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The Ubyssey Nov 13, 1919

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 Issued  Weekly  by  the  Publications  Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume II.
VANCOUVER, B. C, NOVEMBER 13, 1919
Number 6
'VARSITY AT TOP OF LEAGUE
Triumphs Over
Centrals By A
Score of 14-0
The fondest hopes of the supporters
of the University Rugby team were
fully realized on Saturday afternoon,
when U.B.C. defeated the Centrals. The
game was the crucial point of the whole
season, and by her victory the 'Varsity
has practically clinched her hold on the
championship. Every team in the league
has now fallen before the efforts of Art
Lord and his husky confreres.
When the teams lined up at 3.15 Saturday afternoon there were well over
4,000 spectators spread around the oval
at Brockton Point, and not the least
conspicuous of these were the one thousand two hundred and eleven University
students, who were packed on the gaily-
decorated truck and trailer which noisily
romped its way around the track.
The Centrals kicked off and made a
temporary gain, but the University superiority began to be demonstrated.
And right here we must commend the
'Varsity forwards. In the previous
games, the front line has been the weak
spot in Blue and Gold play; but last
Saturday the much-touted Central forward line was helpless before the tackling, packing and kicking
of the University. The
tackling of both teams
was splendid; but the way
Art Lord and Howard
James, especially, upset
their opponents' rushes
was a delight to watch.
The first score of the
game came about 12 minutes after the start of
play, when, after a pretty
piece of combination,
Heyland dragged a Central tackle over the line.
Gwyther, who was playing in hard luck all afternoon, failed to convert.
'Varsity  3,   Centrals  0.
It was only eight minutes later that the 'Varsity three-quarters got
started. Finally, about 20
yards   from  touch,   "Lou"
(Continued on Page 6)
U.B.C. Students Are
Arrested by Police
BUT   ARE   RELEASED   ON   PROMISING TO  BUY  BONDS
Just about eight o'clock on Saturday-
night a howling mob of savages, in
variegated costumes of blue and gold,
was turned loose on the public, with the
apparent object of frightening as many
as possible into buying Victory Bonds.
The parade, as it proceeded down the
street, looked very spectacular, led by
a three-ton truck and trailer carrying
a jazz-band and a hundred torch-bearers, the Freshies toddling along in the
rear. The first outburst of 'Varsity
"pep" occurred at Granville and Rob-
son, where the traffic was blocked until
"Kitsilano" and "Engineers" were rendered. A few minutes later the halls of
the Hotel Vancouver were resounding
with   the  well-known  yells.
After more noise had been produced
at the Post Office, a novel advertising
stunt was staged at Cambie sueet. The
effigy of "A. Skinflint, Tighter Than a
Clam With the Lockjaw," who
"Wouldn't Buy a Bond," was condemned
by the crowd and lynched forthwith.
(Continued on Page 3)
U.B.C. Should
Send Full Quota
FUNDS NEEDED FOR THOSE WHO
ATTEND STUDENT CONVENTION AT DES MOINES
THESE ARE THE BOYS WHO PUT THE UNIVERSITY AT THE TOP
OF THE LEAGUE
"Send British Columbia's full quota
to this convention" was the advice of
both President Klinck and Captain A.
S. C. Trivett, who addressed the mass
meeting of students held last Friday to
consider the proposal to send delegates
to the international student convention
which will take place in Des Moines in
December. Dr. Todd, the honorary
president of the Y. M. C. A., was chairman.
In his address, President Klinck
spoke of the good which resulted from
these student conferences, and declared that the University of B. C.
should come into contact with the men
and women of other colleges. He
urged the 'Varsity tr^ send men and
women who would bring back the most
lasting good, and who could impart to
the other students the inspiration
gained.
Captain A. S. C. Trivett, a student
Y. M. C. A. secretary, who has visited
our college on other occasions, told of
the work which the convention will accomplish.
He declared that the
greatest men of the
world will address this
convention, and that the
University of B. C. could
not afford to miss this
opportunity.
After these addresses,
Mr. Wilson Coates moved
that the University attempt to raise sufficient
funds to send its full
quota. This consists of
seven men, four women,
and three faculty members. The motion carried
unanimously.
The drive for these
funds is now on and
students are urged to
give what little they
can. THE   UBYSSEY
November 13, 1919
Arrow Shirts **><* Collars
Stanfield's Underwear
Hobberlin Clothin?
THIS  IS   THE   STORE
that can always show you
something new, and where
you are always sure of a
smile.
"Our Prices Are Right"
RICKSON'S
Apparel for Men
820   GRANVILLE  STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
JTaaljton - draft
QUALITY CLOTHES
QUALITY   should   be   the   first
thing to look for, especially in
young men's clothes.
