lo   tie   I eld    tmjay.    Pells   opened
0 a.m. In 4.30 p.m. in Clubhouse
ilL-.'V All active members are
iiri'.ed  In come oul   and   vote. P*ge 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday,  February  27,   1958
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized aa second class mall. Post Office Department, Ottawa.
MEMBERS CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Student aubscriptions $1.20 per year (included in AMS fees). Mail subscriptions $2.00 per
,jrear. Single copies five cents. Published in Vancouver throughout the University year by
t£e Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not
MMSsarily those of the Alma Mater Society or the University. Letters tc the Editor should not
fte more than 150 words. The Ubyssey reserves the right to cut letters, and cannot guarantee
pubMcfttions of all letters received.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF. PATRICIA MARCHAK
ing  Editor      Dave  Robertson
J«Ws Editor  Barbara Bourne
Assistant News Editor-..    Bob   Johannes
CUP Editor ...
Features Editor
Sports Editor —
   Laurie Parker
._.... Sylvia Shorlhouso
._. .... Allan Springman
SENIOR EDITOR - ALAN GROVES
Reporters and Deskmcn:—Mary  Wilkins, John Wrinch,    Lois    Boulding,    and    Rupert
Buchanan.
TELEPHONES'
Editorial and News Offices - -AL. 4404.Locals 12, 13. 14
Business and Advertising Offices - - —- AL' 4404- Local 8
Can We Afford
By Rupert
The drama we witnessed Monday between President MacKenzie and Premier
Bennett was a sad reminder of a serious
conflict between two of UBC's roles.
One duty is to make education available
for as many people as possible, and for this
wi must rely heavily on the provincial government for financial help.
The other duty is to be the political conscience of the community. This is necessary
because there ism't anyone else to do it.
There has to be some island of truth in
thie present day sea of self-activated economic and political groups.
Perhaps "island of truth" is too strong.
Our political views are colored by our
youth. Still a recognition of our own fallibility should not shut us up, because it
is better to be wrong through political .self-
interest.
It is self-interest that makes our economic world go round. Problems are sometimes solved by a consideration of what i.s
best for the country but more often by„ a
/playing off of brute power interests against
brute power interests.
Such a battle delayed the building of the
St. Lawrence Seaway. It is probably going
on behind the international commission sel
up to arbitrate the use of the Fraser River.
The thing is most blatantly displayed in
strikes, which have become financial gamble,
company and union each gambling that it
can last out longer than the other.
This is all very well. It is free enterprise
in a pluralistic society, in which large gro'g-s
keep each other at bay.
This is all very well, a.s long as people
A Conscience?
Buchanan
remember that there is a standard of what
is best over and above what the strongest
group would enforce.
Not a standard of what is best in the
sky, but one which can best be arrived at
by a group which is not activated by self-
interest, at least, as much as the other
groups are.
Where is such a group? Certainly not
in management, or in labor. And the
churches have largely abdicated their temporal sway.
The university wins by default.
What does accepting such a role entail?
More is a hardy example. We live under
a government which from east of the
Rockies can be smilingly described as zany
but from inside can only be viewed with
considerable alarm.
Now should UBC speak out, should it
call them as it sees them, and risk losing
financial help from the government, or
should  keep  silent  and  keep  its subsidy?
Keeping its subsidy is of course necessary to fulfilling its role of providing education for as many people who are as ready for
it as possible.
In deciding which role is more importanl,
there is one consideration we would suggest. The subsidy might not bo lost, by speaking out. Its would depend how the voters
took it. They might dismiss it as ivory-
tower rantings and casually re-endorse Social Credit at the next election, or thi y might
lake it. to heart, and make sure that UBC
wa.s not "punished'' for it, by losing its
government  he.lp.
Il comes down to how much faith we
have in the voters.
Representative  Government
By Dave Robertson
The Spring General Meeting will be
asked March 13 to abolish itself.
This is the major recommendation of the
Committee to Investigate Representative
Government at, UBC, after a year's study of
UBC's form of student government.
It is also the major recommendation of
the preceding year's special Students' Council Committee to Investigate Studenl Government at UBC, and of many well-intentioned committees and individuals before
that.
Abolition of the General Meetings is not
put forward to deprive the student body of
any of its democratic privileges, but rather
so that the student body can manage its
affairs more efficiently.
The suggestion now at hand i.s to replace
the General Meeting with a more workable
body in which each faculty and the larger
"interest groups," e.g. UCC, WUS, etc., are
represented in proportion to the size of
their memberships.
Objections to General Meeting as it i.s
now are the same objections that have been
used before, but (hey are just as valid a
quorum  (1.5 per cent of the enrolment —
over 1 ,!i()0 this-, year, and increases every
year); lhe fact, lhal special intcrtsl or "'pressure" groups can loo easily sway a General
Mooting by "packing" il; the confusion lhat
results when the Armoury is januivd -•■-
many cannot hear; few arc allowed lo
speak;  rational discussion  is  impossible.
The General Meeting no longer i.s able
to make any decisions but unanimous decisions. Controversial issues, which arc1 most,
important, are either passed on to rofor-
endtims or voted on, on the basis of each
side's emotional appeal. Decisions the General Meeting makes can hardly be called
"leprost-ntat sve."
The Committee's arguments in favor of
lhe replacement of General Meetings with a
representative assembly are printed on tho
third page of today's Ubyssov, so that students may understand Council's position.
A representative1 assembly can bring
oreler in student government from the chaos
of the General Meeting.
It. can also serve the individual sludenl
bolter than can the General Meel ing; and
this will become more true each year as
UBC's enrolment grows.
itiG Com/no Conoof/cin tlGctions
By David Corbett - Dept  Of Political Science
On Monday, Fell. 3, two days
jifler I lie Prime Minister announced that an election would
lie held, Ihe class in Polilical
Science LH)0 (Government of
Canada) was asked lo hand in,
signed or unsigned, answers to
the question "What do you
think will be the distribution
of scats in Hie House ot Commons, by parties, after the coming election?"
Thc distribution of seals in
the Parliament which had just
been dissolved was;
2v>
U)
5
Conservatives .  112
Liberals      104
CCF
Social   Credit
Others
One hundred and seventeen
students handed in answers. Of
these 91 perdict a Conservative
victory, 26 predict a Liberal
victory, and one will not commit himself, saying that the
parties will end up with "100
to 120 seats each."
01' the students predicting
a Conservative victory, only
HI expect that party to have
an over-all majority of seats
(113 or more). Only one of
those predicting a Liberal vic
tory expects the Liberals to
have a working majority. In
other words about three-quarters of the class expect the
minor parties and independents
to hold the balance of power
in the next Parliament as they
did in the last.
