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The Ubyssey Feb 13, 1919

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume I.
VANCOUVER, B.C.,  FEBRUARY 13, 1919
Number 11
Wireless Club Is
Formed In Varsity
THIRTY    RADIO    ENTHUSIASTS
MEET  TO   FORM   SOCIETY
A meeting of those interested in
wireless was held in the Physics building at noon on Tuesday. Thirty were
enrolled as charter members, and a
temporary executive was elected to
draw up a constitution and decide upon
a name for the club. The temporary
officers are: President, W. G. Walker;
vice-president, H. G. Gwythers; secretary, Green.
A lot of apparatus has already been
received, and more is expected. Equipment is already sufficient to enable the
members to begin practising the code at
once. Notice of further meetings will
be posted in the halls.
Tf you are interested in wireless, now
is the time to join. A knowledge of the
code is  not necessary.
STUDENTS' SERVICE
SUNDAY AFTERNOON
Principal Gandier, of Knox College,
Toronto, will address the student body
at a special service to be held on Sunday, the 16th, at 3 p.m. This is being
held in response to the call for prayer
on behalf of the Peace Conference. Professor Trumpour, of Latimer Hall, will
assist at this  meeting.
As it is seldom that services of this
nature are held in the University, it is
hoped  that  all  will  endeavor  to  attend.
GLEE CLUB
Owing to the examinations, there
were no practices by the Musical Society last week. However, they have
been resumed, as usual, on Mondays,
Tuesdays and Fridays. The orchestra,
whose members have been practising
diligently throughout the year, has
joined  with  the   Glee  Club  in  the   ren-
Players' Club Aids
Memorial Fund
PERFORMANCES ON MARCH 6th
7th AND 8th —TICKETS NOW
ON  SALE
At the beginning of this college year,
the Students' Council decided it was
now time to consider some suitable
memorial for the boys of the U.B.C. who
gave their lives in the great struggle of
the last four years. Various suggestions
regarding the nature of the tribute have
been informally discussed, but, as yet, a
final decision is impossible. The first
essential is the raising of money, and, to
inaugurate such a fund, the Players'
Club have decided to give the entire
proceeds of their first two performances
to this most worthy object. From the
staging of "The Importance of Being
Earnest," on the evenings of Thursday
and Friday, March 6th and 7th, they
hope to clear $700, and will do so, if
every student gives the support he
should. The proceeds from the third
performance of the series, on the evening of Saturday, the 8th, will go to the
Women's Auxiliary of the General Hospital. These ladies are in need of money
to furnish a sunroom in the Military
Annex, and have asked the Players'
Club to assist them. As over five hundred dollars of proceeds from another
year were given to this same hospital,
the Club members were only too pleased
to renew their efforts in aiding the institution.
Tickets for the Thursday and Friday
performances are now on sale. The advantage in buying these is that the box-
office is open to those holding exchange
tickets ten days earlier than to other
purchasers. Last year many were disappointed in not getting the sort of
seats desired; so the wise person is he
who buys his tickets in good time.
dering of some of the selections. The
addition of a cornet and trombone to
the instruments of last year gives a still
greater stimulus to our promising College band.
Senior Class Party
Best Ever Held
GRADUATING CLASS IS ENTERTAINED AT THE HOME OF
THEIR  MEMBERS
The members of the Senior year were
entertained by Miss Gintzburger at the
home of her parents on the evening of
Saturday, February 8th. Whist was the
order of the evening. The games must
have been exciting, to judge from the
continuous merriment at most of the
tables, and between games those who
had finished playing provided a little
jazz and ragtime with the musical favors they had received at the beginning
of the evening. The rendering of
"Polly-wolly-doodle" by Margaret Cameron and Gordon Fraser was particularly pathetic and was loudly encored.
Marjory Peck was forced to reprimand
Gordon Scott and Ian Gibson for their
childish disputes, but otherwise the evening was unusually successful. Chocolate
cake, coffee and ice-cream cannot be
beaten for refreshments; and all appreciated them, especially Lord. Fraser and
Shaw vied with each other for the honor
of being the class speaker. At midnight
the best party ever held by Arts '19
broke up.
Everybody expressed to Mr. and Mrs.
Gintzburger their appreciation of their
kindness in entertaining the class and
giving them a good time.