QUALITY   dominates   in   all
Fashion-Craft Clothes.
Prices moderate.
Value positive.
SHOP OF
FASHIONCRAFT
(IlitnH. JfioBtrr $C (Bo.
Eimttri)
514 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
BISHOP CONDUCTS
MEMORIAL SERVICE
"Whosoever shall seek to save his life
shall lose it: and whosoever shall lose
his life shall preserve it." Upon this
text the Rt. Rev. A. U. de Pencier,
Bishop of New Westminster, preached
a moving sermon in Christ Church on
Sunday evening at the memorial service
for University students who fell in the
war.
Bishop de Pencier sought to answer
two questions which the war has
brought forward. "Why does God permit this death and suffering?" This is
the question of the cross, and if any
religion fails to answer it, that religion
is a sham. Human prepress has always
been made through the suffering of the
innocent. The world's greatest men
have been men of sufferings more than
the  ordinary.
The second question is, "Are we living on inherited faith, or are we really
willing to give all we possess to serve
our fellows?" This, declared the Bishop,
our dead have amply proved. The Empire's response to the call of duty
showed that our faith had followed our
flag all around the world,—that the
generation had been brought up on the
great unselfish teachings of the bible.
He quoted a vow made by a thousand
soldiers on the eve of battle, in memory
of their fellows: "I will love the things
for which they died and hate the things
that brought them to their death," He
exhorted his hearers to take the same
vow to promote loyalty to the Empire
and the cross, to hate wrong and impurity, covetousness and ambition for
power. Deeds are more than words, but
character is greater than all, so we must
help one another to build the character
of the future after the ideals for which
our men  have died.
Before his sermon Bishop de Pencier
read the honour roll of the University.
The service was conducted by Rev.
C. C. Owen and Rev. W. W. Craig.
SONNET
Dedicated   to   the   Senior   Who   Wishes   to
Clear the Freshmen  Off  the  Sidewalks
With haughty air and dignity of mien
The   Senior  views   the  Freshies   as   they
pass—■
The   Freshies   greener   than   the   verdant
grass—■
No serious crime in being young, I ween;
Yet how can he preserve a brow serene,
When Freshmen form a great obstructive
mass
And fill the doorways with the First Year
class,
What time the Fourth Year struts upon the
scene?
And this is what the humble Freshmen say
Whene'er   they   mention   Seniors   and   their
way
Of   claiming   all   the   sidewalk   and   the
street—
" 'Tis kindly meant, O brothers, for. ye know
Ye run grave risk where these your Seniors
go:
How  shall  ye  rise,   if  trampled  by  such
Feet?"
TISIPHONE,   Arts   '23.
Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial Stationers and
Printers
Students' Loose-Leaf Binders
Educational Stationery
School Equipment
Drawing Instruments  and  Materials
320 SEYMOUR STREET
(Opposite C. P. R. Depot)
VANCOUVER. B. C.
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
Capital  $13,500,000    Reserve $15,000,000
THRIFT AND SECURITY
Open a Savings Account with The
Canadian Bank of Commerce. If more
convenient, accounts may be opened
and deposits  made by mail.
Ten Branches in Vancouver District, including the following, which
are in the vicinity of the University:
Fairview—Corner   Sixth   Avenue   and
Granville.
Kitsilano—Corner Fourth  Avenue  and
Yew Street.
Mount   Pleasant—Corner   Eighth   Ave.
and Main Street.
Evans & Hastings
 Are the	
Proud  Printers
of
11
The Ubyssey "
For 1919-1920
We make a Specialty of
COLLEGE ANNUALS
MAGAZINES
BALL PROGRAMMES
Etc., etc.
BOYS!   Give us a call before you
go elsewhere
578  Seymour Street
VANCOUVER, B. C. November 13, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
COACHING
in French, German and English
Composition,     Literature    and
Conversation.
MISS GREGG, GLENCOE LODGE
Phone, Seymour 9022
EDWIN J. GALLOWAY
New  and  Second-Hand
Book Shop
Specialists  in University Books
%. 3Cofc <L ©o.
©jeciustVe furriers
800 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
E. C. KILBY
"Good Goods'
The Hosiery Specialist
628    GRANVILLE    STREET
Vancouver, B. C.
107o off to Returned Men
DO YOU MENTION YOU SAW IT
IN THE "UBYSSEY"?
Have you an
Eversharp?
The finest Pencil made—no student
should be without one. Always ready
—no sharpening —sufficient refills for
years.    From $1.50
HENRY BIRKS & SONS LTD.
Granville Street
SENIORS HOLD MOST
SUCCESSFUL PARTY
"The morning after the Class Party,''
announced Mr. Wood to the members
of Arts '20 while still in their Sophomore year, "every member of the Class
ought to be able to smile at every other
member." That was two long years
ago, and since then Arts '20 has enjoyed
many parties. But the one of November 7th, 1919, easily stands on record as
the most entirely satisfactory of all.
