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The Ubyssey Mar 15, 1951

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 The
vol. xxxin
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 1951
NO. 60
New Council Comes In
At Spring Meet Today
Report On Athletic Scholarships,
Treasurer's Report To Be Given
At least sixteen ordera of business will fill out the two
hour Alma Mater Society General Spring Meeting which takes
place at 12:30 p.m. in the Armories.
PACfONG UP Httft PAPERS as she leaves her presidential office in Brock Hall is Nonie
Donaldson, AMS president for the 1950-51 term.   Newly elected council takes over today.
Assisting Miss Donaldson is Treasurer John MacKinnon, who must serve four more months j
of his ttrin. ,    H$§<vfi*.
^n^^uatiorTAired"^
AMS Meeting
Treasurer John MacKinnon Shows
liminary Budgetary Balance
By JOHN MacKINNON
• { The Alma Mater Society at the end of February still has
four mojniks of its fiscal year left. Therefore it is still too early
no*jv to present anything like an accurate prediction of how our
fin^nc,ial picture will look at the end of June when I officially
go but Of off ice j I intend however at today's general meeting to
givfe jfeu llhonest opinion on how we wi|l'stand financially by
thepi,!togeth<er witlt a summary of my policy and work to date.
iirl Students
Eligible
For Grants
> Women students with proven capacity for good writing who Intend
to make writing their career are
eligible for a scholarship of $500
dohhted by Canadian Women's
Presa Club.
Both graduate and undergraduate students may apply for the
award, provided they have proven
their competence in wilting by
journalism, fiction, drama, periodical articles, scripts for films aud
radio and the like. They must have
a good general academic record
and spend the next year at UBC
or some other approved institution.
Application forms, available at
the Registrar's office, should be
submitted to Dean of Administrative and Inter-Faculty affairs
by March 31.
ment you see In this edition, column (2) represents charges (except where credits exist) to the
account concerned and column (!1)
represents amounts to be charged
in view of bills, outstanding, at
February 28. You will note that a
few organizations have already exceeded, their budgets. Howevbr,
this 1s largely due to the fact that
all receipts for large functions
held ltite in the month had not
been turned In to the AMS by the
end of the mouth.
Mussuc's deficit arises from their
Inability to secure a sufficient number of student musicians tor "The
Gondoliers." The Totem deficit will
stand until the book appears in
mid-April and Is sold.
Income from fees will probably
be no more than $2500 ln excess ol
the amount budgoted during registration week, and. income from
other sources no more than $500.
(See statement page 3)
INTRAMURALS
DIRECTOR
NEEDED
Applications for posh Ionof
Women's Intramural Director
Will' be accepted from March •
16 until March 90 «t thc Wo-
mc'riV Athletic Directorate of.
,flct Ih the gymnasium.        )   -
dMttte.   Remuneration   will  bt
approximately 1200.
Art Demands
Sinclair Tells
Effort,
Group
A huge and spontaneous round of applause from UBC
students greeted the conclusion of an auditorium address by
distinguished writer Lister Sinclair Wednesday.
Mr. Sinclair,  well-known Canad
ian author and critic, and one-time
graduate of UBC, told a university audience yesterday that to
enjoy art you have to work at it.
"A work of art ls a period of
heightening tension," he said,
"the sense of relaxation and exhilaration   conies   afterwards."
The genial humorist told his
audience that to attend a symphony   concert   with   Ihe   idea   that
the music will conjure up for you
a vision of wild goats crossing
mountain streams, or some such
thing, Is to admit that you dn
not like music.
"You  do  not  really  want   to  listen   to   the   music,"   lie   said,   "hut
actually   want   it   to   serve   as   the
I means   of   turning   your   mind   to
other things.''
Such talk is just, what a modern
audience needs to hear, according
to Dorothy Somerset of the Fine
Arts Committee which sponsored
the talk.
Graduate Sinclair is well i|uull
tied to give it such advice. A
former Vancoiiverite he was an
amateur astronomer In his teens
later "demoralized I'BC classes"
by passing exams without bothering to attend lectures, graduated
ced around campus iu conspicii-1 as a mathematician and became a
oils spots where students may give professor, ami has since become
their  contribution   to   ISS. ,n   successful   CMC   playwriter.
Ryan, Foxall
Named to Head
CDS JUS Execs.
i Mike Ryan and Ron Foxall were
chosen beads of Commerce uijd Mn-
glittering Undergraduate Societies
respectively at elect-buns held Tuesday and Wednesday.
Foxall won out over Bill Inglis
ond Norman McCaskell to become
EU*S head for 1961-52.
Ryan was elected CUS president
by a slim eight-vote margin over
his  opponent Dodson.
Over 65 per cent of students ln
the commerce society voted—the
largest voting recorded In any
student   election   this   year.
Other CUS officers elected were
vice-president, Wadsworth; treasurer, G-iroday; secretary, Mender
son; and two executive members,
Heard and Alliens.
Three counts were necessary to
determine the second executive
member. Alliens finally won out
over Parkins by a single vote.
Seven
HAA's
Named
Highest Award
Given Today
Seven Honorary Activities
Awards, highest student honor
at UBC, will be given out **
the general AMS meeting in
the Armouries at 12:30 p.m. today.
Varalty Outdoor Club, an a whole
will be presented with one of the
seven awards foi* their outstanding
contribution to the students or
UBC.