BASKETBALL
The first game in the Inter-Class
Basketball League will be played on
Monday night at 5:30 in the King Edward gymnasium, when the Science
men will meet the team of Arts '22.
Four teams are entered in this league,
the other two being from Arts '20 and
Arts '21. In all, twelve games will be
played, each team taking part in six
contests. The second game will be on
Thursday, February 20th, between Arts
'20 and Arts '21. UBYSSEY
February 13, 1919
HOCKEY
Seattle at Vancouver
MONDAY,  February 17,
8.30 P.M.
Prices:
Reserve    Seats,    80c;     Promenade,
$1.10;    Box    Seats,    $1.35.      Entire
Balcony    Unreserved,    55c;    Boys,
25c.    Prices include tax.
Reserve  Seats now on sale at the
GROTTO  CIGAR STORE
622 Granville Street
Phone,  Seymour  23420
ENLARGEMENTS
Photographs copied equal to the
original. Duplicates, enlargements
and   miniatures   made   from   same.
Uancower Pboio Co,
(Established 1911)
649 GRANVILLE STREET
(Down the Marble Stairs)
JFasljum - draft
QUALITY CLOTHES
QUALITY   should   be   the   first
thing to look for, especially in
young men's  clothes.
QUALITY     dominates     in    all
Fashion-Craft Clothes.
Prices moderate.
Value positive.
SHOP OF
FASHION-CRAFT
5^00. ¥mtn $c CUn.
ffittmtifu
514 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
WE WONDER
If   you   are   still   "going   to   school"   or
"attending the University"?
*    *    *
If you ever miss a warm lunch in order
to attend a noon-hour meeting?
* *    *
If you don't think it is time to cease
aiming, and to open fire?
* *    *
If you have ever considered who would
make the best president for our
Alma Mater next session; or
* *    *
If you are letting someone else do all of
the thinking for the College?
* *    *
If you always greet the ones you meet
in the morning with a hearty "Good
morning"?
CYNICA GAY
Unanswered Correspondents.—Necessity (not choice), kind friends, was
responsible for my neglect last week;
for some research was unavoidable on
my part, in order that certain insistent
individuals might have some foolish
and untimely  questions  answered.
Gwen.—Oh, dear little girl, let not the
green-eyed monster enter your young
life. The errant one did but succumb
to that which lures men even from
Browning lectures—the Orpheum. That,
my dear, was why you had to go home
alone  one  afternoon  last  week.
Astonished.—Oh, yes; Alfred R. has
become quite a follower (in one sense)
of religion. Matter of policy (but that's
not her real name), he declares.
Nelson.—Moth-balls leave a horrid
odor on spats, don't they? At the first
few dances, after the ban, use a little
more "White Rose."
Marjorie.—The best cure I know for
blushing is—remove the cause. Don't
do those things.
Country Student.—Now, my lad, if
you want to be a man of fashion, wear
sox like Murphy, ties like Fraser, and
purchase one of those dreamy little
Trench coats all the boys are wearing.
Acquire a second name, like Preston or
Havelock—it looks so nice on .a dance
programme.
Half the College (Feminine Half).—
Please send no more personal questions
about Dr. S—d—k. How do I know if
he passes the Chemistry building at 9:10
on Tuesday morning, and if it's the furnace fires that keep him late, and if
there are any slates around the Varsity?
Inquisitive.'—I am a young lady and
am not in any year: am only partially
taking a course.
We Specialize in
GLOVES
DENTS       FOWNES
PERRINS
Ladies' and Men's
E. CHAPMAN
545 Granville Street
Success Business
College
Limited
E.   SCOTT   EATON,
Principal
B.A.,
Corner Main Street and Tenth Avenue
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Phone,  Fairmont
2075
GIBSON STUDIO
Photographers
214-18   Birkt   Building
Phone,  Sey. 3430 Vancouver,   B.C.
HARRISON   &  CO.
R.   H.  SEABROOK,  Prop.
□ rawing    Instruments    and    Materials
Architects', Engineers' and Surveyors'
Supplies—Nautical   Instruments
and  Charts
Telephone,  Seymour 5826
582 RICHARDS STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
MCDONALD'S
CHOCOLATES
For   Birthday  Gifts
Granville  Street Near Robson
U.Morimoto & Co.