The guesses about the number of seals the Conservatives
will win range from 90 to 160.
For the Liberals the range is
from 60 to "135. For the CCF,
students foresaw a range of
from f) lo 40 seats, and for the
Social Credit Party, anything
from R to 22 seats. As for
Members of Parliament outside
these four parties, the predicted
number ranged from zero to
10, and in more than one case
a few victories were predicted
for Labour Progressive Party
candidates.
DIFFICULT  TO  SAY
It is difficult to say what,
if anything, these guesses
prove. The ballots are being
kept till after the election in
case anyone should turn out
to have been right, but in contrast to the similar election-
guessing game to be put on at
Open House, there are no
prizes. There  is  no reason  to
suppose that this class would
guess more accurately than any
random selection of students
or the general public.'. Teaching
them how to predict elections
is not part of the course.
My guess is that the class
will in fact prove to have been
farther off the mark than the
general public. I was struck
by the narrowness of the range
of their predictions. For instance, only two students in
the class consider it likely Rial
the Conservatives vill win
more than 150 .seals, and most
of them predict a change of
less than a dozen scats, either
way, from the numbers now
held by each of the major
parlies. I think the students
have been made too cautious
in their guesses by their knowledge of the existing distribution and their assumption that
what exists will persit. Past
elections show that small
changesrtm percentage of popular vote can produce wide
swings in the number of scats
won.
As the class' ballots were
being handed in, I put an estimate on the board. It was as
follows:
Conservatives       150
Liberals          7a
CCF ....    25
Social Credit 10
Others . ..      . f>
Quebec seems likely lo be
the main source of change. The
Conservatives are having less
trouble this lime in finding
able and popular candidates
there, for the very good reason
that they are expected lo win.
Nothing succeeds like success.
I hasten to point oul that
my guess is entirely a guess.
When events prove it wromg
let not the fault be attributed
to Ihe discipline of political
science, There arc a few political scientists who make a specially of analysing electoral behaviour by elaborate formulae
in which an increasing number
of variables can be taken into
account. This work is gradually
becoming more systematic and
the range of error is being
narrowed down. However, my
guess is based on no such systematic research; unfortunately almost none of it has yet
been done in Canada. I rely on
the pricking of my thumbs,
chicken entrails, and other such
lime-tested   methods.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Failure
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
The reaction of a portion of
the student body to President
MacKenzie's words at the
lunch hour meeting on Tuesday seems somewhat akin to
the reaction lo Robert Bonner,
Premier Bennett and a host of
other politicians who have
spoken on this campus.
A Ubyssey editorial saw the
sludenl reaction at the Bonner
meeting as moral indignation.
Perhaps lhe same spirit, which
pervaded the Bonner meeting
was also present yesterday
when our President spoke.
Admille-dly, Hie boisterous
interruptimis came1 from a minority, but in all possibility this
w;is the same minority,
proaipled by Ihe same' motives,
whose' actions at the1 Bonner
meeting were caU'gorizod as
moral indignation.
This is by no means an effort to justify the activities of
the above' named politicians.
Perhaps they "asked for it."
Perhaps their statements were
vague and evasive. Does this,
however, demand questions of
a similar nature'.' Does this call
ior ;i fiasco?
II would appear lhal this is
merely a form of revenge
which doesn't assist in clarifying I lie issue.
Now, if this is revenge, let's
face il thai way and not rationalize' il away. In addition,
there' is a possibility of the interruptions yesterday and al.
thc Bonner meeting, etc., being
expressions by extroverts of
somewhat sadistic feelings, for
purposes not of rectifying a
problem, but so as lo exlol
themselves fit another's expense.     If,   however,   it.   is   an
From
Apparently a lot of people'
were unable lo get into lhe
auditorium to see' and hear
Premier Bennell on Monday.
I expeel a great deal will have
been written ahoul Hm display
in a general sort of way, but
1 thought that some of I heme
might feel a liltle lem; disappointed if I could loll them how
the   thing   looked   from   where
I sal     or slood, or loaned, or
whatever il  was.
1 wenl in al about I I MO with
a friend, and Hie place wa-:
pretty nearly full then. M.\
friend saved me a seat nesir
< he1 door while | went dow n
find got us some lunch While
1 was genu- I he imiil leman wlm
was scheduled In loci lire in Ihe
auditorium from I 1 :!!() usilil
111:30 came m said looked
around and then went su.o
again I am sorry I mi erne I I lml
It might VW'I'i lisue been the
most    eulerlainm-'.    Hinm,    i'.: 11
ere I Sat
By Gordon B.  Inglis
lappcned during lhe whole The' pushing caused several. back, and then sat down again,
affair. smaller people, particularly Finally (lie curtains opened,
We sat and wailed, and some girls, consielcrahle discomforl, fovea line, four men on the
people quiellv sang a liltle and a few mildly e'laustropho- stage. I could not reach the
Social Credit song, which hie types had loud moments pocket in which I keep my
sounded rather good, but l ()1' profane panic. The* _ crush glasses because of the crowd-
could  only  make  out   one  alii-      g"' rather serious after a while. ing,   but   my   neighbours   told
A row of seals seemed to give me lhal the men we're Dr. Mac-
way, and several smaller poo- Keiizie, Mr. Bennell, Mr. Smith,
of I'.cnnelt's store . . ." which I1'0 were forced lo struggle* and Somebody Else. I don't
has  a   nice'   lift   lo   il,   even   as      prell.v  hard,   with  their  fright- know yel   who Somebody  Else
ened, liltle, sweating faces set was, but ho didn't say anything
in expressions of desperation, or do anything anyway,
lo avoid being .smothered. I Dr. MacKenzie started lo
wsis pleased lo sec a large mini- speak, but a lol of people
tier of large and gallant young drowned his voice oul by shout-
mon working strenuously lo ing aboiil going lo the' Arm-
protect relal i vely helpless girls. ouries. lie snid we couldn't go
A ralhe'f courageous fellow, there, but a lol of us shouted
have a private- Iheory about becoming concerned about Ihe any w;iy. I I hiuk wc jusl wauled
i eopl .• in pushing crowds who pessibilily of serious injury, lo gel out anel .go home'
feel called upon lo shoul one made his way down to the Dr. IVIacKcn/ie them an-
or boih of those words. Almost front of the auditorium by noiinced lhal he had been inane "du.- um-ds uould be pre- walking on the backs of lhe formed lhal people* were being
I mm! le I would even .accept scats, and spoke* to sewcral pe*e>- injured al Ihe back of lhe hall,
"Pu-;h!"il il were shouted with pie of apparent importance, and kindly asked us all lo
prope'i'  accenl,                                         who each arose in turn,  looked "keep lhal   in mind."  I  am sure
leralive  line':  ".  .  . and  Bonner
runs a bawelv-hou.se in I Ik* hack
prose.