Through the kindness of Miss Agnes
Darner, the entertainment was held at
her home on Hosmer Avenue, and a
change from the customary scenic effect
was introduced by the revival of the
Masquerade in class-parties. Several
Aery striking costumes competed for the
highly appropriate prizes, the rewards
for the best going to Miss Morris and
Mr. Buck respectively, while the comedians par excelence were voted to be
Miss Walsh and Mr. Weld. The only
disappointment of the evening was
caused by the fact that the Hon. President was unable to appear in costume.
Words fail to describe the fun of the
party, and in conclusion we can only,
on behalf of the Class, thank Mr. and
Mrs. Darner for their kindness in opening their home to the Seniors.
PRIZES OFFERED
FOR WOMEN ORATORS
On Thursday afternoon the Women's
Lit. held their first meeting for this
term. Dr. Sedgewick delivered an address, taking as his subject the word
'academic." The speaker stated that
the word "academic," as applied to a
man, originally meant one who endeavored to solve such problems as "What
is justice?" "What is the ideal form of
government?" in short, one who tried
to determine ideals. "Today." said Dr.
Sedgewick, "the term is one of reproach.
It means dusty, dry, - valueless. It
means that a man is unpractical, that he
is out of touch with life." The speaker
then outlined the means whereby University students could prevent themselves from becoming academized and
could endeavor to draw together the
ideal and the practical.
Plans for an oratorical contest were
brought before the meeting and Dr.
Sedgewick promised to procure prizes
if  such  a  contest  could  be  arranged.
U. B. C. STUDENTS ARRESTED
(Continued from Page 1)
His grave was speedily dug and a tombstone erected, but no sooner had the
last rites been performed than the
gravediggers were arrested by two full-
fledged officers of the law. However,
by the time the patrol-wagon arrived,
the inspector had been prevailed upon
to release the prisoners upon their
promising  to  buy  bonds.
The parade finally proceeded to the
Supper Dance at the Hotel, where,
after cheers for the Victory Loan, for
Alderman Woodside, who made many
of the arrangements, and for Art Lord,
the  leader, it was  dismissed.
If there are any subjects
in which you need special
coaching, try the new
SPROTTSHAW
ACADEMIC
DEPARTMENT
All our teachers are highly
qualified
Special  Evening  Classes
This   department,   as   well   as   our
Business   Department,   bears   that
well-known
Sprott Shiw $tamp=*QuaIity
R. J. Si-xtOTT, B.A., Mgr.
Phone, Sey. 1810
Napoleon was twenty-seven when he
conquered Italy. Pitt, the man who sent
Napoleon to St. Helena, was twenty-
four. Shelley died at twenty-eight.
Keats died at the age of twenty-six.
And still some people will say that youth
is no time for serious thought, for
thoughtful planning, and for definite,
effective  training.
Stylish Caps
for
Young  Men
Ours is easily the largest showing of Men's Caps in the City.
Plain Tweed Caps in staple
shapes,
75c to $1.25
Dress Caps in new shapes,
colorings and materials,
Prices, $1.50 to $2.50
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED THE   UBYSSEY
November 13, 1919
CLUBB   &
STEWART
LIMITED
Headquarters for Young Men
for the past 30 years
Our slock of Young Men's Suits
and Overcoats this season is
better than ever
SEE  OUR   WINDOWS  for
New Models
309    to    3 \ 5
Hastings Street W.
Exclusive Designs in
CHRISTMAS   GREETING   CARDS
(Business and Personal)
CHRISTMAS PAPETERIES
GIFT   BOXES   OF   STATIONERY
LEATHER GOODS
IVORY MANICURE  SETS
VOLLAND'S   CHILDREN'S   GIFT
BOOKS
FRAMED MOTTOES
HALLOWE'EN   SPECIALTIES
BIRTHDAY
AND   FRIENDSHIP   CARDS
WEDDINGS
AND   CONGRATULATIONS
BIRTH    ANNOUNCEMENTS
MEMORIAL  CARDS
Western Specialty Limited
Society Stationers
and Printers
572 Granville St.,   Vancouver
British Columbia
Issued every Thursday by the Publications  Board
of the  University  of British  Columbia.