Direct  Importers of
Japanese Fancy Goods
Ladies' Wear Made Special to
Order
Hemstitching by  Measure
Manufacturers of
"Bamboo  Knitting Needles"
Main Store:
673 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phone, Seymour 6410 February 13, 1919
UBYSSEY
E. C. KILBY
The Hosiery Specialist
628 Granville Street
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Wellington and Comox
COAL
The Best for Kitchen and
Furnace  Use
Macdonald, Marpole Co. Ltd.
Sole Agents
1001  MAIN  STREET
Phone, Seymour 210
J. N. Harvey's Clothing Stores
We   Are   Showing   a   Number   of
NEW SPRING MODELS
In Young  Men's
Form-fitting Suits
That You Should See
Look them over now—try them
on. They will show you just
"what's what" for this coming
spring.
The  prices  range
$25, $30, $35, $40 to $45
Bargains  in  all broken lines  of
Suits, Overcoats, Shirts, Underwear,     etc.,     during     January.
Watch  Our  Window
J. N. HARVEY, LTD.
125-127   Hastings   Street
West
Also 614-616 Yates Street,
Victoria, B. C.
Look for the  Big  Red Arrow
MUSICAL NOTES
The musical outlook for the next
month is not very encouraging, but
better days are coming about the end
of March. Two very great pianists are
announced to appear here this season.
The first, who has assumed the name of
Ethel Leginska, now occupies the place
held until a couple of years ago by
Theresa Carreno as the greatest living
woman pianist; the other is Leopold
Godovsky, who is one of the greatest
pianists of any time, past or present.
Many authorities declare that he has
reached the limit of human possibilities
in the realm of pianoforte technique.
This, perhaps, may be doubted; but
there is no doubt whatever that he is a
supremely great artist, and the rare opportunity to hear him again should not
be neglected.
In addition to these two pianists,
Cecil Fanning, the great American
tenor, is announced to appear here, as
well as Pablo Cassals, who is as great a
'cellist as Godovsky is a pianist. Besides all this, it looks very much as if
we are to have more grand opera, and
this time by a company which is even
better than the San Carlo.
A COLLEGE SONG
If someone gifted with poetic ability
can work up enough enthusiasm to
write the words for our College song;,
there is no doubt whatever that the
music will be forthcoming. It is impossible, however, to write a song without
the words. As Robert Franz said, "The
music emanates from the words; you
cannot have the music first and then fit
the words to it," We want an original
College song of our own, and we are
going to have it; but co-operation is
necessary  in  order  to  achieve  this  end.
MILITARY NOTES
The action of the officers of the
O. T. C, in temporarily cancelling the
Tuesday drills in favor of athletics,
seems to meet with general approval.
The officers are willing to listen to the
athletic enthusiasts, and to meet them
in a fair-minded manner, which should
result in an agreement suitable to all
concerned.
It is confidently expected that arrangements will be completed whereby
the members of the O. T. C. will be allowed to begin shooting practise within
the next few weeks.
Leckie Shoes
are    made    for   the    man    who    is
particular
Remember:    "The Quality goes in
before the Name goes on"
'That's  a Leckie"
University Students
Who have time to spare
could make no better use of their
time than in the
Study of
SHORTHAND
It will be of untold advantage
to you in taking lecture notes.
Most great speakers and many
great writers are good shorthand
writers.
What about  YOU?
Don't you think it would be
valuable to you  also?
Enter any time—Day and Evening Sessions.
R. J. SPROTT, B.A.,
Manager.
Phone, Seymour 1911
"MIKADO"
Our  Specialties:
Silks,   Kimonas,  Ladies'  Wear
Made to Order
Opposite the Orpheum Theatre
766 Granville St. Vancouver,  B.C.
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For   Light  Refreshments,
Ice   Cream   and   Candies
at
774 Granville Street UBYSSEY
February 13, 1919
Clubb & Stewart
Limited
309 to 315  Hastings  Street, West
SPRING MODELS
in Young Men's  Suits
"20th CENTURY BRAND"
and other first-class makes
SPRING HATS
The very latest — the smartest
types we have ever shown. See
them before deciding where you
will buy.
Phone, Sey. 8380
The
Northern Life Assurance
Company of Canada
is a good  Company  to Insure with
EDWIN J. GALLOWAY
New and Old Book Shop
Specialists  in  University  Books
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
Capital
Reserve
- $15,000,000
- $13,500,000
THRIFT AND  SECURITY
Open a Savings Account with The
Canadian Bank of Commerce. If more
convenient, accounts may be opened
and deposits made by mail.