BLOOD DRIVE WORK
Miss Caroline llarvle, William
Haggert, Michael Hind-Smith, Taf-
ara de Ouefe, Peter de Vooght and
Foster Isherwood are the six students to receive the honor.
Miss Harvle was the chief organizer of the Blood Drive on the
campus this year and took a prominent part in the same drive the
previous year.
a iett*li«««i(atrt.M«»t council .member was the chairman of the War
Memorial Gym Finance Drive this
year.
United Nations Club president
on the campus was the chief job of
Michael   Hlnd-Smith   this   ycar.
ETHIOPIAN  STUDENT
Tttfara de Guefo, Rthoplan stu
dent, Is president of the Ethoplan
Students' League of America, and
has been the chief reason why UBC
has more students from Ethiopia
than any other university in North
America.
ISS president was the job taken
over by Peter de Voiight. He was a
member of Student Council last
season.
Foster Isherwood's main contribution to the student body this
year has been working on the Constitution   Revision   Commltee.
Student Matinees
Of   Hamlet' Soon
Two special student matinees
of the Lawrence Olivier production
of Shakespeare's "Hamlet" will be
presented at the Varsity Theatre
neit Monday and Tuesday at 3:30
p.m.
Tickets  are  on  sale  for  '15c   In
the   AMIS   office   for   the   rest  of
this   week,   Total   of   425 tickets I the singing students will  be  dlf-
are on sale for each day. | ferent.
Agenda released to The Ubyssey by retiring AMS president
Nonie Donaldson includes at
least two orders of business which
might bring about "a good deal
of contention" one councillor reported.
Brock Ostrom will present his progress report on the implementation of the athletic plan, and must
seek approval of an additional report on Recommendation 7 of the
Ostrom Plan of the general meeting last fall.
4THLETIC AID
Report on Reccommendatlon 7
will be on the possibility of financial aid to UBC athletics as determined by the special commit'
tee set up to Investigate the problem last fall.
Co-ordlnator of Activities Jim
Midwinter will attempt to have a
motion passed for the electon of a
vice president of the AMS, which
he will present to students on the
strength of a petition signed by
17fi members of the AMS.
Treasurer's report to be presented by John MacKinnon, will outline the financial position of the
society up to the present time.
(See story on financial breakdown
on Page 3.)
CONSTITUTIONAL REVISION
Junior member Ivan Feltham
will give his progress report on
the Constitutional Revision Committee. ...
After outgoing president Nonie
Donaldson gives her "annual report, Cy McGuire will present Honorary Activities Awards to honored students.
New council, under AMS president-elect Vaughn Lyon, will take
over the meeting before new business Is conducted.
All members of the retiring
council will have finished their
jobs technically when Lyon takes
over today, except John MacKinnon, who must continue his term
along with the new treasurer Phil
Anderson until the term Is ended.
SUMMER JOB
REGISTRATION
OPENS AGAIN
USC Employment 8ervic«
will be opened for registration
ployment for two additional
of students for summer em-
days. Mr. H. O. Hayaic, am-
ployment   official   announced.
Today and' Friday, registration will takt place at 12:30
p.m., 1:00 p.m., and 1:30 p.m.
In Hut N6.
Twmii Clotfi
Most Meetings
BB.
Austrian Students
Play Encore Here
Last spring students demanded
an encore from a troupe of singing, dancing Auatrlans who play-
i ed to capacity audiences In UBC
auditorium.
The encore will go on stage here
April 5.
It's the second annual Austrian
Goodwill Tour composed of 30 university studemts who are even
now dancing their way across
North American stages.
The same directors will accompany the troupe, but all but two of
KEN  SPENCER SINGS
Special Events Show Today
Book Per Student
Aim Of ISS Drive
"One text book from each student on the campus." is the aim of
ISS In their current drive for lined
text books which they will wend
overseas  to  South   Kast   Asia.
Collecting  boxes   bave  been   pin-
Last performance sponsored by
the LSE Special Events Committee will feature Negro basso Kenneth Spencer today at 3:30 p.m. at
a full-length recital in the Auditorium.
Tho show lias been scheduled at
:':;»> p.m. to avoid flashing with
the AMS general spring meeting
ut. 12:31) p.m. in the Armouries.
Spencer,   comparatively   unkown
a short  time ago, scored an overnight    success    with   his   singing I
of  "Old   Man   River"   in   a   recent;
Broadway   production   of   "Showboat." »
By special arrangement with Famous  Artists Ltd., Special  Kvents '
Committee  has lieen  able  to  sei
lire this notable attracion at vastly
reduced   costs.
Student prices will be 2.1 and .".0
cents whereas the cheapest seats
at the downtown performance
March   Ul   will   he  two  dollars.
sue
KEN SPENCER
Since his first Broadway
cess, Kenneth Spencer lias climbed steadily. He is now in constant
demand for solo recitals both in
Europe and on this continent.
His Columbia records are considered in the big sellers class.
At a recent appearance in Hollywood Bowl lie hit low C so clearly that the note carried to the
farthermost corner of the great
amphitheatre.
Most speakers at 12:30 p.m.
•are cancelled today because of
the general AMS meeting In
the Armouries.
"AFM MYECTOMY" will be
the subject of a film presented by
Pre-Med Society in Physics 200 at
12:30 p.m. Friday.