Extra mural subscriptions, $3.00 per session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising  Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief A.   A.   Webster
Senior   Editor Patricia   H.   Smith
I Lillian Cowdell
Associate Editors \ H.  L.  Keenleyside
(C. D. Taylor
Chief  Reporter ...A.   H.   Imlah
Exchange  Editor T.   P.   Peardon
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager J.   N.   Weld
Advertising  Manager L.   Fournier
Assistants / ?; A'  Wa,lace       D' Mclntyre
I W.  McKec J. Berto
Circulation   Manager A.   Crawford
Editor for the Week C.  D. Taylor
TIES THAT BIND
The writer who said that "the genius
of life is being a friend and the greatest
possession in life is having friends" gave
utterance to a truth which should be
laid hold of with an unflinching grip by
every college student. Of the memories
which we shall cherish, upon leaving
these halls, none shall be more valuable
and permanent than those of the friendships which we formed during our years
in the U. B. C. Students who spend four
sessions in any university without feeling that their lives have been enriched
by intimate association with companions
and professors alike are to be forever
pitied. The present is too precious, the
future too vast and uncertain, to be travelled alone. Are we permitting our
opportunities to pass us by?
Student days are particularly adapted
to the forming of life-long connections.
And why should it not be so? Our interests are much in common. We imbibe
the same buoyant, genial spirit characteristic of student character. A college
atmosphere leaves an impression which
can always be detected in later days.
Through their inspiring influence, friendships formed under such conditions
make a man bigger and better equipped
to manage the business of life. The
power and encouragement which a fellow receives from his companions very
often spurs him on and on, making out
of an apparent failure a wonderful success. Your chum may be separated from
you; but his influence on your character,
your ambition, your everyday life, shall
remain forever.
The   'Varsity   unite   in   extending   their
best  wishes  to  Mr.  Willis.
A WISE APPOINTMENT
Students of the University were
pleased to learn of the appointment
of our late professor of classics, Mr.
S. J. Willis, to the position of Superintendent of Education for this province.
Mr. Willis has long been recognized as
one of the outstanding leaders of education in the West, and we feel that
British Columbia has been fortunate in
securing such an able official. He is
both a scholar and an organizer. His
ideals are those of a modern educationalist. It is quite apparent, therefore,
that his choice marks a forward movement in the educational affairs of  B.  C.
BE   MERCIFUL
Our new professor in Economics has
been asked to speak to the local Trades
and Labor Council (O.B.TJ.) on "Direct
Action." This request was made because Mr. Angus is given credit for stating that direct action was a legitimate
weapon of organized labor. This, of
course, is pure assumption, as he merely
explained the history of the movement
in England and France and the various
principles involved, at a recent meeting
of the Economics Discussion Club. We
hope, however, that our worthy professor will accept the opportunity of giving
the council the benefit of his study in
this subject. It is interesting to note
that he is the same gentleman whom
Mr. Ridington, earlier in the session,
mistook for a Freshman and attempted
to dislodge from the stack room. Mr.
Angus has been rather roughly dealt
with  since  coming west!
EX CATHEDRA
By the Editor for the Week
There were 880 registered students at
the Rugby game on Saturday. The
other two cannot be found and their
identity  probably  will  never  be  known.
We wonder if it is impossible to improve the appearance and usefulness of
the Men's common room. The men
deserve  something better.
The student body of the University of
British Columbia takes this opportunity
of thanking Alderman Woodside for his
generosity in lending the U. B. C. rooters the big truck which figured so prominently in Saturday's celebration. We
also thank Everett Woodside and his
assistants for fitting up the trailer.
For the benefit of the music-loving
students of U. B. C, we draw your attention to the twilight organ recitals
given by Mr. F. Chubb on Saturday
afternoons in Christ Church. This winter series has already commenced and
a musical treat of the highest order is
assured   for   those   who   attend.
How often do you meet students who,
because of previous engagements, are
unable to attend important University
functions? Would it not be a good idea
to look ahead a few wee's and give the
preference to our own 'Varsity? Think
it  over.
It will be a great pity if our University fails to send representatives to the
student conference at Des Moines. For
a number of U. B. C. men and women
to be associated with six thousand or
more students from all over North
America, even for a few days, would
mean a good deal to our western college.
There is no way under heaven by
which a person can be really happy without being good, clean, square, and true. November 13, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
dnrrpBjmttuntre
All correspondence must be written
legibly, on one side of the paper only, and
may be signed by a pen-name, but must
be accompanied by name and class of the
writer.
Editor   "Ubyssey":
Dear Sir,—The letter by "R. A. F." in the
issue of Nov. 5th, seems to express the opinion
of the student body as a whole, yet, so far as
that issue is concerned, it has not had the
desired effect. It is true that in the last issue
practically all the college news was included,
but why, may I ask, is the premier position on
the front page wasted on a minor organization
of bookworms who indulge in "heated arguments" on the Irish Question, while the 'Varsity
Rugby game, Mr. Robertson's address, and such
vital topics, which command the interest of all
healthy and full-blooded students, are relegated
to a comparatively unimportant position. It is
time, my dear sir, that the pet societies of the
editorial staff were put down in their proper
place—the   bottom   of  the   last   page.