Ten Branches in Vancouver District,
including the  following,  which  are in
the vicinity of the University:
Fairview—Corner   Sixth   Avenue   and
Granville
Kltsllano—Corner Fourth  Avenue  and
Yew Street
Mount   Pleasant—Corner  Eighth  Ave.
and Main Street
UBYSSEY
Issued     every    Thursday    by    the     Publications
Board   of the  University  of British   Columbia.
Extra  mural   subscriptions,   $2.00  per   session.
For   advertising   rates,   apply   Advertising    Man -
ager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief Ian.   A.    Shaw
Senior   Editor Alfred   Rive
j Margaret Browne
Editors J Patricia Smith
I Reginald  E.   Cribb
Chief  Reporter T.   Preston   Peardon
DEPARTMENTS
Musical   Editor Leopold J.   Mahrer
Military  Editor Claude   P.   Leckie
Exchange   Editor Agnes   M.   Ure
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business  Manager W.  John  Allardyce
Advertising   Manager John   N.   Weld
Circulation   Manager J.   Gordon   Fraser
Editor for the Week Reginald E.  Cribb
SUBSTITUTE FOR DRILL
There is a great deal of unrest
amongst the students, due to compulsory military training. The benefits
of a course in any O. T. C. are very
theoretical. Presumably the objects of
such an organization, in a peace-loving
and anti-military country, is to keep the
students physically fit. But it fails to
do so. There is, moreover, a spirit of
medievalism in the training that would
cast men into classes and deprive them
of initiative. We believe, however, most
of the students recognize their duty to
the State is to be efficient men and
women. Since efficiency can be only
maintained by proper attention to the
physical side of life, the authorities are
well within their rights in enforcing
some kind of athletics. We would suggest that the hours devoted to drill be
given over to the charge of some expert
instructor who would put the students
(both men and women) through gymnastic exercises. Although not generally known, the fact is that apparatus
work is not essential either to the development or maintenance of a healthy
body. Dumb-bell drills, massed boxing,
running and mat work constitute the
principal features of the Y.M.C.A. and
Y.W.C.A. classes to-day. The space is
already provided in the Auditorium. A
good instructor, dumb-bells and mats
would complete the necessary equipment. (These supplies will have to be
purchased some time for the gymnasium
at Point Grey.) A compulsory course,
modelled upon those given in the Y. M.
C. A's, would be a pleasure and not a
hardship; the mental tone of the University would be much improved; and
the physical slackers, and those who
hate militarism, could have no complaint to make.
THE LIT. SOCIETIES
Our Province is very deficient in
public speakers, and it seems to us that
the University is the place in which such
men should be developed. We are aware
that we have two Literary Societies, but
both of these are systematically failing
in their work. One would think that
they were organized . for travelling
speakers, professors and missionaries;
for, amongst the students, it is always
the same few who are the class debaters, and take part in the oratorical
contest and international debate. The
success of the Economic Discussion
Clubs shows how deplorably these Lits
have failed, as the meetings of the former show there has been lacjc of outlet
for many of the students to express
themselves. One mistake of the present
organizations is, we believe, that everybody is a member, which, in practice,
means very few are interested. There
should be a definite membership, each
one joining upon the understanding
that, during the year, he or she will
have a certain place in the year's programme. There are many subjects,
historical, political and literary, which
should come under the scope of the
Literary Societies. These can be set
forth in papers, debates and general discussions; impromptu speech nights,
mock trials, mock parliaments and
literary evenings would vary the programme. The Women's Lit. seems to
have grasped the situation; would it be
too optimistic to hope that the Men's
Lit. may some day do the same?
CORRESPONDENCE
(The editors accept no responsibility for statements made in this column.
Letters must be brief. They should be written
on one side of the paper only and, if typewritten,
must be double spaced. The name and year of
the writer must be enclosed, but the letter may
be published over the initials or a pen-name if
so desired. No attention will be paid to letters
that do not comply with these rules.
The editors consider themselves under no obligation to publish any one letter. In the case of
two letters on the same subject, if both cannot be
printed,  the briefer will be given the preference.)