AISLES FILLING
By I:.' o'clock lhe aisles were'
filling up Then a bunch of
sub-human ore-al ures out in I he
led I started to push in with
greal, demcnb'd surges, shoul ■
ing,  ' 1 'barge!"   and   " I tea co'"   I
honest and understanding interest in current affairs which
prompts moral indignation at
"mismanagement", then the
student reactions should be
condoned to say the least.
There are other areas in
which we fail to come to grips
with the issue. We frequently
find discussion in this publication on subjects such as education, UBC's contributions to
the community (eg. community's conscience) etc. To what
extent is this discussion concerned with principles rather
too far removed from practice?
Perhaps those who criticize
the Christian theory of love
which isn't implemented in
everyday life will find many
instances of mere theory in
many student discussions. Such
lbceiri/ing lias ils place but il
seems lhat all too oflen it leaeis
to conclusions which arc false
and inadequate. leading to
complacency and condemnation of others.
We all know lhal il i.s much
easier to find fault with individuals and organizations exercising much responsibility
than il is for these individuals
to formulate policy for the
simple reason lhal the critics
all loo readily see only one
side, their own.
The issue is this: perhaps we
as sludents aren't always right.
Shouldn't we as individual
sludents and as a collectivity
engage in a more legitimate
and incisive evaluation of our
actions and ideas basing it on
a perspective which includes
bid also transcends the immediate socio-intellectual context
of this campus?
Yours truly,
V. VOGT,
Arls  It
South Africa
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
With reference to the article
on the forthcoming South African elections I would like lo
add thc following:
The population of South Africa i.s approximately eleven
million, consisting of only two
million Europeans and thc remainder being made up of Africans, Asians' and mixed
breeds. This minority of two
million Europeans almost completes the voter's list.
Just prior to the death of the
RI. Hon. General Smuts, one
million 'cake colored' were
given the' right to vole, in order lo start, relieving the segregation tension. Alter the
death of General Smuts the
Nationalist Party came into
power because' the' I'nite'd Parly had been in power for a
fairly long period and the people  felt  the need for a change.
Soon after their parliamentary victory the Nationalists revoked the voting power of the
'cake colored' because these
people supported the United
Party.
In order to obtain a larger
number of seals in the following election many of the strong
United Party constituencies
were* subdivided.
Thc new stronger government took into its hands to
change with treason, the people who tried tei belter the
negro's  way of  life.
All of this and much more*
leads lo the fact that it will
not be an election but a reinstatement of something which
i.s almost a scelhing dictatorship.
A South African,
HUGH    HAMILTON,
Eng. I
Suggestion
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
I have three suggestions to
make concerning the morning
traffic rush onto the campus
via University Boulevard.
1. That cyclists should be
asked to ride on the sidewalk
which is usually clear of pedestrians at this time of day.
2. That the speed limit along
University Boulevard be raised to 35 mph from the main
gates lo Wesbrook Butcvard
and thai amber blinker bgh'ts
be installed at all cross walks
in this area.
3. That an entrance be out
across thc sidewalk into the
parking lot at the corner of
University Boulevard and Ihe
East Mall, enabling traffic to
enter the lot without blocking
the Boulevard al Ihis point.
As an addition f would suggest lhat the Universily gales
be moved west some 50 fool lo
give motorists a clear view of
cross traffic when leaving the'
University gi ouncls.
Yours sincerely,
D.  "N.   VlCKEhS,
Arts II
ff.       tf       ff*
Very Important
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
Yesterday I was in your office inquiring about a very important 'Tween Classes nofive
concerning VOC Open House.
No notice of this event, appeared anywhere in the paper,
while on page one, column
two you printed utter trash
concerning a basketball game
attended by (27) twenty-seven
people.
Our event concerns two hundred to three hundred  people.
Perhaps   you     could     make
some   allcnipl   to   consider   important  notices in the future.
Yours  sincerely,
LES  ASHBOURGII,
PRO, VOC
that all the little girls who
fainted, had their ribs crushed,
and Iheir feel trodden on were
greatly comforted to know Unit
Dr. MacKenzie and the rest
were keeping them in mind.
Dr. MacKenzie' wenl on lo say
a lot, of tilings thai 1. couldn't
hear, and the* sub-humans still
out in Ihe hall s h o u I e d
"Charge!" a few more time's.
Then Dr. MacKenzie aske'd Mr.
Smith lo introduce' Mr, I.k'ii-
netl, and I suppose in* did. but
1 didn't hear him because some'
scats gave' way or something
jusl then and things got a bit
confused.
MR. BENNETT
Then Mr. Boning I got up.
lie drank a lol of something
out of a resl plastic cup. and
spoke quite a bil. lie has gained
si lot of confidence since I saw
him last, five \oar-; ago. and
God knows he had enough
Ihem tie seems lo have developed si sort ol "preaching"
st \ le modeled on > bat of Bil ly
Graham     and     Oral     Roberts,
which involves clipping off the
ends of his sente'uees with a
kind of yelp. He' also seems to
be developing a Southern-Central U.S. ae'ce-nl. I didn't hear
much of whal he said, really.
I rather expe-cled a lol of
witty heckling, but nobody
near me said anything very
funny. 1 suppose the people
up in front did, bid I couldn't
hear  Iheaii.
Mr. Betinel I kepi .saying lhat
it would be our own fault if
we rlirln'l have* I ime for <|iics-
lions, smd then he would wa veins arms and encourage i-verv-
bndy lo shoul and use up I ime
some- more. I don't, know whether he really cared whether
I here was a que'sl ion period or
mil.
I don't know much aboiil
polil ies. In it I understand I heme
;. re a lol of "hot" issue s a round
rigid now, and I rather hoped
lhal. he would speak about
I hem,  Iml  he didu'l or if im
ebel, 1 didn't hear bine 1 also
was   hoping   lhal   some   people
who know more about these
things than I do would ask
him some pertinent questions
when Ihey were given a chance.
mi 1 joined in .when everybody started lei shoul period.
Funny tiling, though, when the
question period I'iualh came
nobody asked him much of
anything al all. Somebody said
something about a man in
Campbell River who has a
criminal record, but Mr. Ben-
i-e-l I didn't know I lie mau. Lots
of ne-ople- in Campbell River
have criminal  records,  1  think.