* *       *
A LECTURE on Christian Science entitled "Christian Science:
the science of existence" will* be
given by Hendrick J. de Lange,
OBB, of New York, today at 12:30
p.m. In Physics 200.
* $       *
FRATERNITY     RUSHING    and
proposed changes wilt be discussed Friday nodri In Arts 103. All
should attend.
* *       *
CONCERTO NO. 1 tor r|oUn hy
ProMP$^!l^
by   Muwlc   Appreciation   Club   in
Men's Club Room. Bropk Hall.
* #       *
JAZZ SOCIETY meets Friday
at 12:30 p.m. in Hut behind Brock.
All members requested to attend,
for elections, review of budget,
and discussion of dance and concerts.
in
Passages on three ships sailing
to Europe are available at cut rates
to students this summer, NFCUS
representatives on campus have announced.
Berths are made available by
Canadian Overseus Travel Service
through NFCUS.
Ships will sail from Quebec City
on June 25, from Montreal on June
20, and from New York on June
28. Return fares will vary from
$275 to $361.
Arrangements cover only oceanic travel from Canada to Europe
and return. Students will be ex-
pected to make their own arrangements while In Rurope.
Application forms, which mrst
be sent Including a $50 deposit,
can be obtained from NFCUS office, hut B2 behind Brock Hall.
Mardi Gras Heads
To Be Named Soon
Co-chairmen of Ihe 1952 Mardi
Oras will be elected in the auditorium March 2fl at a general meet-
ing of all Creek Letter Societies,
It was announced today -by joint,
executives of Pan-hellenlc and the
inter-fraternity council. Nomina*
tions, whldi are to lie turned III
to Pan-hell or IFC presidents, will
close on Tuesday,  March 27.
In the past, committees planning the Mardi Oras have not ha*l
sufficient time to Iron out all prob-
lems, executive members said. It
was felt that even greater success
would be achieved if co-chairman
were elected in the spring.
Tt is expected when roport of
the ',"1 Mardi Gras Is released, a
substantial profit to the War Memorial Gym fund will be shown, said
IPO president  Paul  Harris, Pagtt I
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 15, 1951
The
MEMBER CANADIAN trtflVETOITY PRESS
Authorized as Second Class Mall Post Office Dept. Ottawa. Student Subscription! fl per
yenr (Included in AMS Fees). Mail Subscriptions—$2.00 par year. Published throughout
the university year by the Student Publications Board ot the Alma Mater Society ot the
University et British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of fhe Ubyssey ind not
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society nor ot the University.
("Boss U Brook HAU, Phone ALma 162i for display advertising phooe Ai.au HOB
lftt'FOIt>IN#aMIEP  RAV'FRW,
GENERAL STAFF: Senior Editors, Ann Langtoeln, Marl Stainsby; CUP Editor, Joan
Churchill; Women's Editor, Joan Fraser, Sports Editor, Alex MacGlllivray; Fine Arts
Editor. John Brockington; Editorial Writers, Les Armour, Hal Tennant; Photography,
Tommy Hatcher.
Senior Editor This Hius—MARI ftTAINStY
Assistants—JIM ROSS, DOUfl UPEX
Rub Out
Students will see a strange and remarkable occurrence when they turn out to the
Alma Mater Society's general spring meeting in UBC Armory at noon today.
As well as being asked to vote on several Important items of business, they will be
confronted by a student councillor who will
ask students as a whole to over-ride a considered Council ruling, and stump for
an immediate election of a vice-president for
the Society.
There's nothing strange or remarkable
•bout a member of Council taking such a
course of action. In fact, if the circumstances
dflnand it„ it is a. laudable thing for him to do.
To us, the strange and remarkable feature
of ike whole thing is that the move is being
made by a councillor who has built up a reputation through the year as acalm, clear-
thinking AMS executive.
Co-ordinator Jim Midwinter, Rhodes Scho-
lar«*iect, has become known as second to
tlone among student leaders who are able to
come up with sane and sound decisions.
That's why it's a deep mystery to us how
Midwinter happens now to be the leader of
a group of hysteria-mongers.
Hysteria is a strong word, but it seems like
a fitting one when a minority suddenly voices
fears that student government may topple
overnight unless there is a separate and exclusive student office quickly created as a
cushion against the possibility of us losing
our president-elect.
Why rush a man into office merely because there MIGHT be an emergency?
Why cut valuable essay-writing and study
time so late in Uie term, merely to add a 14th
councillor to our AMS executive body?
We are certain that students who attend
the meeting today will see the wisdom of
waiting at least until next fall before making such a grave decision as Midwinter would
have us hurry through right now.
But it's an established fact (which Midwinter, among mahy others, must surely
know) that it's far easier, psychologically, to
vote "yes" to a motion than it is to vote "no."
- That's why we urge our fellow-members
of the Society to keep their eyes and ears
open today, and listen to what the majority
of student councillors have to say.
Otherwise, we may find that we have
made a serious error, through sheer inattention and default.
Welcome Home'  Mr. Sinclair
Few Canadians have rivalled Lister Sinclair's contribution to the nation's drama.
.. Undoubtedly he ranks as a leader among
the small group who, despite the tremendous
handicaps placed upon the playwright's art,
have placed Canadian radio in top spot in
North America.