ENDOWMENTS
Editor   "Ubyssey" :
We sometimes hear the complaint that this
University has not been privately endowed, as
have some of the Eastern univsrsities; that this
University needs money; and why doesn't some
benevolent millionaire donate enough money to
enable the institution to move to Point Grey?
May the University of British Columbia never
receive the endowment of a farthing, if such is
to be used to pay for anything that it is the duty
of the ratepayer to support. Such an endowment
would be a curse. Scholarships, by all means;
but when it comes to the question of reducing
the rates and taxes, the beneficiary can but hinder. The people as a whole must provide the
funds  to carry on our provincial institution.     To FebrTjary 13, 1919
UBYSSEY
The Art of Speaking
Debates, Speeches, Play-parts,
Recitations  Coached
Special   rate  on   single  lessons   to
U.B.C.  Students
HELEN BADGLEY
Suite 23, 709  Dunsmulr Street
Phone,  Sey.  6535Y
Mrs. A. L. Richardson,
L. R. A. M.
Pupil of Tobias Matthay
Formerly    Professor    of    Piano    and
Lecturer at McGill  University,  Montreal,  and  Midland Institute,   Birmingham, England.
Studio,   709   Georgia   Street,   West
Phone,  Seymour 8519L
VIOLONCELLO
MISS MAUDE SCRUBY
A.R.C.M.,  L.R.A.M.
Receives Pupils, Ensemble Classes,
Concerts, Recitals. Visits Vancouver weekly  (Tuesdays).
Studio:  709 Georgia Street
Telephone, Bay. 189
CUSICK
SERVES   GOOD   EATS
692  BROADWAY, WEST
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
3.g).To>.er,01
TWO   STORES:
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
FIT-REFORM
WARDROBE
345  Hastings Street
We sell clothes for young men and
men who stay young
quote Bernard Shaw on the endowment of hospitals, "A safe rule for the millionaire is never to
do anything for the public which the public will
do (because it must) for itself without his intervention."
If you are still unconvinced, think for a minute
of Vancouver's public library. A Carnegie library, to be sure. Was there ever a more miserable collection of books in a city of 200,000
inhabitants? But will the city ever give a cent
to replace this with a real library? Never! Some
other millionaire, dealing in futures, may wish to
deposit a conscience-salve here in Vancouver to
make  his  account  balance   in  heaven.
L'H.  I.
PEOPLE  OF   ONE   IDEA
Dear Editor:
Some of us have been reading an essay upon
"People of One Idea." It seems to me, dear
Editor, that Hazlitt might have had in mind
some students of this University—students who
can only think and talk in terms of Economics
and Economical Theories. If we dealt with more
cultural subjects, we should not become so very
one-sided and see "red," as the tendency is at
present. Even students must be on their guard
against the weak-minded sensationalism of the
soap-hox orator, which is so characteristic of
"people of one idea," or, as Ralph Waldo Trine
calls them, "people with only one window in
their soul." Cannot the Men's Lit. save us from
becoming  ranting  puppets   of   Bolshevism?
R.  E.  C.
THE ANNUAL
Editor   "Ubyssey":
As far as can be seen from present arrangements, it is the intention of the Publications
Board to turn out a very poor Annual this year.
Mr. Webster cannot be blamed for this; he is
doing his best, but his hands are tied. It seems
that the trouble is lack of funds, necessitating a
very small publication this year. We cannot insult the members of Arts '19—the first class to
have passed completely through U.B.C.—by
offering them a paltry pamphlet as a record and
souvenir of the happy days they spmt here. No
one would object, I think, to paying fifty cents
or a dollar, if it came out of the caution money,
and it would enable the board to publish an
Annual of which we would not be ashamed. The
Annual of 1917 was excellent, that of 1918 almost
as good; but what of 1919 ? Remember, too,
that, compared with last year, the students have
shown much greater enthusiasm in all activities
this session. Surely we cannot allow our Annual
to deteriorate just as rapidly as our University
activities develop.
D.   A.   W.
Science   '20.
OUR SOCIAL REFORMER
Now "Facile descensus—■" was the
motto that he bore, and he came to
chase all evil from the Science children's door. Alas! his task is hopeless—
boys will "suck" cigarettes, chew
matches, and match pennies; and, by
Heck! they sometimes bet. But, God
bless his little heartie (very affectionate); they know he's done his best; to
his cause he is devoted, for he never
takes a rest.