D. A.  WALLACE.
Editor   "Ubyssey":
Dear Sir,—It was with a feeling of indignation and pity that I read The Daily Sun's report
on Saturday's Rugby game. My first thought
was that maybe the poor fellow reporting had
by some mischance missed seeing the contest.
But if this surmise should prove false, we must
conclude that the author of such a writeup has
a knowledge of Rugby conspicuous by its absence. It is little wonder that there are few
detailed descriptions of play in the account.
By way of example, let us refer to the paragraph which described "Pinkie" Morrison's fine
work toward the end of the game. This part
reads like the mythical vision of some undaunted
spiritualist. What "converting" did "Pinkie"
do? Which two "blue sweatered players" crossed
the line for touch-downs at this phase of the
game? Not to be too hard on the gentleman,
let us overlook the fact, that they were "drop-
kicks"   that   Morrison   used.
Now, again, taking for granted that the writer
saw the match at Brockton Point, I would like
to know on what corner of the field he was
stationed   to   hear   a   "sudden   outburst   of   cheer
ing by the 'Varsity crowd" when the Central
player was injured. Methinks his keen car must
have caught the echoes from previous "outbursts" sent back from our lofty hills. As I
heard it, three cheers were given for the unfortunate player when he stood up and walked from
the field. If that is a 'bad brand of sportsmanship" I want the new definition of true sportsmanship. It is true that there were a few single
ironic expressions heard later, but these were
directed against the whole Central team, and
this practise of heckling is as old as the hills.
Thus this man's "paragraph of slander" must
stand  as  a masterpiece   of  untruthfulness.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—Isn't it about high time that
the powers that be made some much-needed
repairs to the roadway which runs from
Twelfth Avenue to the automobile parking
grounds? At one time this may have been
a fairly respectable road; but, as it is now,
it consists of two deep ruts and a multitudinous array of large boulders, whose
chief object in life seems to be to shake
very necessary parts from cars which pass
over them. But, though the road itself is
disgraceful, the entrance is worse. Where
this would-be road forms a passing acquaintance with Twelfth Avenue, there is a drop
of about four inches. This bump seems to
be about one foot high when one navigates
it in an automobile, and four feet high when
one is perched in a Ford. One of these days
there is going to be serious damage done to
a car, and someone will have to pay for this,
and  repairs  cost  money.
"MUTT."
Editor "Ubyssey."
"Be not wise in your own conceits."
Dear Sir:—We do not count it among our
many blessings that some, who love originality rather than truth, cannot confine their
spasms to that publication expressly designed to manifest, exhibit and portray the
peculiar and unique excellencies of Arts '20.
We are relieved, however, to learn that
at last the bubble has burst, and that the
receding tide has left naught but a dry
valley of Economic bones, parched by a
desert sun. But we fear that, although the
bubble lies mouldering in the grave, its
soul is marching on; and, although we incipient    Bolshevists,     so    called,     feel    duly
overawed by the superior wisdom emanating from the editorial chair, the spirit of
the dead past tempts us to falter a few
timid  questions:
Will the editor of last week's issue specify
when and by whom it was ever suggested
that it was "a sign of moral degeneration
to be interested in History, Literature and
Art" ? Will he specify one wild and impassioned statement that was hurled at his
unoffending head, and give the madly-
gesticulating radical a chance to betray his
profound ignorance of history in public debate? From his profound store of historical
knowledge, will he specify what "latest"
theories are as old as civilization; when,
where and by whom they were tried and
found to be impracticable? Will he explain
by what interpretation of current events he
classifies an interest in Bolshevism as a
craze for Economics, rather than as a craze
for modern  History?
And, finally, to return again to our newfound senses, to leave the realm of world
politics for that of student affairs, will he
explain by what inimitable "sense of proportion" he assigns the Sigma Delta Kappa
one column in the front page and nearly
half a column elsewhere, while the Players'
Club, Men's Lit. and Y. M. C. A. together
have   only  a  column   inside?
Of   a   truth,   the   thin   wraith   of   our   disillusioned selves  rattles  its  shattered  sword
in  its  bursting  sheath  and   wearies  for   the
good old days that are no more.
Yours   burstingly,
ZEITGEIST.
"DOC" AT BERKELEY
"Doc" McKechnie, who was a general
favorite with all students of U. B. C.
last year, is enjoying the bracing California climate. He is not only drinking
the rich ozone into his system, but is
making progress at California University, Berkeley. We miss "Doc" around
the halls and in the lecture rooms.
A day which is passed without treasuring up some good thought is not well
spent. Every day is a leaf in the book
of life. Do not waste a day, any more
than you would tear out leaves from the
book of life.