Canada and UBC in particular can well
be proud of Mr. Sinclair.
But the fact that there are so few Lister
Sinclair's among us should give us pause for
thought.
We have known for a long time that the
a large part of the cream of the crop somehow
disappears to the United States and Eng
land.
Perhaps this is inevitable—large population centres always attract top talent.   , .... , ,
But we remain unconvinced that it is
necessarily inevitable.
The development of a publicly financed
national theatre, similar to those operated
throughout Europe, could do much to save
our talent and perhaps permit a distinctively
Canadian contribution to drama.
Dublin's Abbey Theatre, after all, is the
work of a small nation.
Perhaps the royal commission on the
arts will come up with some worthwhile suggestions.
As I See It
This reviewer can't help but wish that
the Player's Club had chosen something of
greater significance for their spring production than "The Male Animal." It has been
carefully explained to me that difficulties of
casting prevented more notable plays from
being chosen, but particularly in conjunction
with the Theatre Arts Festival it seems that
something which demonstrates the best in
the art of theatre writing would be a mote
suitable choice.
At the risk of being labelled arty I intend
to express two deep-rooted convictions that
I have about university drama groups in general. The first is that these groups are in a
particularly favourable position to produce
stimulating, thought-provoking plays, and
that if the "individuals in the group go on in
the theatre they will find themeslves producing all sorts of rubbish dictated by the deplorable demands of the box-office.
Secondly, not only have they an exceptional opportunity themselves, but as part of
the university they have a responsibility to
show the students what really good theatre
can be. It is university graduates, if anyone
who are expected to raise standards of taste
in the arts, and if this taste is not developed
in university, it is doubtful if it ever will
be.
"The Male Animal" by James Thurber
and Elliot Nugent is not all rubbish by any
means. It contains certain timely satire on
communist witch-hunters and the glorification of athletes and the flittering arenas they
demand.
by Joon Betted
Colleges overwhelmed with athletic spirit
have long been one of Thurber's pet peeves,
and he goes to some length in "The Male Animal" to caricature the football player who
"never found time to read books" unless they
were boiled down to the "Reader's Digest."
On the whole the play is amusing and
entertaining, and the Player's Club production is lively enough to keep everyone intfr-
ested. Sheila Cameron gave a particularly
capable performance as a professor's Wife
and looked perfectly charming. Phil Keatley
as the professor overdid the fussiness in his
character perhaps, but he was convincing in
a role which is little more than a type and
he gave it a particularly fine comic touch.
Sandy Manson and Don Withrow gave two
of the outstanding performances of the evening. Mr. Manson was the football player and
showed an extremely good stage presence
conbined with ease and strength, while Mr.
Withrow as an elderly professor gave a relaxed, graceful performance. Norman Young
was also convincing in the role of the overbearing Ed KeUer, and Bob Woodward and
Wendy Martin were competent and likeable.
Rolf Blakstad's set was interesting as
usual, but not up to his previous efforts. Unpleasant colours combined with barn-like proportions gave the effect of a furniture display salon rather than a professor's living
room.
On the whole the spring production is a
little disappointing, but I suppose there has
been enough outstanding theatre on the campus, this year notably "The Alchemist" tt.
make up for it.
Letters To The Editor
Dear Sir:
Thank you for Friday's editorial.
The compliment paid the Student
Peace Movemens was well taken
but perhM>» it might not he too
mwflh;«,«o, #y that it contained the
Implies tion that tbe Ubyssey was
responsible tot* a change ot heart
within the peace -movement which
in turn made the editorial pofslble.
While we recognise the power of
the pwss, may we suggest that it
Is, not such as would change a
hopelessly bigotted group to one
Wihich wae willing to listen. To
all points of vlem. Bigots have
a remarkable faith ln their own
convictions as anyone with a narrow-minded landlady will testify,
ahd It is doubtful If public opinion is of any avail in efforts to
make them m* the light.
Apparently it is the policy of the
Ubyssey to splatter mud in all directions la the ballet that if cleanly, the recipients thereof will make
the aeoeasary effort to clean them-
sehrei. As our letter, in reply to
your previous editorial on the SPM
Indicated, the speakers which we
h«jd arranged for the first term
were for the most part UBC professors, when other clubs arranged for outside speakers for the
same date. We oanoelled our meetings as a matter of common oour>
tesy, knowing that our speakers
were on the campus and would
be able to appear later.
iNow that the air has been cleared of all glaring Injustices regarding this matter 1J Is hoped that we
remain the best of friends and that
we will hear from you again in he
near future.
Executive SPM.
Dear Sir:
In recent weeks, members of the
Engineers Undergraduate Society
have received a great deal of unfavourable publicity on the campus. Whether or not It wu all partly deserved need not be discussed
here hut I feel it only right to give
them public recognition for something really worthwhile that they
did.
Consequently on behalf of the
High School Conference Committee I would like to thank the BUS
for tbe part that It played In helping to make the conference a success. Without being asked and entirely on their own Initiative, the
Engineers arranged a number of
very Interesting displays and pro
vlded Riildes to help entertain the
delegates while they were solus
through the Engineering building.
Chuck Marshall,
Hlghschool Conference  Com.