T. V. L.
He—I  wonder where  all  the  bugs  go
in the winter?
Him   (absently)—Search  me!
FOR CLASSY SWEETS
AND   DAINTY   EATS
Give
THE ARBOR
the  "Once  Over"
779 GRANVILLE STREET
T^EEP   the   happy   memories   of
College days for all time.
Bridgman s Studio
will    help   you    with    pictures    of
established  reputation
At  the  same  address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
The
Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial  Stationers   and   Printers
Students'   Loose-Leaf  Binders
Educational Stationery
School  Equipment
Drawing   Instruments   and   Materials
320  SEYMOUR   STREET
(Opposite C.P.R.  Depot)
Vancouver, B.C.
Fresh  Cut  Flowers
Funeral  Work  a   Specialty
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists, Nurserymen
and Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head  Office:
48   HASTINGS   STREET,   EAST
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728   GRANVILLE   STREET
Phone,  Sey. 9513 UBYSSEY
February 13, 1919
IRELAND
&
ALLAN
"Xlbe JBooh
Xovers'
TRetreat"
BOOKSELLERS  AND   STATIONERS
649  GRANVILLE  STREET
Phone, Seymour 602
VANCOUVER, B.C.
THE     YAMATO
Direct  Importers  of
Japanese Silk and Fancy Goods
460 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
Phone,  Seymour 2288
PASTE THIS IN
YOUR SONG BOOK
THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER
Oil, say, can you see by the dawn's early
light,
What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming?
Whose   broad   stripes   and   bright   stars
thro'  the  perilous  fight,
O'er the ramparts we watch'd were so
gallantly   streaming;
While the  rockets'  red  glare,  the bombs
bursting in air,
Gave proof thro' the night that our flag
was still there.
Chorus
Oh, say, does that Star-Spangled Banner
yet wave
O'er the land of the free and the home
of the brave?
On the shore, dimly seen thro' the mists
of the deep,
Where the foe's haughty host in dread
silence  reposes.
What is that which  the breeze, o'er the
towering steep.
As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half
discloses?
Xow it catches  the gleam of the morning's first beam,
Tn full glory reflected now shines on the
stream.
Chorus
'Tis the Star-Spangled Banner. Oh, long
may it wave
O'er the land of the free and the home
of the brave.
Oh,  thus be it ever when freemen  shall
stand
Between   their   loved   home   and   the
war's desolation;
But   with   vict'ry   and   peace,   may   the
Heav'n-rescued   land
Praise   the   Pow'r   that   has   made   and
preserved  us  a  nation.
Then  conquer  we must, when  our  cause
it is just,
And this be our motto:   "In  God is our
trust."
Chorus
And   the   Star-Spangled   Banner   in   triumph shall wave
O'er the  land of the free  and the  home
of  the  brave.
ECONOMIC LEGISLATION OF
BOLSHEVIK GOVERNMENT
Lenine says, in a pamphlet called
"The Soviet at Work": "What we have
already decreed is yet far from adequate
realization, and the main problem of today consists precisely in concentrating
all efforts upon the actual practical
realization of the reforms which have
already become the law, but have not
yet become  a  reality."
The fact that circumstances have prevented the Bolsheviki from putting their
programme into practice, and that many
of their followers have not fully understood it, should not blind our eyes to
the real excellence in many respects of
the Russian constitution and decrees.
The land, which was the basis of the
old monarchic feudal system, has for
long been one of the chief disturbing
factors in Russian life, and it is the Bolshevists' attitude to the land which has
won them such popularity among the
peasants. Doubtless much of their legislation will pass away, but the country
cannot go back to the old land system.
A decree, published immediately after
the November revolution, begins: "All
private ownership of land is abolished
without indemnification," and goes on
to state that all land shall form a national agrarian fund which shall be divided among -the people, giving to each
man or woman as much land as he or
she can cultivate, without hired help,
though it is specially stated that the
people shall co-operate so as to secure
the benefits of large scale production.
For anyone who is incapacitated, special
provision is made: if he is incapacitated
for a period less than six years, the
community works his land and harvests
his crops; if lie becomes permanently
incapacitated, his land is given to another, and he himself receives a pension
from the State. The general land fund
is periodically redistributed, depending
on the increase in population and in the
productivity of the land, but in such
redistribution the kernel of the allotment must remain intact. If in any community the land proves insufficient, the
surplus population, at the expense of the
community, moves to another district.