Smart Footwear for every occasion
<D
U R SHOES are worn by young people who appreciate the
limit of shoe swellness. Fall and Winter Styles are now ready
and the new creations are indeed smart.
7k* INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
666 GRANVILLE STREET
"VANCOUVER'S    SMARTEST    SHOE    STORE" THE   UBYSSEY
November 13, 1919
Art and Style Clothes Shop
UNDERWEAR
Come into BEN PETCH'S Castle
Hotel Shop, and see the remarkable values in Winter Underwear.
Special  price  to  students.
$3.50 a Suit
"LEARN THE LOCATION"
Ben Petch
LIMITED
752 Granville Street
(Opposite Orpheum Theatre)
Trob Cut Tlowm.     funeral Work » Specialty
Brown Bros. & 60. Ltd.
florists, nurserymen, Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head Office:
48 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 9513
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For Light Refreshments
Ice  Cream  and  Candies
at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
U.Morimoto & Co.
JAPANESE FANCY GOODS
MAIN STORE:
673   Granville   Street      Phone, Sey. 6410
BRANCH STORES:
57  Hastings St., W.       Phone,  Sey. 2313
932 Granville   St. Phone,  Sey. 8723
VICTORIA BRANCH:
1235   Government  St. Phone 4742
PLENTY OF "PEP" TO
ARTS '21 PARTY
Arts '21, the unassuming juniors, held
their annual class party last Friday
evening. The auditorium was tastefully
decorated for the occasion, a large number of stencilled '21's adorning the walls.
The lighting effects used for the moonlight waltzes were par excellence, the
picture of a beaming moon being thrown
upon the ceiling from the lantern. The
dancing floor was not crowded, there
being just a sufficient number present
to make the programme go with a
swing and a vim which does not always
mark our college dances.
The patronesses were: Mrs. Klinck,
Mrs. Sedgewick, Mrs. Henderson, Mrs.
Robertson, and Mrs. Mcintosh. "Jimmy"
Mitchell, the popular president of '21,
acted as master of ceremonies. The
thanks of the class have been extended
to "Joe" Schell, who was responsible
for the decorations and the lantern
slides.
'VARSITY  AT  TOP
(Continued from Page 1)
Hunter removed the ball, and, dodging
three Central backs, slid over for the
second score. 'Varsity 6, Centrals 0.
Gwyther's kick hit the goal-post, but
bounced out.
It would be impossible to describe the
pandemonium that enveloped the field
all through this period. The 'Varsity
supporters apparently had been waiting
for years for an opportunity to cheer,
and they made the best use of their
time.
The last ten minutes of the first half
were anxious ones for the University.
During that time the Centrals kept the
ball entirely in 'Varsity territory, and
the play rolled dangerously near the
line. However, the determination of the
forwards and the kicking and tackling
of the backs saved the situation time
after time.
Again, in the second half, the Centrals
started to press, and for five minutes it
looked as though their efforts must result in a score. But the 'Varsity defensive work was superb, and the danger
was pushed back. Gradually the University regained control, and the last fifteen
minutes were all 'Varsity. Time after
time they drove towards the Central
line, and only fine work by the Central
backs held them. Finally, after a throw-
in near the Central line, the ball
bounced to "Pinky" Morrison, who
snapped it over the bar with a beautiful
drop  kick.    'Varsity  10,  Centrals  0.
Then, just to prove that it was no
fluke, exactly the same performance was
presented again three minutes later.
Morrison had been playing a clever
game all afternoon, and these scores
finished off his work perfectly. 'Varsity
14, Centrals 0. Without any further
scoring, the game  ended.
SPECIAL   SERVICE
Next Sunday evening there will be a
special service for students in Chalmers Presbyterian Church. Dr. Henry
will speak on a subject of direct personal  interest  to  University  students.
Bridgman's Studio
AT   YOUR SERVICE
Same Address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
The Art of Speaking
Debates,   Speeches,   Play-parts,
Recitations   Coached
Special   rate   on   single   lessons   to
U. B. C.   Students
HELEN BADGLEY
Suite  23,   709   Dunsmuir   Street
Phone,   Sey.  6535Y
ENLARGEMENTS
Vancouver Photo Co.
(Established 1911)
649 GRANVILLE STREET
(Down the Marble Stairs)
tbe Uancouwr Stationers Etd.
683 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Seymour 5119
T. SCOTT EATON. B.A.. Principal
Success Business College
Limited
Corner Main Street and Tenth Avenue
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
Phone,  Fairmont 2075
MAKE   OUR   STORE   YOUR
HEADQUARTERS FOR
LOOSE-LEAF  NOTEBOOKS
AND SUPPLIES
We   specialize   in   fine   Stationery
Here's a new one in the way of a
strike: Kansas 'Varsity band demand
credits amounting to three hours a week
per musician or there will be no music
for the big football games.