Afler a while Mr. Smith
Ihsinke-d Mr. Bennell and
cvcrybndv went away. All Ihsil
wfis li-fl we're lhe books, rubbers, brief-cases, and timbrel-
I.is lhal belonged |n people who
nsid fainted, and had been sort
ol pushed out. sl ill slandin.g, vo
the sub humans in lhe- hall, who
I'ee'ivesl limn; joyously Taken
al I around il u as a prel ly poor
(Continued on Page 4)
See  FROM  WHERE   I  SAT Thursday, February 27, 1958
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
General Meeting
Or Rep. Assembly?
(Ed.. Note — The following are excerpts from the Report
of the Committee to Investigate Representative Government
at UBC which give the arguments for replacing the general
meeting with a representative Assembly. Students' Council
has adopted this report.)
THE THREE "PSYCHIATRISTS" don't need the beards to cover up their faces. We
know they are really Ken McGill, Clayt Davis, and Gerry Pearl, second-year Med. students who will take part in the entertainment for their Medical Ball on March 5th.
The young sweet thing is Debbie Greenberg. —photo by Jack Reclerman
Eugene Loring To Highlight
Next Week Dance Festival
By   MARY   WILKINS
as participating in the Festival A  workshop  for  dancers  of s
Workshop, March 7 and 8. all  ayes  and  abilities  will   be!
Ewsene Loring,  one of Am- Thursday.   Mr.   Loring   will      hdd   Fl'id;i>'   and   Saturday   of;
erica's   foremost   choreograph-     deliver the first  Koerner Lee-      [hv    Fi-st'val    Week.    Details
ers, will  appear al UBC  next      lure at  8.30  in  room   1 OH,  the
week to take part in the UBC      Buchanan     Building.    Subject
Festival of Dance, March 3  lo      of this tree talk will be "Dance
may he obtained from the UBC
School  of Physical  Education.
Climax of the week will bc
8.
Mr, Loring, who is the creator of such bajlels as Billy the
Kid, and Harlequin for President, whose screen credits include Funny Face and Yolan-
da and thc Thief.', will give
three   public   lectures   as   well
ASUS POSTS
OPEN NOW
Nominations for lhe following" positions on the Arls and
.Science Undergraduate S"ci-
ely will  now l>c aeccpiod.
Presidenl. Vise ■■ President,
Treasurer, Sccn-lary, Fourih-
Year Pop., Tint -;i-Y( sir Pep ,
Seesind-Year Hep., and Public
Petal ions  Oil icer.
Nominations, seconded |-y
al, le.'is! two people in either
second or third scar Arls,
must be in Box I sl 1 of the
AMS oll'ice by fi o'clock on
March 4.
Pharmacy
Hosts Valley
Students
the  Dance Festival  Ball,  sponsored bv the UBC Dance Club,
in  the  20th Century."
Mr.   Loring's  second  appear
ance will be'l'or the students in Saturday.   March  8.   at   9   p.m.
Ihe   Auditorium.   Friday   noon, Titkets ari; Slri0 a cou'jk''
March     7.     His     performance The   Festival,   a   UBC   Con- s
will be titled "Dance i.s a Lan- tcnnial   event,   is   being   spun-;
guage" and will describe wh.at «»'<'d   by   the   UBC   School  of
thc   dancers     are     portraying Physical Education, UBC Fine
when   they perform  ballet  and Arls   Committee,     Department!
jive.
Friday evening lie and hi.s
("impari;' will give a panorama
of ballet, lap, jive and free
style dance in the Auditorium
a I  {'..3 0.
Ticket -s for Ihis performance
are as'ailable al Kelly's or sit
lhe CBC School of Physical
Pducal ion,
Tim Dance Fesl i\ al will open
Monday, svuh a "Sbmccmimi
Stomp"  al   C.30   in   Brock   Hall.
Folk l)mmi'i',.c le.-iluru'!.; Harold Ha rlon , Db'eclor of I he annual Summer Dance Festival
at Couchiehing Park, will be
prosciiled Tuesday evening at
(!.:{() in  Brack Hall.
Admission to both Ih.ese
events is 7,)c.
Wednesday. March 5, will,
see the Dance Drama Company from Mew York starring
Emily Frankel and Mark Ryder performing in the Auditorium at 8.30. They will present.   "The   Diamond   Balls",   a
of University Extension, B.C. j
Centennial Committee, UBC [
Dance Club, and the Students' ;
Special Events Committee, j
Two showings of outs-stand- ■
ing films on the dance will bc i
shown for students during the !
week.
Unusual dances from around
I he   world   will   he   shown   at ,
Li.30  noon  Tuesday.   March  4.
Place  lo be announced.
Alan  Thomas of  the  College
of   Educa! ion   will   show   three
cine-dance films made hy Shir- i
lev-   Clark   of   New   York   and j
discuss  evolving   film   form   at j
12.30   noon,   Thursday,   March
0, in Physics 201.
Triggs Again
Best Photog
On Friday afternoon, as a
curtain-raiser lo the Pharmacy
Open House displays, the Facully of Pharmacy and  the P. C.      or the Scimol of Physical  Ed
SI an ley G. Triggs, Totem pbo-
ographer, has won the Ben Hill-
New York slrcel scene ballet; Tou1 Memorial photographs-
"Brsikenburg Concert Ballet" (.,mU.sl ,-,„. t|u, svv,m({ yenr in
and   "Still    Point",   an   award       ,.   v
winning   ballet      featured     oil \      .„  . ,,,••.
,,,,,,„.,'    ,,  ,. i      rriggs     was     awarded     lirst
(. BC.-I V I'oho. i . .,,,,.   c.    , •
i prize   in   the   Sludenis    Section.
Tickets for Ihis performance   p,|;ick  and   While,   for  his  work
mas-  bc  obtained   from   Kelly';
Pharmaceutical Associa! ion are
hosting fise groups of high
school students from Surrey
and   Eraser  Valley schools.
Chartered buses' will Irans
port groups from the Alder-
grove, I,angles', Crimen Elizabeth and Princess Margaret
High Schools lo lhe Campus and
several Chillisssmk pharmacists
will bring in smother group of
students   Ijpun   that   centre.
Upon arrival on the Campus.
Ihe students ss il I s i< ss I dins
deahii,'.'. wil h Pharmacy si , a
career smd wiih Ihe research
and  developmeiil   of   new   drsm.s
Alter lhe exhibits are opened.
there ss ill be guided lours
through (lie r,:olms,i.al Sciences
and Phnrmaes buildim.; and :v \
eral other buildum's. Follow um,
dinner m \. v,\ aa and F. ml
Camps dm s! uden i.-; wi I! ret i im
home.