First, those who wish to move go; then
those who forfeited the rights of citizenship and want another chance; and,
lastly, those who are chosen by lot.
How the land actually passed from
hand to hand, we do not know; but we
do know what machinery the Bolsheviki
have provided to administer this land
decree. Land committees are elected,
under the control of the local soviet, in
each community. These committees are
responsible for the distribution of land
and agricultural implements, and for the
collection of taxes which the people pay
for the use of the land. Special provisions apply to city real estate and
buildings; but,. beyond the fact that
apartments worth less than eight hundred rubles per annum remain in the
hands of the present tenants, and all inhabitants of apartments worth more
than this must pay the difference to the
State, no details  are  at  hand.
In the field of industry and commerce,
the same principle of socialization prevails. The motto is: "He shall not eat
who does not work." The right to vote
and to be a candidate to a soviet is given
to all those who earn their living
through work useful to society. Moreover, the franchise is denied to any who
live on the interest of capital, without
working; to brokers, to clergy, to the
insane, and to any who have forfeited
the right by selfish or dishonorable
offences; but it is not denied to the educated. Indeed, the boards of workmen's
control, which manage private enterprises confiscated by the State, are composed of an equal number of representatives from the workers proper and the
technical staff. In some cases they have
been able to find only enough trained
men to form one-third of the board.
Just now the Bolshevik leaders feel that
the intelligentia cannot be trusted very
much, but they realize that they must
find some means of taking them up into
their  organization.
The new idea of industry seems to
be    the    satisfaction    of    human    wants February 13, 1919
UBYSSEY
SHIRTS
FOR EVERY PURPOSE
FOR EVERY PERSONALITY
FOR EVERY PURSE
New weaves
And colors
$1.50 to $12
Potts $ Small
LIMITED
Cor. Granville and Pender
SEY.1643
R.C.Purdy,Dd.
Famous Chocolates
and
Home-Made Candies
Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
675   GRANVILLE   STREET
EXCLUSIVE
COSTUMIERES
For Women,  Misses  and  Children
i^M^s*-
575 GRANVILLE STREET
ECONOMIC LEGISLATION  OF
BOLSHEVIK  GOVERNMENT
(Continued from  Page  6)
rather than the making of profits. All
competition is, of course, abolished; and
it is hoped that, when this artificial restraint is removed, labor and capital will
How into more natural and more productive  channels.
The Government has made the grain
trade a State monopoly, hoping in this
way to prevent, in some degree, the
starvation which threatens. The Russian Constitution contains very definite
legislation regarding the conditions of
work; the eight-hour day is compulsory,
and specific regulations are made governing meal hours, rest periods, holidays, overtime work, women's and
children's labor, and like matters; State
insurance is also provided for those in
dangerous trades. Altogether these
regulations seem to be consistent with
humanity and efficiency at the same
time. A Vladivostok factory, which
turned out eighteen cars each day and
employed six thousand men, was reorganized under the new system; the staff
was cut down to one thousand five hundred, but the output was twelve cars a
day, which meant an increase of efficiency over one hundred per cent. But,
of course, things have not gone as
smoothly in all factories. In one institution they adopted a system by which
each two hundred workers sent a delegate to receive their wages on pay-day.
Once the man, thus trusted, fell under
the influence of vodka and lost all the
money. His fellow-workers sat in judgment upon him and decided to expel
him, but to support his family. The
loss was then distributed among the
A'hole fifteen hundred workers in the
factory.
All power in Russia is vested in the
Soviet, under whose control the aforementioned land committees and boards
of workmen's control act. These local
committees and boards are linked up
through the district, regional and provincial organs to the all-Russian main
committees, over which the commissaries, or, as we should call them, the
ministers,   preside.
As one means of emancipating the
people from the exploitation of capital,
the banking business is declared a State
monopoly, and all existing banks are
taken up (their assets and liabilities as
well) into the national bank. The church
is separated from the State, and the
school is separated from the church.
The people's committee on education is
ordered to print all Russian classics in
a cheap form and to provide for popular
education.