In thinking of how frequently we meet
people in the halls who have forgotten
appointments, meetings, etc., we were
reminded of a young chap who wrote a
note to his girl, which read something
like this:
"Dear Mabel:—Please pardon me;
I'm so forgetful. Last night I proposed
to you, but to-day I cannot remember
whether you said 'No' or 'Yes.'"
This was the girl's reply:
"Dear Jack:—Glad to get a note from
you. Last night I said 'No' to someone;
and, for the life of me, I can't tell who
it was." November 13, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
MEN'S LIT. HOLDS
MOCK PARLIAMENT
The most successful meeting of the
Men's Literary Society held this year
took place in the Auditorium last Wednesday. It took the form of a Mock
Parliament, to discuss Home Rule for
Ireland. The President, Mr. Rive,
turned the meeting over to Dr. Eastman, who acted as Speaker of the
House.
Mr. Wilson Coates, as leader of the
Government, brought down his bill for
a system of Dominion Home Rule for
Ireland, with a confederation of four
provinces—Ulster, Munster, Leinster
and Connaught—the internal arrangements to be similar to those in Canada.
Mr.  R.   F.  Adams  seconded  this bill.
Mr. F. H. Buck, leading the Opposition, showed the impossibility of securing Ulster's consent to such a proposal,
and demonstrated the unfairness of
forcing on Ulster the domination of the
rest of Ireland. He then presented
amendments to leave the status of Ireland as at present, and to provide for
some contribution from Ireland to
British defence.' Mr. W. R. Brown,
seconding the amendments, put up a
strong plea against placing Ulster under
the   domination   of  the  south   and  west.
The discussion then became quite
general, and several members, in their
haste,  failed  to  address   the   Speaker.
While the discussion was thus at its
height, Messrs. Couper and Berto
brought in a counter-motion, providing
for a plebiscite, to ascertain the real
wish of the Irish people. They proposed three choices: Home Rule, with
one Parliament, Dominion Home Rule,
or a  Republic.
This, of course, added fuel to the fire,
and the discussion warmed up again.
Soon, however, Mr. Coates moved the
closure of the debate. The House then
voted on the three measures before it,
finally choosing Mr. Couper's counter-
motion.    The  House then adjourned.
LUCKY!
The other day
I
Was  feeling happy,
So I went
To
A lecture in Math.
And the Prot.
Talked me to sleep.
But
I
Heard him say
Something like this:
"Multiply ninety-nine  by
Twenty-six,  add  two hundred
And  eleven,  divide by four
And subtract three,  get the
Square root and add eighty-
Eight,  divide  »y eleven  and
Subtract  nine,   multiply  the
Result by three."
Then he
Yelled at me
For the
Answer.
I said,  "Gee!"
He
Thought  I said
"Three,"
And told me
To go
To the head of the class.
PHONE, SEYMOUR   7853
C.  HERMANN, Proprietor
*v~.
ti\M3wM&€$£*M
HERMANN'S    BARBER   SHOP
ROGERS  BLOCK, 464  GRANVILLE  STREET
THE COLLEGE CAT
I went to see the rugby game, upon
a cold and dreary day, and I have never
felt the same since I beheld that fearful fray. How clearly do I recollect the
yelling and the awful noise, I do not
know but I suspect 'twas caused by several hundred boys. I saw with these
bewildered eyes Doc. Sedgewick leaping o'er a fence, and this beheld with
some surprise, I really thought he had
more sense. And then there came into
mine ears a yelling and a wild uproar;
somehow I knew by those mad cheers
that 'Varsity had made a score. Those
boys did cause the ground to shake, they
stamped and roared and yelled and
howled, I thought I saw creation quake
—I lifted up my voice and yowled. I
must admit my acts, alas, were open to
severe reproof, the noise I made did
quite surpass ten common felines on a
roof. As in a dream I seemed to hear
one hundred cranky motor cars, while
all about me did appear bright meteors
and shooting stars. And when the world
stopped whirling round and back to
normal state I came, I knew by all the
varied sound that 'Varsity had won that
game. I heaved a most melodious sigh,
I gave an academic shout, I caused two
ancient curs to fly in awed and terror-
stricken rout. I saw a terrier walking
near, I made him turn and quickly
yield, and when he couched in abject
fear, I left him there upon the field.
And next I spied a Boston bull and then
I met him face to face, I charged upon
him fair and full, and knocked him far
out into space.
Within the stack-room safe I rest,
victorious laurels crown my brow, but
as, perchance, you may have guessed,
I   think  I   dreamed  it  all  somehow.
PUSSY.
FINANCING THE  WAR
The Senior Economics Discussion
Club will discuss the method of financing the war at their meeting on Thursday evening. Papers will be read on the
two suggested methods, by Victory
Bonds and by taxation.