SI udenls    i"    ! i m|
and   Science   ss !m   si
in    Ihe    csmm r      p.. ;
I 'harmai \     ;., • ■    i, s :' m I    lo    s
Ihe     Pliarn sm;..     imlu'm! ,    ,'iu
( Ipell     I I- ".!• "     smd     So     v  ,e-s
slioss in  s    ol     I'rr-r:.:,        I'll' a-
I; o ■ 11 n   1' 11 s i   ,, i   e i -,,    , 11   i; •
loss in ■■   I ' us- ■
|<Yid.m .   F, i.rmu -    ::,; ;
lo  -LOU  pa. ,  '■', nu  m    , v,V i, -Mi
Sal ii rd,i s .   Alan hi !    I
pans   I-  In ,i |is,s , I! I.i li pin
cal ion.
UN Presents
Asia Panel
"Cynthia."
He also took third prize in
that division wiih "African
Conl lemon." r
Another Tot cm photographer,
Fred C. Schrack, was fourth
svilh   "One-Zcro-Tsvo."
"Cold   Hill,   B.C."   won   S.   E.
Head   I'irsl   prize   in   the  Faculty
Division.   Black  and   White.
The   [' ;\    Club   pn souls   the       oiher  prizes    were:     Beverly
sixth  in  lis series on  "Asia -   - A    March.  "Fire  Escape", Student's
Ciaul   hi  Turmoil,"   m   Arts   100,    Individual   Color;   Milton   S.   E.
;il 'i'""! !»il;iy ; Hicks,   Slud.-id's   Set   Color;   A.
I)":i"    -oss-.ard.    Dr     Lnponce, ' VVaiiiniaii.      "Markel      Woman",
;|;|(I   Alr    Fasszle  Asudi   ssill   par-' Faculty     Inch vicinal     Color;     A.
Iicipale   in   a   panel   ,,n   "Tiie   Fu-    Wainman.  Inicillly  Set   Color.
Hire o|  Mm  Baghdad   Pad   in  the        [Jen   Hill Tool   was   an   Extern-
'Middle  l-'m-d.'   oiscnssing 11 u- So-   sion   Photographer   who  died   in
vicl.    Weslerm   and    Arab   post     lhe  summer  of   lOs'H  and   lel'l   a
ll"ll~; re.-,peeiis'cl\ . sm,, ,,|" money in his will for Ihe
1 ''" ctlijel  of  111 • ■  recenl   uierg-    or:.',,in i/al ion   of   a   student   coni-
or-,   o|    !-a:i ;,| x> rm      suid      It'siq     polil ion
■birdsiii   on   Ilm   pact   ssij]   lie   an Thi-.   sear's  compel ition   i.s  lhc
I I I li inl   annual.
Objections to the General
Meetings:
The general meetings are unsatisfactory.
REASONS:—
1. Difficulty in getting a quorum. Fifteen percent of the
student enrollment constitute a
quorum. 1335 students arc required to be present at a general meeting. As the university
grows it will become more difficult to get more students out
and there should be a minimum
limit for a quorum.
2. The general meeting can be
"packed" thereby making it possible to pass motions that are
only in the interest of special
interest groups rather than in
the interests of the entire student body. This will become
more evident as the universily
grows.
Nature of the recommended
".Representative Assembly." —
4. As the size of the budget
increases and as greater responsibilities make themselves apparent the students' council
should be subject to some form
of a checking power. As such
the general meeting appears to
be. in practice, a very small
check upon the students' council."
Composition of the Student
Senate or Representative Assembly:
• The committee recommends
that the Assembly be composed
of — a) all present office holding councillors (elected and appointed) — b) representatives
from the student body at large
elected on the undergraduate
societies basis, and c) representatives from certain interest
groups on the campus.
The student councillors, a.s the
executive officers of the society
should bc representatives.
The committee believes that
the most satisfactory way to
elect the members to the Representative Assembly is on thc
undergraduate society level;
lhal is to say each undergraduate society will be entitled to a
certain number of delegates corresponding  to  their enrollment.
The Committee further believes that there arc certain in-j
terest groups that should have |
representation in thc .Representative Assembly a n d these
groups are (i) the UCC; (ii) the
MAA; (iii) WUS (as long as il
stays on council); (iv) WAA; (v)
the  Publications  Board.
The committee recommends
that these interest groups have
only a token representation in
the Assembly. Since these
groups receive a large portion
of the AMS budget the committee recommends that they be
given representation.
Fades and regulations for selecting representatives for the
Representative Assembly:
(i) Studenl Councillors —
All duly elected and appointed student councillors who take
office   in   the   spring   term   for
their respective year shall be
members of the Representative
Assembly.
(ii) Undergraduate Societies
Representatives —
a) Each president of his respective undergraduate society
shall automatically be an elected representative lo the Representative Assembly.
b) Each undergraduate society
with an enrollment of 200 or
less shall have in addition to the
president a minimum of lour
elected representatives. One of
the four representatives must
be in the final year in his faculty.
c) Each undergraduate society
with an enrollment of more
than 200 shall have one representative for fifty students regis-
trede in their undergraduate
society in addition to the president.
d) Of those undergraduate societies having an enrollment of
more than 200 but less than 500
there shall be one representative from each year of the undergraduate society.
e) Of those undergraduate societies having an enrollment of
more than 500 there shall be
two representatives from each
year of the undergraduate society.
1) Each undergraduate society
shall be responsible for electing
their allotted number of representatives to the representative
assembly.
g) Students of post-graduate
level shall be included in determining the enrollment of an undergraduate society.
(iii) Interest Groups —
The following organizations
shall have the specified number
of representatives:
MAA, 2; WAA, 2; WUS, 2;
Pub., 2;    UCC, 2.
DANCE TEAM
TAKES TROPHY
Thc UBC Dance Club Viennese Waltz Team tied with
the Ex-Magee Team in thc
MacMillan Waltz Festival at
the Georgia Auditorium last
Friday, each team receiving
90 points.
The male dancers of the
Dance Club were acclaimed
the best on the floor.
The trophy is on display in
the showcase of thc Brock
Extension.
Council Posts
Open Until
Five, Friday
Applications for Students'
Council Public Relations Officer
are now being accepted by the
Secretary, Box  150, Brock Hall.
Council i.s also seeking applicants for Chairman of the High
School Conference Committee,
Chairman of the World University Service Committee, Chairman of NFCUS Committee, College Shop Manager, Totem Editor and Editor of the Handbook
and Tuum Est.
Deadline for these applications is 5 p.m. Friday.
Scholarship
Scoreboard
MacMillan and Bloedel Lid. j
are offering scholarships of
$400 each to sludents in Arts
and Science who are preparing
to enter Forestry or Forest Engineering in the following session.