Dear Sir:
I agree with you Meanrs. Small,
I*>wry and Olrard, that $150 Is a
lot of money for tree-planting. I
would like to state, however, tha
the breakdown o| grad, fees as
shown In The Ubyssey was not
quite accurate. The 15c per student is really set aside to cover
incidental and Unforeseen expenses arising in connection with the
various grad class functions, with
the expenses In connection with
tree-planting to come out of this
fund.
I   accept   your   quotation   from
the B.C. Forest Service to the effect that the cost of planting 7260
trees would be 2 cents per tree,
allowing for cookhouse loss and
depreciation on road, construction.
However, we are not planting 7260
trees. We are only planting one
tree. Perhaps the B.C. Forest Service would be willing to quote a
price for one tree, allowing for
cookhouse loss and depreciation
on road construction, of course. I
think it would be considerably
higher than the 2c contributed
by yourselves.
In this connection,,Incidentally, 1
would llketto acknowledge receipt
of the 2c you enclosed ln your let
ter. The balance of your fees may
be paid at the AMS or Bursar's
Office.
Ken Murphy,
THI
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COMMENCING MONDAY, MARCH  19
NO STUDENT PRICES AT
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since, grandpa ms afrosfv!
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It's an old campus tradition .;; grandpa wore
Arrows and his daddy too! Now, Arrow
presents the newest and finest yet, for yo'ur
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New Arrow Ensembles with shirts in a
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THE UBYSSEY
Pi|e *
Paper - Burning Climax
To Strife At Toronto
TOiW>NTO-~(CUP)-*-A week of strife between members
of U of Toronto's undergraduate daily, Hie Vanity, and the
Engineering faculty was climaxed recently with the burning
of several hundred issues of The Varsity outside its offices.
•"Wrtiest  interference  by  Engi-<§>
Wei's   was    the   effort   to   in
s*rt several unofficial stories
into tbe regular Varsity copy before It reached the print shop.
However, copyboy Gord Bowles,
accosted toy the Engineers, warned
the Varsity staff, who phoned long-
distance to the plant at Oahawo
warning that somehing was up.
Two editors, Jack Grey and Jim
Knight, drove out to Oshawa to
check copy. On arriving they found
that the front page layout had been
changed and three stories substituted for the originals.
One of the stories, headed, "Discrimination,"   laid   The   Varsity
masthead   during   the   year   has
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
shown its policy is not in any way
to accommodate professional faculties."
At the Students' Administrative
Council meeting editor Prank Mor-
isugu, on giving his report of the
incident, demanded that the culprits be found and dlclpllned. "This
seems like a neat caper that didn't
come off, but lt really is a serious
matter. Tampering with Varsity
copy hurts the students who read
the paper."
As a result of the burning ot
Friday's paper, the Engineering
Society has to foot the bill for another issue containing the perti-
nenj news which was prevented
from reaching the campus.
I    ITEM
Administration & General
Pass Fund (Leas MAD and
PubUstttloiia
Activities ...-	
MAD „	
WAD	
Public-Wens 	
Mar^a	
Salaries	
Stationery * Ottice	
^'▼W^WMPp™*    ^*     *^t^^*eB*I^WW^
ttwnwl* Dnnradation.
ifcnosarknpa a»d Awards
mm	
Budget
Granted
18,750.00
6,788.00
3400.00*
.18,480.9ft
1.900.W
8,000.00
3t000i**0
•M0MI
GENERAL
9^00.00
2,200.00
100.00
700.00
400.00
750.00
900.00
1,700.00
500.00
500.00
1,000.00
X/kmritsilmmmni*m
, *^WP^ "■   T**'"'*
0HI	
Phys. Ed. V*	
Medical U.S	
Frosh US,	
Nurses U.S	
Engineers U.S	
Home Ec. U.S	
Aggie U-S	
Pharmacy U.S. '	
*P*e>lirted. U.S	
Arts U.S	
Teacher Training .
Social Work 	
use  	
LIE 	
Players Club 	
Biuaiqe 	
Kickapoos	
Special Pep Grant
Homecoming  	
Delta Sigma Pi, ....
Frosh Orientation
18,750.00
100.00
321.00
50,00
60.00
50.00
88.00
1,125.00
170.00
276.00
164.00
100.00
300.00
200.00
144.00
30.00
1,200.00
600.00
PUBLICATIONS
Directory 	
Engraving & Ubyssey
Photo Dept	
Totem   	
Pub. Board General ...
Legal Notes	
ACTIVITIES
Symphony Orchestra ..
Gtee Club 	
Mamooks 	
Var.siAy Band 	
IRC 	
Civil Liberties Union	
Social Problems 	
Jazz Society 	
ISC   	
Parliamentary  Forum  	
U.N. Club  .'.	
Radio Society 	
VE7ACS   	
CCF Club 	
Liberal Club	
Progres. Conserv. Club....