A number of copies of "Poems of the
Canadian West" are available for sale,
and may be obtained from Miss Damer,
Arts '20; H. L. Keenleyside, Arts '20; A.
Webster, Arts '21; E. A. Johnson, Arts
'22; D. J. Mcintosh, Arts '23.
Smith, Davidson & Wright, Ltd.
Manufacturing  &  Wholesale
Stationers, and Paper Dealers.
Vancouver   and   Victoria,    -    B. C.
CUSICK
SERVES
HOT LUNCHES
692   BROADWAY,  WEST
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Insist on your Dealer supplying
you with
KEYSTONE
Loose Leaf
COVERS and SHEETS
No. 2736 Open End size 5% x 8%
No. 276S Open Side size 9V2 x 7%
No. 2769  Open  Side  size  10% x 8
R. €. Purdy, Ltd.
Famous Chocolates
and
Home-Made Candies
Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
675 GRANVILLE STREET
Happiness is incompatible with stagnation. A man must feel his expanding
power lifting, tugging away at a lofty
purpose, or he will miss the joy of living. THE   UBYSSEY
November 13, 1919
., The ..
Western Life
Assurance Co.
Offers   in  its   Guaranteed  Security
Policies   one   of   the   best
investments for to-day
Every Student Should
Carry One
See the Manager, or one of their
many agents, for particulars
Head Office for B. C:
701 LONDON BLDG.
628  Pender  Street, West
VANCOUVER, B.C.
C.  E.  MAHON,  Manager
J. W. FOSTER
LIMITED
TWO STORES:
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
FIT REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, W.
We sell clothes for young men and
men  who  stay  young
COMPLETE   PLANS
FOR ARTS DANCE
At a meeting of the A. M. U. S. the
final arrangements for the annual dance
were completed. It was decided to
make this social function as exclusive
as possible and to adhere strictly to the
rule regarding the admittance of non-
students to college dances.
Each student will be allowed one
ticket, and the privilege of inviting one
outsider, for whom he may obtain a
ticket, or, if desired, have an invitation
mailed. This measure was considered
necessary in view of the fact that the
University dances have come to be
looked upon as public affairs.
Tickets for the dance must be secured beforehand, as none will be sold
at the door.
Time    :. Dec.   4th
Place    Lester   Court
Girl    ?
Ladies, 75c Gentlemen, $1.25
INTERMEDIATES   LOSE
FIRST LEAGUE GAME
The intermediate basketball team of
the University got away to a bad start
in the league race on Saturday night,
when they were defeated 30-27 by the
Adanacs, at New Westminster. The
score at half time was 15-8 in favor of
'Varsity, but the superior condition of
the Adanacs enabled them to overcome
this lead in the second period. • However, the season is yet young. The
following players represented U. B. C:
Guards, R. Hunter and McLellan; centre, Mathers; forwards, A. Hunter and
Arkley.
CONDEMN   PROFITEERS
The Junior Economics Discussion
Club held their usual fortnightly meeting at "Ye Little Brown Inn" on Thursday evening, Nov. 6. Mr. Cutler presided. Miss Rankin and Mr. Munro
read papers on profiteering. The former dealt with profiteering in connection with government contracts, while
Mr. Munro took up a more general
phase of the subject. The discussion
which followed was distinctly onesided, as everyone seemed unanimous
in condemning the profiteers. Mr.
Limpus and Mr. Black will read papers
on "Proposed Commonwealths or
Utopias" at the next meeting of the
club, which will probably be held at
Chalmers'  Church.
DISCUSS   FRESHIES'   CAPS
The third meeting of the Sigma Delta
Kappa was held on Thursday, November 6th. Short speeches were required
from each of the members present.
Among other subjects, the matter of
"green caps for Freshies" was settled
to the satisfaction of all. The next
meeting will take the form of a debate.
Another Shipment of
Zimmerknit
Underwear
for Men
Prepare yourself against
the cold and save Doctor
bills by buying a suit or two
of this winter weight underwear today. Every garment
represents  exceptional iplue.
Combination Suits
$2.50
Shirt and Drawers, ^   _-.
each garment  «pl.5U
J. N. Harvey, Ltd.
123, 125, 127 Hastings Street, West
Also 614-616 Yates Street, Victoria
Look for the big Red Arrow Sign
J&TBell.
MM IT CO
Dame  Fashion's   latest  dictates  in
Fine Footwear
in  endless  variety at
CLUFF'S
You will always find just the shoe
you are looking for at the right
price here.
A perfect fit guaranteed.
Where  quality  counts,  we  win.
ClufF Shoe Co. Ltd.
649    HASTINGS    STREET,    WEST
Opposite   Bank   of   Commerce

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