Two of these scholarships will
be available for Forestry and
one for Forest Engineering.
Application forms are obtainable from Dean Gage's office.
All applicants must indicate
their intention of proceeding to
Forestry or Forest Engineering
in the fall of 1958.
A scholarship of $200, the gift
of the B. C. Dental Supply Co.
Ltd., is open to sludents proceeding to dentistry. It will be
awarded to the student in attendance who has completed the
pre-dental requirements and has
been accepted by an approved
school of college of dentistry.
Application forms may be obtained from Dean Gage's office,
and" should be submitted by
April 30.
The London Free Press bursary of $500 will be awarded to
a graduate of a Canadian university entering the Graduate
Diploma Course of Journalism
| at the University of Western
1 Ontario in September, 1958.
The award will be based on
evidence of aptitude for journalism as a profession and an anticipated ability to improve the
status of journalism as a profession.
Application should be made
to the Registrar, University of
Western Ontario, London, Ontario,  before  August 31,  1958.
The Japanese government lias
offered a two-year scholarship
for study in Japan.
The  scholarship  provides   for
tuition   and   a   living   allowance j
of $05 per month.    It is open to j
graduates  in  any  field,  but  undergraduates   will   also   bc   considered.
Applicants need not know the
language, and can spend one of
the years lerning the language
if they wish.
For further information see
Professor Ron Dore, Room 159,
Buchanan Building, History Department.
SKIERS
Varsity Men's and Women's
Intramural Ski Meet to have
been held on Grouse Mountain
Sunday. March 2, is now cancelled due to lhe lack of snow,    j
ear     AC-,
Inl eresled
;      ol
n i
The College Shop - Brock Extension
WHERE THERE'S SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
Don't Forget That We're Open During
Open House
FRIDAY- 5;00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
SATURDAY - 10:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
COME IN AND SEE OUR SPECIAL OFFERS
NEVER BEFORE AVAILABLE
DON'T FORGET
BIG SALE on MARC
Daffodils in the garden , . .
crocuses gay in purple and
yellow dress , . . and, in
EATON'S, new foshicm, new
merchandise to excite the winter-weary shopper. To fi/nl.sr
interest you . . . o vm .Ic
season ot thrilling cir .misor t
Jws opened at EATC',V.r< . . .
ond you'll find rtmr.y ci int«r-
•lling moment whl!» o'ttiid '.'
them.
There's Elegance
in Casuals
such os these dyed-to-match
sweaters and skirts by Bern-
hard Altman of Austria. Tha
slim skirt of eggshell cashmere-
like wool meticulously designed
with stitching in front to giva
a panelled effect. The colour-
keyed cashmere sweatir banded
down the front with brown and
white embroidery and fastened
from the collar with "pearl"
buttons.    Skirt 25.00
Sweater
39.50
Other   sets   in   various   colours
and styles.
Sportswear—Second Floor
The Chemise Lock
Comes to Ling-srfe
An adornble chcrrme nightgown of dacr.va, nylon and
cottoir, drip-dry end ne iron. A
ddlicctely prinlcd flora! bond
at knee-',enmh fnm winch falls
a deep f! 'ance The boct neckline end yoke cue fros'rT with
two tone lace. VVnite, pink, or
yellow. g^5
Lingerie—Second Floor
.- \^'-\   lm'\)
■•>;   .'-.in
Adorable Baby DoSIs
Take to Chemise Sfryta
Sweetly striped with tiny
msebud.,, the lop is yiven the
chemise look with o low -set
encirclement of satin ribbon
finished with a bow. Rows of
luce frost the yoke- and outline
lhe square, nea-.line, YeN'ov,
pink,   or  blue. 1 0 QZ
lingerie—Second Floo*
Men Like lightweight
Socks for Sprang
lo ,.,,.;, i Im I ragoo .mpci
. ' r ;■,; I o. nam', \cll ■•■■,
V -,, , , jr, -, : , -mlsnoa vv in
,.,.;■      !   ■  s   ,        iilmoj   m   Mo    .
■■ '■•- ..'.■--'—i 79c
He .iimy — Meiin  floor Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 27, 1958
Th
e
By ROBIN MAUNSELL
The Scene: Stanley Park.
Persons of the dialogue: Socrates, who is the narrator. Several youths — Raucus, Gaucon,
Deletus, Cautios.
Socrates speaks: Since the
subject of our inquiry is education, Thqmaclytus and the
others have entreated me not
to let the question drop, but.
to proceed in the investigation.
We have been trying to arrive
at the truth about the nature
of classical and progressive systems of education and about
their relative advantages. What
I really think, my friends, is
that, the inquiry being of a
serious nature, we will require
very good eyes. Remember the
old saying of Homer — "So
little for the mind leading the
blind."
Seeing then that we are no
great wits, I think we had
sbetter adopt a method which
I will illustrate thus: suppose
a short-sighted person were
asked by someone to read small
print from a distance and his
friend bethought himself of the
magnifying glass (you will pardon the anachronism, I hope)
so that he might read the letters enlarged — would not
that have been thought a rare
piece of good fortune?
Man, you're right, said Raucus, but how does that apply
to our inquiry?
I will tell you, I replied.
Education, which is the subject of our inquiry, is, as you
know, sometimes spoken of as
the responsibility of the individual and sometimes as the
responsibility of the state.
True, he replied.
And is not a state larger
than an individual?
It is,
Then in the larger, the quantity of knowledge is likely to
be larger and more easily discernible. I propose, therefore,
that we inquire into education,
first as it appears in the state,
and secondly in the individual,
proceeding from the greater to
the lesser and comparing them.
I dig you, said Deletus. That
is an excellent proposal.
And if we imagine the state
in process of creation we shall
see the educational system in
process of creation also.
That ..follows.
When the state is completed
there may be a hope that the
object of our search will be
more easily discovered.
Yeh, far more easily.
But ought we to attempt to
construct one, I said, for to do
so will be a very serious task.
Think of the abuse earned by
those who have attempted to
do   so before   us.
One more hypothetical state,
replied Gaucon, won't make
any difference,  man.
Well then, I began, it is ap-
pparent that a state is created
only because its citizens band
together for their convenience.
They all have need of each
other; none is self-sufficient.
Could it be imagined that people might form a state with the
primary purpose of becoming citizens of lhat state, that
„, i.s to say, without first considering the material advantages of
having helpers and partners?
No, that seems unlikely, Socrates, admitted Cautios.
But is il possible that the
citizens, once their slate was
no longer a primitive society,
might delude themselves into
imagining they had joined together I h r o u g li pure civic
pride'.'
Very   true.