ASAE 	
Commerce Public Spe'k'g
VCF   	
NFCUS   	
Music Appreciation 	
Classics Clueb 	
Student Peace Movement
Visual Arts 	
200.00
177.00
206.00
8.00
6,788.00
5,196.00
750.00
1,200.00
834.00
20.00
8,000.0*
50.00
330.00
450.00
300.00
27.00
35.00
27.00
27W0
2/T.0O
330,00
35.00
220^00
319.00
15.00
15J0
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
750,00
15.00
15.00
3.017.00
mwsmmmsmammsmmmmm
Total to  Oustattding
Date Requitl-Hoa*
12,182.77 521.00
4,109.90
1,854.35
13^52*8.75
4».«7
' 6,847.09
1,615.00
242.00
110.00
11,850.00
mtitj»   h**mo
5,887.60
2,208.16 44100
40.25
465.86
350.00
576.64
211.75
714.50
586.00
239.00
940.41
201.60 "
12,188.77
13*81 Je^
309.59
82.86 (cr)
56.50
6.06
34.32
587.5ft
65.24
244.05
75.46
122.93
127.18
16&M
'5.23 (cr)
Ubyssey CI
78017
1,180.68
49.20
190.23
242.80
7.62
226.15 (er)
4,106.96
8(^.00
521.00
15.00
45.00
11.00
25.00
47.00
25.00
444.00
26.00
8.00
33.00
446.00
LOST
WATERMAN'S P®X, brown with
stripes lengthwise. Ph. John at
AL 2439ft.
UMBRELLA, blue With scalloped
edges and hooked handle, on Tues.
in vicinity of Library or Caf. KE
3813R.
PARKiER '51, blue pen, last Sat.
Please return to W. J. Roy at room
301, Eng. Bldg. or phone AL 2134R
BURBERRY with green paint on
sleeve left in Oaf March Oth. Please
leave at Lost & Found.
QliASBBS,  lost Thursday,  March
8th. Half dark, half clear plastic
rimmed. Please turn Into Lost &
Found.
NEW RONSjON LIGHTER, Mon.
night In vicinity of Armouries. REWARD If returned to Lost &
Pound.
PARKER *51, grey with stiver top
and gold clip. Phone Cllve Mc-
Cord at KE 2939M.
POUND
LADIES' rubber overshoes, may be
Identified at Lost ft Found.
WATERMANS' PEN, may be identified at Lost ft Found. ;
FOR IALI
LDARN TO FLY this spring and
summer. Graduating and going
East, will sell my shares in VBC
Aero Club at a great reduction for
eash. Thirty flying hours gives you
a private license plus a $100 gift
from the govt. See Mickey Jones
ia Press Hut, HM, next to Field
House, any noon.
NEW HEAR EVER HEALTH METHOD OF COOKING Is now being
represented in the university area.
OB 4944, Morris Daunoey.
im AUSTIN COACH, new front,
end, new battery, '61 licence plates
$335 or nearest offer,
or nearest offer.
ROOM ft iOARO, ITC.
ROOM  ft   BREAKFAST  tor  student, preferably male. Close to bus.
OH 3924.
LARGE ROOM, double, with sea
view, la cental West End, Reasonable. PA 8501.
TVPIMQ
TYPING: English and foreign languages, essays, theses, manuscripts
card work, letters of application.
Miss Elolse Street, campus rates.
Dalhousie Apts. AL 0055 R.
TYPING: by Gold Medalist, quick,
efficient service at standard rates.
Phone Mrs. Edwards at KE 6201Y
any evening, or Saturday and Sunday. Will Pick up and deliver, 25
cents, saves your car fare.
TUTORING, ITC.
TUTORING,  ln  1st  year  English
and Math %y McGill graduate. 3211
W 37th, W 77U0L.
COACHING IN FRENCH *'QXR-
mmmmKmmmsmmmmissmmmmmmmmm
man by Viennese born teacher. FA
8869M.
CAREER IN RADIO: Announcing,
singing, public speaking, continuity writing. Phone Miss Ethel
Wallace at PA 6(501.
NOTICIS A MEETINGS
AUTHORS ANONYMOUS has vacancies for members. Anyone interested in creative writing who
wishes to apply tor membership
ln the summer session or next tall
could submit a letter of application and a manuscript to Box G
in Brock or phone Bill Dumares,
AL laiMt for more information.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION UNDER-
grad society meeting: Nominations will b* accepted ton emeu*
tive, Fri. 12:30 in HL %
CAMPUS aAHBSHOPi Tired Of
store cake, cookltog aad pita? ^elt!
you are ln for a sm'prlae! A, ta&ftrt
new shop has Just ope««l oalfed
the Campus Bake Shop it *4$|8-V'
10th. Drop around even if it Is
Just to look the place- over. We
guorantee you'll take away at least
one of their delectable meat pies.
Hope to  gee you! ,
NOTICIS ft MIITINOS
STUDENTS — Make real goo.'
money ln your spare time. Oppor*
tunity knocks, good oonsmlsslcA.
Unlimited demand. TA 4101, 4ay
or evening.
-msmsmmmtmstmmmmm--mmmmm
'^^tf^m, •
PMaht it fifty Player's and it's* d*aW
-EESESsam
mmm
uTT ii ii i iitirififlrii/ritisbr-
EASTER HIGHLIGHTS IN STYLE SHOES
FOR MEN
(cr)
50.00
1,615.00
104.53
4,514.01
589.34
910.48
726.73
115,00
10,7.00-
11,576.00
52.00
6,847.09      11,850.00
70.74
286.81
423,50
140.82
J26.25
#6.40
f" 7.89
h 87.25
(cr)
19.00
38,00 |i
25.00
(cr)
300.17   ~»
42.88 (cr)
17483
253.19
7.46
6.40;
3.28
1.94
7.20
10.71
460.93
14.43
2.72
4.00
6.29
1,954.:i5
5.00
. 9.00
18.0U
1Q&0O
Bold handsome lines are featured
in Woodward's Shoes for Spring
•  RAGLAN NOSE BLUCHER
O MOCCASIN
O WAFFLE PATTERN
O BALMORAL
O STRAP
O GORE LOAFER
O BANKER LAST
GH I LLIE TIE
BROGUE
9.95 to 14.95
6,00
2.00
12.00
3.00
242.00
MEN'S SHOES
MAIN FLOOR
VANCOUVER'S  FASHION  CENTRE Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 15, 1951
THIS column, usually
Written by Sports Editor
Alex MacGilliyray, is having
its sanctity invaded by John
Napier-Hemy this issue.