(Continued  on  Page  8)
Exclusive Styles
in
for
Voung men and
young Women
'T»HE NEW STYLES IN  FALL
AND WINTER FOOTWEAR
are  certainly  handsome.
For the young woman, the new
military heel boot, with cloth or
buck tops, in colors of brown,
grey, or black.
For the   young   man,   the   new
shades of    tan,    with    leather    or
Neolin soles;   also smart  styles in
black.
We have an Expert Fitting
Service.
Ingledew
Shoe Co,
666 Granville Street
"Vancouver's   Smartest   Shoe
Store'' UBYSSEY
February 13, 1919
Shoes for
Young Men
qMART and SNAPPY STYLES
^ —the latest in Shoes as now
being worn in the large Eastern
centres.
In   all   leathers—in   Black,   Tan,
Brown—all the popular shad&s.
The   largest   and   best   stock   of
Men's Shoes in Vancouver.
Your   Money's   Worth
or  Your  Money  Back
WILLIAM DICK
Limited
33-49 Hastings, East
Vancouver, B. C.
RENNIE'S  SEEDS
They  Always  Grow
Send for Catalogue To-day
WM. RENNIE CO., LTD.
1138 HOMER STREET
872 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 530
HAVE YOUR COSTS
OF LIVING DROPPED?
The street railway's expenses have
not. The same expenses which
made the 6-cent fare necessary
since last July are being borne
to-day.
The same wages, the same prices
for materials, are being paid today as then.
The street car ride costs the same
or more.
B.C. Electric
ECONOMIC LEGISLATION OF
BOLSHEVIK  GOVERNMENT
(Continued from  Page 7)
All existing legal institutions, district
courts, courts of appeal, etc., are abolished, and in their place a court, consisting of a permanent elected judge and
two jurors selected in turn by the
Soviet from a list of jurors. These courts
are altogether separate, of course, from
the revolutionary tribunal, which does
not deal with civil matters.
Inheritance, such as we know it, is
abolished; but in case a man dies, or
leaves a community, his relatives are
given first choice for his land when redistributed.
The story is told that, one morning,
Souchanov, the young Petrograd leader,
was listening to the sounds of the hammers striking in the valley below him.
He turned to his friend and said: "The
old revolutionists used to make a noise
with bombs, but this is the noise of the
new revolutionists." The Bolsheviki
have certainly not used the old tools of
democratic government; whether they
will be able to work out the idea expressed in their constitution, or not,
time  alone  can tell.
I. M. T.
ANNUAL, 1919
There is much activity in Annual circles this week. Plans for this year's
production had only begun when the
attention of the Annual staff, in common with all other students, was required in another direction. However,
those days of torment have past into
memory, and all have once again regained their natural poise. Haste must
be made. Every one who has been
given any responsibility must realize
the necessity for immediate action. Advantage must be taken of every day. All
material, including class and society
notes, ought to be at the Publications
office by February 20th. Tt is especially
urged that those who are requested to
call at Bridgman's Studio may do so not
later than the time stated above. Those
who know the facts can clearly appreciate the immense difficulty of producing an Annual this session. It is therefore to be hoped that all students will
cheerfully co-operate with the staff in
their task of making the best possible
use of very limited means. But don't
forget to  act—now.
Gloom (in cafe)—Say, waiter, have
you ever been to the zoo?
Waiter—No,   sir.
Gloom—You ought to go; you'd enjoy
seeing the tortoises whiz past.
The Great-West Life
Assurance Co.
HEAD    OFFICE:    WINNIPEG,    MAN.
Assets, December 31st,  1917,
Over 24 Millions
As soon as possible every young
man should create an estate by purchasing a life insurance policy.
Investigate the merits of The Great-
West Life, and it will not be necessary to seek  information elsewhere.
Inquire at
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Branch Office for B.C.
Remodelling: Skins Tanned
FURS
A   SEALSKIN   COAT   or   a   fur
piece made up by us is a thing
of beauty.
H.  E.  TAYLOR
Repairs
508   DUNSMUIR   STREET
Phone, Sey. 4891
WELL-PRINTED
STATIONERY
Means Everything
to Your
Business Success
Get   Your   Next   Supply
from the Pioneer
Printing House
EVANS & HASTINGS
PRINTING   COMPANY
578 SEYMOUR STREET
Phone, Sey. 189     Vancouver, B.C.
None  but  Union   Mechanics   Employed

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