Let us create* in our minds a
stale, then -- and yet the true
createir is invent ion, which is
the daughter of our desperation.
Of course', replied Deletus.
Eel us first e'onsidcr their
way of life. They will produce
corn and coca-cola and clothes
and shoes- and live in prefabricated house's, interposed
Raucous.
Hold on. my young frie-nd, I
replied, we- have- as ye-l in
vented no Housing Administration. You would iml wish our
stale lei resembli- si Shrum','
Their houses will be' of Hie'
simplest ci insl met ion; I hey will
have their meals served on a
mat   of   remits;   I hey   will   IVclltie
on   beds   strew n    \\ illi   ye-w   or
Right
Wing Republic
myrtle. And they and their
children will feast, drinking of
the coca-cola which they have
made, wearing garlands on
their heads and hymning the
praises of the gods, and in
happy converse with one another.
But Socrates, Raucous interrupted again, there must be
some progress in the state. Do
you want the kids growing up
in ignorance and bliss, just like
their old man? You haven't
said a word about education.
True, I replied, I had forgotten about progress. But do
not think I have been overlooking education. The fathers
will leach their children their
own craft: they will take care
that their families do not exceed their means.
Man, that would do for a
state of squares! They might
be content with roots and
herbs.
But what else do you wish,
Raucus? I replied.
Why, the ordinary conveniences of life, man. Sauces and
sofas in the modern style!
Do you see where your desire for a modern state is leading you? You would have us
create a community such as the
one we have fled from today.
And possibly there is no harm
in that, as we will better be
able to see the workings of
education in a complex state.
In my opinion a healthy state
is one such as I have described.
However, I have no objection
to examining the sophisticated
state for I suspect many will
not be satisfied with the simple
life.
Well, I'm no culture-vulture,
said Deletus, but I don't see
where education rears its head
in this rustic life.
You are thinking, then, of
formal education. We may define education for our purpose,
may we not, as the training of
the youth of the state? It seems
lo me that the bequeathing of
their heritage to their children
by the parents is a noble sort
of education. Still, I see you
will not bc satisfied with my
picture. We must, then, have
artisans and craftsmen of all
sorts, importers, that is merchants, No longer will every man
do one clearly defined job in
the state. People will have
larger, more pretentious
houses: some will employ hirelings — men cannot be their
own masters in this state.
A.s the proverb says: "A rolling stone gathers no boss."
With a more pretentious style
of living will come ornamentation — the art of the painter
and the embroider will be set
in motion. And you will agree
that we must have lawyers and
doctors, and guardians to govern our state, for men practising different trades and professions cannot be said all to
possess the same facility of
mind   or   body.
That is evident, admitted
Cautios.
Now we have our state set
up so that we can examine il
and decide what educational
method would be best suited
lo perpetuate it. Do you renumber that we agreed earlier
that the state is established I
by the inhabitants for their own |
benefit? In short, are we
agreed that the people are
more important, more permanent, than the method by which
Ihey choose to organize their
life and lhe customs and insl ilutions which are outgrowths
of  the  communal life?
It seems clear that the state
serves the* people, not the people* the state, admitted Raucus.
Whal would you think if I
were* lo describe to you a system which was devoted to adapting its citizens lo Hie service nay, lo Hie* very shape
of the slate, one under
which a well-bred woman
w o u I d be indistinguishable
from  Ihe wood  work?
Man,  thai   sounds  real  gone,,
shouted  Raucus. !
Indeed, it sounds quite foolish, added Cautios.
That, my friends, i.s bid a
slight exaggeration of lhe pro-1
givssivo method so much favoured m Ihe- modern cities you
wish mc lo construct for you.
As eve have proven Hu* main
itiimimu of teachers should bc
vv ilh  Ilii'  votit.hs thev are edu
cating to be leaders and worthy
men. But you may ask —
worthy of what? Of the state?
Assuredly not, for it is they
and their forebearers who have
created the state. Rather, they
should be worthy of themselves
and their fellowmen.
That seems plain.
Now, having disposed of this
sophistic road to success, we
must turn our attention to the
method we propose to follow
in educating the citizens of our
state. Would it seem reasonable
to you to assert that we want
men who are sensible, sensitive
and strong?
Those  would  seem   fair  requirements.
S
S
Perhaps you will be surprised to hear I have no method
to propose in educating the
youth of our state.
Man, nothing would surprise
us,  nothing!
That is not overly gratifying. However, I would have
the teachers of the state pay
proper heed  to the  two sides
S
EDITOR, BARRIE HALE
■a
Big Contest!
One (Count Them) One Big Prize!
Announcing the first annual Why I
Line the Bottom of My Garbage Can With
the Reviews and Criticism Page Contest!
One count them one prize only to be awarded to the winner! By simply completing,
in 100 words or less, the sentence below,
you yes you can win One Case of Beer (or
equivelent). Winner declared and published
and prize awarded March 21, 1958. Deadline for contest March 14, 1958. Mail entries to the Why I Line the Bottom of My
Garbage Can With the Reviews and Criticism Page Contest, Ubyssey, Brock Hall.
OFFICIAL ENTRY BLANK
Complete this sentence:
I THINK THE PEOPLE WHO WRITE FOR THE
REVIEWS AND CRITICISM PAGE ARE A BUNCH
OF MEALY-MOUTHED LITTLE POSEURS BECAUSE . . .
CRESTS
NUMERALS
U.B.C. BLAZERS
U.B.C. JACKETS
U.B.C. TIES
T-SHIRTS
PINS
RINGS
BEER MUGS
NOTE BOOKS
RAZOR BLADES
SHOE LACES
PLAYING CARDS
LIGHTER FLUID
FLASH BULBS
MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION
SWEAT CLOTHES
SCARVES
UMBRELLAS
CRESTED STATIONERY
CHRISTMAS GIFT ITEMS
FACULTY SWEATERS
LOST AND FOUND
BUMPER STRIPS
PING PONG  BALLS
CRESTED JEWELRY
COMBS
BOBBY PINS
NAIL TRIMMERS
KLEENEX
COUGH DROPS
TOOTH  BRUSHES
BANDAIDS
THE  COLLEGE  SHOP
NEW BROCK EXTENSION
Open Monday to Friday — 11:30 to 1:30
Double-Breaste
I'.ll , l-.ll    I A I'O    M'.M
male-Breasted Models
Sia GUANVtlJ,fi
Custom Tailored Suits
for  Ladies and  Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted suits
modernized in the new
single breasted styles.