Calltornla's Oolden Sears are
invading UBC next week for the
finil't^o games or the World
Cu|s Series, to be played on
M#Ch 22 and 24.
All usual spirited, energetic,
KibiftpooB will be on hand to
driinl up student support and
entkutiasm. This year they're
ndt letting on what they have in
store in toe way or entertain-
m6flt, but judging from past performances the tare will be novel
aar^i enjoyable.
■*.;'•'■■ ¥ ¥ ¥
KI<*KAI»00» figured In practl-
catlt. every football game last
term, drawing
supporters to
pep meets
with name entertainers such
as Barney
Potts, Claude
Logan and
Specs Watson.
Although 'Bird
footballers never had quite en-
otith stuff to win, student spirit
wil .it an all-time high, thanks
to fassle-tlaMle publicity and Joe
College ballyhoo.
NQLItH ruggers, on the other
hand, won all their games,
but proved a poor drawing card,
li there was no one to glamorize
t|ttA and -praise them to the
skies. This contrast alone shows
ths beneficial affects of a little
hifeh'powered  advertising.
▼ TT* V
WHIN THI Bears arrive for
th*,finals next week we'll have a
■happy combination of a winning
team and Kickapoos. It all goes
«-ell the Kickapoos will be able
to draw a record crowd Into the
Stadium.
However, we cannot expect
miracles from the Kickapoos unless they receive more support
from the students than they have
in the past.
IMI FEW really active Kickapoos have suffered from
_ay.*r-work owing to the fact that
a 'large 'proportion of the members do no work at all. The executive estimates that that at
least ten more functioning members are needed, and soon. Let's
give Kickapoos the boost they
need.
HOCKEY
SCORING
Drake      	
...   114
A Pts
21    35
Young
     19
12    31
Lindsay     	
      1
1G   27
Bailey
     10
11    21
Hole     	
7
6    12
Scott      	
       5
G    11
Hood     	
       6
4    10
Stanton    	
       5
4    10
Carpenter
     3
5      S
Kavanaugh
      1
5      G
Ilodgert       	
       3
2     5
IN THE RING
'    His Boys Sae Artioti
ALBERT LAITHWAITE coach of the UBC Thunderbird
Ruggerists will let his charges loose Saturday when they
tangle with Vancouver Lions in the Stadium: Game time
is £p.m.
S P O RT
Sports Edltor-ALEX MacGILLIVRAY
er Cup
Resumes Saturday
UBS Thunderbird Rugby team meets Vancouver Lions
Saturday in the continuation of McKechnie Cup Rugger.
Jack Smith. Fly Back, 5'7", 160*
Lai th walte's squad fresh from
an Invasion of California Is expected to be In top condition for
the crulclal contest.
UBC beat the Lions 3-0 In a
game this season and stand a fair
chance of repeating the win.
A few of the starters will be:
Dl.ave McFarlane, Fullback; 6-
1", 200 lbs., age 22, commerce 4.
of rugby after starring with the
football team for the past three
years. He has adopted himself
very well o the fullback position
on the team. Takes care of the
team's punting, averages 40 to 50
yards. Holder of two Big Blocks In
football.
Oeorge Pull, Right Wing, 5'10",
150 lbs., age 21, arts 3.
Oeorge Is one of the best-known
athletes on the campus. He has
starred for the past three years In
both rugby and football where he
has shown remarkable agility and
speed. Holder of two Big Blocks
In football and one for rugby.
John Newton, Left Wing, G'2",
175 lbs:, age 20, arts 1.
John Is one of the best prospects
on this year's team. Experience
gained with Victoria College has
enabled him to hold down, the left
wing position this year. Very fast.
Stan Clarke, Inside 3-4. 5'10",
170 lbs., age 21, arts 3.
Third year veteran wlio holds
clown the inside three-quarter combination along with Gerry Main.
Learned rugby at St. Georges and
ls holder of two Big Blocks.
lbs., age 22, arts 3.
Sophomore backfield member of
the 'Birds. Filling in very capably
this year at fly-half. Former Brit-
tanlan High School, Kx-Brlttania
player. Holder of Big Block.
John Tennant, Scrum-half 5*8",
150 lbs., age 23, law 1  (B.A.).
Captain of the team, John Is
playing his fifth year of rugby at
the university. Probably the best
scrum half in Vancouver rugby circles today. Graduate of Kitsilano
High School where he played both
football and rugby. John owns 4
Big Blocks, 2 rugby and two football.
SPORTS
EVENTS
JUDO Club will meet In the Stadium at 12:30 on Thursday: All
members turn out and bring strip.
* *       *
WOMEN'S Intramural Badminton Finals start Monday. All managers please watch notice board
ln gym for times ot draws.
* #       *
MANAGERS   wanted   for   girl's
athletic teams for 1&51-52. If Interested In managing basketball.
grass hockey, skiing, tennis, badminton or swimming teams please
contact Do Brinham at CH 185.") before March IB.
* if.        *
""INTRAMURAL   Association meting next Tuesday at 12:30.
BY PUNCH
He Is Fight Expert
Joan Fraser can write about Barbara Ann
Scott, John Brockington can criticize tho Vancouver Symphony; I ask myself, "Why can't
I cover the pro fight?" '
Last Monday 1 did just. that. The show put
on featured the Canadian Featherweight, champ,
Frank Almond against a tough French Canadian,
Oliver Breton.
This wx event number 15 for "lean and
mean" Frankie and his first title defence since
winning the crown. Fight fans will remember
how handily be put away dispirited Lou Alter
In the tenth last year In an elimination mutch.
Monday lie stretched his KG to ten. doing away
with Breton in the eight heat.
ft was a fair fight up to then with Frank
gaining a large lead lu points. Oliver looked a
little bewildered he had good reason, i'or everywhere that Breton looked Frank's fist was sure
to be. But never let it he said Ihat llie challenger
wasn't game. He only knows of one direction,
and   Unit's   forward.    However,    Almoin!   didn't
leave his chin hanging out as he did with Nick
Smith and so didn't encounter many difficulties.
Probably most, fans will agree that the semi
wind up, featuring Tony Alvarez and Terry Strut/
was the bout of the night—lt was pure poetry in
•motion. Both boys undoubtedly could have made
a   good   living   as   ballet   dancers.   Strut?,   didn't.
neeni too happy In the first round, having a time
figuring  Tony's  excellent  boxing  technique.   He
finally figured In-flghtlng was his best bet, and
so managed a draw call.
The other fighters weren't exactly Inspiring
but the special event did have its moments.
.Jimmy l.aChanee, who allegedly caught the flu
two weeks ago, got slightly mussed by a vigorous, cocky heavyweight named Chuck Ross.
This was Ross's sixth outing and his fourth victory, He may not go far but. will always please
llie crowd.
That's abnul all there was to the fights. ,nUl.
except for one or two had moments ( wnt hmue
happy.
Huskies Defend
Ski Titles Sunday
Swimmers In Last-
Meet At Victoria
A powerful University of
Washington ski squad pulled
into Vancouver today and immediately departed for the
slopes of Grouse Mt. to practice for the Northwest Intercollegiate Championship meet
to be held here Saturday and
Sunday, March 17 and 18.
Coach Buster* Campbell's Huskies are determined to defend their
title they have held for four uninterrupted years. However,*' Campbell Is not expecting an easy win
this time.
Washington Stote College, which
will arrive tomorrow lias beaten
the Huskies oncd this year and
will go In to the meet as tiie team
to beat.
The Cougar's three Norwegian
jumpers Holmenkollen champion
Falkanger, Forland and Hoff seem
to have an edge over the Hu'skle
jumping trio of Lie, Lundtegen and-
Pederson (Wso from Norway,) and
Campbell's boys will have to work
hard to make up the difference in
the other thre events.
The UBC squad Is rated very
high In the downhill and slalom
events but 4s considered quite
weak ,In the Nordic events. The
Thunderbirds came third behind
Washington and Washington State
ln two meets this year and not
expected to ge any higher this
time either.
However, captain Gar Robinson
ls going all out for a win in the
downhill and slalom events and
might work up enough points in
these events to give the leaders
a good battle for four way honors.
Bob Beck's Montana state team
Is expected to finish close to the
leaders in the final scoring, while
Seattle Unlversitys skiers are
shooting for honors in the Alplnet
events.
The first event of the meet, a
giant slalom will git underway
on Saturday at 11 a.m. v
LEARN TO DANCE
• QUICKLY
• EASILY
• PRIVATELY
UBC splashers will try for one more win before ending the,
1951 season when they clash with an All-Star team consisting
of swimmers from the Victoria YMCA and the Victoria Ama*'
teur Swimming Club, on Saturday night in Victoria.
The Thunderbirds will only be.,
using one half of their travelling
team for the meet, and will be
minus their coach Doug Whittle
who has his liHnds full with the
gymnastic team tljat will leave for
Pullman, Wash the same day.
The Thunderettes will be represented by Peggy Hennlnger, the
only,CBC place winner In theVo-
men's B.C. Championships. Dian-
ne Johnson, Mayreen Bj*ay and two
others yet to be selected.
Should the finmen score another
win, this season's. record will be
six wins out of eight starts in dual
meets, a second place in a triangular meet which saw the Huskies
take top honors, and an impressive win in the Conference meet.
~     ' ' - "•—•—t	
SHIRTS and CLIANINC
1-DAY 8ERVICC
J/vp//V /
*MIW. IMh At*.
100 Miles For $1.00
It's easy In the new
Morris Minor
• Economy
• Comfort
• Roadability
FLEMING MOTORS
7th A Cambie PA 4165
NEW   A     USED CAR8
3 Lessons $5.00-10 Lessons $15.00
Francos Murphy
Donco School
Alms Hall      3679 W. irosdwsy
FA-5932.MI       - IAY44IB

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