Matz and Wozny
SPECIAL   STUDENT   RATES
548 Howe St.      MArine 4715
HOME
TRIMBLE  SERVICE  GARAGE
4494 W. 10th Ave., Vancouver, B. C. ALma 1551
STUDENT SALESMEN NEEDED
PART TIME
Local firm requires a group of Universily sludenis
In be trained by us to make S 100.00 per week working
only pari lime. This is something new and compara-
livolv easy lo sell, (let complete information Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, (2Hlh, 27th and 2Sth) at
12:M0 in MM li.   (next   lo personel office.)
Filmsoc Presents
Thursday,  Feb.  27—12:30
WH A LOAD OfF YOUIFKT
UAVE YOUR WORRIES BEHIND
For a joyoti*
uplift... tins is
just what the
doctor ordered.;
3ti&\
KASTMAWCOI.OB
,    V1STAVISION   (
i
OIRK   BOGARDe
MURIEL PAVLOW
DONALD SINDEN
JAMES  ROBERTSON JUSTICE
t^OM THI HKW XOVM   9T
KlfHAHr) (SIMOOM   I *.*AK) (Ofl
MIS    tmi. I.)W 1*1  till  HOII'.t,"
*«U "(MH'.IIW Al UA,"
ffi
of education considered necessary in my day — music and
gymnastics.
Music?
Yes, by this was meant the
arts — literature and all things
ordered and harmonious. Yet
you must take care not always
to regard the newest song
which the singers have, as
Homer warns in The Ubyssey.
Sounds like a dirty dig
against rock and roll.
Quite possibly. At any rate,
we may take it as a general
warning against new-fangled-
ness and excess. As for gymnastics, I think I can do no
better than to read you a passage from an author closer to
your time, Roger Ascham, on
the sports befitting youth. (Perhaps he is a contemporary of
yours?)
"I would wish that, besides
some good time witly appointed and constantly kept, to increase by reading the knowledge of the tongues and learning, youg gentlemen should use
and delight in all courtly exercises and gentlemanlike pastimes. And good cause why:
for the selfsame noble city of
Athens, justly commended of
me before, did wisely and upon
great consideration appoint the
muses Apollo and Pallas to be
patrons of learning to their
youth . . . Therefore, to ride
comely ... to play at all weapons ... to run, to leap, to
wrestle, to swim, to dance
comely, to sing, and play of
instruments cunningly; to
hawk, to hunt, to play at tennis, and all pastimes generally,
which be joined with labor ...
containing either some fit exercise for war or some pleasant
pastime for peace . . . be , . ,
necessary, for a courtly gentleman to use."
Now may I suggest we adjourn to the Sports Pavilion?
You're the bee's knees, Socrates, cried Gaucon.
I should prefer to be known,
I replied, as the gadfly's eyes.
COMING EVENTS
"Baby Doll" the latest Ten-
nesse Williams — Elia Kazan
collaboration, has passed the
British Columbia Board of
Censors and is now showing at
a downtown movie house.
The film, which is about a
year late in coming here, may
or may not be cut; the manager of the movie house now
featuring it would not commit
himself. He did say that if it
was cut, only about "two or
three" minutes are missing,
which is enough, of course to
emmasculate it, both literally
and artistically.
At noon today in Physics
202, Mr. George Swinton of
the University of Manitoba
will speak on "The Art Of The
Eskimo".
At 3.30 this afternoon, Dr.
Earle Birney of UBC's English
Department, will deliver another in his series of Readings
of Contemporary Poetry in the
40    YEARS OF SERVICE
TO THE   UNIVERSITY  OF
BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
ITS FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES,
THERE'S A REASON
Sedgewick Memorial Reading
Room.
The Ben Hill - Tout Menu*
rial Photographic Salon commenced last Tuesday in the
Fine Arts Gallery, and continues to March 15.
In the absence of publicity,
we can only assume that rehearsals are proceeding as
planned for the Player's Club
Annual Spring Play. Enough
information has leaked out of
the Green Room, however, to
allow us to inform you that the
production this year will be
Wilde's "The Importance of
Being Ernest," and that it will
be directed by Gay Scrivener.
™'ncn.-! /STATIONERY AND
PRINTING CO. LTD
TEIEPHONE      PACIFIC   OI7I
lOSS  Seymour  Street
Vancouver 2, B.C.
CLASSIFIEDS
WANTED—Male or female with
Reel   Cross   qualifications,   to
:     be  .swimming  instructor  clur-
i ing July and August, at the
children's summer camp in
the   Okanagan.     Phone     BA.
I     4618 Monday through Friday,
i     from I) a.m. to 5 p.m.
FOR SALE —Triumph 200 cc.
motorcycle, used very little,
cost $520. What offers? Phone
BA. 9047, ask for Dave.
LOST -— Asahit'lex F 2-4, serial
No. 795fi0, Reward. Phone
DE. fi4()7-L.
ITALIAN —• Experienced lady
teacher wants to start group
conversation lessons, Phone
EM. 8553. tt'55
LOST — One briefcase in Book
Store. II' found, leave in Ag.
Common Room or phone EM.
11154 after 5 p.m.
NOTICE Experl    typing   of ;
Theses,   Essays,   etc.   Call   KE. !
8162. |
FOR RENT      Large   furnished j
room.   Phone   AL.   447U-M,        •
LOST   --•   Wallet   in   Arts   Bldg. :
basement, Monday nighl. Call j
iVl.'t   Madam. Keep cash. Papers ■
valuable.   Please   return   lo   J.
A. Bonibardieri.
LOST        Black Waterman's pen i
in old   Arls  Bldg    Please   liiru
in  In  janitor  in   Arls  Bldg.
FROM WHERE I SAT
(Continued from Page 2)
show, so you needn't feel disappointed if you didn't get in.
Nobody gained anything much,
except possibly the fellow who
pinched  my cap,  and  even it
is pretty old and dirty.
WON'T BOTHER
Mr. Bennett said he was going to come back soon and
speak in the Armouries, but I
think I won't bother to go and
hear him. I will take Dr. Mac-
Konzie's advice and keep in
mind those people who were
being injured, and go out to
the Varsity Grill and have a
good lunch instead.
Exclusive to Students
NFCUS LIFE
Specially designed by
NFCUS to meet
your    needs
Call
TERRY
l Etth V MULLIGAN
'58 Grads
Your NFCUS credits
allow vou to start your
PERMANENT savings
and insurance at the
end oi summer and yet
have immediate protection,
CALL   US   NOW!
LOR INFORMATION
CALL OR WRITE
CANADIAN
PREMIER LIFE
INSURANCE   COMPANY
77!> W. Broadway. F'LX 2924 j
Sidney  K.  Cole, C.L.U.
Branch   Manager

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0125213/manifest

Comment

Related Items